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THE DAILY NEWS 

ALMANAC 



REMOTE STORAGE 



learning anb Jfabor. 

LIBRARY 



t University of Illinois. I 

W " 

' 




ILLINOIS SfSTOSICAJ, 



THE DAILY NEWS 

I ALMANAC 



AND 



POLITICAL REGISTER 



FOR 



19OO. 



COMPILED BY GEO. E. PLUMBE, A. B., LL. B. 



SIXTEENTH YEAR. 



ISSUED BY 
THE CHICAGO DAILY NEWS COMPANY. 

THE CHICAGO QUARTERLY 
OP 

THE CHICAGO KECORD and THE CHICAGO DAILY NEWS. 

PUBLISHED QUARTERLY AT CHICAGO, ILL.. BY THE CHICAGO DAILY NEWS CO. 
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE $1.00 PER ANNC.M. 

VOL. 7, NO. 2. JANUARY, 1'JOO. 
ENTERED AT THE CHICAGO POSTOPKICB AS SECOND-CLASS MATTER. 

[Copyright, 1900, by THE CHICAGO DAILY NEWS Co.] 



PREFACE. 



The year preceding a presidential election is important and 
interesting from a purely political point of view. The state con- 
ventions and the elections of the year indicate the popularity of 
new issues and frequently set the pace for the following cam- 
paign. In this regard the elections and the utterances of state 
conventions in 1899 are significant and valuable. 

The war in the Philippines and the conditions in Hawaii, 
Cuba and Puerto Rico will, in all probability, exert a powerful 
influence on the campaign of 1900. In all of these departments 
THE DAILY NEWS ALMANAC for 1900 is singularly replete. In 
the article upon the war in Luzon valuable official documents 
are given, including the report of the Schurman Philippine com- 
mission. As to other important and historic features of the year, 
like the Peace Conference at The Hague, the temporary adjust- 
ment of the Alaskan boundary and the Spanish treaty, very 
interesting official papers, which have rarely been published, are 
given in full. 

The Nicaragua canal, which is likely to be the subject of 
congressional legislation, is treated with a good deal of detail, 
and other subjects, like the Colonial Systems of the World, 
Submarine Cable Lines, American Trusts, Railroads, Samoan 
affairs and partition, and many other topics, are given the 
prominence they deserve. 

Besides these discussions there is the same amount of 
material relating to finance, the army and navy, trade and com- 
merce, money, schools and education, pensions, agriculture, the 
churches, congress, national debt and other themes that have 
contributed so largely to the popularity of THE DAILY NEWS 
ALMANAC in the past. 

Nothing of a political character has been omitted from the 
present volume that has any direct bearing upon the issues in 
the presidential campaign of 1900, while very much new material 
has been added to meet the demands of educators, clergymen, 
agriculturists and others interested in nonpolitical affairs. 

January I, 1900. 



Chicago Daily News Almanac 



19OO. 



NOTE. The time given In this Almanac is local mean time, except when otherwise indicated. 



ECLIPSES. 
In the year lt)00 there will be three eclipses, two of the Sun and one of the Moon. 

I. A Total Eclipse of the Sun, May28. Visible to North America and northwestern corner 
of South America, Europe, Northern Africa, and the North Atlantic Ocean. The path of 
totality running through Mexico, New Orleans, Mobile. Raleigh, Norfolk and across to Algiers, 
being of an average width of fifty miles. 

II. A Partial Eclipse of the Moon, June 12. Visible to North and South America, Spain 
and Africa, occurring as follows: 



STANDARD 



EASTERN 



CENTRAL 



MOUNTAIN 



PACIFIC 



Moon enters Penumbra 
Moon enters Shadow . . . 

Middle of Eclipse 

Moon leaves Shadow /. . 
Moon leaves Penumbra 



12d. 8h. 15m. A 
12d. lOh. 24m. A 
12d. lOh. 28m. A, 
12d. lOh. 32m. A 
13d. Oh. 41m. M 



12d. 7h. 15m. A 
12d. 9h. 24m. A. 
12d, 9h. 28m. A. 
12d. 9h. 32m. A. 
12d.llh. 41m. A. 



12d. (ih. 15m. A. 12d. 5h. 15m. A. 
12d. 8h. 24m. A. 12d. 7h. 24m. A. 
12d. 8h. 28m. A. 12d. Th. 28m. A. 
12d. 8h. 32m. A. 12d. 7h. 32m. A. 
12d.lOh. 41m. A.I 12d. 9h. 41m. A. 



First contact of shadow 4 degrees from South point of the Moon's limb toward the East. 
Magnitude of Eclipse 0.001. (Moon's diameter 1.0.) 

III. An Annular Eclipse of the Sun, November 22. Invisible. Visible to southern half of 
Africa and to Australia. 



THE FOUR SEASONS. 



SEASON. 



Lasts. 



Winter 

Spring 

Summer 

Autumn 

Winter... 



December 21, 1899, 6:56 P.M. 

March 20. 1900, I'M P.M. 

June 21, 1900, 3:39 P.M. 

September 23, 1900, 6:20 A.M. 

December 22, 1900, 0:41 A.M. 



I). H. M. 

89 42 

92 20 1 

93 14 41 

... 89 18 21 



Common Year, 365 6 45 



March. 
June... 



EMBER DAYS. 

.. 7, 9, 101 September 19, 21, 22 

.. 6,8, 9 | December 19, 21, 22 



MORNING AND EVENING STARS. 

MERCURY will be Evening Star about March 8, July 4 and October 29, and Morning Star 
about April 22, August 11 and December 7. 

VENUS will be Evening Star till July 8 and then Morning Star the rest of the year. 

JUPITER will be morning Star till May 27; then Evening Star till December 14, and then 
Morning Star again the rest of the year. 



CHURCH DAYS AND CYCLES OF TIME. 



Epiphany Jan. 6 

Septuagesfma Sunday Feb. 11 

Sexagesima Sunday Feb. 18 

Quinquagesiuia Sunday Feb. 25 

Ash Wednesday Feb. 28 

Quadrageshua Sunday Mar. 4 

Purim Mar. 14 

Mid-Lent Sunday ; Mar. 18 

Palm Sunday Apr. 8 

Good Friday Apr. 13 

Easter Sunday Apr. 15 

Low Sunday Apr. 22 

; Rogation Sunday May 20 

i Ascension Day May 24 

! 



Whit Sunday June 3 

Trinity Sunday JunelO 

Corpus Christl J une!4 

Hebrew New Year (5061) Sept.24 

First Sunday in Advent Dec. 2 

Christmas Dec. 25 



Dominical Letter. 

Solar Cycle 

Lunar Cycle (or Golden Number) 

Koman Indiction 

Epact (Moon's Age, Jan. 1) 

Julian Period. 



G 
5 

13 

29 
6618 

Year of the'World (Septuagintj '.I'.'.'... .7408-7409 
Dionys<ian Period 229 



fHoon's ISfjascs. 


1900 




n. 


EASTERN TIME. 


CENTRAL TIME. 


MOUNTAIN TIME. 


PACIFIC TIME. 


January. 


New Moon... 
First Quarter. 
Full Moon 
Last Quarter. 
New Moon... 


8 
15 
1'3 
30 


H. M. 

8 52 morn. 
40 morn. 
2 7 eve. 
6 53 eve. 
8 22 eve. 


H. M. 
7 52 morn. 
11 40 eve. 
1 7 eve. 
5 53 eve. 
7 22 eve. 
'7th. 


H. M. 

6 52 morn. 
10 40 eve.* 
7 eve. 
4 53 eve. 
6 22 eve. 
*7th. 


H. M. 

5 52 morn. 
9 40 eve.* 
11 7 morn. 
3 53 eve. 
5 22 eve. 
*7th. 


Febru'y 


First Quarter. 
FullMoop 
Last Quarter. 


6 

14 
-'2 


11 23 morn. 
8 50 morn. 
11 44 morn. 


10 23 morn. 
7 50 morn. 
10 44 morn. 


9 23 morn. 
6 50 morn. 
9 44 morn. 


8 23" morn. 
5 50 morn. 
8 44 morn. 


March. 


New Moon. . 
First Quarter. 
Full Moon.... 
Last Quarter. 
New Moon... 


s 
1(3 
24 
30 


6 25 morn. 
34 morn. 
312 morn. 
36 morn. 
3 30 eve. 


5 25 morn. 
11 34 eve.* 
2 12 morn. 
11 36 eve.t 
2 30 eve. 
*7th. t23d. 


4 25 morn. 
10 34 eve.* 
1 12 morn. 
10 36 eve.t 
1 30 eve. 
*7th. t23d. 


3 25 morn. 
9 34 eve.* 
012 morn. 
9 36 eve.t 
30 eve. 
*7th. t23d. 


1* 
o. 
4 


First Quarter. 
Full Moon 
Last Quarter. 
New Moon... 


8 

14 
_".' 

29 


3 54 eve. 
8 2 eve. 
9 33 morn. 
23 morn. 


2 54 eve. 
7 2 eve. 
8 33 morn. 
11 23 eve.* 

*28th. 


1 54 eve. 
6 2 eve. 
7 33 morn. 
10 23 eve.* 

*28th. 


54 eve. 
5 2 eve. 
6 33 morn. 
9 23 eve.* 

"28th. 




E 


First Quarter. 
Full >Ioon 
Last Quarter. 
New Moon... 


6 

14 
-21 

2S 


8 39 morn. 
10 36 morn. 
3 31 eve. 
9 50 morn. 


7 39 morn. 
9 36 morn. 
2 31 eve. 
8 50 morn. 


6 39 morn. 
8 36 morn. 
1 31 eve. 
7 50 morn. 


5 39 morn. 
7 36 morn. 
31 eve. 
6 50 morn. 


o 
g 

1-3 


First Quarter. 
Full Moon 
Last Quarter. 
New Moon... 


B 
12 

lit 
26 


1 59 morn 
10 38 eve. 
7 57 eve. 
8 27 eve. 


59 morn. 
9 38 eve. 
6 57 eve. 
7 27 eve. 


11 59 eve.* 
8 38 eve. 
5 57 eve. 
6 27 eve. 
*4th. 


10 59 eve.* 
7 38 eve. 
4 57 eve. 
5 27 eve. 
*4th. 


*j 

3 

>-9 


First Quarter. 
Full Moon 
Last Quarter. 
New Moon... 


4 
12 
111 
2(i 


7 13 eve. 
8 22 morn. 
31 morn. 
8 43 morn. 


6 13 eve. 
7 22 morn. 
11 31 eve.* 
7 43 morn. 
*18th. 


5 13 eve. 
6 22 morn. 
10 31 eve.* 
6 43 morn. 
*18th. 


4 13 eve. 
5 22 morn. 
9 31 eve.* 
5 43 morn. 

*18th. 


August. 


First Quarter. 
Full Moon 
Last Quarter. 
New Moon... 


3 

10 
17 
24 

2 
B 

15 
23 


11 45 morn. 
4 30 eve 
6 46 morn. 
10 52 eve. 


10 45 morn. 
3 30 eve. 
5 46 morn. 
9 52 eve. 


9 45 morn. 
2 30 eve. 
4 46 morn. 
8 52 eve. 


8 45 morn. 
1 30 eve. 
3 46 morn. 
7 52 eve. 


September 


First Quarter. 
Full Moon.... 
Last Quarter. 
New Moon... 


2 56 morn. 
6 morn. 
- 3 57 eve. 
2 57 eve. 


1 56 morn. 
11 B eve.* 
2 57 eve. 
1 57 eve. 
*8th. 


56 morn. 
10 6 eve.* 
1 57 eve. 
57 eve. 
*8th. 


11 56 eve.* 
9 6 eve.t 
57 eve. 
11 57 morn. 
Mst. t8th. 


October. 


First Quarter. 
Full Moon 
Last Quarter. 
New Moon... 
First Quarter 


1 
8 

15 
23 
31 


4 10 eve. 
8 18 morn. 
451 morn. 
8 27 morn. 
3 17 morn. 


3 10 eve. 
7 18 morn. 
3 51 morn. 
7 27 morn. 
2 17 morn. 


2 10 eve. 
6 18 morn. 
251 morn. 
6 27 morn. 
1 17 morn. 


1 10 eve. 
5 18 morn. 
1 51 morn. 
5 27 morn. 
17 morn. 


November. 


Full Moon. . . . 
Last Quarter. 
New Moon... 
First Quarter. 


6 

13 
)> 

2f< 


6 eve. 
9 37 eve. 
2 17 morn. 
35 eve. 


5 eve. 
8 37 eve. 
1 17 morn. 
11 35 morn. 


4 eve. 
7 37 eve. 
]7 morn. 
10 35 morn. 


3 eve. 
6 37 eve 
11 17 eve. 
9 35 morn. 
*21st. 


1 December 


Full Moon... 
Last Quarter. 
New Moon. .. 
First Quarter 


B 

13 
21 

28 


5 38 morn. 
5 42 eve. 
7 1 eve. 
8 48 eve. 


4 38 morn. 
4 42 eve. 
6 1 eve. 
7 48 eve. 


3 38 morn. 
3 42 eve. 
5 1 eve. 
6 48 eve. 


2 38 morn. 
2 42 eve. 
4 1 eve. 
5 48 eve. 



1st MONTH. JANUARY. 31 DAYS. 


h . 


d 


(b 


January Is named from Janus, 
au ancient Roman divinity, and 


Chicago, Iowa, 
Neb., N.Y.. Pa., 


St. Louis, S. ill., 
Va., Ky., Mo., 


St. Paul, N. E. 
Wis. and Mich., 


OK 


S 





was added to the Roman Calen- 


S.Wis., S.Mich., 


Kan., Col., Cal., 


N.E. NewYork, 


si 


H 


5 fe 


dar 713 B. c. 


N. 111.. Ind., O. 


Ind., Ohio. 


Minn., Or. 


Q* 


^ 

a 


GT 


AMERICAN HISTORY. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 

sets. 


Moon 

K.&S 


Sun 

rises 


Sun Moon 
sets. R.& s. 


Sun 

rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 

R.&S. 










H.M. 


H.M. 


H. M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 1 H. M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H. M 


1 


i 


Mo. 


Slaves emancipated, 1863. 


7 29 


4 38 


5 5 


7 19 


448 


5 13 


7 39 


4 29 


457 


2 


2 


Tu. 


Bragg defeated, 1862. 


7 29 


4 39 


622 


7 19 


4 49 


6 28 


7 39 


430 


6 16 


3 


3 


We. 


Battle of Princeton, 1777. 


7 29 


4 40 


738 


7 19 


4 50 


7 42 


7 39 


430 


7 34 


4 


4 


Th. 


Battle of Stone River, 1863. 


7 29 


4 41 


8 52 


7 19 


451 


854 


7 39 


431 


8 51 


5 


5 


Frt. 


Arnold burns Richmond, 1781. 


7 29 


442 


10 6 


7 19 


452 


10 6 


7 39 


4 32 


10 7 


6 


6 


Sat. 


Great earthquake in N.E.,1663. 


729 


4 43 


11 19 


7 19 


4 53 


11 17 


7 39 


4 33 


11 22 


7 


7 


Sl'Ji. 


Battle Springfield, Mo., 1863. 


799 


4 44 


morn 


7 19 


4 54 


morn 


7 38 


4 35 


morn 


8 


8 


Mo. 


Battle of New Orleans, 1815. 


7 28 


4 45 


030 


7 19 


4 55 


026 


7 38 


4 36 


. 36 


9 


9 


Tu. 


Ft.Sunbury,Ga.,captured, 1779. 


7 28 


4 46 


1 40 


7 19 


4 56 


134 


7 38 


437 


1 48 


10 


10 


We. 


Florida seceded, 1861. 


7 28 


447 


2 48 


7 19 


467 


2 41 


738 


4 38 


2 57 


11 


11 


Th. 


Alabama seceded, 1861. 


7 28 


448 


3 52 


7 19 


458 


3 43 


737 


4 39 


4 2 


12 


12 


Frl. 


Lincoln's 1st speech in cgs,1848. 


7 27 


449 


4 51 


7 18 


4 59 


4 42 


737 


441 


5 2 


13 


13 


Sat. 


Ft. Fisher attacked, 1865. 


727 


451 


5 44 


7 18 


5 


535 


7 36 


4 42 


5 55 


14 


14 


8l\. 


Gen. Braddock sails, 1755. 


7 26 


4 52 


629 


7 18 


5 1 


6 20 


7 36 


4 43 


6 39 


15 


15 


Mo. 


Ft. Fisher captured, 1865. 


7 26 


4 53 


rises 


7 18 


5 2 


rises 


7 35 


4 44 


rises 


16 


It! 


Tu. 


Amnesty bill passed, 1872. 


7 26 


4 54 


6 9 


7 17 


5 3 


6 14 


7 35 


4 45 


6 4 


17 


17 


We. 


Morgan defeats Tarleton,1781. 


7 25 


4 55 


7 9 


7 17 


5 4 


7 12 


734 


4 47 


7 6 


18 


18 


Th. 


Battle of Frederickstown,1813. 


7 25 


457 


8 7 


7 16 


5 5 


8 9 


7 34 


448 


8 6 


19 


19 


Frl. 


Battle of Mill Springs, 1862. 


7 24 


458 


9 6 


7 16 


5 6 


9 6 


7 33 


449 


9 7 


20 


L'O 


Sat. 


Battle of Somerset, N. J., 1777. 


724 


4 59 


10 5 


7 15 


5 7 


10 3 


7 32 


450 


10 8 


21 


M 


SIX. 


Jackson enters N.Orleans.1813. 


723 


5 


11 4 


7 15 


5 8 


11 


731 


4 52 


11 8 


22 


;j;j 


Mo. 


Stone fleet sunk Charl'st'n,1861 


722 


5 1 


morn 


7 14 


5 10 


11 59 


7 31 


4 53 


morn 


23 




Tu. 


Massacre River Rasin. 1813. 


7 22 


5 3 


3 


7 14 


511 


morn 


7 30 


4 55 


10 


24 


}'t 


We. 


Rhoddy drtv'n f r'm Tean.,1864 


7 21 


5 4 


1 6 


7 13 


512 


1 


7 29 


456 


1 14 


25 


_T> 


Th. 


Orizaba taken, 1848. 


720 


5 5 


2 9 


713 


513 


2 1 


7 28 


457 


2 18 


26 


26 


Fri. 


Webster's reply to Hayne,1830 


7 19 


5 6 


3 12 


7 12 


5 14 


3 3 


727 


459 


3 22 


27 


27 


Sat. 


New Providence taken, 1778. 


7 18 


5 7 


4 13 


7 11 


5 15 


4 4 


7 26 


5 


4 24 


28 


2* 


SUN. 


First nat'l bank at Phila., 1783. 


7 18 


5 9 


5 9 


7 10 


5 16 


5 


7 25 


5 2 


5 20 


29 


_'9 


Mo. 


British take Augusta.Ga., 1779. 


7 17 


5 10 


5 57 


710 


5 17 


549 


7 24 


5 3 


6 6 


30 


:;D 


Tu. 


Constitution amended. 1816. 


7 16 


5 11 


sets 


7 9 


5 19 


sets 


7 23 


5 4 


sets 


31131 


We. 


Naval battle off Charl'sfn, 1863. 


7 15 


5 12 


6 27 


7 8 


5 20 


631 


7 22 


5 6 


625 


ad MONTH. FEBRUARY. SSDAYS. 


!! 


d 

S 


g* 




February is named from Roman 
divinity Februus (Pluto), orFeb- 
rua (Juno), and was added to 


Chicago, Iowa, 
Neb., N T .Y.,Pa., 
S.WIs. S. Mich., 


St. Louis, S. 111., 
Va., Ky., Mo., 
Kan., Col., Cal., 


St. Paul, N.E. 
Wis. and Mich., 
N.E. NewYork, 





h 


fe 


Roman Calendar about 713 B. o. 


N. 111., Ind., O. 


Ind., Ohio. 


Minn., Or. 


ft 1 * 


P 


P^ 


AJIERICAN UI8TORT. 


Sun 

rises 


Sun 'Moon 
sets.lR.&s. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 

sets. 


Moon 

H.&S. 


Sun Sun | Moon 
rises sets. K.&S. 




" 






H.M. 


H.M. H.M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H. M. 


H.M. H.M.I II. M. 


32 


ITh. 


Battle of Cowan's Ford, 1781. 


7 14 


5 14 


745 


7 7521 


7 46 


7 20 5 7 7 45 


83 

4 


2|Fri. 
SiSat. 


Mexican cession of 1848. 
Battle of Dover. 1862. 


7 13 
7 12 


5 15 
5 17 


9 2 
1016 


7 6522 
7 5 5 23 


9 1 
10 12 


7 19 5 9 9 4 
7 18 5 10 10 20 


35 


4 srx. 


Clinton reaches N. Y., 1776. 


7 11 


5 18ill 28 


7 55241123 


7 17 5 11 11 35 


86 

37 


5 Mo. 
6 : Tu. 


Med'ling w'h sl'v'ry ill'gal,1836 
Treaty with France. 1778. 


7 10 
7 9 


5 19 

5 20 


morn 
039 


7 4526 
7 35 27 


morn 
032 


7 16 5 13 morn 
7 145 141 48 


38 


7iWe. 


Jeff Davis' case dismissed, 1869. 


7 7 


r. _<_' 


146 


7 25 28 


1 38 


7 13 5 16 1 56 


30 


8.Th. 


Conf 'derate gov'tformed,1861. 


7 6 


5 23 


2 47 


7 1 5 29 


2 38 


7 12 5 17 2 58 


40 


9'Fri. 


Conf 'derate congress met, 1861 


7 5 


5 24 


341 


6 59 5 30 


332 


7 10 5 18 


3 52 


41 


10 Sat. 


Battle Hornet & Resolnte,1813. 


7 4 




428 


6 58 


5 31 


4 19 


7 95 20 


438 


42 


11 


StN. 


Lincoln left for Wash'n, 1861. 


7 2 


5 27 


5 8 


657 


-> :<_ 


5 


7 75 21 


5 17 


43 


12 


Mo. 


First fugitive slave law, 1793. 


7 1 


5 2S 


5 43 


656 


> 34 


5 37; 


7 6523 


5 51 


44 


13 


Tu. 


Massacre of Glencoe, 1691. 


t! 59 


5 30 


6 12 


6 55 5 35 


6 8| 


7 4524 


6 19 


45 


14 


We. 


Pickens routs the British.,1778. 


(i 58 


5 31 


rises 


6 54 5 36 


rises 


7 35 25 


rises 


40 


15 


Th. 


Battleship Maine destr'd, 1898. 


6 57 


-> 32 


6 58 


6 52 5 37 


659 


7 15 27 


6 58 


47 


16 


Fri. 


Hessian troops hired, 1776. 


6 55 


5 33 


7 57 


6 51 5 38 


756 


7 05 28 


759 


48 


17 Sat. 


Treaty of Ghent ratified, 1815. 


6 54 


5 35 


856 


6 50 5 39 8 53 


6 58 5 30 


8 59 


4!l 


18SCH. 


Lee com. -In-chief, 1864. 


6 52 


5 36 9 55 


6 49 5 40i 9 51 


6 57 5 31 


10 1 


50 
51 


19 Mo. 
20,Tu. 


First nat'l thanksgiving, 1795. 
Braddock arrives m Va., 1755. 


6 51 

6 50 


5 37 10 55 
5 38 11 57 


6 4715 42 10 50 
6 46'5 43 11 50 


6 55 5 33 
6 54 5 34 


11 3 
morn 


52 


2l|\Ve. 


Silver remonetized, 1878. 


648 


5 39 morn 


6 45 5 44 morn 


6 52 5 36 


6 


53 


22;Th. 


Battle of Ogdensburg, 1813. 


6 47 


5 41 58 


6 43 5 45 50 


6 51 5 37 


1 8 


54 


23 Frl. 


Battle of Buena Vista, 1847. 


6 45 


5 42 1 58' 6 42 5 46 1 49 


6 49 5 39 


2 9 


55 


24 Sat. 


Johnson impeached, 1868. 


6 44 


5 431 2 54 6 41 5 47 2 45 


6 47 5 40 


3 5 


5(3 


25 SfX. 


Conscription bill passed, 1863. 


6 42 


5 44 


3 44 (5 39 5 48 3 36 


6 45 5 41 


3 54 


57 


26 Mo. 


Nashville surrendered, 1862. 


6 41 


5 46 


4 29 6 38 5 49 4 22 


6 44543 


438 


58 


27 Tu. 


Battle of Morris Neck, 1776. 


(i 39 


5 47 


5 g: 6 37 5 50. 5 3 


6 42 5 44 


5 51 


59 


28 We. 


Private'r Nashville dest'd.lSIB 


6 37 


*> 48 


5 44 6 35 5 51 5 40 


6 40 5 45 


5 48_, 



3d MONTH. MARCH. 31 DAYS. 


AT OF I 
fEAR. | 


c 
(- 


fc M 


March was named from Mars, 
the god of war. It was the 
first month of the Roman year. 


Chicago, Iowa, 
Neb., N.Y., Pa., 
S. Wis., 8. Mich., 
|N. 111., Ind.. O. 


St. Louis, S. 111., 1 
Va., Ky., Mo., 
Kan., Col., Cal., 
Ind., Ohio. 


St. Paul, N.E. 

Wis. and Mich., 
N.E. New York, 
Minn., Or. 


or 


e 


O 


AMERICAN BISTORT. 


Sun 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 

R.&S. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 

sets. 


Moon 

R.&S. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 

sets. 


Moon 

R.& S. 










H M 


H M 


H. M. 


H M 


TLf 


H. SI. 1 




60 


i 


Th. 


Articl's of confed. ratift'd, 1781 


6 36 


5 50 


6 32 


li 31 


5 52 


632 


(i 38 5 46 


6 33 


61 


2 


Fri. 


Grant made lieut.-gen., 1864. 


634 


5 51 


7 50 


6 32 


5 53 


7 48 


636 


5 48 


7 53 


62 


3 


Sat. 


Battle of Brier Creek. 1779. 


6 32 


5 52 


9 6 


6 31 


5 54 


9 2 


li 35 


5 49 


9 12 


63 


4 


SUN. 


First congress met. 1789. 


6 31 


5 53 


1020 


6 29 


5 55 


10 14 


6 33 


5 51 


10 28 


64 


5 


Mo. 


Boston massacre, 1770. 


6 29 


5 55 


11 31 


6 28 


5 56 


11 23 


6 31 


5 52 


11 40 


65 


8 


Tu. 


Battle of Pea Ridge. 1862. 


6 28 


5 56 


morn 


6 27 


557 


morn 


6 29 


5 53 


morn 


66 


7 


We. 


Bible society formed, 1804. 


626 


.) 57 


37 


6 25 


5 58 


28 


6 27 


5 55 


047 


67 


8 


Th. 


Stamp act passed, 1776. 


6 24 


5 58 


1 35 


6 24 


5 59 


1 26 


6 26 


5 56 


1 46 


68 


9 


Fri. 


Monttor-Merrimac battle, 18(52. 


6 23 


5 59 


2 25 


6 22 


6 1 


2 16 


6 24 


5 58 


2 35 


69 


10 


Sat. 


McClel'n crosses Potomac, 1862 


6 21 


6 


3 8 


6 21 


6 2 


3 


6 22 


5 59 


3 18 


70 


11 


SUN. 


Confed.constit'n adopted, 18(>1. 


6 20 


6 1 


3 44 


6 19 


6 3 


3 37 


6 20 


6 


3 52 


71 


12 


Mo. 


Grant made com. -in-chief, 1864 


6 18 


6 2 


4 15 


6 17 


6 4 


4 10 


6 18 


6 1 


4 22 


72 


13 


Tu. 


Red river expedition, 1864. 


6 VQ 


6 3 


442 


6 16 


6 5 


439 


6 17 


O *> 


448 


73 


14 


We. 


Newborn captured, 1862. 


6 14 


6 4 


5 8 


6 14 


6 6 


5 6 


6 15 


6 4 


5 12 


74 


15 


Th. 


Island No. 10 bombarded, 1861. 


6 13 


6 6 


5 33 


6 13 


6 7 


5 32 


6 13 


6 5 


5 35 


75 


16 


Fri. 


Battle of Guilford, 1781. 


6 11 


6 7 


rises 


6 11 


6 8 


rises 


6 11 


6 6 


rises 


76 


17 


Sat. 


Boston evacuated, 1776. 


6 9 


6 8 


7 48 


6 10 


6 9 


7 45 


6 9 


6 8 


7 53 


77 


18 


SUN. 


Stamp act repealed, 1776. 


6 7 


6 9 


849 


6 8 


610 


8 44 


6 8 


6 9 


8 56 


78 


19 


Mo. 


The Oregon left S. F., 1898. 


6 5 


6 10 


950 


6 6 


6 10 


9 43 


6 6 


6 11 


9 58 


79 


20 


Tu. 


Washington ent'rs Boston,1776 


6 4 


6 12 


10 50 


6 5 


6 11 


1042 


6 4 


6 12 


11 


80 


21 


We. 


Battle of Henderson, 1864. 


6 2 


6 13 


11 49 


6 3 


6 12 


11 40 


6 2 


6 13 


11 59 


81 


22 


Th. 


Stamp act signed, 1765. 


6 .0 


6 14 


morn 


6 2 


6 13 


morn 


6 


6 14 


morn 


82 


23 


Fri. 


Battle of Winchester, 1862. 


5 58 


6 15 


45 


5 


6 14 


036 


5 58 


6 16 


56 


83 


24 


Sat. 


Attack on Peekskill,1777. 


5 57 


6 16 


136 


558 


6 15 


1 27 


5 56 


6 17 


1 46 


84 


25 


SI'S. 


Hudson river discovered, 1609. 


5 55 


6 17 


221 


5 57 


6 16 


2 14 


5 54 


6 18 


2 SO 


85 




Mo. 


Forrest beat'n atPaducah,18K4 


5 54 


6 18 


3 2 


5 55 


6 17 


2 56 


5 52 


6 19 


3 10 


86 


27 


Tu. 


Tanning, Tex., massacre, 1836. 


5 52 


6 19 


3 39 


5 54 


6 18 


3 35 


5 50 


6 20 


3 45 


87 


28 


We. 


Seminole treaty, 1833. 


5 50 


(5 20 


4 13 


5 52 


6 19 


410 


549 


6 22 


4 16 


88 


29 


Th. 


Vera Cruz capitulates, 1847. 


5 49 


6 21 


4 44 


5 51 


6 20 


444 


5 47 


15 23 


445 


89 


30 


Fri. 


Battle of Somerset, Ky., 1863. 


5 47 


I! 21' 


sets 


5 49 


621 


sets 


5 45 


6 


sets 


90 


31 


Sat. 


Treasury bldgs. burned 1833. 


15 4(5 (5 24 


7 53 


5 47 


6 22 


748 


5 43 


6 25 


8 


4th MONTH. APRIL. 30 DAYS. 


. < 


6 

% 


h * 


April was named from apriere 
(to open), the season when buds 


Chicago, Iowa, 
Xeb.,N. Y., Pa., 
S. Wis., S. Mich. 


St. Louis, S. 111., 
Va., Ky., Mo., 
Kan., Col., Cal. 


St. Paul, N. E. 
Wis. and Mich. 
N.E. New York, 




^ 


t* s 


open. 


N. 111.. Iird., O. 


Ind., Ohio. 


Minn., Or. 


O 


p 


ft 




Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 








AMERICAN H1STORT. 


rises 


sets. 


R.&S. 


rises 


sets. 


R.&S. 


rises 


sets. 


R.& S. 










H.M. 


H.M. 


H. M 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H. M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H. M. 


91 


1 


scs. 


Battle Five Forks, 1865. 


5 44 


i 25 


9 8 


5 46 


6 23 


9 1 


5 41 


6 27 


9 17 


92 


2 


Mo. 


Battle at Selma, Ala., 1865. 


5 42 


11 21 i 


1018 


544 


6 24 


1010 


5 40 


6 28 


1028 


93 


3 


Tu. 


Richmond evacuated, 1865. 


540 


(i 27 


1121 


5 43 


6 25 


11 12 


5 38 


6 30 


11 32 


94 


4 


We. 


First newspaper in U. S., 1704. 


5 39 


6 28 


morn 


5 41 


t; 21 ; 


morn 


5 3(5 


6 31 


morn 


95 


5 


Th. 


Yorktown besieged. 1862. 


5 37 


6 29 


016 


5 40 


6 27 


7 


5 34 


6 32 


26 


96 


8 


Fri. 


1st house of rep.organiz'd,1789. 


5 3 5 


6 30 


1 4 


5 38 


6 28 


056 


5 32 


6 33 


1 14 


97 


7 


Sat. 


Battle of Shiloh. 1862. 


5 33 


6 31 


1 43 


5 37 


6 29 


1 36 


5 31 


6 35 


1 52 


98 


8 


SUN. 


Island No. 10 taken, 1862. 


5 32 


6 32 


2 16 


535 


6 30 


2 11 


5 29 


6 36 


224 


99 


9 


Mo. 


Lee surrendered, 1865. 


5 30 


6 34 


245 


5 34 


6 31 


2 41 


5 27 


6 37 


2 51 


100 


10 


Tu. 


Battle of Ft. Pulaski, 1862. 


5 29 


ii :-;.-) 


3 12 


5 32 


6 32 


3 9 


5 25 


(5 3* 


8 16 


101 


11 


We. 


Ft. Sumter bombarded. 186L 


5 27 


li 36 


336 


5 30 


6 33 


3 35 


5 23 


i; :;<i 


8 38 


102 


12 


Th. 


Ft. Pillow massacre. 1864. 


5 25 


6 37 


4 


5 29 


6 33 


4 1 


5 22 


6 41 


4 


103 


13 


Fri. 


Ft. Surnter surrendered, 1861. 


.-) 24 


6 38 


425 


5 27 


6 34 


428 


5 20 


6 42 


424 


104 


14 


Sat. 


Battle of Monks' Corners. 1780. 


5 22 


6 39 


451 


5 26 


li 35 


4 54 


5 IS 


6 43 


4 47 


105 


15 


SUN. 


Lincoln dies, 1865, 


5 21 


6 40 


rises 


5 24 


li 3i i 


rises 


5 16 


6 44 


rises 


lOti 
107 


16 

17 


Mo. 
Tu. 


Porter passed Vicksburg, 1863. 
Death of Franklin. 1790. 


5 19 
5 17 


6 41 
6 42 


843 
9 43 


5 23 
5 22 


6 37 
6 38 


8 36 
9 34 


5 1-1 
5 13 


(\ 45 
6 47 


8 52 
9 53 


108 


18 


We. 


Ride of Paul Revere, 1775. 


5 16 


6 43 


10 40 


5 20 


6 39 


10 31 


5 11 


6 48 


10 51 


109 


19 


Th. 


Battle of Lexington, 1775. 


5 14 


6 45 


11 32 


5 19 


6 40 


11 23 


5 9 


<; 49 


11 42 


110 


20 


Fri. 


Lee resigns U. S. A., 1861. 


5 13 


(i 4(5 


morn 


5 17 


6 41 


morn 


5 7 


6 50 


morn 


111 


21 


Sat. 


Spanish- Amer. war began, 1S98. 


5 11 


6 47 


019 


5 16 


6 42 


11 


5 6 


ii 52 


28 


112 


22 


SUN. 


Paul Jones at Whitehav'n,1778 


5 9 


15 48 


1 


5 15 


6 43 


54 


5 4 


( ; 53 


1 8 


113 


23 


Mo. 


Call for 125.000 men. 1898, 


5 8 


ti 49 


1 36 


5 13 


6 44 


1 32 


5 3 


6 55 


143 


114 


24 


Tu. 


Ranger takes the Drake, 1778. 


5 6 


li .-)() 


2 10 


5 12 


6 45 


2 7 


5 1 


(5 56 


2 14 


115 


25 


We. 


U.S. land office estab'sh'd, 1812. 


5 5 


li r,l 


2 42 


5 11 


6 46 


2 41 


4 59 


(5 57 


2 44 


116 


2i i 


Th. 


New Orleans taken, 1862. 


536 52 


3 13 


5 9 


6 47 


3 14 


4 58 6 58 


3 13 


117 


27 


Fri. 


Habeas corpus suspend'd,1861. 


5 26 53 


3 45 


5 8 


6 48 


3 48 


4 56i7 


343 


118 


28 


Sat. 


Battle of Saugatuck riv'r, 1777. 


5 1 


6 54 


4 19 


5 7 


6 49 


4 24 


4 55 


7 1 


4 14 


119 




SUN. 


Md. d'cidesag'nstseces'n,1861. 


1 59 




sets 


5 6 


6 50 


sets 


4 53 


7 2 


sets 


120 


3(1 


Mo. 


Washington inaugurated. 1789., 4 58 6 56 


9 3 


5 4 


6 51 


8 54 


4 52 


7 3l 9 13 



6 tli MONTH. MAY. 31 DAYS. 


gpl 


d 


h M 


May is from the Latin Mains, 


Chicago. Iowa, 
Neb.,N.Y., Pa., 


St. Louis, S. 111., 
Va., Ky., MO., 


St. Paul, N.E. 
Wis. and Mich., 


OK 


^ 


w 


the growing month. 


S.Wis., S.Mich. 


Kan., Col., Cal.. 


N.E. New York, 


5> K 


^ 


<- M 




N. 111., Ind., O. 


Ind., Ohio. 


Minn., Or. 


Pr 





Q 




Sun Sun 


Moon 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 








A31EKH A.N HISTORY. 


rises sets. 


K.& S. 


rises 


sets. 


H.& S. 


rises 


sets. 


R.&S. 










H.M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H M 


H.M. 


121 


1 


Tu. 


Dewey's victory. 1898. 


457 


ti 57 


10 3 


5 3 


6 52 


9 54 


4 50 


7' 4 


10 14 


122 


2 


We. 


Battle of Chancellorsville, 1863 


456 


6 58 


1 54 


5 2 


6 52 


10 45 


4 49 


7 6 


11 4 


123 


3 


Th. 


First call for 3-year men, 1861. 


4 54 


6 69 


1138 


5 1 


6 53 


11 31 


4 47 


7 7 


11 47 


124 


4 


Fri. 


Grant crosses the Uapid'n,1864 


4 53 


7 1 


morn 


459 


6 54 


morn 


446 


7 8 


morn 


126 


5 


Sat. 


Yorktown evacuated, 1862. 


4 51 


7 2 


15 


4 58 


6 55 


9 


4 45 


7 9 


023 


126 


8 


Sl'N. 


Ark. and Tenn. secede. 1861. 


4 50 


7 3 


46 


4 57 


6 56 


42 


4 43 


7 10 


53 


127 


7 


Mo. 


Baton Kouge, La.,capt'r'd,1862 


449 


7 4 


1 14 


4 56 


6 57 


1 10 


4 42 


7 12 


1 18 


128 


8 


Tu. 


Battle of Palo Alto, 1846. 


4 48 


7 5 


139 


4 55 


6 58 


137 


4 40 


7 13 


1 42 


129 


9 


We. 


Battle of Kesaca. Mex., 1846. 


4 46 


7 6 


2 3 


4 54 


6 59 


2 3 


439 


7 14 


2 4 


180 


10 


Th. 


Jeff. Davis captured. 1865. 


4 45 


7 7 


2 27 


453 


7 


2 29 


438 


7 15 


226 


131 


11 


Fri. 


Battle of Charl'st'n Neck,1779. 


4 44 


7 8 


2 52 


4 52 


7 1 


2 56 


437 


7 16 


2 50 


182 


12 


Sat. 


Crown Point taken, 1775. 


4 43 


7 9 


321 


4 51 


7 2 


3 25 


4 35 


7 17 


3 16 


133 


13 


SIN. 


War declar'd ag'nst Mex., 1846 


4 42 


7 10 


3 52 


4 50 


7 3 


3 58 


4 34 


7 18 


3 46 


134 


14 


Mo. 


Cape Cod discovered. 1602. 


4 41 


7 11 


rises 


4 49 


7 4 


rises 


4 33 


7 19 


rises 


135 


15 


Tu. 


Ft. Granby taken, 1781. 


4 40 


7 12 


8 34 


4 48 


7 5 


8 25 


432 


720 


844 


186 


It! 


We. 


Lincoln nominated, 1860. 


439 


7 13 


9 29 


4 47 


7 6 


9 20 


431 


721 


939 


137 


17 


Th. 


First national fast, 1776. 


438 


714 


10 18 


4 46 


7 7 


10 10 


4 30 


7 23 


10 28 


138 


18 


Fri. 


Grant invests Vicksburg, 1863. 


437 


7 15 


11 1 


4 45 


7 7 


1054 


4 29 


7 24 


11 10 


189 


19 


Sat. 


The "dark day," 1780. 


437 


7 16 


11 38 


4 44 


7 8 


11 33 


428 


7 25 


11 45 


140 


20 


Sl'N. 


Mecklenburg declaration,1577. 


436 


7 17 


morn 


4 44 


7 9 


morn 


427 


7 26 


morn 


141 


21 


Mo. 


Ft. Galphin taken, 1781. 


435 


7 18 


12 


443 


7 10 


8 


426 


7 27 


16 


142 


22 


Tu. 


Brooks jissaults Sumner, 1850. 


4 34 


7 19 


43 


4 42 


7 11 


41 


4 25 


7 28 


46 


143 


23 


We. 


Settlem'nt at Jamestown, 1607. 


433 


7 20 


1 13 


4 41 


7 12 


1 13 


4 24 


7 29 


1 14 


144 


24 


Th. 


Banks evac's Strasburg. 1862. 


4 33 


7 20 


1 43 


4 41 


7 13 


1 46 


4 23 


7 30 


1 42 


145 


25 


Fri. 


Battle of Spottsylvania, 1864. 


4 32 


7 21 


2 16 


4 40 


7 13 


220 


4 22 


731 


2 12 


14 H 


21 ! 


Sat. 


Last confeds. surrender, 1865. 


431 


7 22 


252 


4 40 


7 14 


258 


421 


732 


2 46 


147 


27 


SO. 


Fts. Erie & George aban'd,1813. 


4 30 


7 23 


3 34 


439 


7 15 


3 41 


421 


733 


3 27 


148 


28 


Mo. 


Battle of Dallas, Ga., 1864. 


4 30 


7 24 


sets 


4 38 


7 16 


sets 


420 


734 


sets 


149 


2!l 


Tu. 


Battle of Waxhaw, 1780. 


4 29 


7 25 


8 44 


4 38 


7 16 


8 35 


4 19 


7 35 


8 54 


160 


30 


We. 


Corinth taken, 1862. 


4 29 


7 2(5 


9 31 


4 37 


7 17 


9 23 


4 19 


7 36 


9 41 


151 


31 


Th. 


Battle of Fair Oaks, 1862. 


4 28 


7 27 


10 11 


437 


7 18 


10 4 


4 18 


737 


1020 


Gtli MONTH. JUNE. 30 DAYS. 


gj 


6 

I 


fc. . 

OS4 


June traced to Juno, the queen 
of heaven, who was thought to 
preside over marriages. 


Chicago, Iowa, 
Neb., N. Y., Pa., 
S.Wis., S.Mich. 
N. 111.. Ind. 0. 


St. Louis, 8. 111.. 
Va , Ky., Mo., 
Kan , Col., Cal.. 
Ind., Ohio. 


St Paul, N.E. 
Wis and Mich., 
N.E. New York, 
Minn., Or. 




R 


ft 


AMERICAS BISTORT. 


Sun 

rises 


Sun 

sets. 


Moon 

K.& S. 


Sun 

rises 


Sun 

sets. 


Moon 

R.&8. 


Sun 

rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 




"" 






H.M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H M. 


H.M. 


R.M. 


H. M. 


152 


1 


Fri. 


Battle of Cold Harbor. 1864. 


428 


7 28 


10 45 


4 36 


7 19 


10 40 


4 18 


737 


10 52 


153 


2 


Sat. 


Battle Lake Champlain, 1813. 


427 


7 28 


11 14 


436 


7 19 


11 11 


4 17 


738 


11 20 


154 


3 


SI'S. 


Merrimac sunk, Santiago,1898. 


427 


7 29 


1141 


436 


7 20 


11 38 


417 


7 39 


11 44 


166 


4 


Mo. 


Ft. Pillow evacuated. 1862. 


4 26 


729 


morn 


4 35 


7 21 


morn 


4 17 


7 40 


morn 


156 


5 


Tu. 


Battle of Piedmont, 1864. 


4 2(5 


7 30 


6 


4 35 


7 21 


5 


4 16 


7 41 


8 


157 


e 


We. 


Confeds. sur. Memphis, 1862. 


I 26 


731 


030 


435 


7 22 


031 


4 16 


741 


030 


158 


7 


Th. 


Fenians raid Canada, 1866. 


4 26 


731 


054 


434 


7 23 


057 


4 15 


7 42 


52 


169 


8 


Fri. 


Battle of Chattanooga. 1862. 


425 


732 


121 


434 


7 23 


1 25 


4 15 


743 


1 17 


160 


9 


Sat. 


Battle of Big Bethel, 1861. 


4 25 


7 32 


1 51 


4 34 


7 24 


1 56 


4 15 


7 44 


145 


161 


10 


Sl'N. 


War d'cl'd ag'nst Tripoli, 1801. 


4 25 


7 33 


2 25 


434 


7 24 


232 


4 15 


7 44 


2 18 


162 


11 


Mo. 


Walker lands in Nicar'g'a,185;> 


4 25 


7 34 


3 5 


4 34 


7 25 


3 13 


4 14 


7 45 


2 57 


163 


12 


Tu. 


Grant cros.Chlckah'miny. 1861 


4 25 


7 34 


3 54 


434 


7 25 


4 3 


4 14 


7 45 


3 46 


164 


13 


We. 


Fugitive slave law rep'l d.1863. 


4 24 


7 35 


rises 


434 


7 26 


rises 


4 14 


74(5 


rises 


166 


14 


Th. 


National flag adopted, 1777. 


424 


735 


8 59 


434 


7 26 


852 


4 14 


746 


9 8 




15 


Fri. 


Wash'n takes command, 1775. 


4 24 


7 36 


9 38 


4 34 


7 26 


932 


414 


747 


946 


167 


16 


Sat. 


Mississippi discovered, 1693. 


4 24 


7 36 


10 14 


4 34 


727 


10 10 


4 14 


747 


10 20 


168 


17 


Sl'N. 


Battle of Bunker Hill, 1775. 


4 24 


7 36 


10 47 


4 34 


7 27 


10 44 


4 14 


7 48 


10 50 


169 


18 


Mo 


Can. evac't'dbyAm'ric'ns.l776 


4 25 


737 


11 17 


4 34 


727 


11 17 


4 14 


7 48 


11 18 


170 


19 


Tu. 


War decl'd ag'nst Engl'd.1812. 


4 25 


737 


11 47 


4 34 


728 


11 49 


4 14 


7 48 


11 46 


171 


20 


We 


Battle of Stony Ferry. 1779. 


4 25 


7 37 


morn 


4 34 


728 


morn 


4 14 


748 


morn 


172 


H. 1 , 


Th. 


U.S. A. reaches Santiago. 1898 


4 25 


737 


18 


434 


728 


22 


415 


7 49 


16 


173 




Fri 


Ewell crosses Potomac. 1863. 


4 25 


7 37 


52 


4 34 


7 28 


57 


4 15 


749 


047 


174 


23 


Sat. 


Great Eastern at N. Y., 1860. 


4 26 


7 38 


1 30 


4 35 


7 29 


1 37 


4 15 


7 49 


1 23 


175 


21 


SIX. 


Battle of Sevilla, 1898. 


426 


7 38 


2 15 


4 35 


7 29 


223 


4 15 


7 49 


2 7 


176 


25 


Mo. 


Custer massacre, 1876. 


4 26 


7 38 


3 6 


4 35 


7 29 


3 15 


4 15 


7 49 


258 


177 


26 


Tu. 


Seven days' battles began. 1R02 


4 26 


7 38 


4 2 


436 


729 


411 


4 16 


7 49 


3 54 


178 


27 


We. 


Morm'nsmobb'd.Cartlfge, 1857 


4 27 


7 38 


sets 


4 36 


7 29 


sets 


4 16 


7 49 


sets 


179 


2 Th. 


1st foloni'l assembly m'ts, 1619 


427 


7 38 


8 42 


4 36 


7 29 


8 36 


416 


7 49 


850 


180 
181 


29 Fri. 
30 Siit. 


Howe reaches Sandy Ho'k,17'i6 
Guiteau hanged. W2. 


4 28 7 38 

4 2817 38 


9 14 

9 43 


4 37 
4 37 


7 29 
7 29 


9 10 

9 40 


4 17 

14 17 


7 49 
7 49 


9 20 

9 47 



7th MONTH. JULY. 31 DAYS. 


o 


c 

Z 


h . 


July named In honor of Julius 
Caesar.who was born on the 12th 


Chicago, Iowa, 
Neb.,N. Y., Pa., 

S.Wis., S.Mich., 


St. Louis. S. 111.. 
Va., Ky., Mo., 
Kan., Col., Cal., 


St.Paul.N.E. 
Wls. and Mich., 
N.E.NewYork 


" 





5> 


of July. 


N 111., Ind., O. 


Ind., Ohio. 


Minn., Or. 


a 


a 


cr 


ABEKIl'AX HISTORY. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 

R.&S. 


Sun 

rises 


Sun 

sets. 


Moon 

R.* S. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 
sets. 


R.&S. 


~~~ 


~~ 


~~~~ 




H M. 


II . M . 


H. M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H. AI. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H. M. 


182 


i 


SEX. 


Battle of San Juan, 1898. 


4 28 




10 8 


1 3.s 


7 29 


10 6 


4 IS 


749 


10 10 


183 


2 


Mo. 


Garfleld assassinated, 1881. 


4 29 


7 38 


10 33 


4 38 


7 29 


10 32 


4 18 


7 49 


10 34 


184 


3 


Tu. 


Cervera's fleet destroyed, 1898. 


4 29 


7 38 


10 56 


439 


7 29 


10 58 


4 19 


7 49 


10 55 


185 


4 


We. 


Vicksburg surrendered, 1863. 


4 30 


7 38 


11 22 


4 39 


7 29 


11 26 


4 20 


7 49 


11 20 


186 


5 


Th. 


Battle of Carthage, Mo., 1861. 


430 


7 38 


11 51 


4 40 


7 28 


11 56 


4 20 


7 48 


11 46 


187 


6 


Fri 


Battle of Jamestown, 1781. 


431 


7 38 


morn 


4 40 


7 28 


morn 


4 21 


7 48 


morn 


188 


7 


Sat. 


Hawaii annexed to U. S.. 1898. 


4 32 


7 37 


22 


4 41 


7 28 


28 


4 21 


7 47 


16 


IS!) 


8 


8EX. 


Wash'n chosen as capital, 1792 


4 32 


7 37 


058 


4 41 


7 28 


1 6 


4 22 


7 47 


51 


190 


9 


Mo. 


Surrender of Pt. Hudson, 1863. 


4 33 


736 


1 43 


4 42 


7 27 


1 52 


4 23 


747 


1 35 


191 


10 


Tu. 


Fr'nch allies land, N'port,1780. 


4 34 


7 36 


2 36 


443 


7 27 


245 


4 24 


7 46 


2 28 


192 


11 


We. 


Battle of Rich Mountain, 1861. 


4 35 


735 


3 36 


4 43 


727 


3 45 


4 24 


7 46 


3 28 


193 


12 


Th. 


Norwalk, Conn., burned, 1779. 


4 36 


7 35 


rises 


4 44 


7 26 


rises 


4 25 


7 45 


rises 


194 


13 


Fri. 


Draft riots in N. Y.. 1863. 


4 36 


7 34 


8 13 


4 45 


7 26 


8 9 


4 26 


7 45 


8 20 


195 


14 


Sat. 


Battle of Carnck's Ford, 1861. 


4 37 


7 34 


8 48 


4 45 


7 25 


8 45 


4 27 


7 44 


8 52 


196 


15 


SEX. 


Battle of Baylor's Farm, 1864. 


438 


7 33 


9 20 


4 46 


724 


9 19 


4 28 


743 


9 22 


197 


16 


Mo. 


Wayne takes Stony Point,1779. 


4 39 


732 


9 51 


447 


7 24 


952 


4 29 


7 43 


9 51 


198 


17 


Tu. 


Santiago surrendered, 1898. 


4 40 


7 32 


10 21 


447 


7 24 


1024 


430 


742 


10 19 


199 


18 


We. 


Maximilian shot, 1867. 


4 40 


7 31 


1055 


4 48 


7 23 


10 59 


431 


7 41 


10 50 


200 


19 


Th. 


Morgan defeated, 1863. 


4 41 


7 31 


11 32 


449 


7 22 


11 38 


4 32 


7 40 


11 26 


201 


20 


Fri. 


Confed. cong. Richmond, 1861. 


4 42 


7 30 


morn 


4 50 


7 22 


morn 


4 33 


7 39 


morn 


202 


21 


Sat. 


Battle of Bull Run, 1861. 


443 


7 29 


13 


4 51 


7 21 


21 


4 34 


7 39 


6 


203 


22 


SEX. 


Gen. McClell'n takes com.,1861 


444 


728 


1 1 


4 51 


7 20 


1 10 


4 35 


7 38 


053 


204 


23 


Mo. 


Gen. Grant dies, 1885. 


4 44 


7 28 


1 55 


4 52 


7 20 


2 4 


4 36 


7 37 


1 47 


205 


24 


Tu. 


Mormons arrive in Utah, 1847. 


4 45 


7 27 


253 


4 53 


7 19 


3 1 


437 


7 36 


2 45 


206 


25 


We. 


Battle of Lundy's Lane, 1814. 


4 46 


7 26 


3 54 


4 54 


7 18 


4 1 


4 38 


7 35 


3 47 


207 


26 


Th. 


Halleck sup's McClel Ian, 1862. 


4 47 


7 25 


sets 


4 55 


7 17 


sets 


4 39 


7 34 


sets 


208 


27 


Fri. 


Atlantic cable laid, 1866. 


4 48 


7 24 


7 44 


4 56 


7 16 


7 40 


4 40 


7 33 


7 48 


209 


28 


Sat. 


Ponce, Puerto Rico.taken, 1898 


4 49 


7 23 


8 11 


4 56 


7 16 


8 9 


4 41 


7 32 


8 14 


210 


29 


SEX. 


The Alabama starts out, 1862. 


450 


7 22 


836 


457 


7 15 


835 


4 42 


7 31 


8 37 


211 


30 


Mo. 


Petersb'g mine explod'd, 1864. 


451 


7 21 


9 


4 58 


7 14 


9 1 


443 


7 30 


9 


212 


31 


Tu. 


Battle of Malate. 1898. 


4 5-2 


7 20 


9 24 


4 59 


7 13 


9 27 


4 44 


7 28 


9 22 


8th MONTH. AUGUST. .31 DAYS. 


AT OF I 

rAB. | 


6 

33 




(- H 


August was named In honor 
of Augustus Caesar, he having 
been made consul in this mouth. 


Cbliago, Iowa, 
Neb.,N. Y., Pa., 
S.Wis., S.Mich., 
N. 111., Ind., O. 


St. Louis, S. 111., 
Va., Ky., Mo., 
Kan., Col.. Cal., 
Ind., Ohio. 


St. Paul, N. E. 
Wls. and Mich., 
N.K. New York, 
Minn., Or. 


or 


^ 


a^ 




Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


Sun Sun Moon 








A.MKHICAX HISTORY. 


rises 


sets. 


R.&S. 


rises 


sets. 


R.&S. 


rises 


sets. R.& s 


~^~ 


~~ 






H.M. 


H.M. 


H. M. IH.M. 


H.M. 


H. M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


213 


1 


We. 


Clerm'nt'strip on Huds'n, 1807 


4 53 


7 19 


951 


5 


7 12 


9 55 


4 45 


7 27 


9 47 


214 


2 


Th. 


Battle 01 Ft. Stephenson, 1813. 


4 54 


7 18 


1021 


5 1 


7 11 


1027 


4 46 


7 26 


10 15 


215 


3 


Fri. 


Col'mbus sails from Sp'n. 1492. 


4 55 


7 17 


10 55 


5 2 


7 10 


11 2 


4 47 


725 


10 48 


216 


4 


Sat. 


Col. Isaac Hayne hang'd, 1781. 


4 56 


7 16 


11 35 


5 3 


7 9 


1143 


4 48 


7 23 


11 27 


217 


5 


SEX. 


Farrag't ent'rs M'bile Day, 1864 


457 


7 15 


morn 


5 4 


7 8 


morn 


4 50 


7 22 


morn 


218 


6 


Mo. 


Ram Arkansas explod'd, 1862. 


458 


7 14 


023 


5 4 


7 6 


32 


4 51 


7 20 


15 


219 


7 


Tu. 


Lafavette departs, 1825. 


459 


7 12 


1 19 


5 5 


7 5 


1 28 


4 52 


7 19 


1 11 


220 


8 


We. 


Battle of Mackinaw, 1814. 


5 


7 11 


2 22 


5 6 


7 4 


2 30 


4 53 


7 18 


2 14 


221 


9 


Th. 


Battle of Cedar Mount'n, 1862. 


5 1 


7 10 


3 32 


5 7 


7 3 


3 38 


4 54 


7 16 


3 26 


222 


10 


Fri. 


Battle of Wilson Creek, 1861. 


5 2 


7 9 


rises 


5 8 


7 2 


rises 


4 56 


7 15 


rises 


223 


11 


Sat. 


Bat.Sulphur Bridge Sps.. 1864. 


5 3 


7 7 


7 19 


5 9 


7 1 


7 17 


457 


7 13 


7 22 


224 


12 


SEX. 


Spanish protocol signed, 1898. 


5 4 


7 6 


7 50 


5 10 


6 59 


7 50 


4 58 


7 12 


7 51 


225 


13 


Mo. 


Manila surrendered. 1898. 


5 5 


7 4 


822 


5 11 


6 58 


8 25 


459 


7 10 


8 21 


226 


14 


Tu. 


Death of Farragut, 1870. 


5 G 


7 3 


8 56 


5 12 


6 57 


9 


5 


7 9 


8 52 


227 


15 


We. 


Lafayette visits the U. S..1824. 


5 1 


7 1 


933 


5 13 


6 55 


9 39 


5 2 


7 7 


9 27 


228 


16 


Th. 


Battle of Bennington, 1777. 


5 8 


7 


10 14 


5 13 


6 54 


1021 


5 3 


7 6 


10 7 


229 


17 


Fri. 


Anti-Neb, con. Saratoga, 1854. 


5 9 


6 58 


11 


5 14 


6 53 


11 8 


5 4 


7 4 


10 52 


230 


18 


Sat. 


Panic of 1S73 began. 


5 10 


6 57 


11 51 


5 15 


6 52 


morn 


5 5 


7 2 


11 43 


231 


19 


SEX. 


Battle of Bluelicks, Ky., 1782. 


5 11 


6 55 


morn 


5 16 


6 50 





5 6 


7 1 


morn 


232 


2(1 


Mo. 


Battle of Fallen Timb'rs. 1794. 


5 12 


6 54 


048 


5 17 6 49 


57 


5 8 


6 59 


040 


233 


21 


Tu. 


Lawrence, Kas., sacked, 1863. 


5 13 


6 52 


1 48 


5 18 


6 48 


1 56 


5 9 


6 58 


1 41 


234 


22 


We. 


Att'ck on Ft. Sumter rep., 1863. 


5 15 


6 51 


2 49 


5 19 


646 


2 55 


5 10 


6 56 


2 43 


235 


_':: 


Th. 


Ft. Morgan surrenders, 18C4. 


5 16 


6 49 


3 50 


5 20 


6 45 


3 55 


5 11 


6 54 


3 45 


236 


24 


Fri. 


British capt're Washing'n.1814 


5 17 


ti 48 


4 51 


5 21 6 43 


4 55 


5 12 


6 52 


4 49 


237 


25 


Sat. 


Battle Ream's Station, 1864. 


5 18 


6 46 


sets 


5 22 6 42 


sets 


5 14 


6 51 


sets 


238 


26 


SEX. 


Stamp-act riot Boston. 1768. 


5 19 


6 45 


7 5 


5 23 6 40 


7 6 


5 15 


6 49 


7 5 


239 


27 


Mo. 


Battle of Long Island, 1776. 


5 L'O 


6 43 


729 


5 24'6 39 


7 32 


5 16 6 47 


7 28 


240 


L'8 


Tu. 


Post-car serv.C.&N. W.Ry. 1864 


5 21 


6 42 


7 56 


5 24 6 38 


7 59 


5 17 6 45 


7 52 


241 


29 


We. 


Second battle Bull Run, 1862. 


5 22 


6 40 


824 


5 25,6 36 


8 29 


'5 18 6 44 


8 19 


242 


30 


Th. 


Americ'ns evacuate R. I., 1778. 


5 23 


(I 38 


8 56 


5 26 6 34 


9 2 


5 19 6 42 


8 50 


243 


31 


Fri. 


French fleet arrives, 1781. 


5 21 


6 37 


9 33 


5 27 6 33 


9 41 


5 20.fi 41 


9 26 



9tn MONTH. SEPTEMBER. so DATS. 


*4 

& 


6 

f- 


og 

<s 


September, from Septem (sev- 
enth), as It was the seventh 
Human month. 


Chicago, Iowa, 
Neb.. N.Y., Pa.. 
S.Wls., S. Mich. 
N. 111., Ind., O. 


St. Loul8,S.IH., 
Va., Ky., Mo.. 
Kan., Col., Cal., 
Ind., Ohio. 


St. Paul, N.E. 
Wls. and Mich., 
N.E.NewYork, 
Minn., Or. 


Q^ 


fi 


(& 


AMERICAN HISTORY. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 

sets. 


Moon 

R.&S. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 

R.&S. 


Sun 

risen 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 

li.A S 










H.M. 


H.M 


H. M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H. M. 


U.M. 


H.M. 


H. M 


244 


1 


Sat. 


Battle of Chantilly, 1862. 


5 25 (i 35 


10 16 


5 2* 


31 


10 24 


5 21 


t! 39 


10 8 


215 


2 


srx. 


Atlanta surrenders, 18(i4. 


5 2(5 6 34 


11 6 


5 20 


6 30 


11 15 


5 22 


37 


10 58 


246 


a 


Mo. 


Treaty peace, U.S. & G. B..178y. 


5 27 6 32 


morn 


5 30 


6 28 


morn 


5 23 


6 35 


11 56 


247 


4 


Tu. 


Gen. Morgan killed. 1K64. 


5 28 


30 


4 


5 31 


6 27 


12 


5 25 


6 33 


morn 


24S 


5 


We. 


Lee invades Maryland, 18C2. 


5 20 


6 28 


1 9 


5 32 


6 25 


1 16 


5 20 


6 31 


1 2 


249 





Th. 


Mayflower sails, 1620. 


5 30 


627 


2 20 


5 33 


6 24 


2 25 


527 


20 


2 14 


250 


7 


Fri. 


Ft. Wayne captured. 1863. 


5 31 6 25 


3 35 


5 33 


6 22 


3 38 


5 28 


6 27 


331 


261 


8 


Sat. 


Battle of Molinodel Key, 1847. 


5 32 6 23 


449 


5 34 


6 20 


451 


5 29 


6 25 


4 48 


252 


9 


SI:H. 


Geneva award paid, 1873. 


5 33 6 21 


rises 


5 35 


6 19 


rises 


531 


6 24 


rises 


263 


10 


Mo. 


Perry's vict. in Lake Erie, 1813 


5 34 6 20 


6 53 


5 36 


6 17 


6 57 


5 32 


22 


6 51 


264 


11 


Tu. 


Battle of Brandywine, 1777. 


5 35 6 18 


7 30 


5 37 


6 16 


7 35 


533 


6 20 


7 25 


265 
266 


12 
13 


We 
Th. 


Battle of Chapultepec, 1841. 
Gen. Wolfe killed, 1759. 


5 366 17 
5 37 6 15 


8 10 
856 


5 38 
5 30 


6 14 
6 13 


8 17 
9 4 


5 34 
5 35 


6 18 
6 16 


8 4 
848 


267 


L4 


Fri. 


City of Mexico taken, 1847. 


538613 


948 


5 40 


6 11 


957 


537 


6 15 


9 40 


258 


15 


Sat. 


Delegate! adopt constl'n, 1787. 


5 39 6 11 


1044 


541 


6 10 


10 53 


5 38 


013 


10 36 


269 


10 


srx. 


Battle of Winchester, 1804. 


5 41 


6 10 


11 43 


5 41 


6 8 


11 51 


530 


611 


11 36 


200 


17 


Mo. 


Battle of Antictam, 1862. 


5 42 


6 8 


morn 


5 42 


6 6 


morn 


5 40 


6 9 


morn 


261 


IS 


Tu. 


Fugitive slave law signed, 1850 


5 43 


6 6 


43 


5 43 


6 5 


50 


5 41 


6 7 


037 


2(i2 


10 


We. 


Battle of luka, 1862. 


5 44 


6 4 


1 44 


5 44 


6 3 


1 49 


5 43 


6 6 


1 39 


203 
264 


-'(1 

21 


Th. 
Frl. 


Battle of Lexington, Va.. 1861. 
Battle of Fisher's Hill, 1804. 


15 45 6 2 
5456 1 


2 44 
343 


5 45 

5 46 


6 1 
6 


247 
3 46 


5 44 
5 45 


6 3 
6 1 


2 40 
3 42 


265 


22 


Sat. 


Arnold's treason, 1780. 


5 46!5 59 


4 42 


5 47 


5 58 


4 43 


540 


5 59 


4 42 


266 


23 


St'X. 


PaulJones' victory, 1779. 


5 47^5 67 


5 40 


5 48 


5 57 


5 39 


5 47 


5 57 


5 42 


207 


24 


Mo. 


Monterey captured, 1846. 


5 48,5 55 


sets 


5 49 


5 55 


sets 


5 49 


5 56 


sets 


268 


25 


Tu. 


Philadelphia captured. 1777. 


5 49 5 53 


6 29 


5 50 


5 53 


6 33 


5 50 


5 54 


625 


200 


21 i 


We. 


Harrison leaves Vincen'es.lSll 


5 51 


5 52 


659 


550 


5 52 


7 5 


5 51 


5 52 


6 53 


270 


27 


Th. 


Battle of Pilot Knob, 1864. 


5 52 


5 50 


7 33 


551 


5 50 


740 


5 52 


5 50 


726 


271 


2S 


Fri. 


Detroit retaken, 1813. 


5 53 5 48 


8 13 


5 52 


5 49 


8 21 


5 53 


548 


8 5 


272 


20 


Sat. 


Andre convicted, 1780. 


5 5415 46 


9 1 


5 53 


5 47 


9 10 


5 55 


5 46 


8 53 


27:s 


::o 


SI X. 


< ongress meets nt York. 1777. 


5 55 5 45 


9 55 


5 54 


5 45 


10 4 


5 56 


5 44 


9 47 


loth MONTH. OCTOBER. 31 DAYS. 


OK 

S 2 

^ ^ 


6 

7, 
t 


AY or 

fKKK. 


October was formerly the 
eighth month, and hence the 
name from Octem (eighth). 


Chicago, Iowa, 
Neb., N.Y., Pa., 
S.Wis., S.Mich. 
N. 111.. Ind., O. 


St. Louis, 8. 111., 
Va., Ky., Mo., 
Kan., Col., Cal., 
Ind., Ohio. 


St. Paul, N.E. 
Wls. and Mich., 
N.E.NewYork, 
Minn., Or. 


a* 


Q 


Of- 


AMERICAN- HISTORY. 


Sun 

rise 8 


Sun Moon 
sets. R.&S. 


Sun 

rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 

R.AS. 


Sun 

rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 
R.48. 










H.M. 


H.M.IH. M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H. M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H. M. 


274 


1 


Mo. 


Jncks'n removes U.S.deps,1833 


5 57 


5 43 


1055 


5 55 


544111 3 


5 57 


5 42 


1048 


275 


2 


Tu. 


Andre hung as a spy. 1780. 


5 58 


5 42 


morn 


5 50 


5 42 morn 


5 58 


5 40 


11 54 


276 


a 


We. 


Harrison at Terre Haute, 1811 


5 59 


5 40 





5 57 


5 41 


6 


6 


5 38 


morn 


277 


-i 


Th. 


Battle of Germantown, 1777. 


6 


5 38 


1 10 


558 


5 30 


1 14 


6 1 


5 37 


1 5 


278 


5 


Fri. 


Tecumseh killed, 1813. 


6 1 


536 


2 22 


5 59 


5 38 


2 25 


6 3 


5 35 


220 


279 


6 


Sat. Peace proclaimed. 1783. 


6 2 


5 35 


3 37 


6 


5 36 


3 38 


6 4 


5 33 


3 37 


2SO 


7 


srx. 


Bristol, K.I. .bombarded, 1775. 


6 3 


5 33 


4 54 


6 1 


5 34 


4 53 


(> 5 


5 31 


4 56 


281 


8 


Mo. 


First great Chicago flre, 1871. 


6 4 


5 31 


rises 


6 2 


533 


rises 


6 6 


5 29 


rises 


282 





Tu. 


Battle ot Strasburg. Va.. 1S64. 


6 5 


5 29 


6 3 


6 3 


5 32 


6 9 


6 8 


5 28 


5 57 


283 


1(1 


We. : Naval academy opened, 18J5. 


6 6 


5 28 


648 


6 4 


5 30 


655 


6 9 


5 26 


6 41 


284 


11 


Th. 


Battle Lake Champlain, 1770. 


6 8 


5 26 


7 38 


6 5 


5 29 


7 46 


6 10 


5 24 


7 30 


285 12 


Fri. 


Battle of Resaca, Ga., 18M. 


6 9 


5 25 


8 34 


6 6 


5 27 


8 43 


6 11 


5 22 


826 


286 13 


S:it. 


B;ittlo of Queenstown, 1812. 


6 10 


5 23 


9 34 


6 7 


5 26 


9 42 


6 12 


5 20 


920 


287 


14 


SI X. 


Declaration of rights, 1774. 


6 11 


5 21 


10 36 


6 8 


5 24 


1043 


6 14 


5 19 


10 29 


288 


15 


Mo. 


Great bank panic 1857. 


6 12 


5 20 


11 37 


6 9 


5 23 


11 42 


6 15 


5 17 


11 31 


280' 1(5 


Tu. 


Harper's F arsenal capt.. 1859 


6 14 


5 18 


morn 


6 10 


5 21 


morn 


6 16 


5 15 


morn 


200 17 


We. 


Burjiovne's surrender, 1777. 


(i 15 


5 17 


38 


6 11 


5 20 


042 


6 17 


5 13 


34 


201 18 Th. 


Tr.-atywith Seminoles, 1820. 


6 16 


5 15 


i :N 


(i 12 


5 18 


1 41 


6 19 


5 11 


1 33 


202 10 Fri. 


Curnwallis surrenders, 1781. 


6 17 


5 14 


2 37 


6 13 


5 17 


2 38 


(5 20 


5 10 


237 


2015 20 


St. 


(irant relieves Rosecrans, 1863 


o is 


5 12 


3 34 


6 14 


5 10 


3 33 


6 22 


5 8 


335 


201 21 


srx. 


Earthquake at San Fran., 1808 


6 19 


5 11 


431 


6 15 


5 14 


4 29 


6 23 


5 6 


434 


205 22 


Mo. 


Ili-ssians arrive. 1776. 


20 


5 9 


5 30 


6 16 


5 13 


5 20 


24 


5 4 


534 


200 23 


Tu. 


Topeka eonvent'n meets. 1855. 


6 21 


5 8 


6 28 


6 17 


5 12 


6 23 


6 20 


5 3 


635 


207 '-'1 


We. 


/iconyi'sch'gc. Springf'd. 1S01 


6 22 


5 6 


sets 


() 18 


5 10 


sets 


27 


5 1 


sets 


298 25 


Th. 


British evacuate It. 1.. 177H. 


24 


5 5 


6 15 


6 10 


5 9 


623 


I! 20 


5 


6 8 


200 20 


Fri. 


; Secession agreed upon, iscfl. 


25 


5 3 


6 59 


(i 20 


5 8 


7 7 


30 


4 58 


651 


300 


'- ( 


Snt. 


Kara Albemarle sunk, 18C4. 


I) 27 


5 2 


7 50 


21 


5 6 


7 58 


ill 


4 57 


7 42 


301 


28 


srx. 


i Erie canal completed, 1825. 


28 


o 


8 48 


22 


5 5 


8 50 


33 


4 55 


841 


302 


20 


Mo. 


Model Ian dies, 1885. 


20 


4 50 


9 50 


6 23 


5 4 


9 57 


34 


4 54 


9 43 


303 


30 


Tu. 


San Fran, bay discovered, 1769 


30 


4 58 


1056 


624 


5 3 


11 1 


636 


4 52 


10 51 


304 31 


We. 


Gen. Scott retires. 1861. llfi 32 


4 50 


morn 


6 20 


5 2 


morn 


16 37 4 51 


morn 



utii MONTH. NOVEMBER. so DAYS. 


Sri 


c 

z. 


s, 


November, from Xorem (nine), 
as it was formerly the ninth 


Chicago, Iowa, 
Neb., Is .Y., Pa., 
S.Wls., S.Mich. 


St. Louis, S. 111., 
Va., Ky., Mo., 
Kan., Col., Cal., 


St. Paul, N. E. 
Wis. and Mich., 
N.E. New York, 


Syj 


< 


C^ 


month. 


N. 111., Ind., O. 


Ind., Ohio. 


Minn., Or. 


q 


O 




AMERICAN HISTORY. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 

R.AS. 


Sun 
rises 


SunlMoon 
sets. R.&S. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 
R.&S. 










H.M. 


H.M. 


H. M. 


H.M. 


H.M. H. M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H. M. 


305 


] 


Th. 


Bat. French Creek, N. Y.. 1813. 


6 33 


4 55 


5 


(i 27 


5 9 


8 


38 


4 50 


2 


806 


2 


Fri. 


Washington's farewell, 1783. 


34 


4 54 


1 15 


-_'S 


4 59 


1 17 


40 


4 48 


1 14 


307 


3 


Sat. 


Battle of Opelousas, La. ,1863. 


35 


4 53 


2 28 


6 29 


4 58 


2 28 


6 41 


4 47 


229 


308 


4 


SO. 


George Peabody died, 1869. 


36 


4 52 


3 43 


(i 30 


4 57 


3 41 


643 


4 45 


3 46 


309 


5 


Mo. 


Battle near Nashville, 1862. 


6 38 


4 50 


4 58 


6 31 


4 56 


454 


ti 44 


4 44 


5 4 


310 


6 


Tu. 


Brownsville, Tex., taken. 1863. 


6 39 


4 49 


6 14 


32 


4 55 


6 8 


6 45 


4 43 


6 22 


311 


7 


We. 


Battle of Tippecanoe, 1811. 


6 40 


4 48 


rises 


33 


4 54 


rises 


6 47 


4 41 


rises 


812 


8 


Th. 


Confed. envoys taken, 1861. 


6 41 


4 47 


6 18 


6 34 


4 53 


6 26 


6 48 


4 40 


6 10 


813 


9 


Fri. 


Battle of Tailadega, Ga., 1813 


6 42 


4 46 


7 18 


630 


4 52 


7 26 


6 50 


4 38 


7 10 


314 


10 


Sat. 


Burnside takes command,18fi2. 


6 44 


444 


821 


637 


451 


828 


6 51 


437 


8 14 


315 


11 


SO. 


Cherry Valley massacre, 1778. 


6 45 


4 43 


925 


38 


450 


931 


52 


4 36 


9 19 


31(3 


12 


Mo. 


Montreal taken, 1775. 


6 46 


4 42 


10 27 


39 


4 49 


1031 


6 54 


4 35 


10 22 


317 


13 


Tu. 


Provisional govt. in Tex., 1835. 


6 47 


441 


11 27 


40 


4 48 


11 31 


55 


434 


11 25 


318 


14 


We. 


U. S. Christian com. org., 1861. 


6 48 


4 40 


morn 


6 41 


4 48 


morn 


6 57 


4 33 


morn 


319 


15 


Th. 


Articles conf n adopted, 1777. 


6 50 


4 40 


027 


642 


4 47 


29 


58 


4 32 


26 


320 


10 


Fri. 


Manistee lost, 1883. 


6 51 


4 39 


1 27 


6 43 


4 46 


1 27 


(i 59 


4 31 


1 28 


321 


17 


Sat. 


Battle Knoxville, Tenn., 1863. 


6 52 


4 38 


2 25 


644 


4 45 


223 


7 


4 30 


2 28 


322 


18 


SO. 


Standard time adopted, 1883. 


53 


4 37 


3 23 


6 45 


4 45 


3 20 


7 2 


429 


327 


323 


19 


Mo. 


Gettysb'g cem. dedicated, 1863. 


6 54 


4 36 


4 20 


6 47 


444 


4 16 


7 3 


4 28 


4 26 


324 


20 


Tu. 


British take Ft. Lee, 1776. 


6 56 


4 36 


5 19 


4s 


444 


5 13 


7 4 


4 27 


5 27 


325 


21 


We. 


Surrender Fredricksburg, 1862. 


6 57 


4 35 


619 


649 


4 43 


612 


7 5 


426 


6 28 


320 


22 


Th. 


Ft. George captured, 1780. 


6 58 


434 


sets 


6 50 


4 42 


sets 


7 7 


4 25 


sets 


327 


23 


Fri. 


Fight at Chattanooga, 1863. 


59 


4 33 


5 46 


6 51 


4 42 


5 55 


7 8 


4 25 


5 38 


328 


24 


Sat. 


Battle Columbia, Tenn., 1864. 


7 


433 


6 42 


(i 52 


4 41 


6 50 


7 10 


4 24 


6 34 


329 


25 


SO. 


Ft. Duquesne taken, 1755. 


7 2 


4 32 


7 44 


6 53 


4 41 


7 51 


7 11 


4 23 


7 37 


330 


20 


Mo. 


Sojourner Truth died, 1883. 


7 3 


4 32 


8 49 


54 


4 40 


855 


7 12 


4 22 


8 43 


331 


27 


Tu. 


Utah declar'd in rebellion, 1857 


7 4 


431 


957 


655 


440 


10 1 


7 13 


4 22 


953 


332 


28 


We. 


Ft. Rosalie massacre, 1729. 


7 5 


431 


11 5 


6 56 


4 39 


11 8 


7 15 


421 


11 4 


333 


29 


Th. 


Savannah. Ga., taken, 1778. 


7 6 


4 30 


morn 


6 57 


4 39 


morn 


7 16 


4 21 


morn 


334 


30 


Fri. 


Battle of Franklin, Tenn.,1863. 


7 8 


4 30 


14 


658 


4 39 


15 


7 17 


4 20 


14 


12th MONTH. DECEMBER. 31 DAYS. 


H 


_c 
f- 


AY OF 

fEEK. 


December, from Decem (ten), 
the Roman Calender terming it 
the tenth month. 


Chicago, Iowa, 
Neb.,N.Y., Pa., 
S.Wls., S.Mich., 
N. 111., Ind., O. 


St. Louis, S. 111., 
Va., Ky., Mo.. 
Kan., Col., Cal., 
Ind., Ohio. 


St. Paul, N.E. 
Wls. and Mich., 
N.E. New York. 
Minn., Or. 


Q^ 





ftP' 




Sun 


SunlMoon 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 




a 




A 31 EH 1C AX HISTORY. 


rises 


sets. 


R.&S. 


rises 


sets. 


R.&S. 


rises 


sets. 


R.&P. 










H.M. 


H.M. 


H. M. 


H.M. 


R.VJ 


H. M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H. M. 


335 


1 


Sat. 


Habeas corp. re-estab., 1865. 


7 9 


429 


1 25 


6 59 


4 39 


1 23 


7 1814 20 


1 27 


330 


2 


six. 


Execution John Brown, 1859. 


7 10 


4 29 


238 


7 


4 39 


2 34 


7 1914 20 


242 


337 
338 


8 

4 


Mo. 
Tu. 


Revolutionary army dis., 1783. 
Senate exp'ls Breck'nri'ge.1861 


7 11 
7 12 


4 29 
4 29 


3 50 
5 3 


7 1 
7 2 


4 38 

4 38 


3 45 
4 56 


7 21 

7 22 


4 19 
4 19 


3 57 
5 11 


339 


5 


We. 


Worcester, Mass., taken. 1786. 


7 13 


4 28 


6 15 


7 3 


438 


6 7 


7 23 


4 19 


6 25 


340 


6 


Th. 


Anti-slavery soc. org., 1833. 


7 14 


4 28 


rises 


7 4 


4 38 


rises 


7 24 


4 19 


rises 


341 


7 


Fri. 


Bat. Prairie Grove, Ark.. 1862. 


7 15 


4 28 


559 


7 5 


4 38 


6 7 


7 25 


4 19 


5 51 


342 


8 


Sat. 


British take N'port, R. I., 1776. 


7 16 


4 28 


7 5 


7 6 


4 38 


7 12 


7 26 


4 18 


58 


343 


8 


SIX. 


Battle of Great Bridge. 1775. 


7 17 


4 28 


8 10 


7 7 


4 38 


8 15 


7 27 


4 18 


8 5 


344 


10 


Mo. 


Savannah besieged, 1864. 


7 17 


4 28 


9 13 


7 7 


4 38 


9 17 


7 28 


4 18 


9 9 


345 


11 


Tu. 


Burnside cross's Rap'nock.1862 


7 18 


4 28 


10 14 


7 8 


4 38 


10 17 


7 29 


4 18 


1013 


34(5 


12 


We. 


Battle Franklin, Tenn., 1862. 


7 19 


4 28 


11 15 


7 9 


4 39 


11 16 


7 30 


4 18 


11 15 


347 


13 


Th. 


Ft. McAllister taken, 1861. 


7 20 


428 


morn 


7 10 


4 39 


morn 


7 30 


4 19 


morn 


348 


14 


Fri. 


Kan.-Neb. bill submitted, 1853. 


7 21 


428 


14 


7 10 


4 39 


13 


7 31 


4 19 


16 


349 


15 


Sat. 


Hartford convent'n me'ts,1814 


7 21 


4 29 


1 12 


711 


439 


1 9 


7 32 


4 19 


1 15 


350 


16 


SO. 


Boston " tea party," 1773. 


7 22 


4 29 


2 9 


7 12 


4 40 


2 6 


7 33 


4 19 


2 15 


351 


17 


Mo. 


Battle Goldsboro, N.C., 1863. 


7 23 


4 29 


3 8 


7 13 


4 40 


3 3 


7 33 


4 19 


3 15 


352 


is 


Tu. 


Battle Mississiniwa. Ind., 1812 


7 24 


4 29 


4 8 


7 13 


4 40 


4 1 


7 34 


4 20 


4 16 


353 


19 


We. 


Am. army at Vall'y For'e, 1777. 


7 24 


4 30 


5 7 


7 14 


4 40 


4 59 


7 34 


4 20 


5 16 


354 


20 


Th. 


Battle Dranesville, Va., 1861. 


7 25 


430 


6 3 


7 14 


4 41 


5 55 


7 35 


4 20 


6 13 


355 


21 


Fri. 


Sherm'n reaches Savan'h, ISiU 


7 25 


4 31 


6 56 


7 15 


4 41 


6 48 


7 36 


4 21 


7 6 


350 


22 


Sat. 


The embargo act passed, 1807. 


7 20 


431 


sets 


7 15 


4 42 


sets 


7 30 


4 21 


sets 


357 


21! 


so. 


Washington resigns, 1783. 


7 20 


4 3'' 


6 39 


7 10 


4 42 


6 45 


7 37 


i 22 


6 33 


358 


24 


Mo. 


Treaty of Ghent, 1814. 


7 27 


4 32 


7 47 


7 16 


443 


751 


7 37 


4 22 


7 42 


359 


25 


Tu. 


Amnesty proclaimed. 1868. 


7 27 


4 33 


8 55 


7 17 


4 44 


8 58 


7 38 


4 23 


8 53 


860 


20 


We. 


Buttle of Trenton, 1776. 


7 28 


4 33 


10 5 


717 


4 44 


10 6 


7 38 


4 24 


10 5 


861 




Th. 


Washingt'n made dictat'r.1776 


7 28 


4 34 


11 16 


7 18 


4 45 


11 15 


7 38 


4 25 


11 18 


302 


2S 


Kri. 


Mason and Slidellsur., 18(3. 


7 28 


435 


morn 


7 18 


4 45 


morn 


7 39 


4 25 


morn 


863 


29 


Sat. 


Battle Mossy Cre'k.Tenn., 18T3I !7 28 


430 


27 


7 18 


4 46 


24 


7 39 


4 26 


031 


304 


30 


SIX. 


Mexican Gadsden cession, 1853 


7 29 


4 36 


1 37 


7 19 


4 40 


1 33 


7 39 


4 27 


1 43 


[305 


31 


Mo. 


Battle of Quebec. 1775. 


7 29 


4 37 


2 48 


7 19 


4 4s 


2 42 


7 3914 27 


2 56 



A CYCLICAL CALENDAR 

Of the Christian era. A. D. ItiOO to the millenium, showing at a glance a complete calendar 
for every month of every year, day of the week for every date, day of the week of birth- 
days, battle days, holidays, ann versaries, etc. 
(Copyright, ltO9, by J. Lee Knight, Topeka, Kas.) 




FORM 1. 


FORM 2. 


FORM 3. 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


s 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


8 


1 

8 
15 

22 
29 


r 

Hi 
28 

30 


3 

10 

17 
Jl 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 

1!) 
2G 


6 
13 

jo 
87 


7 
14 
21 

28 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

S 
15 

22 

J't 


a 
5 

16 

23 
30 


3 
10 

17 
2i 

81 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 

1-J 
1!) 

26 


6 < 
13 
20 

27 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
M 
Jl 
28 


8 
15 
22 
28 


2 

!) 
16 
23 

:so 


3 

10 
17 

24 
81 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


FORM 4. 


FORM 5. 


FORM 6. 


8 


M 


T 


W 


'V 


f 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


11 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 

13 

JO 

27 


f 
M 
21 

28 


1 
8 
15 
22 
29 


2 
B 
16 
23 

so 


$ 

10 
17 
24 

:;L 


4 
11 
18 
25 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 

12 

111 

08 


6 
18 
20 
37 


7 

14 
21 
28 


1 


15 
22 
98 


9 
9 
16 
23 

30 


3 

10 
17 
24 
31 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
89 


'6 
12 

lit 
Jti 


6 

13 

JO 
27 


7 

11 
Jl 

JS 


1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


2 
9 
16 
23 
30 


INDEX TO MONTH FORMS: ALL YEARS. 


FORM 7. 


Common Years. 


A 


B 


C 


D E 


K 


<; 
7_ 


Leap Years. 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


JAN. 


OCT. 


1 


2 


3 


4: 5 


8 


JAN. APK. JUL 


MAY. 


2 


8 


4 


5 6 


7 


1 


OCTOBER. 


2 
9 
16 
23 
30 


| 

10 
17 
24 

HI 


\ 
11 

IS 

88 


5 
12 

W 

26 


6 
11 

JO 

27 


7 
14 
21 

28 


1 
8 
15 
22 
29 


AUGUST. 


8 


4 


5 


8 7 


1 


L> 


MAY. 


FEB.MAK. Nov. 


i 





6 


7 1 


J 


8 


FEB. AUG. 


JUNE. 


r> 


<; 


7 


I 2 


: 
_4_ 


4 


MAR. NOV. 


SEPT. 


DEC. 


8 


7 


1 


2 3 


r> 


JUNE. 


APRIL. JULY. 


7 


1 


2 


i 4 


5 


8 


SEPT. DEC. 


Explanation: The number of form for any month of any year is found under letter of 
the year and on line with name of the desired month. Example: 1899. Year letter is A; 
under A on line with May is figure 2. Form 2 is calendar for May, 1899. 




EXPLANATION 


AND INDEX. 


d 

o> 

1 

C4 
<N 

8 

co 


d 

a> 

S 

LO 
IN 

| 
<N 

I- 

iH 


The figures in the table 00 to 99 represent the years of any century, 
indexed at the end in four columns. The letters A to G indicate day 
of the week on which the years begin. All years beginn ng on Sunday 
are indexed as class A; those on Monday, B; Tuesday, C; Wednesday, 
D; Thursday, E; Friday, F, and Saturday, G. From this classification 
the month forms are arranged and ndexed as above. The leap years 
in table are printed in black-face type; common years light-face. The 
cycle ia repeated every 400 years, hence first column of index letters Is 
for 1600. 2000, 2400, etc.; the second column for 1700, 2100. 2500, etc.: third 
column for 1HOO. 2300, etc., and fourth column for I'.tOO, 2:fflO, 2700, etc. 
1600, 2000,2400, etc., are leap years. All other even centuries are com- 
mon years. 
Find the year, as '76, '99, etc., in the table. On same line under 
desired century is its class or index letter. 


a 
w 

w 

<N 

i-i 


2 
5 

o 
o 
1- 

w 

s 
s 

M 


A 


F 


00 


6 18 


17 23 




34 


10 


45 51 




62 


(iS 


73 


79 




H) 


M; 


D 


B 


B 


G 


01 


7 


18 24 


29 


!5 




40 J52 


-.7 


13 




74 * 


!(> 


u 


)1 




E 


C 





A 


02 


8 13 


19 


30 


5(i 


41 


47 




58 


; : 


09 


75 




^1 


) 


B7 


F 


D 


D 


B 


03 


14 ', 


JO 23 


31 




42 48 


53 


59 




70 


76 


31 


S7 




98 


G 


E 


E 


C 


04 


9 15 


2G 


32J37 


43 




51 


50 


89 


71 




89 


SS 


98 


99 


A 


K 


F 


D 


] 


Hi 


21 2~ 




:;s 


44 49 


W 




80 


7'^ 


77 


S! 




94 




B 


G 


G 


E 05 ] 


1 


1?1? /v 


5 33 


88 




60 


5(> 


;i 


87 




78 84 


88 


90 




C 


A 



12 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE, WITH RATE OF DUTY. 


For the fiscal year ended June 30, 1899. compared with the corresponding period of 1898. 
[Abbreviation: n. e. a., not elsewhere specified.] 


IMPORTS FREE AND DUTIABLE. 


1898. 


1899. 


Duty. 


Quant's. 


Valiies. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Agricultural implements free 










52-12.75 hd. 
. .Various 
5c-*1.50hd. 

20* 


A nimals (No.) Cattle free 
Do dut 


577 
291,012 

800 
2,285 
3047 


$76,631 
2.836.592 
145,456 
269.443 
42.805 
I,i3,517 
155.967 
83,714 
420.859 
4,253,266 


626 
199,128 
1,064 
1,975 
2,396 
343,515 


$95,513 
2,225.009 
296,092 
254.798 
46.132 
1.1511949 
183.473 
81,559 
621,210 
3.215.315 


Horses free 


Do dut 




Do dut 


389,267 




Do ; dut 






ouu (dut 
Total 








4 674,125 




4,336,525 

155,275 
55.827 
84.990 

206.002 


Horses (free, No.) Imported from 
United Kingdom 


35 
722 
43 
800 


59.540 
67.640 
18,276 
145,456 


143 
745 

1.064 


British North America 




Total 


Horses (dut., No.) Imported from 
United Kingdom 


43 
2,019 
223 
2.285 


18,800 
246,393 
4,250 
269,443 


47 
1,916 
12 
1,975 


20.922 
232,877 
999 
254,798 


British North America 




Total. 


An timon y ore free . . 1 bs. 
Antimony, as regulusor metal dut...lbs. 
Articles, the growth, product and manufacture 
of the U. S., returned, n. e. s free 
Art works free 


5,359.590 
2,230,902 


78,510 
121,116 

3,783.241 
701.208 


3,020.01C, 
2,316,728 


40,362 
179,373 

3,540,921 

418,8o7 
2.040,121 


Do dot 








Artworks (free) Imported from 
United Kingdom 




170,372 




136.410 
211,332 
16,693 
46,718 
6,424 
70 
1,210 
418,857 


...$1.50 ton 

30% 
25* 


France 




353,403 




Germany 




28, SOS 




Italy 




80.484 




Other Europe 




24.668 




British North America . 




36.05C 




Other countries 




7,92* 




Total 




701.208 




Art Works (dut.) Imported from 
United Kingdom 




691,658 




478,907 
1.251.297 
118,283 
103,444 
42,549 
36,120 
9,521 
2,040.121 


France 




524,216 




Germany 




115.06C 




Italy 




173,284 
48,741 
5.569 
3,691 




Other Europe 






British North America...... 






Other countries 






Total 




1.562,219 




Asphalt inn or bitumen, crude free 1 , tons 


12,440 

79.060 
27,033 


34,157 

260,765 
106,306 
187 249 






Do dut. .tons 


73,494, 
17,845 


234.426 
C2.504 
207.480 
704.959 
181,706 
1.688,446 
1,31)3,473 


Bark hemlock free.c'rdt 


Bolting cloth free 


Bones, horns & hoofs, unmanufact'd. .free 




471,731 
165.20b 
1,538.907 
1,345,085 




Bones and horns, manufactures of dut 
Books, music, maps, engravings, etc. .free 
Do dut 
Books, etc. (free) Imported from 
United Kingdom 














645.343 




751,439 
202,640 
548,354 
147,269 
26717 


Germany 




155,436 
554 291 




Other Europe 




13851 




British North America 




35,501 

9820 




Other countries 






12,027 
1,688,446 


Total 




1.538,907 




Books, etc. (dut.)- Imported from 
United Kingdom 




947,375 
65,84S 




981.953 
68.12(1 
237,841 












221,93" 








5911o 




60,81(1 
26.178 
4.10a 






27.734 




1 China 




3.494 





IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. 13 


IMPORTS FHEE AND DUTIABLE. 


1898. 


1899. 


Duty. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Quant's. 


Values. 






$13,375 
6,212 
1,345.085 




$10.750 
3,713 

l.:Ki.47M 


.SOcbu. 
. 15c bu. 
. 15c bu. 
...Iclb. 
. lOc bu. 
.25cbu. 
25* 

40& 
10% 

.7c 100 Ibs. 

..lc-ltfc Ib. 
30% 

Iclb. 
3clb. 

....n ib. 

$6 Ib. 








Total 






Brass, and manufactures of dut 
Breadstuff's Barley dut....bu. 




35,096 




55.185 


124,804 
8.417 
9,098 
287,910 
32.938 
2,MA,fif)C 
2,744 


43.868 
1,479 
3.368 
15,1)97 
13.323 
1.948.289 
12,230 
195.829 
917,969 
3.152.067 


110.475 
4,171 
11,500 

298,764 
402 
1,871,091 
902 


53,696 
1.618 
4,432 
17.740 
982 
I,407,fil5 
4.046 
203.615 
850.978 
2.544.722 


Corn dut. ..bu. 


Oats dut...bu. 


Oatmeal dut. ..Ibs. 


Rye dut...bu. 


Wheat.. dut. . . bu. 


Wheat flour dut..brls. 


Farinaceous substances, etc., n.e.s...free 
All other, and preparations of, etc.. .dut 
Total 


Bristles (Ibs.) Crude, not sorted, bunched or 


1.203 
1,533,887 
1,535,090 


416 
1,248,703 
1,249,119 


21.421 
1,835,156 
1.856.577 


12.399 
1,445,853 
1,458,252 




Total 


Brushes dut 
Buttons and button forms dut 
Cement Roman, Portland, etc dut.. .Ibs 


97,648,183 


745,267 
435.069 
2.578,282 


839,42Ui8 


&W.624 
451,331 

2,776,336 


Cement (Ibs.) Imported from 


1,1.723,295 
-40.127.:iUH 
13060916 


379.759 
716,440 
39,072 

1.366,209 
66.405 
10,330 
67 

2.578,2s. 


00.592.130 
165.274.395 
7,655.200 
442.6(10 779 


368253 




789,268 
24,170 
1,535,258 
50,611 
8,7tf 

2,776,33* 






407.467,520 
^1.093,145 
2,170.799 
5.200 
97,648,183 


Other Europe 


21,290.544 
1,946,070 
2,000 
839,421,118 






Total 


Chemicals, Drugs and Dyes Alizarin and aliz- 
arin colors or dyes, etc free. .Ibs. 
Argul. or argol, or crude tartar free.. Ibs. 


5,872,015 
741,150 
18.461.479 
2,935.100 

"158,055 


886.332 
65,154 
1.525,873 
273.228 
3,689,21 
45,762 


5,231,507 

23,300,762 
3,281,977 

"'97,563 


700,485 

' l',9i4,45C 

346,576 
3,799,35; 
23,20- 


Barks, cinchona, or other, etc free.. Ibs. 
Coal-tar colors and dyes dut 
Cochineal free. . Ibs. 


Dye woods Logwood f ree.tons 
All other '. free 


46,596 
'4,684,672 


141.455 
174.386 
256,17 
1,172,01 


37,375 
3' 183 864 


546,27^ 
222,967 
219,192 
988,433 


Total 




Logwood (tons) Imported from 
Centra 1 America 






50 
1,322 
14,614 
21,389 


1.570 
22853 




821 
16.625 
29,083 
67 
46,5% 


21.922 
264,42, 
453,646 
1.465 
741,455 


British West Indies *. 


2241788 
297,063 


Other West Indies 


Other countries 


Total 


37,375 


546.274 


Dyewoods, Extracts of (Ibs.) Imp. from 
United Kingdom : 


1,400.223 
912,537 
357,118 
281,800 
1,132,994 
4,084,672 


86,72 
61.01 
16.11 

26,050 
66,27 
256,17 


997,485 
860,828 
95,864 
189,270 
1,040,417 
3,183.864 


58,885 
55,90 
8,06 
14,870 
81,476 
219,192 








Other countries 


Total 


Glycerin dut. . .Ibs 


12,274,98- 


774,70 


15.665.252 


1,024,13 


Gums (free, Ibs.) Arabic 


942.231 
2,047,234 


lll.'.'l 
365,652 


928.089 
1.807,888 
2.445.06 
18,126,228 
38.123,478 
9,829,11 


116,3* 

322,100 
363,05 
1,844,775 
754,497 
1,397.635 
1,070,321 
5,868,768 


Camphor, crude 


Chicle dut 


Copal, cowrie, anddamar free 






Gambler, or terra japonica free 


42.334,591) 
6.984,395 


1,021,34 
939.36 
2,599,39 

5.040.68. 


All other free 
Total 




3.097,340 
70,136.59 

6.720,636 
107,511.941 
73.50E 
1,466.21 
14,41 
109,431 
100,2 


1.815.41 
1,171,621 

92.48' 
1,329,43, 
17.46: 
440.54 
1 32.31 
233,26 
1 652,34 


3,127,35 
98,432,31 


1,698,583 
1,566,83C 


Licorice root free. .Ibs 
Lime, chloride of, or bleaching pow- 


Do . . dut Ibs 


ii2",107.25C 


1,159,271 


Mineral waters, all not artificial free.gals 
Mineral waters dut gals 


1,606,986 


596,337 


Opium (Ibs.), crude or unmanufactured. ...free 
Do dut 


514,49 

124J21 


1,223,951 
828,201 


Prepared for smoking, and other, etc. dut... 



14 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


IMPORTS FREE AND DUTIABLE. 


1898. 


1899. 


Duty. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Opium. Crude (Ibs.) Imported from 


48.074 
83,6M 

22,711 


$114.853 
75.601 
42,813 


104,819 
174.544 
235,136 


$275.691 
427.671 
520,590 


Hclb. 

Iclb. 

....2-10clb. 
Iclb. 
25c ton 

...3-10clb. 

....2^clb. 

$lton 
2556 








Total 


109.4H1 


233.2IS7 


514.499 


1,223.951 


Opium, Prepared < Ibs.) Imported from 


99.958 
' 300 
100,258 


650.644 
1,697 
652,341 


123,394 
820 
124,214 


823,863 
4,340 
828,203 




Total 


Potash (Ibs.) Chlorate of free 
Do dut 


630.340 
4.287.636 
118.U5ti.204 
12.930.986 
35,904,415 
171.799,581 


45.026 
263,432 
1.817,221 
270,291 
893,132 
3,289.102 






2,808,718 
y5,856.2f>3 
19,985.505 
39,828,207 
158.478.693 


173.488 
1.509.915 
409.818 
892,551 
2.985,772 


Muriate of free 


Nitrate of. or saltpeter, crude free 
All other. free 


Total 


Qutnia sulphate of, etc free...oz. 


4.372,477 
29,697,185 
125.081 
8.851,011 
S7.8tKl.619 
21,400,585 


896.908 
476,032 
2,729,750 
40.266 
589,714 
225,628 
4.061.390 


3.978.421 
18,405.244 
122.314 
4,224.680 
45,444.3(15 
23,891,135 


1949,104 
252.291 
2,042.932 
20,905 
310,742 
317,032 
2,943,902 




Nitrate of free. tons 


Sal soda dut. ..Ibs. 


Soda ash .. dut.. .Ibs. 


All other salts of dut.. .Ibs. 
Total 


Sulphur, or brimstone, crude free. tons 


172,389 
8,301,235 
63,997 


3,193,528 
120.205 
279.755 
5.291,584 


128.683 
12,975.970 
272,174 


2,370,449 
183,136 
1,235,412 
5,137.511 
5,124,870 
25.158,328 
17,510,403 
42,668,731 




Vanilla beans free. .Ibs. 


All other , free 


Do dut 
Total chemicals, drugs & dyes. | J^ t e 

Total 




5.080.421 
25,773,522 
15,697,251 
41,470,773^ 


:::::::::: 




176,210 
139,497 


2.137 
2,963 






Do dut. . .Ibs. 


159,269 
335,347 

1,124,446 

116,757 


2,353 
11,061 

201,415 

786,514 

274,023 


Chicory root, roasted, ground or prep.. dut... Ibs. 


Chocolate, prepared, etc. (not confectionery) 
. ..dut... Ibs. 


868.905 
106,266 


128,539 

738,8111 

276,766 




Clocks and Watches and Parts of (dut.) 
Clocks and parts of 


Watches and parts of 
Coal anthracite free. tons 




689,656 




1,061,959 


...Various 
67c ton 

5clb. 


5,851 
1,273,311 


14,729 
3,401,301 


601 

1,258.784 


2,684 
3,595,793 


Coal, bituminous dut.. tons 


Coal, Bituminous (tons) Imported from 


133.245 
2.35S 
756.920 
1U8.103 
2.675 
266.318 
8,605 
1,273.311 


311,733 
5.184 
2,380.48ti 
200.728 
8,075 
486.935 
8,160 
3.401.301 


106,860 
1,433 
830,537 
120.105 
7.552 
192,013 
284 
1.258,784 


263,294 
3,746 

2,736.409 
2-54,884 
21.412 
335,491 
557 
3.595,793 


Other Europe 












Total 




25.717.404 
686.564 


3,492,033 
223.596 


35,512.364 
926.219 


5,064,703, 
295.4S 


Cocoa, prepared, etc dut.. .Ibs. 
Cocoa, etc. (Ibs.) Imported from 
United Kingdom 


1,960,626 
722,579 
627,676 


304,147 
113.398 
39,164 


2.030,945 
630.884 
550.392 
68.513 
14,396.659 
987.355 
4.631.201 
10.388.891 
112,023 
1,715.501 
35,512,364 


343.447 

99.556 
83,707 
8,597 
2,107,891 
157,000 
646,7561 
1,378.604 
14,398 
224,747 

5,064.703 








British West Indies 


8,376,766 
1,612,184 

1.376,810 
10.617,74(1 
374.614 
48,399 
25,717,404 


1,257.225 

225,865 
173,846 
1,203.370 
111,865 
63.147 
3,492,033 


Other West Indies 


Brazil 


Other South America 


East Indies 


Other countries 


Total 


Coffee free. .Ibs. 


870,514,455 


65.067.631 


831.820.341 


55.274.646 


Coffee (Ibs.) Imported from 
United Kingdom 


1,796.985 
859.419 
7.SM.801 

2.409.96r 
2.427.834 
35.RV2.3S5 
34.511,168 


254.206 
62.173 
538.717 
361.095 
136.902 
4.459.183 
3,599,392 


4,465,794 
92.319 

2.138,780 
3.655.289 
390,660 
45.298.800 
27,324,827 


494.553 
8,255 
209,399 
404.137 
22.041 
5.318.711 
2,686,2;8 






Netherlands 


Other Europe 


Central America 





IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. 17 




1898. 


1899. 


Duty. 




Quant's. 


Values. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Salmon, pickled or salted dut .. 


903,990 


S-6,693 
267.712 


521,904 


W 1.4 15 
321,287 
5,956,190 


Iclb. 
30* 


All other dut 


Total 




6.985,045 




2clb. 
...^clb. 

.'.'.'./Iclb! 
Iclb. 
2clb. 
. . .2^c Ib 
Iclb. 

. .Various 

4c Ib. 
...Iclb. 


Fruits, Including Nuts (Ibs.) Bananas.f rce 
Currants free.. 




4.236,418 




5,665,588 


Do dut... 


25,186,310 
13.561.434 
9,628,426 


837.937 
371.992 
509.U02 
2,848,130 
886.522 

38l'.88!l 
922.357 
421,657 
873.19S 
12.329,012 


30,849.253 
12.943.305 
7,284,058 

"'600.360 
4,933,201 


798,357 
324.087 
356.762 
4.31)8.004 
1,097,596 
63.574 
282.400 
1,020,643 
543,3til 
1.039,287 
15,589,669 


Dates dut. 


Figs dut 


Lemons dut 
Oranges dut 


Plums and prunes dut 
Kaisius dut. 


303.99.' 
6,593,833 


Prepared or preserved fruits dut 
All other fruits free 
Do dut 


Total fruits 




Bananas Imported from 




90,337 
1.569.749 
1,852,843 




87.047 
1.816,843 
2,7ti2.949 
61.258 
732,431 
52,294 
152,766 
5,665.588 


Central American States. 






Cuba 












103,692 
48,081 














5il,716 




Total 




4,236,418 




Lemons Imported from Italy 




2,771.875 




' 92^478 
17.725 
4,398,004 






69,16( 








17,095 




Total 




2.848,130 








23,149 
207,464 




87,673 
298.005 
139,644 
646,851 
622 
5,656 
19,145 
1,097.591 


Italy .. . . 










134,672 




British West Indies . 








Cuba * 




1,99] 








'.',11- 








7,08i 




Total 




886,722 




Nuts (Ibs.) Almonds dut 


6,746,362 


659,65 
554.061 


9,957,427 


t222,5H7 
6*5,788 


IX) dut 




21,874 
1.002.344 
14,666.95(1 




All other ... dut 






879,166 


lc Ib. 


Total fruits and nuts 
Furs Furs and fur skins, undressed., .free 
Furs, and manufactures of dut 
Furs and Fur Skins, etc. Imported from 
United Kingdom . 






18.317,201 


....SOcgal. 
. ..Various 




3,832.603 
4.048,56!! 




6,645,580 

5,211.01'. 




1.122,891 




1,728.999 
791,239 
1,866.751 
375,964 
397.120 
151,704 
994 
429,801 
5,645,580 






355,95(j 

1,428,863 




Germany 










81&00 
















62,973 








75 
359.357 




Other countries 






Total 




3.832,603 




Furs, and manufactures of Imported from 
United Kingdom 




1,310.753 




1,373,769 
484,120 
1,801.251 
1,133.29; 
66.780 
313,ti92 
45.114 
5.211.019 






235.710 
1,331,078 










Germany 




930,768 








15 7X 








204678 








19.84!) 




Total 




4,048,569 




G inger ale or ginger beer ( pints) dut. . doz 
Glass and Glassware (dut.) Bottles, etc., empty 


182,683 


132,709 


367.915 


268,236 




338861 




371 .309 


Cylinder, crown, etc.. unpolished Ibs 
Cylinder and crown glass, polished (sq. feet) 


38.908,992 

2.810,511 
244.044 
179.981 
656,183 
51! 


953,ll(j 

569,380 
66.768 
9,88(1 
161,637 

5t>2 


47,189,667 

2,651,534 
89* 
219.099 
88,273 
358 


1,275,184 

521,957 
622 
9.528 
233,190 
419 






Plate glass fsq. ft.) Fluted, rolled or rough 


Cast, polished, silvered 



18 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


IMPORTS FHEE AND DUTIABLE. 


1898. 


1899. 


Duty. 


Quant's. 


Value*. 


Quant's. 


Values. 






$1.574,841 




11,769,872 
4,182,141 


^clb. 


Total 




3,675,045 




Glass Cylinder, etc. (Ibs.) Imported from 
United Kingdom 


2.890.943 
3o.fiH8.022 
150.496 
185,711 
18,575 
25,245 
38.908.992 


150,083 
765.335 
8.205 
27,985 
641 
867 
953.116 


3,729,098 
43,059,885 
82,55* 
256,007 
23,03ti 
39,138 
47,189,667 


193.297 
1.0U.260 
3,046 
32.533 
354 
1,694 
1.275.184 












Total 


Glue. dut....lbs. 


3,726,324 


397,990 
431,080 


5,358,073 


479.450 
436,171 
260.508 




Grease n. e. s dut 




161,748 




Hair Unmanufactured free 




1.839.666 




1,814.964 
159,049 
1.974,013 


...Various 
...Various 

$4 ton 
155J 






286.698 
2,136,366 




Total 






Hats, Bonnets and Hoods, and Materials for, 














36,308 






Hats, bonnets and hoods dut 
Materials for dut 
Total 




683,994 
1,624,047 
2,214.349 




619.370 
1,807,350 
2,426.72C 


Hay dut. tons. 
Hides and Skins, Other than Fur Skins (Ibs.) 
Goatskins free 


3.887 


34.659 


19.871 


115.209 


64.923,487 
51.lJ07.ft34 
l.!6,243,595 
245.774.61C 


15,776,601 
7.667.34-' 
13,624,981; 
37,068,932 


71.032,102 

66.963.560 
130.320,120 
268.305.782 


18.488,32( 
9.877,773 
13,621,946 
41,988,045 


All other, except hides of cattle, etc.free 


Total 


12clb. 

30& 
30 

....40cton 
$4 ton 
4 ton 
...6-10c Ib. 
...4-10c Ib. 


Hides and Skins (Ibs.) Imported from 
United Kingdom 
France 
Germany 


46,673.962 
19.901.428 
13,755.842 
2i.191.180 
14,414,711 
1.962.803 
13.300.7i9 
4.230.753 
5' 195 320 


6,432.181 
3.460,23*. 
2.572.454 
3.S60.465 
1,148.935 
193,874 
1,698.574 
419.853 
9,178 328 


48,700,441 
20.509.334 
22,406.250 
29,743,3*4 
15,138.704 
2,516.334 
12.313,046 
3#)9,243 
61 611,441 


6,433,869 

3.826.50! 
3,385,238 


Other Europe 
British North America 


4.133,863 
1.324.302 
287,557 
1.879,750 
387,970 
10 447.178 








South America 




23.5f>0.789 
8.828,131 
7.334.15U 
9.424,768 
245,774.616 


3.853.29* 
1.706,930 
1.226,844 
1,316.962 
37,068,932 


27,211.970 
9,195,661 
6,461,227 
9,293,758 
268.305.782 


5.021.702 
2.246,061 
1,158,530 
1,455.511) 
41,988,045 




Africa.. 


Other countries 


Total 


Hide cuttings, raw and other glue 
stock free 








718.968 


Hops dut.. .Ibs. 


2,375,922 


648.155 
1,779.055 


1,319,319 


591,755 
3,112.885 


Household and personal effects, etc. . . free 
India Rubber & Gutta-Percha, & Manufactures 
ot Unmanufac'd (free, Ibs.) Gutta-percha 


636,477 
46,055,497 
46,691.974 


159.381 
25,386,010 
25.545,391 


518,939 
51,079,258 

51.598,197 


167,577 
31,708,765 
31.876,342 


Total unmanufactured 
India Rubber, Crude (Ibs.) - Imported from 
United Kingdom 


9.001.797 
1.691.683 
5,6f,1.852 
972.631 
136.874 
10,467 
26.570.127 
1.557,508 
418,860 
11.731 
21,967 
46,055,497 


5,322.469 

682.995 
3,167.970 
419.742 
41.901 
2.500 
14,980.875 
622.641 
131,529 
3.832 
9,550 
25,386.010 


10.735.223 
1,887,161 
6.103.9% 
1,486.783 
324.730 
30.069 
27,464,654 
1,981.291 
999.877 
5.734 
59.810 
51,079.2i>8 


6.956.970 
1.034.04b 
4,3S8,570 
855.145 
142.887 
9.080 
16.999.345 
951,737 
342,790 
2.852 
25,325 
31.708.765 




Other Europe 






West Indies 


Brazil 
Other South America 








Total 


Manufactures of (dut.) Gutta-percha 
India rubber 
Total manufactures .". 




156.997 
309,247 
466,244 




113.425 
379,076 
492,501 


Iron and Steel and Manufactures of Iron 
ore dut. tons 
Pig iron dut. . tons 


352.455 
25.640 
1.502 
S3,9flO,9oH 
529 


470.089 
675.883 
14.931 
683.429 
1S.S24 


269,113 
23.316 
4,642 
44,745.118 
624 


403,298 
711,088 
65.185 
907.495 
20.353 




Bars, railway, of iron or steel, etc. . .(Int.. tons 



IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. 19 




1898. 


1899. 


Duty. 




Quant's.l Values. 


Quant's 


Values. 


Hoop, band or scroll ..- dut...lbs 
Ingois, bl'ms, sl'bs, bii'ts.of steel, etc..dut.. .Ibs 
Sheet, plate aud taggers Iron or steel. .dut.. Ibs 
Ties for baling cotton free.. Ibs 


M4 K'-.osr 

30.821.157] 1,202.05. 
5.899,900| 183,40^ 


1H.80C 
23.718.99 
4,241,21* 


$3.929 
1.088,84 
178,892 


...Various 
...Various 
....l^clb. 

....l^clb. 
...Various 

. . i%<- ib 

...Various 
...Various 


Tin plates, terne plates and tag- 


171.2.34 
39.K01.K* 
5,318.193 
777,90! 
170,346 


3.809.148 
844.84 
348.854 
47,797 
11.4311 
944.05t 
35,344 
409,032 


108.484.8* 
8<UU0,6o< 
5,278,04 

522.43t 
362,85. 


2,613.564 
73(1,95, 
348.080 
32,32o 
21.'JOb 
1,187.231 
42,7'iO 




Wire, and articles made from dut...lbs 
Manufactures of Anvils ilut. . . 1 hs 


Cutlery dut 
Files, file blanks, rasps and floats... dut 


Firearms dut 






75H,57a 




Needles, hand sewing and darning..free 
Machinery dut 
Shotgun barrels, in single tubes, 
forged, rough-bored free 
Allother dut.. . 




362.600 
1,875,222 

48.88o 
1,107.590 
12,626,431 




407,740 
1,630,542 

138.87 
1,210,78 
12,098,239 


...Various 
...Various 

10% 


Total, not Including ore 
Tin Plates, etc. (Ibs.) Imported from 
Un i ted Kingdom , 






170,872.133 
779.48-2 
10,730 
171.662,345 


3,786,626 
22,151 
371 
3,809,148 


107.831639 
653.187 


2,591.80b 
21,758 


British North America 


Other countries 


Total 


108484S2G 


2.613.564 


! Ivory (free, Ibs.) Animal 


244.138 
15,156,128 


520.518 
155.934 


321.310 

8.864.25- 


690.980 
8S.479 


Vegetable 


Jewelry, Manufactures of Gold and Silver, and 
Precious Stones Diamonds, uncut, includ- 
ing miners', etc., not set free 
Diamonds, cut but not set dut. ...:.. 
Other precious stones, rough or uncut, free 
Other precious stones, cut but not set. . .dut. . 
Jewelry, and manufactures of gold and 
silver dut 




2.517,759 
4,438,1)80 
22.W-, 
1,982,450 

1,427,833 




3,678,260 

8,497.284 


39,928 
2,140,275 

3,293,693 
17.649,440 


20 


ftit 


Total 




10.388,880 




...Mc}b. 
...Zfciclb. 

..Various 

2056 
20* 
10% 
..Various 


Precious Stones, etc. (free) Imported from 
United Kingdom 




1,108,661 




2.302.602 
60.266 
1,343,044 
8.447 






1244* 








1,227.387 








71,660 




Brazil. 




1.303 
7,096 




Other countries 






3,835 
3,718,194 


Tola 1 




2,540,561 




Jewelry, and other Precious Stones, etc. (dut.; 
Imported from United Kingdom 




1.958.618 
2.546,392 




3.600,367 
4.360.48! 
917,857 
3,991. 4S1 
1,018,962 
5.440 
13,930 
7.198 
15,531 
13.931,262 






539,146 




Netherlands 




2,122,257 








573.186 








92,111 








6.747 








3,944 




Other countries 




5,918 




Total 




7,848.319 




Lead, and Manufactures of (dut., Ibs.) Lead in 


81.656.980 
3,313,090 


2,534.258 
82,271 


91,931.295 
414,023 


2.7(3,884 
10,052 






M anuf actures of 




4,250 




10,575 


Lead, Pigs, Bars. etc. (Ibs.) Imported from 


644,482 
30U053 
1,120,628 

42,5f>r,856 
37.H07.33it 
443,812 
84970070 


17.830 
8,944 
28,938 
934,149 
1,601,45* 
5,210 
2,596,529 


267,422 


7,522 






111,952 
13,212,553 
57.998.2*9 
755,142 
92.345.31S 


1,940 

845.5<iO 
1,908,111 
10,903 
2,774,036 


British North America 




Other countries . 


Total 


Leather, and Manufactures of Leather (dut.) 
Band or belting and sole leather 
Calfskins, tanned, etc 
Skins for morocco 
Upper leather and skins, dressed, etc 
Total leather 




155.860 
176.578; 
3.081,77(1 
2,210,937 
5,625,146! 




52,688 
258.816 
2.455,332 
2,470,841 
5,237,707 







20 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 




1898. 


1899. 


Duty. 




Quant's. 


Vului'x. 


Quant' 


Values. 


Manufactures of (tlut.) Gloves, of kid or 
other leather 
All other 




S5.38J.16S 
404.8L, 




15,398,125 
48071!) 


...Various 


Total manufactures 




5.78S.99U 




5.878,844 


. . . ..45c bu. 
....40cpal. 
....20cgal. 


Gloves Imported from Belgium 




234,til! 




2ol,18( 
2.061.58. 
2.:7.82? 
720,981 
599 
5.39S.12a 


France 




1,6.24,11 




Germany 




2.684.287 




Other Europe 




790,67i) 
469 
5,384.168 




Other countries 






Total 
Malt Barley dut. . .bu 






4.7K 


4.412 


4,98 


4,14- 


Malt Liquors (dut., gals.) In bottles or jugs... 
In other coverings 


733.535 
1.7J7.202 
2,510,737 


695.102 
506,428 
1,201,530 


815,**.H 
1,928,655 
2,844.554 


91 4.229 
570,r 
1,484.90) 


Total 


Manganese ore and oxide of free. tons 


9i',320 


772.310 


115.094 


87;i,478 


Marble and Stone, and Manufactures of (dut.) 
Marble, and manufactures of 




689.454 




68029? 


Stone, and manufactures of, including slate. . 




249,50 - ~ 




203 Ol* 




Total 




938.956 




883.611 


..6csq. yd. 

45$ 
...Various 

4556 
Segal. 


Matting for floors free .-rolls. 
Matting and mats for floors, etc clut.sq.yds 
Metals. Metal Compositions, and Manufactures 
of (dut.) Bronze manufactures 
All other 


20.804 
19.792.461 


61. Sit 

1,375.272 


37,yOSJj<J9 


2,65i,i6r 




480.281 
3.340,7S; 




558.472 
3,559^4b 
4,117,81 


Total 




3 821,068 




Musical Instruments, and parts of dut ,. 
Oils (gals.) Animal or rendered Whale and 
flgh ...dut 




930.094 




1,057.791 


673.2 14 


221,830 


531932 


198110 


Other dut 


14.1(3 
370,147 
15,439 


5.71S 
98.252 
3.114 
1,893.878 
540,331 


9.056 
1,789,514 
2,775 


1.589 
140,1 4H 
697 
1,907,923 
611.234 
1.090.213 
1.381.2ti 
309994 


Segal. 

... 40cgal. 
. .Various 


Mineral free 


Do dut 


Vegetable Fixed or expressed free 
Do dut 


Olive dut 


736,877 


92.5,804 
1.1:3.371 


930,004 




Do dut 




377,707 




Total .- 




5,198,002 




5.641.146 




Paints pigments and colors free 




8.470 






Do dut 




1.056.61S 




1,205.737 


Paper Stock, Crude (free; see also wood pulp) 


49,800,209 


699,961 
2,170,342 


55,596,560 


805.515 
1,809,369 
2.611,914 


.25 to 35* 

>0elb.&45<6 
r.0% 


All other 


Total 




2,870,323 




Paper Stock, Crude Imported from 




1,068.272 




1,006,108 
2J6.09B 
191.048 
679.014 
227.938 
109.9S1 
66.082 
9,051 
105,455 
61,145 
2,614.914 






273,141 








208,923 
571.965 










Italy 




254.407 








129.810 








212.526 








10.777 








80.318 




Other countries 




60,104 




Total 




2,870.323 




Paper, and Manufactures off- 








799.087 
56,45:i 
2,334,545 
3,190,085 








750,469 






2.838,738 


icial '. 




2,838,738 




Paper and Manufactures of Imported from 




522 .",74 




544,65.' 
1,0,011 
21)5.833 
1.920.129 
103.585 
?_>1,30J 
44,572 
3.190.085 






58,106 








255,625 








1,708,826 




Other Kurope 




55.474 








198.830 








39,437 
2.838.738 




Total 






Perfumeries, cosmetics, etc dut 
Pipes and smokers' articles dut 




432,003 

2.V.I.SM 




Ml.liOOi 

280.997 



IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. 21 


IMPORTS FREE AND DUTIABLE. 


1898. 


1899. 


Duty. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Quant'*. 


Values. 


Plants Shrubs and Vines dut. 7 








$763.538 
1.193.4V5 
1,081.859 


....35c Ib. 
...Various 
6c Ib. 
6c Ib. 
2c Ib. 


Platinum free. .Ibs. 


6,003 
11.154 


$1,032,192 
472,401 


6,357 
15,970 


Plumbago f ree . tons 


Provisions, Comprising Moat and Dairy Prod- 
ucts (dut.) Meat products- 




345,108 




263,748 
109,647 
3,962 
1,562,193 
52,603 


All other 




80,031 
5,474 
1,343,173 
67,729 


'"23.766 
11,819,993 


Dairy Products (Ibs.) Butter 


31,984 
10,012,188 




Milk 


Total 




1,841.515 




1,992,153 


2c Ib. 
Mclb. 

8-12cl001bs. 
25cbu. 
...Various 

. ..Various 
...Various 
60* 

. ..Various 

16clb. 
20o Ib 


Cheese (Ibs.) Imported from 
Un i ted Kingdom 


197,439 
919,116 
263.795 
3,ltiO,OOt; 
8W.08f> 

4,;ua, r xHo 

224.fW 
27,389 
5,892 
10,012,188 


30,537 
146,860 
34,215 
417,816 
96,100 
585.309 
27,907 
3,755 
674 
1,343,173 


159,433 
1,093,710 
356.355 

3.857,887 
1,091,285 


27,37!1 
192,039 
45.148 
475.201 
120,864 
653.958 
40,183 
6,820 
601 
1,562.193 






Italy 


Netherlands 




328.906 
51,629 
4,815 
11.819,993 




Other countries 


Total 


Rice (Ibs.) Rice dut 


125,:!96,330 
4,414.800 
60.474,685 
190,285,315 


2,604,572 
188,r>39 
953,722 
3,746,833 


151.497.888 
2.595.600 
49,979,805 
204,073293 


3,022.96!* 
135,683 
771,411 

3,930,063 


Do (Hawaiian Islands treaty) free 
Rice flour, rice meal and broken rice.dut 
Total 


Salt (Ibs.) free 
Do dut. . .Ibs. 


2,053.8!)0 
316,200,216 


34,168 
490,493 


363J82,933 


'" 658,922 


Sausage casings free 




488.755 




622,493 


Seeds (bu.) Linseed or flaxseed dut 


136,098 


150.515 
698,387 
382,864 
1.231.766 


81,953 


87,602 
748,877 
385,155 
1,221,634 


Do dut 






Total 






Shells, unmanufactured free 
Silk, and Manufactures of Unmanufactured- 




860.706 




973,944 


10.492 
10,315,162 
1,762,297 


3,999 
31,446.800 
659,267 
32,110,006 


13,537 
9,691.145 
1,545,701 


2,288 
31,827,061 
650,278 
32,479,627 




Waste 


Total unmanufactured 
Silk, Raw (Ibs.) Imported from France 
Italy , 


339,934 
1,742,157 
2.612,279 
5,217,182 
403,610 
10,315.162 


1.192.008 
6.230.071 
6.311,188 
16,510,502 
1.182,431 
31.446,800 


330,248 
2,251.216 
2.512.29!) 
4,515.116 
82,266 
9,691.145 


1,248,037 
8.929.776 
6,497.983 
14,920,787 
230,478 
31,827,061 


China 


Japan 


Other countries 


Total 


Manufactures of (dut. ) Clothing, ready-made, 
and other wearing apparel 
Dress and piece goods 




1,855,279 
10.4S6,057 
3.349.464 
2,035,411 




1,618,638 
13,082.364 
2,878.720 
1,726,242 

1,975,016 

1.553,687 
2,270,815 
25,105,482 


Laces and embroideries 
Ribbon s 
Spun silks, in skeins, cops, warps, or on 




1,727,710 
478,285 


Velvets, plushes, and other pile 
fabrics Ibs. 






All other 
Total manufactures 
Manufactures of Imported from 
United Kingdom 




6,788,454 
23.523,665 




1.935,072 
135.634 




2,273.519 
166,954 
60,396 
10,569.524 
4,630.622 
3te.589 
4,079.437 
39,995 
143.399 
2,689.766 
66,281 
25,105,482 


Austria-Hungary 






Belgium 




31,216 








10 842 561 




Germany 




4,434.957 




Italy 




356 97 








3 492 734 




Other Europe 




46,585 
135.889 




China 






Other countries 




50.132 




Total 




23.523.fi65 




Soap (dut., Ibs.) Fancy, perfumed, etc 


592,92 


254,443 
214,009 


7931S57 


327.923 
248,266 


All other 


Total 




498512 




576,189 











1 

22 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 




1898. 


1899. 


Duty. 




Quant's. 


Value*. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Spices Unground (Ibs.) Nutmegs free 
Pepper, black or white free 
All other free 


1,213,994 
14,080. 1 

13.7*1.689 
2,658,706 


1331,235 
909,711 
898,992 
264,691 
2,404,629 


1,530.102 
12.332.747 
13,851,055 
3,346,925 


S368.T65 
1,0*3.100 
91)7.783 
332,6<>3 
2,782,281 


Iclb. 

. .$2.25 gal. 
...Various 

2056 


Do dut 


Total 


Nutmegs, Pepper, etc. (free, Ibs.) Imported 
from United Kingdom 


7.576,669 
2.023, US 
l,142,r>43 
2,515 
2,368,264 
2508689 


599.742 
220.837 
85,988 
166 
166,365 
158,669 
795,620 
50.282 
60,079 
2,190 
2,139,938 


5.032,785 
1.076,872 
274,987 

we 

3,756,519 
2,426.110 
11.886,256 
1.401,840 
1,811,935 
46,834 
27,713,904 


874,533 
171,830 
26,161 
48 
284.092 
149.023 
1,220,982 
127,891 
92,726 
2,362 
2.449,648 


Netherlands 


Other Europe 


British North America 


British West Indies 


China 


Kast Indies 


1/238.416 


Other Asia and Oceanica 


493,870 
l,G6l!.225 
58.380 
29,078,819 


Africa 


Other countries 


Total 


Spices, All Other (dut.) Imported from 
United Kingdom 




191,080 




244,830 
27,498 
38,144 
22,161 
332.638 


Other Europe 




28,661 
30,468 
13,882 




Mexico 






Other countries 






Total 




264.691 




Spirits, Distilled (proof gals.) Of domestic man- 
ufacture, returned (subject to internal 
revenue tax) free 


854,586 
137,806 

770.830 
1,78*318 


734,901 
395,758 
1,004,135 
2,134.794 


998,273 
219,838 
1,227,157 
2,445.2(8 


834,948 
626.65b 
1,683,015 
3.144,619 


Brandy dut 


All other dut 
Total 


Spirits (not of domestic manufacture, proof 
gals.) Imported from United Kingdom.. 
Belgium 


338,486 
25.757 
172,907 
51.80* 
9.94b 
111.701 
9329 


490,535 
32,316 
492,297 
35.989 
16.767 
56,886 
l(i,509 
183,919 
54,555 
11,243 
6,067 
2,810 
1,399,893 


585.934 
26,209 
272,223 
79,138 
23,919 
157,047 
20,962 
136,221 
26,556 
86,584 
19.240 
12,962 
1,446,995 


897,478 
36,000 
792,363 
55.9*5 
37,331 
83,149 
37,192 
265,208 
59,056 
26,720 
7.595 
11,644 
2.309.671 




Germany 


Italy 


Netherlands 


Other Europe. . 


British North America 


98,430 
22,830 
41,324 
21,194 
5,022 
903.732 


West Indies 


China 


Other Asia and Oceanica 


Other countries 


Total 






401,725 




429,776 
259,084 


Straw and grass, manufactures of dut 








Segal. 
....1.95clb. 
....1.95clb. 


Sugar, Molasses and Confectionery- 
Molasses free.gals. 
Do dut. .gals. 


49,275 
3,554.272 


2,346 
541,670 


15,300 
5,682,596 


542 
783.808 


Sugar (Ibs.) Not above No.16 Dutch standard- 
Beet dut 


140.641,485 
499,760,798 
1948123905 

101.088,663 
499,7(56,798 

M90154053 


2,717,955 

16.600,109 
38,659,764 

2,434.921 
16,660,109 
43,812.640 


723JH36.514 

4tK.299.S8l 
2731868574 

62,745,601 
462.299.880 
35179601)89 


15.269,413 

17,287,6Si 
60,714,089 

1,692,935 
17,287,683 
77,676,437 


Cane free.. 


Cane and other dut 


Above No. 16 Dutch standard- 
Beet, cane and other dut 

Total sugar \ ^f t e 


Total 


XBHQOB&l 


60,472,749 


39S02505t>;> 


94,964.120 


Not above No. 16 Dutch standard (Ibs.) Im- 
ported from United Kingdom 


16,551,980 
1,046,190 


388,472 
24,473 


16,591,179 
68,462,705 


431,518 
1,459,468 






Germany 


138.084,955 
2,308,083 
77.230 
935.901 
4,761.387 
2,893,145 

232.798,204 
440,225.111 
211.342.294 
139.426,195 
192.755,229 

!> 973 


2.656.135 
57,128 
1,698 
44.705 
195,149 
44,598 

4.610,350 
9.8?8,07 
4.203.484 
2.317.9S7 
3.940.618 
5755 


754.843,277 


13,808,655 






1,996,400 

236,598 
6,011,S12 
3,088,331 

264.596.400 
H63.543.657 

247,212.60* 
41,222,162 
226.877.0V4 

369.623 

WV037563 


41,070 
5,983 
158,639 
52,976 

5.967.814 
16.412,088 
5.'*K601 
810.276 
5,341,713 
6.365 

20.:;s3.'.ti3 


British North America 






West Indies- 
British 


Cuba ,.., 


Other West Indies . . '. '. 


Brazil 




China 


East Indies l610.2fi9.56K 


11.246.9S8 



IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. 23 




1898. 


1899. 


Duty. 




Quant's 


Values. 


Quant'*. 


Value*. 




49!>,776,79f 
30,489.61 
295,91 
64,435,28* 
14 
25838321$ 


116.729.755 
381.27! 
7,423 
1,353,1* 

58,037,828 


462.2<W.88C 
51.625,281 
! 3,436,4 15 
189,043 014 


517.287.683 
l! 969,32o 
86,62" 
4,198,543 


....4-50clb. 
lOclb. 

...S1.851b. 
.3i-56c Ib. 

54Ulb&25 
MHilb&25<& 

35* 

...45c bu. 
...40c bu. 
...25c bu. 
40 
25% 
. . .2%c Ib. 

.$2-$8 doz. 
.40-60cgal. 
..Various 






Africa 


Other countries 




Total 


3917504968 


93,271,185 


Above No. 16 Dutch standard (Ibs.) Imported 


4.991.26C 
6U6.9& 
6,693 
37,100,480 
38,107,744 
6,794,69 
13,390,854 
101,088,66; 


126.650 
32,977 
324 
864.661 
928,653 
170,99h 
310,655 
2,434,921 


1,307,373 

964,638 
66.007 
12.284,49b 
6,894,728 
10,388,54 
30,839,818 
62.745,601 


30,226 
26,357 


Aiistria-Hungary 
France 




2.506 
176,013 
290,2119 
1,167,624 
1,692,935 




China 


Other countries 


Total 


Confectionery (fat 
Sulphur ore . free. . tons 




27,13! 


"296,2i(] 


31,772 
970,804 


Tea free. . . Ibs 


69,455.84" 


9,653,672 






Do dut.... Ibs 


2.501.868 


400.611 


74,088,153 


9,673,678 


Tea. (Ibs.) Imported from United Kingdom 
British North America ..'... 


3.011.390 
1.521,171 
38,631.891 
tm.W. 
26.233.40" 
303.179 
2,47" 
71,957,715 


580,183 
242,420 
5,811.051 
278,273 
3,106.663 
34.951 
742 
10.054,283 


1,687,507 
1,221.681 

39,597.365 
2,038.243 
29,277.708 
231.439 
4,252 
74,088.153 


378.092 
189,28f 
4,797,17: 
266.5581 
4,007,805 
31,856 
2,907 

9,673,678 


China 


East Indies 






Other countries 


Total 


Tin in bars, blocks, pigs, etc free.. Ibs 
Tin in Bars. etc. (Ibs.) Imported from 


IM.'.US.SS; 


8.776.151 


67,342,105 


11,843,357 


21.622,583 
3.783.288 
36.782.fi25 
1,571,307 
179,086 
63,938,889 


3.122.562 
532.924 


11,795,569 
2,131.319 
52,420.247 
864,899 
130.071 
67.342,105 


2,309.037 
400.609 
8,953.001 
155.600 
25.110 
11.8(3,357 




East Indies 


4,882,412 
213.515 
24,738 
8,776,151 


Other Asia and Oceanica 




Total 


Tobacco, and Manufactures of Leaf (dut., Ibs.) 


3,988.561 


3,913,294 
3,575.314 

7.488.608 


4,147,048 
9,888,583 
14.036,631 


4,349.034 
5,550,999 
9,900.033 


Other 


6.488,547 
10,477.108 


Total leaf 


Tobacco, Leaf (Ibs.) Imported from 


395,80fi 
3,685.435 
489.875 
395:246 
578.548 
4,316,475 
585,723 
10,477,108 


41,565 

3-.59.VW,' 
328)611 
253,694 
259.279 
2,848,524 
161,553 
7,488,608 


349.334 

3,806.921 
474,329 
563,733 
624,664 
7,825,657 
391,003 
14.035.631 


42,208 
3,791.385 
293,320 
491,642 
229.554 
4,964.529 
87,395 
9.900,033 




Other Europe 


British North America 


Mexico 




Other countries 


Total 


Manufactures of (dut. Ibs.) Cigars, cigarettes, 


331,902 


1.551 .009 
52,497 


418,634 


2,082,450 
61,549 
2.143,999 


All other 


Total manufactures 
Toys dut 
Toys Imported from France 




1,603,506 






2.2H.482 




2.261. H6S* 




93,183 
2,020,045 




101,529 

2,(HV632 
47.83C 
26,978 
2.261.969 




' 








72,0811 




Other countries 




29,174 




Total 




2,214,482 




Vegetables (dut., bu.) -Beans and dried peas... 


163.560 

488.853 


149,227 
429,173 
473,154 
243,354 
239,733 
499,959 
2.034.600 


184,499 
771,960 
530,420 


165,830 
499,520 
294.391 
352.008 
312.650 
554,298 
2,178.697 




1,171,378 


Pickles and sauces 
AHOther In their natural- state 
Prepared, or preserved 
Total 


Wines (dut.) Champagne and oth'r sparkl'g.doz. 


223.82T 
1,980.871) 
268.921 


3.2ia.:w; 
I,:i92.710 
1,312,147 
5,969.180 


28.667 
2,250.451 
274,847 


3.1168,720 
1,571.532 
1,346,551 
6.586,803 


In other coverings doz. 


Total 


Wines Imported from United Kingdom 
France 




222,042 
3,783,137 




201,607 
4.246,999 



24 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


IMPORTS FREE AND DUTIABLE. 


1898. 


1899. 


Duty. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Germany 




$917,180 




$1,081,252 
228,854 
799,951 
28,140 
6,586.80 


. . Ic cu. ft. 

....$2M 
30cM 
...Various 


Italy 




280,747 
731) tol 




Other Europe 










29,523 
5,969,180 




Total *.. 






Wood, and Manufactures of Unmanufactured 
(M ft.) Cabinet woods Mahogany.free 
All other free 
Logs and round timber free 
Timber, hewn, etc free 
Do dut.cu.ft 


14,679 

'"275,547 
815 
138,78b 
107.953 
245.262 
435,421 


799,149 
9UO,187 
2,430.089 
22,416 
17,118 
1.055,126 
2,454.692 
760,964 
796,843 
2,290,18s 
14,578 

274.153 


24,711 
"'198.195 


1,244,921 

846,356 
1,766,294 


133,792 

"'423,926 
473,028 


18,068 

' 4,200. U4 

828.053 
986,962 


Lumber boards, planks, etc free 
Do dut 


Shingles dut. .M. 




All other unmanufactured free 
Do dnt 






1,969.801 
20,110 

315.242 


...Various 
....35 


Manufactures of (dut.) Cabinetware or house 




Woodpulp . ..tons 


29,84b 


601,642 
1,444,758 
13,861.923 


33.319 


671.506 
1,632,060 
14,499,487 


Iclb. 
Jiclb. 

. ..Various 
...Various 
...Various 


All other 
Total wood and manufactures of 
Mahogany (M ft.) Imported from 


1.354 
4.253 
7,160 
40 
125 
L662 
85 
14,679 


261,095 
141,724 
309.493 
1,766 
8.821 
71,569 
4,681 
799,149 


4.041 
7,078 
11,426 
412 
1,025 
467 
265 
24,714 


337,145 
369,126 
413.222 
33.671 
52,193 
16.696 
22,868 
1,244,921 


Central American States 


Mexico 


Cuba 


Other West Indies. 




Other countries 


Total 


Boards. Planks, etc. (M ft.) Imported from 


353,075 
140 
353,215 


3,499,056 
10,762 
3,509.818 


423,720 
205 

423,925 


4,187,057 
13,057 
4,200,114 


Other countries 


Total 


Wood Pulp (tons) Imported from 
Germany 


1,607 
3,809 
24,430 


72,167 
159.042 
370,433 


713 
4,471 
28,135 


41,519 
180.455 
419,51(2 


Other Europe 


British North America 


Other countries 


Total 


29.84f> 


601.642 


33.319 


671.506 


Wools, hair of the camel, goat, alpaca, etc., and 
manufactures of Unmanufactured (Ibs.)- 
Class 1, clothing: In the grease free 
Do dut 


10.902,270 
3^.159,102 
2.274.045 
107,570 
3.197.64G 
1,107,917 
15.310 


1.841,523 
5.461.318 
643.069 
23.701 
631,929 
224,452 
3,218 


12'.973',444 


' '1,948,402 


Do dut. 


3,555 


552 


Class 2, combing: In the grease free 
Do dut 
Scoured free 
Do dut 


2,154,232 


586,865 


1,187 


196 


Class 3, carpet: In the grease free 
no dut 
Scoured free . . 


5,186,116 
77,841.550 
2,197 
1,479 
21.577.584 


473.820 
7,480,339 
208 
115 
3,593,767 
13,189.925 
16.783.692 


61,578,547 


5,784,444 


Do dut.. 


25,244 
'76,736,209 


2,438 
' '8',322,897 


Total unmanufactured \ Q? t e 


Total 
Wools (Ibs.) Imported from 
Class 1 United Kingdom 


132795,202 


20,074.328 
1,154.631 
G 729.538 
14.205.227 
3,279,263 
45.442,987 


2,836,259 
299.073 
841,377 
3,516.l5 
476,237 
7,969.611 


4,520,541 
115,953 
3.930.204 
8,089,829 
1,388,372 
12,976.999 


720.926 
13.591 
478.180 
546.298 
189,959 
1.948.954 


France 


South America 


Asia and Oceanica 


Other countries 


Total 
Class 2 United Kingdom 


3,090.310 645.50) 
35,119j 7,933 
9(19.5491 177,506 
222,533 28,411 


1.797.574 
314.287 
36,971 
1,485 


470.565 
107,208 
8,166 
106 


Other Europe 




South America 


Asia and Oceanica 


Other countries 


3,362- 199 
4.320.S73 1 859,589 


5,102 
2.155,419 


1,016 
5S7.061 


Total 


Class 3 United Kingdom 
France 


22.830.248 2,622,959 
3.146.122 333.060 


19.297.OoS 2,024.559 
1.542,469! 151.908 



EXPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. 25 




1898. 


1899. 


Duty. 




Quant's. 


Values. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Germany 


1,053,030 
19.U7.436 
29,988 
10.589,418 
20,308.267 
5,508,141 
417,792 
83,031,342 


$111,093 
1,925,507 
1,756 
862,321 
1,510,106 
552,777 
34,843 
7.954,482 


721.358 
14,897,587 


$73,946 
1,507,049 


20c Ib 


Other Europe 


British North America., 




6,105,714 
14,264,551 
8,944,081 

830,969 
61,603,791 


459.429 
1,084,535 
394,188 
88,268 
5,786,882 






Other countries 


Total 


Manufactures of Wool Carbonized, dut. . Ibs. 












589,715 


1,790,132 

765,181 
3,965,577 

6,036.080 
387.26P 


631,397 

"4,692,898 
27,098,584 


1,758,902 

832.666 
3,909,466 

5.905,548 
625,795 


...Various 

...Various 
...Various 

...Various 

tii'|]i.\..ii-. , 

25clb. 
...Various 
...Various 
...Various 

...l!*clb. 


Clothing, etc., except shawls and knit 
fabrics dut 


Cloths dut. ..Ibs 


5,062,261 
29,125,529 


Dress goods, women's and children's 


..dut.sq.yd 


Knit fabrics dut .. 


Rags, noils and wastes free.. Ibs. 
Shoddy, mungo, nocks, etc ,..dut...Ibs. 


1.724,489 
1,574,262 


253,779 
443,843 
39,683 




314,540 


70,224 
55.331 
109,681 
564,354 
13,831,967 


Yarns dut.. .Ibs. 


331,889 


185,447 
966,780 


173,870 


All other dut 


Total manufactures 
Carpets (sq. yds.) Imported from 
United Kingdom 




14,823.771 




211.895 
245.H93 
12,244 
93,918 
25,995 
589.745J 


509.556 
8X3.1SS 
13,887 
290,<i84 
92,817 
1,790,132 


235,495 
272,840 
7.359 
78,755 
36,978 
631,397 


541,706 

850,827 
9,810 
223,234 
133,325 
1.758.JXB 


Other Europe 




Otner Asia and Oceanica 


Other countries 


Total 


Cloth (Ibs.) Imported from 
United Kingdom 


4,062.973 
49,976 
106,321 
111.760 
720.854 
3,580 
6,797 
5,0(3,261 


3,009,630 
47,009 
89,522 
123,940 
686,057 
3.060 
6,359 
3,065,577 


2,807,703 
83,803 
152.215 
210,545 
822.683 
9.219 
6,730 
4,092.898 


2,675.396 
79,212 
136,174 
241.374 
763.667 
7,712 
5,931 
3,909.466 






France 


Germany 


Other Europe 


Other countries 


Total 


Dress Goods (sq. yds.) Imported from 
United Kingdom 


13.366,681 
7,036,334 
7.381,048 
1,388,168 
2,298 
29,125.529 


2,318,563 
1.620.345 
2,060.994 
35,329 
849 
6,036,080 


12,676,762 
7,187,661 

7,135,801 
97,727 
633 
27,098,584 


2,338.525 
1,913.6! 
1,030,388 
22,707 
240 
5,995.548 


France 


Other Europe 


Other countries 


Total 


Zinc or Spelter, and Manufactures of (dut.) In 
blocks or pigs, and old Ibs.. . 


3,250,965 


127,033 
11,69-4 
138,727 


2,124,928 


99,004 
17,083 
116,089 




Total 






All other articles free 
Do dut 
Total value of merchandise free 
Total value of merchandise dut 
Total value of imports of merchandise. . 




6,887,810 

5.538,849 




5,888.373 
5,460,527 


;;;;;;;;;; 


J91.414.175 
524.fi35.479 
H6.049.654 





)Oa;7.94S 

596848,908 
597116,854 





EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC MERCHANDISE. 
[Fiscal Tear Ended June 30, 1899.] 


EXPORTS, AND COUNTRIES TO WHICH EXPORTED. 


1898. 


1899. 


Quant' 


i. Values 


. Quant' 


?. Values. 


Agricultural Implements Mowers and reapers, an 
partsof 


a 


85,500,66 


I... 


$9053,830 


Plows and cultivators, and parts of 




937.25 


<J 


1 545410 


All other, and parts of 




. 1,181,81 


7 


. 1.832,957 


Total 




. 7,609,72 


2 


. 12.432.197 


Exported to United Kingdom 




. 1,145,02 


.i . . . 


1 372 393 


France 7. 




. 1,252,16 


7 ... 


. L7S1.659 


Germany 




. 1,232,2 


2 


. 1646711 


Other Europft 




. 1,451,28 


4 


2 641 891 


British North America 




781,41 




1 521 054 


Central American States and British Honduras 




14.91 





6.244 



26 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


EXPOUTS, AND COUNTRIES TO WHICH EXPORTED. 


1898. 


1899. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Quant's. 


Value* . 






$124.368 




8832,478 
786 
43,104 
2.955 
11,460 
1,679,019 
34,130 
1,540 
284,304 
6,701 
768,672 
66,491 
340,758 






1,079 








7,817 








2504 




Other West Indies and Bermuda 




7.432 








377.054 




Brazil . . 




24755 








4 843 








196,054 
8333 




Bastlndies (British) ." 










6!)7 565 








56,159 
224.306 




Africa 










420 
7,609 732 










12,432,197 
441,846 


Aluminium, and manufactures of 










378,956 


35,431,464 


308.126 


28,213.572 




British North America 


15,805 
98 
1,958 
42,119 
285 
39 


1,068.239 
7.058 
78,400 
1,232.157 
7,4G2 
2,720 


3,709 


221,037 
3,485 
98.920 
I,a49,958 
5.193 
13,295 
11.373 
30,516,833 


Central American States and British Honduras 


59 
2,301 
74,757 
223 
241 
74 
389.490 










Total 


439,255 


37,827,500 


Hogs (No.) United Kingdom 


1,030 
4,039 
4,097 
1,463 
24 

3,636 


7.987 
24,941 
44,487 
11,556 
188 
19,213 


20 


125 

6.847 
87.642 
95.926 

sslnb 

2,338 
227,241 




7.390 
17,949 
42 
6,13! 
128 
33,031 










122 
14,411 


1,816 
110,487 


Total 




22,129 
72 
7.913 
7,559 
9,415 
234 


3.072,498 
9,000 
1,161,750 
769,170 
874.674 
12,795 
77,090 
141,382 
5.700 
34.925 
17,585 


20,929 
684 


3.024.952 
97,780 
824,2:>5 
491,400 
667.16.') 
6.228 
81 849 






5,484 
4,852 
10,088 
99 
1.138 
1,565 










1.297 
2,043 


West Indies and Bermuda . 


154,118 




350 
117 


779 
127 


75.316 

i(>,t>80 






Total 


51.150 


6.176.568 


45,778 


5,444,342 


Mules No 


8,0* 


664,785 


6,755 


516.9U- 


Sheep (\o ) United Kingdom 


142,178 

48,32i 
2,359 
5.0.% 
1,475 
29b 
199,690 


1.016,89. 
50 
108,44t 
9,748 
38,871 
12,4(8 
27.467 
1,213,886 


98,080 


702,347 






34,782 
3,235 
5,654 
1,180 
355 
143,286 






ll!525 
34.794 
8,620 
20,946 
853,555 


West I ndies and Bermuda 






Total 






250,175 
46,243.4* 




322,037 
37,880,916 


Total animals.. 








273.52 
329.99 




303.49;! 
369,693 
41.916 
420,219 
431.963 
195.760 


Bark and extract of, for tanning 








151,094 


41.82 
382,00 


152,494 


Blacking Stove polish 


All other 




351 56 




Bones, hoofs, horns and horn tips, strips and waste 




174.86 




Books. Maps. Engravings. Etchings and Other Printed 
Matter United Kingdom 




841.095 




782.597 
38.47: 
121.2% 
59.491 
844,409 
41,10: 
57,819 
11.KI4 
45.743 
16.831 






3045J 

102,33; 

62,4ft 








- 






| 


British North America 




722,04S 




Central American States and British Honduras 




34,26 








125,001 


.. 
, 






55( 
2250f 










Puerto Rico 




1.33' 





EXPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. '27 


EXPORTS, AND COUNTRIES TO WHICH EXPORTED. 


1808. 


1899. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Other West Indies and Bermuda 




$26967 




$27.642 
20.971 
45,536 
48,695 
123.050 
29.448 
22.118 
36,163 
150,852 
51,478 
80,353 
75 

2,656.136 






26614 




Brazl 1 




163,770 








17.484 




Other South America 




43,558 
15,836 
12,831 
27,608 










East Indies (British) 
















92,706 




Other Asia and Oooanica 




33.521 








41,384 












Total 




2,434.325 




Breadstuff:* Barley bu. 


11,237.077 
91,188 

15,990.558 
1.370,403 


1.320,093 
5,542,040 
1.339.519 

7as.264 
589.285 


2.267.400 
127,953 
16.447,240 
1.533.980 


1.351.049 
1.375.274 

2,002.588 
809,998 
846,028 




Buckwheat bu. 


Corn (bu ) United Kingdom 


82,876,864 
11,447.980 


29.580,758 
3 985 687 


68,607.317 
5.236.194 
34,605.873 
43,529.764 
19,150,676 
73,332 
154,644 

636,10t 
155 
686,409 
49,082 
277,337 
1,076,769 
5,364 

174.089.094 


27,512,398 
2.0C0.101 
13.S55.290 
17.850.1P3 
6,867,627 
36,313 
63,412 
266 
293.507 
63 
320,018 
23.122 
117,881 
474,890 
2.397 
(8,977.448 




Germany 


39,21)3.528 
48,211,439 
23,47K.5U9 
130.227 
125.310 
409 
1.055,512 
201) 
739.543 
95,419 
15 261 


14.171,961 
17.203.435 
7,850.840 
70.965 
43.557 
16< 
415,803 
80 
314.120 
38,18b 
10,168 
509.51h 
1,608 
74.196.850 


British North America ; 


Central American States and British Honduras 






Cuba . 




Other West Indies and Bermuda 


South America 




1,302.442 
4,290 
208,744,939 




Total 




827,651 
69.130.28S 
86.500,350 
15,541,575 
8,410 


1,766.068 
20.^2,914 
1,757.978 
8,825.7(>9 
11.815 


791,488 
80.309,680 
5H.M2.505 
10,140,876 
4,826 


1.775.868 
9,787,540 
1,25.9KS 
5,936.07* 
15,015 


Oats bu. 




Ilye flour brls. 




80.163.805 
30.041.289 
3 218 4 01 


76 834 521 


74.lil3.804 
2.232.190 
10.311,450 
41.045,888 
8,869.314 
39,869 
7,083 
899 
259,492 


55.;!67.897 
1.675,339 
7,666.210 
31.268.327 
6,142.21(0 
84.823 
5,145 
823 
191,211 




32.5fiK.250 
3 124 543 






22.124.014 
5,116.901 
41,540 
45 
1,384 
1,857,433 
102.316 
70.663 
5,493,470 
148,231,261 


21,307.934 
5.104.800 
43,808 
41 
1.580 
1,705.171 
85.395 
59.667 
4,850.941 
145.fS4.659 


British North America .. 


Central American States and British Honduras 




West Indies and Bermuda 


South America 


British Australasia 


Other Asia and Oceanica ,. 


30,112 
2,523.219 
139.432815 


22,445 
1,805.659 
104269.169 




Total 


Wheat Flour (brls.) United Kingdom 


9,132.465 
3,826 


41,083.120 
16.991 


10,233,360 
1,959 
502.R74 
1,861.949 
743,463 
248.95b 
34,537 
34,694 
442.081 
152,079 
739.277 
818.8K 
98,519 
382,588 
28,526 
4,672 
1.221,314 
226,029 
80.334 
249,519 
380,078 
17,066 
18,502,690 


41.335.609 
7,720 
2.1X17,-! 04 
7,214,364 
3,886.553 
986.717 
138,979 
146,106 
1,719.225 
492.664 
2.868.501 
3.399.027 
425.904 
1,410,485 
105,200 
17.967 
4,030.340 
722,710 
299,194 
828,175 
1,495.240 
60,777 
73,093.870 


France 




190,03!) 
1.282.457 
557.471 
250.228 
19.240 
a5.889 


851,731 
5.146.080 
2.767.203 
1.183.182 
86.848 
197.338 


other Europe 


British North America 


Central American States and British Honduras 








245.293 
90.578 
770.289 
637.592 
115.2.S6 
365.290 
19.609 


1, 160,73* 
450.493 
3.836.418 
3.210.362 
541.147 
1,740.204 




Other West Indies and Bermuda 


Brazil 


Colombia 




China 


89,305 
39.678 
3,835.727 
641,039 
174,118 
614,483 
1,511.95*) 
52,578 
69.263,718 


East Indies (British) 


8.866 
939.053 
161.654 
41.845 
139,756 
882,651 
10,694 
15,349.943 


Hongkong 




British Australasia 


Othor Asia and Oceanica 


Africa 


Other countries 


Total 
Preparations of. for table food 




1765 9 07' 




2,133,110 









28 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


EXPORTS, AND COUNTRIES TO WHICH EXPORTED. 


1898. 


1899. 


Quant's 


Values 


Quant's 


Values. 


Allother 




$1 743 03, 




$1,681,725 
27a999.699 


Total breadstuffs 




333,897.11 




Bricks -Building M 


4.861 


300 


7,291 


63,743 
175,312 
229,055 


Fire 


12i' 20( 


Total 




157.27 




Broom corn 




163,OW 
1/5827 




IHo.iKir 
211,931 
275,470 


Brooms and brushes 






Candles Ibs 


3.172,37 


233,21 


8,416.51 


Carriages, Cars, Other Vehicles, and Parts of Cars, pas 
sengerand freight, and parts of For steam railways 
For other railways 




1.478.1S 




1,554,012 

504,481 
2,047,788 
4,106,284 




2t>039, 




All other carriages, arid parts of, except cycles 
Total 




1,685,8S 
3,424,41 




Exported to UnitedJKingdom 




f'j;.ir, 




786,190 
106.507 
106,680 
63,883 
582,094 
36,695 
510.247 
21,941 
131,211 
6,171 
91,880 
533 ( )31 






71,03 








ltti,5&. 




Other Europe 




60,8& 




British North America 




183,235 




Central American States and British Honduras 




4514 








50867 




Santo Domingo 




24,11 




Cuba 




22,194 








582 








74 84 




Argentina 




237,'50t 








564 77 




105,583 
25,801 
51.531 
10,792 
15,091 
6,035 
31)4,202 
203,3)5 
316,474 






42029 




Other South America 




799ii 




China. 




29098 




Bast Indies (British) 




10,75 








10,96 








324 890 




Other Asia and Oceanica 




59 12, 




Africa . 




359139 




Other countries 








Total 




3,424,419 




4,106,284 


Cycles and Parts of United Kingdom 




1,852,10 




868,190 
479,381 
1.1 17,352 
1,865.860 
582,500 
6,33C 
48,301 
253 
22,614 
2,912 
67,840 

238.783 

65,046 
9,328 
64,441 

26.180 
142,301 
8,847 
I17,43 
255.053 
82.S48 
200,813 
759 
5,753,880 






48268U 








1,724 404 








949,502 








614.(JOi 




Central American States and British Honduras 




8,2(57 








68,02i 








1.171 








9,214 








3,359 
84,393 
90,229 
















Brazil 




98,48: 








1568- 








48,966 








27,4*9 




East Indies (British) 




90,388 








7,636 








88.905 








309.006 








73,528 
197,365 
1,710 
6.846.529 
















Total 






Total carriages, cars, etc 




10.270.94S 




9,860,164 






155,444 




173.771 
131,361 


Dement. .' brls. 


'-. 48.836 


86.208 


64,122 






115.050 
33.202 
475,717 
442,967 




207,247 
29,676 
1,173,186 

478,582 
782,545 
700.1*0 
2,661,008 
169,828 
4,792,317 
0,995,289 




869.841 
4,736,373 


745.433 
7,475,001 








174,063 
37,496,283 


638,446 

537.856 
2,4GO,6(i9 
147,839 


193,196 
8,987,511 
















4,590,017 
9.441,763 




Total 






:ider gals. 


465,ira 


60,063 


490,76T 


64.500 



EXPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. 29 


EXPORTS, AND COUNTRIES TO WHICH EXPORTED. 


1898. 


1899. 


Quant's 


Values 


Quant's 


Values. 


Clocks and Watches Clocks, and parts of 




$955.55 




$1,043,621 
819,810 
1,863,431 






771.91 




Total 




1.727.4W 




Exported to United Kingdom 




646,43 




(552.177 
2,901 
18,055 
32.791 
410,237 
2,757 
28,008 
14,886 
26.616 
67,745! 
93,532 
16,699 
78,517 
133,307 
188.602 
34.084 
62,476 
41 
1,863,431 






11,21 
11.21 




Germany 










33.52- 
349,19 
6.99 










Central American States and British Honduras 










20,12t 
1205 1 




West Indies and Bermuda. 










28,0ti, 
40,89* 
85.041 




Brazil 






Other South America 






China 




18,50 




East Indies (British) 




48943 








163,438 
152,722 




British Australasia 






Other Asia and Oceanica 




25,26' 








73,51:. 
30~ 
1,727.469 










Total 






Coal and Coke Coal (tons) Anthracite 


l,32t.,582 
2,682.414 
4.008 996 


5,9116.17 


1,572,957 


(5,478.693 




5,777,578 
11.683.749 


3,478,976 
5,051 ,93':, 


7,182,335 
13,661,028 


Total coal 




a 

2.057 
37 
5,905 
3,186.740 
5.668 
340.426 
3.384 
210.079 
9,766 
183.840 
17,570 
16,109 
6,165 
16,641 
4,551 
4,008,996 
212.021 


550 
11,322 
15b 
37.84* 
9,510.92'. 
19.335 
974.040 
11,288 
464.888 
21,014 


7.89t 
1,011 
27 
31.871 
3,631,761 
4,590 
450.813 
4,647 
357,368 
21,980 
224,208 
47.028 
14,0^2 
82,687 
119,191 
52,773 
5,051,933 
215.513 


30,512 ! 
2,398 
158 
88,705 
10,348,534 
13.104 
1,235.265 
12.827 
685,297 
45,098 
478,857 
150.254 
43,815 
162.475 
267.205 
96,524 
13,661,028 
632,788 


















Puerto Rico 




422.4K8 
93,778 
38.281 








20,425 
47.939 
9,974 
11.683.749 

608.784 








Coke tons 


Coffee and cocoa, ground or prepared, and chocolate 
Cooper, and Manufactures of Ore (tons) 




137,368 




192,863 


5,886 
2 
2,507 
8,395 


579,939 
300 
243.926 
824.165 


1,612 


179,035 






4,298 
5,910 


261,540 
440,575 


Total 




72,306,274 
60.656,376 
B.898.962 
11431.982 
1,398.565 
186,515 
77.937 
>78,935641 


8,079,l(i4 
6,770.671 
3,705.937 
12,332.912 


72.722,558 
18,172.635 
44.WKI.972 
87,938.296 
1,183.038 
260.734 
152,844 
,54,987,079 


9,668.(i04 ; 
6.673,345 
(i.208,095 
11,719,778 
146.63T> 
38,800 
21,086 
34,476,343 
1,507,186 I 
S>,983.529 








British North America 


155.215 
22.583 
9,154 
31,075,636 
1,105.236 






Total 




Total copper and manuf 's of, not including ore 
' Cork, manufactures of 




i2.180.872 






45,891 




62,385 


, Cotton and Manufactures of Unmanufactured Ibs. 


15 filO 302 


2.767,291 
27,674.924 
J0.442.21:> 


4.142.052 

7592(58241 

7r:;no293 


$2.361X97 
207203,077 
JOSt 564.774 




w.'wisi;ro 

850 64 -95 


Total 


Exported to United Kingdom 


7t!(ar>039U 
n.018.931 
29.262.297 
32.1:54.257 
1,247.259 
21.216,287 


65.853.~614 
1.599.724 

54.>.24o 

8i. smart 

3.961.586 
1,321,473 


sdir.'i'.';^ 

J01.70;i20S 
964.487.271 

) 11.885.936 
49,114.841 
18,064,891 


99,709.352 
21.946,691 
47.846,679 
30,614,182 
2.994,674 
1,043.473 


France 






Brit ish North America 






12.106.823 
(5,699.498 
8.553 
J850264295 


7,428,226 
451,800 
653 
M.442.215 


91.367,051 
2,062,664 

2,496 

'773410293' 


5,775.784 
133,752 

187 
209 564.774 






Total unmanufactured 



30 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1000. 


EXPORTS, AND COUNTRIES TO Wnicn EXPORTED. 


1898. 


1899. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Waste Ibs. 


12,521.574 


$511,004 


14,308.829 
108.940.972 
303,063.083 
412.004.055 


$524.802 


Manufactures of Cloths (yds.), colored 


79.415.870 
191,092,443 
270.507,818 


4,138.887 
9,151 ,93i- 
13,290,823 


5,221, 27S 
13,748,019 
18,969,897 




Total 


Exported to (yds.) United Kingdom 


10,765.645 
163,687 
487.387 
1.381.134 
14.Dti.228 
8,496,741 
6.0/9.429 
2,642,088 
138,662 
22.878 
13,598,473 
2.H73.651 
8.000.680 
5.857,768 
24.000.968 
115,492.797 
13,411.373 
302,652 
580 8<>1 


726.284 
8.878 
43.09<i 
91,877 
783,985 
396,510 
415,910 
120,167 
12,163 
2.206 
703,175 
181.868 
565.921 
281,803 
1.126.871 
5,195.845 
627,843 
32.169 
47284 


9,951,404 
24,131 
257,145 
1.270.813 
17,114.475 
13.527,417 
8,31(9,834 
4,444,898 
9,001,836 
3.852,581 
18.748,736 
2,835.517 
9,328,179 
8.325.980 
31.752.038 
221.043.642 
5,547,691 
578,001 
5 0< t479 


628,445 
2.480 
28,505 
81,162 
819.241 
567,514 
481.509 
198.893 
447,839 
169,057 
939,143 
195,624 
545,545 
892,343 
1.374,117 
9.823.253 
266,405 
47,226 
.33,822 
216,384 
1,309.494 
396,097 
5,079 
18.969.897 








British North America 


Central American States nnrt British Honduras. . . 


Mexico 




Cuba 




Other West Indies and Bermuda 




Brazil 




Other South America 


China 


East Indies (British) 


Hongkong 




British Australasia 


1.148.B27 
26,630.361 
13,149.131 


114,088 
1.163,283 
554,301 
5,296 
13,290,828 


2.427.900 
33.267,717 
9,696.464 
. 77,577 
412.004.055 


Other Asia and Oceanica 


Africa 


Other countries 


100,641 
270.507.818 


Total cloths 


Other Manufactures of Wearing apparel 




934,192 




1,275,839 
315,375 
3,006,803 
4,598,017 


Waste, cop and mill Ibs. 


7,096908 


283,643 
2,215,434 


7,088.492 


All other , 


Total 




3,733,269 




Exported to United Kingdom 




380,089 
4,478 




430,978 
18,813 
194,146 
99,774 
1,939,929 
232,896 
401.962 
20,205 
112,580 
28,2fi3 
130.230 
65,484 
41.657 
40,793 
52,404 
21.312 
2,380 
16,039 
197,780 
405,977 
119 490 


France 










190.041 
70,085 
1,681,645 




Other Europe 






British North America 






Central American States and British Honduras 
Mexico - 




213.503 
334651 








18,491 
11,715 

1,078 




Cuba 






Puerto Rico 






Other West Indies and Bermuda 




96.92(1 




Argentina 




34,726 




Brazil 




50,828 








45.364 




Other South America 




31,810 




China 




7,582 




East Indies (British) 




1,882 








8,288 




British Australasia 




167,274 




Other Asia and Oceanica 




319,17." 




Africa. . 




52,728 








7,312 
3,735,269 




5,907 

4.597,017 
23,567.914 


Total other manufactures of 






Total manufactures of 




17,024,092 




Earthen, Stone and China Ware Earthen and stone ware 




193.334 
39,658 
232.992 




312,887 
38,943 
351.830 






Total 






Eggs doz 


2.754,810 


448,370 
157,553 


3,693,611 


641.3SO 
212,374 


Feathers '. 


Fertilizers, phosphates, crude tons 


| 474,230 
4"4.?."0 


4,359,834 
4,359,834 


5 780.513 
( 41,587 
822,100 


5,989,891 
974,474 
6.964.365 


All other 


Total 




98.815 
14.864 
183.231 
147,377 
4,574 
1 
21 
2,422 
76 


779.657 
83, 130 
1.788.351 
1,184.1513 
33.470 
40 
537 
56.475 
:>.:>?.-. 


170,098 
64.445 
270,089 
244,615 
6,401 
2 
26 
4,784 
3 
55,351 


1,179,381 
400,659 
2,521,983 
1387.688 
131,587 
35 
905 
100,853 
141 
736,531 




















23,139 


417,735 





EXPORTS OP MERCHANDISE. 31 


EXPORTS, AXD COUNTRIES TO WHICH EXPORTED. 


1898. 


1899. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Quant's. 


Values. 




211 
474.230 


$2,868 28b 
4,359,834! 822,100 


$4,59!) 
6,964.36.". 


Total 


Fibers. Vegetable, and Textile Grasses Manufactures of 




550,926 




406.593 
735,04!) 
1,504.971 
446,486 
3,093,102 




10,104.13(1 


576.140J 8,672,348 
1,091,576 




All other 




332 82S 




Total 




2.557,465 






1,250,050 
7.989 681 


48,878 

300,953 
74,844 
48,442 
14,830 
75.403 
2.564,017 
332 0^3 


1,444,079 

9.247,076 
3.101,560 
842,342 
1,017 
14.428 
30,167,267 


53,072 

370,112 
66,032 
40,308 
12,771 
61,650 
2,906,475 
331,601 
124,520 
215.387 
727,349 
249,455 
11,039 
5,169,773 


Dried, smoked or cured Cod, haddock, hake and 




3,701.52* 
1,093,32* 

1.370 
20.345 
27.279,455 


Other Ibs. 




Other brls 




Other, fresh or cured 


Canned fish, other than salmon and shellfish 
Caviare 




146,510i 
19o,110 


Other 




58ii,403. .. 

2'>> Mi 


All other fish, and fish products 




20840 


Total 




4,674.659 


Fruits and Nuts Apples, dried Ibs. 


31,031,251 
605,390 


1,897.725 19.:j.749 
1,684,717 380.222 
339 346 


1.245,733 
1,210,459 
282.313 
380.847 
242,752 
1,997,517 
2,330,715 
66,899 
140,250 
7,897.485 






15.940 791 
3,109,t!39 


1.021.888 5.610.565 
Iti7,062 4.659,807 
2.033.845 




All other green, ripe or dried 


Fruits, Preserved Canned 




1,6*1,741 




Other 




82504 




Nuts 




161,432 
9013310 




Total 










3-U5616 1 


3.282,490 
702,863 
890.635 
939,199 






747 389 






1.644 723 1 






1 195547! 






1 202 998' 


1,156.047 
27,324 
75.920 












68,513 ; .-. 






1,394 
38.175 
2318 




1,769 
64,683 
4.826 
57.533 
17,202 
17.208 
8.749 
22,164 
23,761 
12,346 
67,718 
260,611 
147,151 
116,232 
1,054 
7,897,485 


















56,096 
9761 










Brazil .... ... 




11843 








10.189! 






24.220 
31 785 




China 






East Indies (British) 




12,853 








43,471 
293,757 














85,358 




Africa 




90,711 








847 
9.013,310 




Total fruits and nuts 






Furniture of metal 




21,758 




182,128 


Furs and Fur Skins United Kingdom 




2 020 459 




2,083,597 
46.140 
516,131 
13.597 
427,624 
5,751 
3.092,846 






15,497 
527.220 
15.271 

3SO 798 






















Other countries 




21,725' 


Total 




2.986.970! 


Glass and Glassware Window glass 




23,480 
1,187,604 




32,690 
1,470,%1 
1,503.651 


All other 






Total 




1,211,084 




Glucose or grape sugar Ibs 


96.864.605 
2,318,711 


2,871.839 229.0WJ.571 
209.441, 2.368.087 
1,964,5651 


3,624.890 
222,072 
2,576,508 


Glut' Ibs 


Grease, grease scraps, and all soap stock 


Gunpowder and Other Explosives Gunpowder Ibs 


1,202.971 


139.644: 1.504,724 

1 25.') 702 


182,142 
1,350,247 
1,532,389 


Cartridges and other 


Total 




1 395406 









32 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


EXPORTS, AND COUNTRIES TO WHICH EXPORTED. 


1898. 


1899. 


Quant's. 


Fa hies. 


Quant's. 


Values. 






S*i35 716 




S503.712 

858.992 


Hay tons 


81,827 


1.15l',273: 64,9if> 


Hides and Skins, (Jlher than Furs (Ibs.) 


318.651 
687,7,% 
4.879.327 
382.021 
5,142.937 


29.456 343.970 
67.382 259.151 
392.292! 5,118,499 
54,492 511.816 
460.325 3,878,576 


40.068 
30.273 
430.417 
67,824 
ai5,871 


France 




British North America 


Central American States and British Honduras 




19,117 
1.472 
20.200 


2,676 
163 
1,205 


lfi.403 
3.750 
4,97& 


2,606 
IBS 

875 






Other Asia and Oceantca 


Africa 


80.962 
3,760 
11,536,073 


6,650 
391 
1.015.032 








3,700 

10.140,840 


550 
929,117 


Total 


Honey 




98.504 


55,899 


Hops (Ibs ) United Kingdom 


15,809.457 
1.98! 

282.374 
21.335 
290.772 
122 
3,097 
495 
(5.734 
8615 
27008 


2,468.853 
280 
35.185 
3,279 
32.425 
19 
389 
54 
773 
1.248 
8.760 


18.961.836 
757.773 
464,013 
26,386 
17,951 
288 
7,251 
974 
4.995 
13,122 
85.406 
752.663 
46.562 
3.292 
21,145.512 


3,291,347 
131.473 
61,389 
3,783 
2,362 
42 
1,532 
130 
590 
2.082 
11,382 
113.291 
6,440 
301 
3,626.144 






Central American States and British Honduras 




Cuba 








East Indies (British) 




682.580 
23.827 

3,318 


93.101 
3.090 
323 
2.642,779 






Total 
Ice to* 18 


17.161.6tii 


22.541 


38.116 


22,898 


43,461 


India Rubber and Gutta Percha, manufactures of Boots 


mjsp 


224.705 
1.499,157 


486,586 


260,886 
1,504,499 
1,765,385 


All other 


Total 




1.723,862 




India rubber, scrap and old 




257.63!) 




376.962 







113 l| 24 




104.693 
106,280 
210.973 


Other 




90.003 




Total 




203,927 




Instruments and Apparatus for Scientific Purposes, In- 
cluding Telegraph, Telephone, and Other Electric- 




538293 




a r A426 
454.818 
412,995 
272.381 
429,731 
80,136 
427,041 
185.700 
2^7,0ti2 
113.981 






174 31d 








234 <W2 








239.018 








305.G16 
58711 














287270 








88,815 
109,696 














88.23? 








123.800 
31.199 




120,951 
34.135 
232,892 
177.524 
180.857 
77,748 
799 
3,399.180 












230197 








57907 




Other Asia and Oceanica 




107,959 








94,637 








194 
2,770.803 




Total 








11.587 
.8.403 
328.4 

Baia 

10.fi84.U34 
37.77ti.37:. 
2,76! 
22.162 
84,66! 

ts; 
30.3x>l 
5,085 
9,235 


34.224 
344.743 
2,885.252 
632.334 
163.261 
470.052 
37.150 
426,4:.'7 
1,665,405 
11.074 
661451 

124.415 
207.015 
1,150,766 
613.858 


31,413 
495 
299.271 
91.985 
23.564.511 
73,861.862 
11.776 
30.570 
92..%1> 
1.635 
28,873 
9.337 
10.338 
8.3tfl 
43 516 


66,400 
20,667 
8,2! -0,628 
1,041.227 
365.144 
944,874 
141.706 
581.753 
1,720.503 
34,627 
587.58!) 
190,275 
249.080 
192.588 
959.016 ! 




A 11 other tons 








Steel Europe tons 




Central American States and British Honduras 








49,631 
24.952 


Asia and Oceanica 



EXPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. 33 


EXPORTS, AND COUNTRIES TO WHICH EXPORTED. 


1898. 


1899. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Africa 


3,105 

2-J9.783 


163,736 
4,613,376 


40,891 
266,089 


1782.694 
5,298,125 


Total 


Billets, ingots and blooms tons 


16,100 
3,475,969 
32.409,526 
'.1.1)87,071 
27.3(10,932 
20,827 
30,586 
137.0.V1.6U4 
21,006 


290,827 
47,327 
330,022 
182,809 
354,679 
962 
1,183,482 
2,593,306 
129,446 
804,975 
31 181 


43,242 

6,763,270 
56,492 707 
15,107,028 
112.689.113 
205,910 
49,069 
215,194,475 
23,933 


882.790 
107,703 
580,490 
324,747 
1,634,866 
10,046 
1,759.988 
3,891,180 
132,124 
1,066,626 
31,437 
164,603 
681,440 


Hoop, band and scroll Ibs. 


Rods, wire, of steel ..Ibs 


Sheets and plates Iron Ibs. 


Steel . Ibs 


Tin plates, terne plates, and taggers tin Ibs. 


Structural iron and steel tons 


Wire Ibs 




Castings, n. e. s 
Cutlery Table 


Allother 
Firearms 




125,377 
672.223 




Builders' Hard ware and Saws and Tools Locks, hinges 
and other builders' hardware 




3997796 




4,898,762 
223,764 

2,719,856 
7,842,372 


Saws 




206,799 
2,223,737 




Tools, n. e. s 






Total 




6,428,332 




Exported to United Kingdom 




1,585,069 
181,866 




1,833,369 
269,157 
866,872 
778.576 
906,047 
82,480 
358,213 
11,072 
262,379 
18.780 
79,617 
232,579 
225,191 
108,768 
234,069 
55,685 
41,639 
67,489 
1,018,011 
151,766 
238,709 
1,924 
7,842.372 


France 






Germany 




778,623 
555,568 
719,326 
82,462 
461,532 




Other Europe 






British North America 






Central American States and British Honduras 






Mexico 




Santo Domingo 




13,197 
56,961 
9,439 




Cuba 






Puerto Rico 






Other West Indies and Bermuda 




62,739 




Argentina 




147958 




Brazil 




160,884 
90.309 
20S.323 
19,669 




Colombia 












China 






East Indies (British) 




22,066 
76,500 
877,635 

108.8IW 
208622 






















Africa 






Other countries 




3,716 




Total 




6,428.332 












2,736,110 
6,491.686 
847,006 

2,710,654 


Metal-working 




4,618,683 








874,615 




Pumps and pumping machinery 




2,023,034 




Sewing Machines, and Parts of United Kingdom 




879,650 
102,809 




966,424 

95,963 
688,980 
167,876 
163,095 
20,312 
270,692 
2,378 
12,323 
4,086 
22.174 
14:1,893 
112,398 
6-J.374 
127,299 
4,544 
7,818 
6,270 
321,785 
55,918 
11.985 
373 
3,264.344 






861,702 








211,643 








141,172 








30,312 
197,692 
1.282 
2.786 
















Cuba . 






Puerto Rioo . . . 




3,120 
17,471 














77,188 




Brazil .... 




95.966 
82.359 














101,289 




China 




3.848 




East Indies (British) 




4.363 








5,883 
274,154 














30,961 
10,566 
159 
3,136,364 
















Total 










895,788 




853,936 
13,973 
4,728.748 
335.011 
1,182,489 




9 

46S 
665 


7,497 
3,883,719 
398.570 
927,552 


4 

m 

606 






Boilers and parts of engines 


Typewriting Machines, and Parts of United Kingdom. . . 
France 




89(5,575 
94.608 




i,05i,<r,o 

160.S57 



84 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


EXPORTS, AND COUNTRIES TO WHICH EXPORTED. 


1898. 


1899. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Qua Jit's. 


Values. 


Germany 




$425,614 
232253 




$507.000 

360608 


Other Europe 






British North America 




61,677 
2,360 

28.9K 

1,457 
65 
4,225 




69,323 
2.440 
45.824 
208 
19,7651 


Central American States and British Honduras 






Mexico 






Santo Domingo 






Cuba 






Puerto Rico 






4.229 
5,736 
31,164 
6,135 
3,942 
25,981 
5,799 
12,981 
7,262 
77,285 
18.400 
31,627 
75 
2,449,205 
18,722,251 


Other West Indies and Bermuda 






Argentina 




18,187 
4,945 




Brazil 






Colombia 




4228 




Other South America 




14,652 




China 




2,642 
9,014 




East Indies (British) 






Japan .... 




4.220 
60,039 

9986 




British Australasia 






Other Asia and Oceanlca.. . 






Africa 




36,342 




Other countries 






Total..., 




1,902,153 




All other 




13.336.93C 




Nails and Spikes (Ibs ) Cut. . . 


b2.31U.ITO 
22,894,OW 
t308,082 


612,234 
458,787 
245.722 
3 U92.01G 


32,809,265 
51.233,212 
4,719,846 


604,215 
973,434 
286.947 
5,874,228 
145.349 
390,214 
503.739 
10,450,779 
93,715,951 


Wire 


All other, including tacks 


Pipes and fittings 


Safes No 


1,319 


87,614 
343200 


2,257 


Scales and balances 


Stoves, ranges, and parts of 




382,980 




All other manufactures of iron and steel 
Total iron and steel, etc., not including ore 
Jewelry, and Other Manufactures of Gold and Silver- 




9.305,977 
70.406,885 






555.719 
192,061 
747.780 




729,194 
233,962 
963,151! 


Other manufactures of gold and silver i 






Total 






Lamps, chandeliers, and all other devices for illuminating 
purposes 




672,010 




777,409 


Lead, and Manufactures of (Ibs.) Pigs, bars, and old 


32,560 
301,988 


1,462 
104.404 
117.152 


164,306 
259,309 


6,502 
97.745 
130,8155 
235,112 


All other 


Total 




223,018 




Leather, and Manufactures of Leather, sole (Ibs.) 


30,019.305 
305,900 
4.201,948 
1,056.204 
41,828 
42,950 


5,125.572 
60,305 
787,867 
203,161 
8,672 
9,071 
327,836 
37.724 
40.935 
34,539 
8,871 
6.644,553 


31,381.148 
411,134 
3,041.063 
848.119 
36,230 
17,142 
757,961 
127,064 
330,887 
126.573 
48,591 
37,120,912 


5,168,688 
84.468 
655,217 
157,707 
7,566 
4,321 
165.603 
23.207 
72,018 
26.495 
10,714 
6,280.904 








West Indies and Bermuda 






1,563.105 
178,522 
192.118 
166.538 
44,511 
37,813,019 




Other Asia and Oceanica 






Total 


Leather Other Upper leather K id, glazed 




249.990 




694,265 






93.847 

9 yty.oHo 




82.9US 
11.576.822 
1,090,574 

13,444,569 












858,421 




Total 




11,151,851 








8,025,217 




9,595,30K 
385.087 
954,347 
1.260,305 
663.823 
10.278 
9.872 
1.759 
14.8^8 
8.84"? 
26,015 
34,433 
53,913 
3781 






291,2281 




fjp-rman v* 




587.602 
1.162,151 
674,893 




Xfrhftr "PiirnnA 
















4,713 








9,310 








569 
2,298 














1,394 








15,105 
4,360 















64,022 








4,133 








13,288 
239,124 




32,033 
318,345 
39.062 






Other Asia and Oceanica 




38.028 





EXPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. 36 


EXPORTS, AND COUNTRIES TO WHICH EXPORTED. 


1898. 


1899. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Africa . .... 




$23,886 
630 
11,151,861 




$32,271 
268 
13,444.569 








Total leather, other 










352,755 

26,778 
68672 




525,242 
39,664 
79,578 
59,481 
427,023 
10B.6M 
212,245 

SOUK*! 

34.231 

36.562 
409.0U7 
175,588 
99.877 
2,178 
2,711.385 














Other Europe 




36,113 
285,054 

88.907 
87,669 
















Mexico 






West Indies and Bermuda 




290,516 
41,430 




Colombia., 










28,879 
235,679 
177.418 




British Australasia . . 












Africa 




93.247 
3,621 
1,816,538 




Other countries , 






Total 






Harness and saddles . . 




214,665 




237,552 
792,575 
23,466,985 


Allother 




1,286,033 
21.113,640 




Total leather and manufactures of 






Lime brls 


48,887 
406.702 


42.268 
287,473 


73,377 
452.038 


71,736 
324.087 


Malt bu. 


Malt Liquors In bottles doz 


406,231 
391,802 


497,031 
88,648 
585,579 


1.433,802 
602,056 


1,733,373 
164,751 
1,888,124 


In other coverings gals 


Total 


Marble and Stone, and Manufactures of Unmanufactured 




95,953 

1,370,075 




68,903 
1,363,617 
454.236 
1,886,756 






All other 




422,607 
1,888,535 




Total 






Matches 




78.648 




103.693 


Musical Instruments (No. ) Organs 


13.421 
987 


742,963 
232,144 

408,760 
1,383,867 


17,119 
1,169 


985,997 
253,950 
651,896 

1,791,843 


Pianofortes 


All other, and parts of 


Total 






Naval Stores Resin, tar, turpentine, and pitch (brls.) 
Resin 


2,206,203 
19.31P 
19,225 
2.-J44.744 


3,689,262 

3B.475 
48.611 
3.774.338 


2,563,229 
36,907 
22,945 
2.623.081 


3,741,681 
86,002 
54,953 
3,882,i 


Tar 


Turpentine and pitch 


Total 


Exported to (brls.) United Kingdom . . 
Germany 


U14.203 
520,427 
698,053 
49.960 
6,774 
4,323 
2,895 
4,077 
404 
7,537 
53,782 
113,058 
6,037 
49,753 
2,139 
8,067 
60,288 
42,979 
952 

i 

2,244.744 


1.0fi8,256 
843.611 
1,102,577 
111,482 
15,469 
10,212 
6,156 
7,543 
814 
15.853 
96,161 
194,409 
13,102 
95,878 
4,635 
17,762 
106.564 
62,726 
2,046 
92 
3,774,338 


766,955 
625,750 
816,637 
69,460 
5,011 
3,714 
1,781 
4,867 
639 
6,200 
41,775 
127,980 
6,661 
43,532 
3,025 
11,030 
63,443 
46,051 
1,570 


1,176,692 
859,258' 
1.092.808 
132,740; 
13.924 i 
8,924 i 
8,760 
9.032 
1,281; 
11,508 
74.242 
220,213 
12,517 
80.540 
5,943 
19,114 
99,628 
67,384 
3,128 


Other Europe 


British North America 


Central American States and British Honduras 


Mexico 


Santo Domingo . 


Cuba 


Puerto Rico 


Other west Indies and Bermuda 


Argentina 


Brazil 


Colombia 


Other South America 


China 


Japan 


British Australasia 


Other Asia and Ocean ica.. .. 


Africa 


Other countries 


Total resin, tar, etc 


2,623,081 


3,882,530 


Turpentine, Spirits of (gals.) United Kingdom 
Germany 


7,508,831 
2,810,73 
0,079,499 
670,432 
7,468 
10,071 
1,229 
48,149 
4,675 
22,310 
335,677 
202,207 
11,757 
1(59.334 


2.156,130 
797,125 
1,753,074 
207,600 
3,029 
3,626 
491 
15,352 
1,648 
7,785 
129,606 
74,148 
4.513 
61,934 


8,988,226 
2,634,867 
4,560,063 
627,472 
9,495 
10,348 
1,452 
88,935 
9,616 
25,648 
139,186 
136,784 
14,110 
111,28* 


2,996,538 
876,389 
1.595.C7U 
230,758 
4,181 
4,393 
627 
35,374 
4.345 
10,754 
55,785 
51.791 
6,738 
47.859 


Other Europe 


British North America. 


Central American States and British Honduras. 


Mexico 


San to Domingo 


Cuba 


Puerto Rico 


Other West Indies and Bermuda 


Argentina 


Brazil 


Colombia 


Other South America 



36 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


EXPORTS, AND COUNTRIES TO WHICH EXPORTED. 


1898. 


1899. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Quant's. 


Values. 




MB 

12,500 
368.593 
20,550 

<nj.ua; 

411 

18,351,140 


$2,494 
4,088 
126.553 
7,358 
24,192 
160 
5,380,806 
9,155.144 


20,050 
20,200 
271,944 
88,226 
83,549 
50 
17,791,533 


$8,289 
8,476 
105,494 
16,970 
39,908 
23 
6,100,419 
9,982,955 










Other countries 


Total . ... 


Total naval stores. . 




5,699,110 


1,402.803 

96,330 


4,907,722 


1,110,222 
134,929 


Nursery stock 


Oil Cake and Oil-Cake Meal (Ibs.) Cottonseed 


919,727,701 
436,206,321 
1355934022 


8,040,710 
4,540,824 
12,581,534 


1081108979 
486,061,890 
1567170809 


9,268,398 
5,262,744 

14,531,142 




Total 


Exported to (Ibs.) United Kingdom 


351,187,738 
67.343.237 
433,308.604 
487.844,589 
3.579.666 
12,2'K>,858 
301,282 
121.988 
1355934022 


3,295.959 
629,967 
3,795,548 
4,661.127 
36,571 
157,178 
3,724 
1,460 
12,581,534 


374,435.429 
66.397,448 
403,957,019 
643.001,057 
7,101.857 
11, 828,036 
349,035 
100,988 
1567170869 


3,547,924 
654,546 
4.032,654 
6,071,151 
64,728 
154,070 
4,825 
1,244 
14,531,142 








British North America 


West Indies and Bermuda 




Other countries 


Total oil cake and oil-cake meal 


Oilcloths For floors 




29.429 




31,080 
101,452 

132,532 


Other 




89,212 
118,641 




Total 






Oils Animal (gals.) Fish 


585,930 
775.102 
83,302 
123,711 
1.568,045 


108,194 
305,825 
37,726 
60,587 
502,332 


946,358 
917,007 
79,767 
166,372 
2,109,504 


191,342 
412,447 
35,970 
64,368 
704,127 


Lard .... 


\Vhale 


Other 


Total animal 


Mineral, Crude Including all natural oils, without 
regard to gravity (gals.) France 


85,125,657 

16,042,002 
100 
7.713,859 
3,829,463 
585,290 
1,026 
113^97.397 


3,221,437 
644,761 

317,514 
207,649 
61,808 
85 
4,343,262 


83.630,510 
18,000,184 

20.510 

7,909,871 
3,297,175 
160,000 


3,832,827 
768,061 
1,420 
395.386 
192,086 
12,512 


Other Europe 


British North America 


Mexico 


Cuba 


Puerto Rico 


Other countries : 


Total 


113,088,060 


5,202,892 


Mineral. Refined or Manufactured, Not Including Residu- 
um (gals.) Naphthas, including all lighter products 
of distillation 


16,232,929 

824.420,581 
60,299,366 
900,978,875 


1,080,797 

42,922.082 
7,239,454 
51.242,933 


16,252,785 
722.279.480 
67,424,080 
805,956,345 


1,170,294 
41,087,031 
7,943,193 
50,200,518 




Lubricating and heavy paraffin oil 


Total 


Exported to (gals.) United Kingdom 


212.265,563 
12.835,031 
152,203.222 
200.431.31U 
11,067,502 
1,064.980 
1,100.853 
579.825 
243,202 
200,542 
4.108.714 
11,099,132 


11.157.459 
1,133,288 
6,838,404 
12,431.565 
737,389 
112,834 
184,088 
60,051 
31,358 
22,677 
338,299 
1,007,498 
1,532,231 
103.145 
967,067 
2.86o.09o 
2,577,216 
991,929 
3,815,125 
1,985.605 
1,242.989 
1,114,103 
3,458 

51.242,933 


212.734.107 
12,012,773 
128,084.786 
253,544.389 
10,912,290 
1,123,072 
1,259,263 
344,633 
1,080.309 
554,650 
3,978,825 
7.371, 200 
16,987,232 
1,880,988 
9.UU085 
2-2.809,793 
24.469,724 
18,198,402 
38.002,276 
17.138.566 
10.703.2ai 
12,488,595 
40,045 

805,956345 


12.023,768 
1,118.254 
6,542,815 
13,554,069 
702,024 
131,333 
191.480 
39.955 
125,156 
61,015 
383,354 
797,004 
1,499,118 
129,000 
890,460 
1.810,565 
1,800,519 
1.399.374 
2.401,475 
1,788,201 
1.382.031 
1,298,288 
3,560 

50,200,518 


France 


Germany 


Other Europe 


British North America 




Mexico 


Santo Domingo 


Cuba 


Puerto Rico 


Other West Indies and Bermuda 


Argentina 


Brazil 


20.561.084 
1.009.022 
11.283.540 
44,523552 
35.752,592 
15,732,648 
53,398.185 
20.495,398 
18,621,008 
12,292,744 
42,020 

900,978,875 




Other South America 


China 


East Indies (British) . 


Hongkong 


J apan 


British Australasia 




Africa 


Other countries 


Total mineral, refined or manufactured (not includ- 
ing residuum) 


Residuum, including tar, and all other, from which the 
light bodies have been distilled brls. 


475,562 


539,383 
51,782.316 


730,214 


869,758 

51.070.270 


Total refined or mnnufaotured (Including residuum) 



EXPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. 37 


EXPORTS, AND COUNTRIES TO WHICH EXPORTED. 


1898. 


1899. 


Quant's. 


Valuta. 


Quant's 


Values. 


Vegetable Corn gitls. 


2,646,560 
2,560.090 
lU'.,fvSl 
2,600,577 
15,471,225 
460.64'J 
8.869 
1,727,423 
82,773 
9,543 
100 
754.504 
19,270 
876,307 
323,247 
76,506 
1.300 
864,820 
40,230,784 


1575,646 
629,679 
3,617.133 
639,312 
3,977,385 
115.648 
3,080 
328,768 
27.824 


2,360,623 
5,845,12; 
16,959,352 
8.521,410 
17,911,699 
477.830 
12,925 
2,678,027 
94,542 
70,46b 
4,736 
702,698 
94,066 
781,078 
308,096 
47,440 
800 
1,116,931 
50,627,219 


$565.293 
1,296,342 
4,043.709 
873,395 
4,411,086 
111,517 
5,114 
491.114 
30.627 
20.395 
1.619 
183,448 
29,752 
196,501 
97.897 
14,629 
236 
270,138 
12,077,519 




France 


Germany 


OtherBurope 




Central American States and British Honduras 


Mexico 


Santo Domingo 


Cuba 


2,774 
30 
196,192 
5,947 
237,065 
104,844 




Other West Indies and Bermuda 


Argentina 


Brazil 




British Australasia 


22,686 
355 
228,897 
10,137,619 


Other Asia and Oceanica 


Africa 


Total 


Linseed gals. 


90,074 
145.375 


38,439 
180.S11 
201,497 


106,300 
117,462 


47,681 
118,227 
162,358 
838,257 
13.809,335 




Other 


All other 




885,057 
12,019,069 




Total vegetable 






Paints, Pigments and Colors Carbon black, gas black, and 
lamp 'black 




178,422 
211.299 
689,797 




191,827 
316,862 
938.736 
1,447,425 


Zinc, oxide of Ibs. 


7,140,102 


9,719,741 


All other 


Total 




1.079.518 




Paper, and Manufactures of Paper hangings 




186.904 




129,000 
2,385,667 
158,096 
2.805,121 

5,477,884 




107,405,503 


2,702,351 
1H0.499 
2,444.810 


98.154,644 




All other 






Total 




5,494,6* 




Paraffin and Paraffin Wax (Ibs.) United Kingdom 


96,105.035 
2,768.836 
23,588.73,' 
19J34.X>5 
88,664 
444,809 
3,637,767 
31.656 
234.939 
111.879 
4,380.5s!6 
2,727,184 
58,154 
715,391 
154.628,460 


3,671.424 
120,756 
926,540 
802,544 
3,839 
21,694 
157,863 
1.246 
10.968 
5,703 
158,305 
117,246 
2,658 
29,506 
6,030.292 


107.362.181 
2.508.011 
21,604,920 
30,172.657 
69,432 
624,587 
5,119,362 
55.058 
280.115 
152,795 
3,:i28.05S) 
2,480.451 
211.514 
885,559 
174,844,701 


4.050.114 
101.282 
867,287 
1,201,455 
2,651 
31,935 
241,110 
2,607 
13,583 
7,994 
132,273 
107,836 
9,008 
35.549 

6,804,684 








Central American States and British Honduras 


Mexico 




Brazil 


Other South America 








Africa 


Total 






306.363 
417.J24 




316.542 
450.462 


Plated ware 






Provisions, Comprising Meat and Dairy Products Meat 
products Beef products -Canned (Ibs.) 


20,763,131 
422,017 
6,069,003 
3,046,732 
619,315 
257,318 
112,162 
466 
81.046 
384 
449,213 
4,880 
184.600 
72,273 
157.317 
173.858 
5,000 
133,220 
227,672 
69.945 
383.435 
4.976,319 
264 
37,109.570 


1,828,593 
35.503 
446.440 
256,779 
40.1o9 
28,579 
14,237 
40 
6,412 
30 
11.651 
545 
17.744 
6,623 
14,492 
24,470 
668 
19,712 
33,452 
7,695 
56,958 
398,855 
2(1 
3.279.657 


22.723.304 
354.534 
3.334.8HO 
2,281,066 

1,583.766 
198,033 
148.179 
1,256 
144,680 

two 

361,743 
15.148 
171,942 
56.563 
124,196 
122,313 
10,161 
158.198 
346.778 
24,510 
591,155 
5,633,440 


2,066,308 
32,029 
294,123 
202,393 
36,957 
20.148 
19,670 
117 
13,698 
50 
36.349 
1.445 
17.101 
6,073 
11.861 
16,814 
1,201 
23,185 
40,750 
2,498 
85,945 
476,678 












Mexico 


Santo Domingo 




Puerto Rico 






Brazil 


Colombia 


Other South America 


China 


East Indies (British) 






British Australasia 


Other Asia and Oceanica 






Total 


18.385.475 


3.503.293 





38 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOB 1900. 


EXPORTS, AND COUNTRIES TO WHICH EXPORTED. 


1898. 


1899. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Qttant's . 


Values. 


Freeh (Ibs.) United Kingdom 


274,183,636 

144.860 
439,578 


$22,922,136 
9.676 
34,744 


281,041,427 
483.851 
442,501 
172,195 
282,139974 


$23,456.488 
39,055 
36,579 
14,063 
23,645,185 


British North America 






Total 


274,768,074 


22.966,556 


Salted or Pickled, and Other Cured (Ibs.) Salt' d or pickl' d 


41.314,479 
1,589,052 
45.903,631 


2,368.467 
150,051 
2,518.518 


46,561,876 
1,579,313 
48,141,189 


2,525,784 
146,996 
2,671,780 


Total 




19,279,027 
323,776 
4.832.150 
5.637,239 
3,364.167 
793,031 
8,276 
52,600 
279.189 
16,700 
5,869,499 
22,400 
252.189 
3,123,675 
1.417.626 
613,500 
18,500 
45,903,631 


1,126,707 
17.911 
271,011 
293.693 
155,628 
39.079 
492 
2,718 
13.720 
859 
311.033 
1,237 
13,240 
175,027 
65,650 
30,752 
961 
2,518.518 


20.035,195 
180,400 
5.911,654 
8,728.91* 
3,860.983 
673.604 
11,744 
93,574 
618,079 
24.30U 
4,944,572 
41,550 
280,043 
3,221,825 
1,003.250 
489,500 
21,100 
48,141,189 


1,186.322 
10,304 
319,506 
348.874 
187,882 
35.858 
625 
4.875 
32,014 
1,227 
260,516 
2.630 
14,713 
174,498 
65,217 
25,633 
1,186 
2.671.780 


France .* 






British North America 


Central American States and British Honduras 


Mexico 




Cuba 


Puerto Rico 


Other West Indies and Bermuda 


Brazil . . 


Colombia 


Other South America 




Africa 




Total beef, salted, etc 


Tallow (Ibs.) United Kingdom 


41,661,299 
9,603,964 
11,195.548 
11,419,748 
247,375 
2.206.331 
636.742 
786,763 
404,767 
6,307 
2,041,605 
572.245 
373,283 
463,419 
133,563 
2.860 
81,744.809 


1,598,528 
351,545 
446,231 
422,424 
7,185 
95,679 
24,364 
30.338 
13,231 
287 
85,917 
25.070 
16.230 
20.033 
6,447 
144 
3,141,663 


37,190,354 
16.803,083 
16,895,585 
29,714,611 
597,782 
2,052.822 
814,723 
374.39C 
497.770 
10,015 
1,266,006 
701,601 
277,995 
732,046 
420.519 
11,707 
107,361,009 


1,538,114 
616.048 
677,487 
1,190,962 
16,829 
92,126 
33,575 
15.S40 
19,160 
647 
58,815 
37,778 
14,408 
33.762 
21,292 
613 
4,367.366 


France 


Germany 


Other Europe 


British North America 


Central American States and British Honduras 


Mexico 


Santo Domingo 


Cuba .7 


Puerto Rico 




Brazil 


Colombia 


Other South America 


Asia and Oceanica 


Other countries 


Total 


Hog Products Bacon (Ibs.) United Kingdom 


473.201,692 
2.370,965 
51,524,565 
82,583.840 
19,699.775 
217,533 
95,100 
31,824 
10,736,382 
496,391 
737.730 
7,857,354 
18,460 
380,001 
36,656 
140,488 
31,172 
650,108,933 


34.919.807 
165,925 
3.338.869 
5,335,717 
1,267,287 
16,692 
9.804 
2.21S 
672,008 
33.013 
66.123 
608,171 
1.366 
29,223 
4,635 
17,906 
2,159 
46,380.918 


395.474.204 
12,366,110 
36,151.678 
88,521,122 
9,804,718 
263.640 
184.482 
31.552 
11,353,301 
1,138,421 
676.705 
6,040.051 
27,325 
235,429 
69,110 
247,387 
76,250 
562.651.480 


30,312,477 
853.030 
2,532,600 
5,975,282 
604,189 
17,914 
17,277 
1.903 
643,381 
74,283 
47,075 
415,745 
1,862 
16,758 
7,532 
30,354 
5,405 
41.557,067 




Germany 


Other Europe 


British North America 


Central American States and British Honduras 


Mexico 


Santo Domingo 


Cuba 


Puerto Rico 


Other West Indies and Bermuda 


Brazil 






China 


Other Asia and Oceanica 


Africa 


Total 


Hams (Ibs.) United Kingdom 


153.549.559 
1.182.618 
11.963,631 
19,902.884 
5.793,345 
278,160 
211,471 
69,918 
S.oK.SMO 
602,415 
1,534,182 
33,016 
156,021 
795,108 
68,159 
6.985 


14,567,748 
117,513 
1,109,550 
1,893.425 
613,129 
28,291 
23.790 
6.716 
365,243 
60,941 
138,380 
3,262 
13,805 
84,268 
8,788 
909 


177.702.854 
1.145,490 
9.813,118 
20,634,4!l& 
5,933.259 
248,286 
277,623 
69,055 
6.229.4S6 
127,234 
1,696.163 
32,412 
194,327 
818,841 
103,490 
46,758 


16,366,851 
106,499 
9U3.010 
1,893,573 
509.000 
23.200 
30,956 
7,483 
559,584 
11,641 
147,931 
3,649 
16,507 
84,837 
13,127 
5,259 




Germany 


Other Europe 


British North America 


Central American States and British Honduras 




Santo Domingo 


Cu Da 


Puerto Rico 


Other West Indies and Bermuda 


Brazil : . 


Colombia 


Other South America 


China 


British Australasia 



EXPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. 39 


EXPORTS, AND COUNTRIES TO WHICH EXPORTED. 


1898. 


1899. 


QuanVs. 


Values. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Other Asia and Oceanica 


3*7,856 
162.025 
15,568 
200,185,861 
12,224,285 
88,133,078 
100.357,363 


843,713 
16,604 
1,450 
18,987.525 
815,075 
4.906,961 
5.722.036 


635,223 
215.650 
22,983 
225.846750 


$65,989 
23,136 
1.789 
20,774,084 


Africa 




Total ,. 


Pork (Ibs ) Fresh 


41,310,364 
137,197.200 
178.507,5P4 


2,722,661 
7.917,060 
10.639,727 


Salted or pickled 


Total 


Exported to (Ibs.) United Kingdom 


31,601.732 
112,900 
9,<J17,088 

13.829.336 
15,751,791 
1,423.005 
95,000 
267.600 
8,666,700 
19,205.017 
32,300 
154,039 
4.242.440 
144.735 
85.500 
147.629 
100,357,363 


2,014.665 
6,670 
624.859 
801,817 
867.101 
70,438 
5.338 
14,103 
176,219 
985.879 
2.045 
8.899 
218.508 
9,840 
6,336 
8,319 
6,722,036 


90,686,214 
212,936 
15,515.225 
26,553.645 
17,994,451 
1,306,575 
112.801 
752,766 
3,332,800 
16,686,667 
117,900 
171.474 
4,515.559 
168.980 
209.600 
169,968 
178,507,664 


5.805.258 
12,472 
824.018 
1.572.405 
983,818 
63.395 
6,949 
39,466 
173.151 
872.000 
7,368 
9,613 
236,575 
12,688 
11,201 
9,760 
10,639,727 








British North America 


Central American States and British Honduras 


Santo Domingo 


Cuba 


Puerto Rico 


Other West Indies and Bermuda 


Brazil 




Other South America 








Total 


Lard (Ibs.) United Kingdom 
France 


241,077,725 
21.307,239 

233.814,879 
l3S.510,<i()t 

ii..v<9.294 

2.666,022 
3,602.758 
489,767 
20,139.515 
3.609,131 
6,482,058 
46,002 
15,362.399 
2.U57.865 
10,837.480 
661.288 
2,018,217 
41,800 
709.344.045 


13,807.640 
1.129,191 
12.813.2db 
7,631.883 
355,448 
166,161 
177,525 
29,682 
1.027,657 
190,630 
418,487 
3,133 
973.99U 
120.436 
681.023 
46.854 
145,228 
2,498 
39.710.672 


204.645.770 
32.312,597 
229.230.175 
159.922.867 
7.016.986 
2.742.674 
3,270,339 
468.927 
27,291,504 
4,741.704 
6,594,892 
53,912 
17.839,650 
1,766,263 
9.745,658 
1.307,334 
3,253,787 
64,812 
711.259851 


12.310,730 
1.830.281 
13.600.767 
9,367,911 
373.403 
158,967 
1H9.689 
27.945 
1,462,604 
256.372 
869,668 
3,636 
1,219.882 
105,119 
628,365 
81,955 
238,165 
3.113 
42,208,462 








Mexico 




Cuba .. 








Brazil 




Other South America. 


Asia and Oceanica 


Africa 




Total 


Lard compounds, and substitutes for (cottolene, lardine' 
etc.) IDS- 


21,343,028 


1,118,659 
1,821,519 


22,114,712 


1.200.231 

1,671,052 
29.427 




Mutton. Ibs 


32JU6S 


27,961 


379,110 


Oleo and oleomargarine (Ibs.) Oleo, the oil 


1325711.277 
4,328,536 
136.907.813 


7,904.413 
386,297 
8,290,710 


142390.492 
6.549,322 
147.939,814 


9,183.659 
509.703 
9,693.362 


Oleomargarine, imitation butter 


Total 


Exported to (Ibs.) United Kingdom 


9,164.137 
31,590.087 
81,452,099 
11,536,933 
823,902 
10,930 
,017 


651.425 
1,911,780 
4.878,313 
668,194 
49.604 
1,254 
961 


7.700,908 
30,612,969 
86,452,770 
19,129,704 
912,204 
22,875 
7,614 
204,891 
2,120,435 
123,224 
222.312 
271,688 
158,320 
147,939.814 


476.875 
2,080,029 
6.514.523 
1.260,434 
67,618 
2,514 
731 
22,903 
208.093 
11,225 
23.913 
28,675 
15,829 
9,693,363 






Other Europe 


British North America 


Central American States and British Honduras 






Other West Indies and Bermuda 


1,753.190 
98,896 
161,766 
198,896 
112,960 
136.907,813 


170.090 
8.40C 
15,865 
22.440 
12,394 
8.290.710 


Colombia 


Other South America 






Total 


Poultry and game 




85.73J 




183,503 
5.831,865 


All other meat products 




4,193,078 




Dairy Products Butter (Ibs.) United Kingdom 


14,801,641 
1,448,800 
1,141,279 
3.809.452 
279.895 
249.079 
55,816 
42.715 
18,900 


2,2<a,931 
171,735 
139.418 
594,033 
48.631 
43,720 
7.911 
8,087 
2,407 


10,278,788 
918,262 
972,801 
1,986.083 
250,195 
280.924 
76,647 
685.840 
45,706 


1,705,190 
135,299 
141.427 
324,996 
46,637 
49,767 
11.154 
99,497 
8,169 






British North America 


Central American States and British Honduras 




Santo Domingo 


Cuba 


Puerto Rico 





40 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


EXPORTS, AND COUNTRIES TO WHICH EXPORTED. 


1898. 


1899. 


Quant's . 


Values . 


Quant's. 


Values. 




1,857.252 
749.653 
134.644 
651.569 
21,555 
115,20< 
255.304 
20.987 
36,275 
25,690,025 


1284,855 
92,191 
19,672 
91,622 
4,688 
23,097 
52,995 
4,186 
5,586 
3,864.765 


2,005,538 
1,420,222 
83,351 
911.943 
22,337 
92,495 
216,882 
17,147 
22,936 
20,247,997 


8329,100 
177,514 
15,127 
141,219 
5,159 
18.592 
48,128 
3,505 
3,471 
3,2K3,9ol 


Brazil. 






China 








Other countries 


Total 


Cheese (Ibs.) United Kingdom 


38,146,235 
105 
13,149.652 
156,187 
123,541 
32,766 


3,267,507 
9 
1,073,447 
17,721 
14,436 
3,984 


23,715,719 


2,063,409 






11,873,701 
150,324 
167,555 
39,755 
635,225 
220,917 
719,693 
6.615 
64,640 
110,467 
101,950 
62.680 
318,271 
22,441 
38.198,753 


942.612 
17.602 
19,889 
4,928 
76,884 
27,404 
85,945 
638 
7,950 
13,362 
11,161 
5.965 
36,044 
2,256 
3,316,049 








Cuba ^ 


219,631 
12,167 
766,813 
2,285 
91,658 
134,899 
44.264 
85,594 
241.215 
10,368 
53,167,280 


25,888 
1,535 
90,483 
257 
11,082 
17,079 
4,817 
3,867 
26,071 
1,141 
4,559,324 


Puerto Rico 




Brazil 






China . 








Total 


Milk 




671,670 




1,049,211 


Total provisions, etc 




167,340,960 




175.508,605 


Quicksilver Ibs. 


973.460 
637,146 
5,563,841 
17,073,214 


414,938 
27,501 
35,498 
66.151 


1,123,471 
852,704 
14,481.985 
25.246,634 


516.398 
38.511 
80.301 
86.315 


Kice Ibs. 




Salt Ibs. 




31,155.381 
32,764,781 
257.228 
10,238,780 


1.892.101 
197,258 
231.237 
317.173 
167 109 


19,982,234 
34,443,806 
2.830.991 
16,149,611 


1,264.922 
197,023 
2,815,449 
492,710 
156,200 
153,092 
5.079,396 


Cotton .- Ibs. 




Timothy Ibs. 








149*845 




Total 




2.954,723 




Exported to United Kingdom 




1 065977 




852.496 
172.184 
920.394 
1,641,413 
1,384.233 
4,875 
15,724 
320 
4,190 
539 
4.384 
10,842 
1.085 
1,594 
2,440 
616 
60,684 
7,113 
4,290 
5,079,396 


Prance 




44,904 




Germany 
Other Europe 




838,904 
390943 




British North America 




481,486 




Mexico 




5.337 
29472 








864 
2,612 
19 
3,970 
368 
858 
1 73S 




Cuba 






Puerto Rico 






Other West Indies and Bermuda 


















Colombia 






Other South America 




2,345 




China 




909 
76,134 




British Australasia 










5,609 
2229 




Africa 






Total seeds 




2,954,723 




Shells 




129 143 




116,052 
200,729 


isilk, manufactures of 




297.074 




Soap Toilet or fancy 




275935 




314,326 
1,143,284 
1,457,610 


Other Ibs. 


29.397,734 


1,114,668 
1,390,603 


32,529,093 


Total 


Spermaceti and spermaceti wax Ibs . 


236,537 


68,428 


214,443 


67,929 


Spirits, Distilled (proof gals.) Alcohol Wood 
Other, including pure, neutral, or cologne spirits 


385,938 
1,619,230 
24,886 
607.634 
286,599 
17,495 
36,869 
2,978,651 


199.230 
463,616 
39.455 
845.673 
241,066 
31,164 
30.149 
1,850,353 


727,062 
1,476.028 
20,844 
850,719 
224,918 
104,884 
19,536 
3.423.991 


414,875 
427.288 
29.289 
1,175.306 
267,865 
156,617 
24,372 
2.495,612 






Whisky Bourbon 


Rye 




Total 





KXPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. 41 


EXPOF.TS, AND COUNTRIES TO WHICH EXPORTED. 


1898. 


1899. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


StarcU Ibs. 


72,806,313 


$1,371,549 

1,005,011 


110,223,776 


$2,292,973 
1,120,893 
60,940 
359,780 


Stationery, except of paper 


Stereotype and electrotype plates 




61,48! 




Straw and palm leaf, manufactures of 




317,468 




Sugar and Molasses Molasses gals. 


3,817.829 
7.573.541 
400,682 


267,202 
794,727 
17,353 


5,682.080 
10,070,650 
403,119 


444,392 
1,465,849 
14,275 


Sugar, brown Ibs. 


Sugar, Refined (Ibs). United Kingdom 


547.132 
2,075 
5,949 
74.151 
1,041,455 
416,981 
30,280 
1,789,814 
525,688 
92,355 
1,231,167 
290,561 
6,047.608 


24,698 
98 
318 
4 563 


308,9671 
580 
2,010 
2,036,781 
412,113 
1,036,120 
22,570 
2.093,881 
319,641 
42,528 
2,881,709 
305,328 
9,462,228 


15,051 

30 
98 
92,012 
19,047 
50,104 
1,206 
106,576 
15,316 
2828 
108.723 
15.711 
426,202 


Other Europe 


British North America 


Central American States and British Honduras 


50,408 
18,722 
1,618 
96.877 
26,816 
5,204 
57,257 
14,933 
301.511 


Mexico 


Santo Domingo 


Other West Indies and Bermuda 


Colombia 


Other South America 




Africa 


Total 


Total sugar and molasses 




730,865 
2,111,658 




603,170 
2.953,888 


Tobarco. and Manufactures of Unmanuf'd (Ibs.; Leaf . . . 
Stems and trimmings 


252.258.902 
10,761,312 
263.020.214 


41,924.337 
247,243 
22,171,680 


272,421.295 
11,191,827 
283,613.122 


365,470 
25,170,771 
296,447 
25,467,218 


Total 


ETported to (Ibs.) United Kingdom 


8S,4H0.225 
22,016.203 
60,303403 

7o.46-i.43* 

7,1*3,730 
218.429 
1,814,086 
3,201,279 
236,146 
56.029 
1,172,617 
2,751,246 
2,246,127 
238,245 
2,637,612 
2,400 
263020.214 


8.575.li26 
1,724.682 
4,326,743 
5,435,039 
700,995 
30,777 
135,636 
311,645 
12,984 
8,057 
100,298 
197,036 
332,369 
21.195 
259,203 
295 
22,171,580 


85,799.321 

23,656,171 
50,391.017 
73,553,317 
12,698.069 
179,226 
1.852,700 
2,788,017 
357,071 
49,589 
1,068.979 
24,198.879 
2,701.384 
522.881 
3,817,901 
1,600 

233.6i3.i22 


7,821,659 
1,918.024 
4.021,447 
6,697,576 
1,252,125 
24,629 
143,786 
269,811 
24,677 
6,449 
97,663 
2,414.482 
374.299 
40,393 
359,413 
185 
25,467,218 


France 




Other Europe 


British North America 


Central American States and British Honduras 


Mexico 


West Indies and Bermuda 










British Australasia 


Other Asia and Oceanica 


Africa 




Total unmanufactured 


Manufactu r es of Cigars M. 


1,547 

1.005.905 
9.439.002 


37,381 

2.018,616 
2,077,664 
684,832 


3,732 
1.169,467 
8,999,945 


76,172 
2.197.353 
2,097,816 
807,672 
5,179,012 


Cigarettes M . 


Plug Ibs. 


Allother 


Total 




4,818,493 








1183.080 





727,040 
13,242 
80558 
375,970 
82,841 
51,694 
20.329 
160,547 
138,123 
6,204 
600 
6,663 
84,655 
822,671 
246,017 
57,* 
612/J40 
1,732,916 
266.799 
291,654 
1,066. 
5,179,012 






18.052 








134,998 








333,862 
62,139 




British North America 






Central American States and British Honduras 




49,671 
25.914 










Cuba 




146,292 
148,669 




Other West Indies and Bermuda 










2,362 




Brazil 




560 
3,748 














82;015 




China 




328,404 




East Indies (British) 




138,608 








46,439 
474.236 










British Australasia 




1.2I7.9S9 




Other Asia and Oceanica 




200,578 




Africa 




216,914 
4,062 
4,818,493 










Total manufactures of 






Toys 




177,668 




148,791 
132,638 

463.547 






104602 




Varnish gals. 


398,841 


422,693 


438,134 




854,284 


1,094,094 


883,201 


1,269,812 





42 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


EXPORTS, AND COUNTRIES TO WHICH EXPORTED. 


1898. 


1899. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Onions bu. 


100,148 
605,187 


$00,832 
460,66! 
386.039 
350,157 


164,902 
681,833 


$134.250 
449,989 
555.<xn 
388,908 
2,798,600 


Potatoes bu. 










Total 




2,381,788 




Vessels Sold to Foreigners (tons) Steamers 


678 
2,267 
2,945 


120,243 
24,300 
144,543 


143 
1,507 
1,660 


49,400 
17,625 
67,025 




Total 


Vinegar gals. 


108,657 
129,476 


12.939 
382,786 


107,314 
144.283 


13,479 
395,443 


; Whalebone Ibs. 


: Wine In bottles doz. 


9.672 
1,623,103 


46.721 
682,028 
728,749 


10.973 
1,498,078 


52,015 
624,315 
676.330 




Total 


Wood, and Manufactures of Timber and unmanufac- 
tured wood Sawed M feet 


338,575 
5,489,714 


3,438,578 
1,128,893 
3,189,820 


416.418 
4,79fi,658 


4,161,097 
818,841 
3,262,589 
8,242,527 


Hewn cubic feet 


Logs and other 


Total 




7,757,291 




Exported to United Kingdom 




3,032,929 




3,482,156 
384.068 
1,171.164 
1,444.568 
880,347 
28.988 
257,918 
43,723 
6.000 
18.706 
4,524 
22,445 
26,192 
239,752 
120,525 
111,461 
8,242,527 






328.822 
1.331.621 




Germany 






Other Europe 




1,202,576 




British North America 




1,111,820 








49,526 
296,689 
14.863 
5,121 
11,728 










Cuba 






Other West Indies and Bermuda 












Brazil .. . 




7,278 
23,737 
60,997 
154.201 










Other South America 






British Australasia 










90.237 




Africa 




45.246 

7,757,291 




Total timber and unmanufactured wood 
Lumber (M feet) Boards, deals and planks 






790,659 
35,610 
826,209 


12,080.318 
387,671 
12,467,989 


973,064 
34,394 
1,007,458 


15.221,066 
371,840 
15,592,906 


Joists and scantling 


Total 


Exported to (M feet) United Kingdom 


124676 
26.080 
37.805 
116.751 
79,793 
3.254 
65,215 
2.696 
23.897 
4,050 
35,963 
76,096 
48,705 
4.355 
46,085 
17,256 
967 
7.685 
40.801 
42.536 
22,456 
147 
826,269 


2,853,842 
368.101 
817.088 
2.004.82S 
1,097,138 
38,469 
843.300 
38.090 
258,076 
61,129 
513.302 
87f.362 
629.796 
56,838 
616.490 
121.469 
14.692 
62.287 
451,664 
405.118 
447,939 
2,171 
12.467.989 


150,340 
29,580 
52,868 
155,976 
92,060 
4,795 
73.774 
2.088 
64.456 
4,876 
47,449 
89,036 
34,359 
3.752 
40,223 
15,487 
2,401 
1,257 
46,817 
53,704 
41,929 
243 
1.007,458 


3,606,492 
436,147 
1,101,310 
2,880,80. 
1,308,201 
(50,606 
797.600 
34,174 
730.964 
61,543 
653.601 
990,780 
443,622 
49.736 
521,315 
138,545 
24.125 
13.828 
510.687 
520.597 
704,476 
3.945 
15.592.906 


France 




Other Europe 


British North America 


Central American States and British Honduras 


Mexico 




Cuba 


Puerto Rico 


Other West Indies and Bermuda 




Brazil 


Colombia 


Other South America 


China 


Hongkong 




British Australasia 


Other Asia and Oceanica 


Africa 


Other countries 


Total boards, deals, etc 
Shingles M 


60,524 


101.010 
486.8.10 
557,895 
3,559.750 
227328 


73,734 


126,939 
434.290 
590.866 
3,718.302 
177.006 
3,081,295 
1.136.907 


Snooks Box 


Other No . 


544.079 
54,142,769 


683,524 
44,325.545 




Heading 


All other 




3,250,880 




Manufactures of Doors, sash and blinds 




817,515 




Furniture, n. e. s. United Kingdom 




1,027,463 




1.083.625 
74.952 
173,741 
231.208 
439.636 
37,489 


France 




234,447 




Germany 




314084 




Other Kurope 




260253 




British North America 




623.434 




Central American States and British Honduras 




74,580 





SUMMARY-IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. 43 


EXPORTS, AND COUNTRIES TO WHICH EXPORTED. 


1898. 


1880. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Mexico 




$157,095 




$241.771 
9,042 
92.248 
23.914 
97.170 
7T.157 
32.819 
29.96!) 
6K.555 
10.093 
7.138 
16.552 
250.(>50 
243.232 
330.570 
1,944 
3.571.375 






11657 




Cuba 




24.910 




Puerto Rico 




6,041 
113260 




Other West Indies and Bermuda 








62224 




Brazil 




36.010 
33,410 
75,962 










Other South America 






China 




21320 




East Indies (British) 




18.555 
27.424 










British Australasia 




185.924 
147.236 




Other Asia and Oceanica 






Africa 




343.178 
3,378 
3,701.851 




Other countries 






Total furniture, n. e. s 






Hogsheads and barrels, empty 




336.8tiO 
287.494 
500.0*2 




210,137 
376,273 
728.591 

6116.319 
2.995,1)83 
41,679,416 


Trimmings, moldings, and other house finishings 






Wood pulp Ibs. 


50,428,161 


636,670 
3,017,787 


65,952,270 


All other 


Total wood, and manufactures of 
Wool and Manufactures of Wool, raw Ibs. 




37,613,252 




121,139 


18.071 


1.683.4U 


237,350 


Manufactures of Carpets yds. 


192,891 
80,979 


164,274 
41,472 
47.439 
429.033 
407,414 


107,779 
27,667 


81,138 
16,933 
42,672 
638,334 
368,330 
1.047,407 












All other manufactures of 






Total manufactures 




1.089.632 




Zinc, and Manufactures of Ore tons 


11.3K 


313,37( 


15.484 


448,145 


Manufactures of Pigs, bars, plates and sheets Ibs 


25,892,221 


1,251.246 

88,422 


18,321,375 


972,076 
184,894 

1.156,970 


AH other manufactures of 


Total, not Including ore 




1.339,668 




All other articles 




4,560,145 




5,893.652 


Total value of exports of domestic merchandise 




121029191; 




1204123134 


Carried in cars and other land vehicles 




07.058,731 
45,485.753 
992.518,062 
13,752,879 




77,169,770 
55.494.817 
993.765.956 
16.488.412 
753389,367 
26,662.948 
15,760.064 
109.425.S09 
2.561.651 
25.382.818 
44.194.827 
20.005,833 
67,090.758 
2.889 
32,778,791 
1,142.518 
978.317 
6.601.061 
4.252.310 
7.544.656 
4.396,210 








Belgian 






British 




776.216.000 
20,474.037 




Dutch 






French 




ir,.r, i s.n:s 








U0.850.fc'] 




Italian 




942.132 
24 355 868 










All other 




44 Ui9 02i 




American vessels Sailing 




19 231.038 




Foreign vessels Sailing 




86007721 




Belgian 




58 161 413 




Dutch 
French 




70S.8SI 
1.600 41 S 








8 309 811 








4 427 6S1 




Norwegian 




8.822.446 








3,927,064 




SUMMARY-IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. 
[Fiscal years 1898-99.1 


GROUPS. 


1898. 


1899. 


IMPORTS. 
Free of Duty Articles of food and live animals 


Values. Per ct. 
$105.004.473 36.0C 
152,192,787 52.25 
20,461,3/5 7.02 
'.),236,096 3.r 
4,459,447 1.5E 
291,414,176 100.0C 


Values. Per ct. 
$89.814,258 29.91 
175,321,653 68.39 
20,180,433 6.72 
9,685,186 3.22 
6,266,418 1.76 
300,267,948 100.00 


Articles in a crude condition for domestic industry 


For consumption 
Articles of voluntary use. luxuries, etc 


Total free of duty 


Dutiable Articles of food and live animals 
Articles in a crude condition for domestic industry 


7,141.371 23.4t 
49,235,588 15.V 


122.055,660 30.76 
46,676,724 11.76 



44 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


GROUPS. 


1898. 


1899. 


IMPORTS. 
Articles Manufactured For meet 
For consumption 






Values. Per ct. 

58,123,184 11.74 
88,146,311 27.15 
72,989,025 22.48 
324.635,479 100.00 


Values. Per ct. 
$40.532,085 10.21 
98,936.220 24.93 
88,648,217 22.34 
396,848.906 100.00 






Articles of voluntary use, luxurie 
Total dutiable 


3, etc 








Free and Dutiable Articles of foot 
Articles In a crude copdition for c 
Articles Manufactured For nice! 
For consumption 


and live animals 
lomcstic industry 


181.205.844 29.41 
2ill.428.375 32.70 
58.584.559 9.51 
97.382.404 15.81 
77,448,472 12.57 
616,049,fi5l 100.00 


211,869.918 30.39 
221.998.377 31.85 
60.712.518 8.71 
108,621.406 15.58 
93,914,635 13.47 
fi97,116,854 100.00 






Articles of voluntary use, luxurie 
Total imports of merchnridis 
Percent of free 






e 








47.34 


43.07 


Duties collected 
EXPORTS. 
Domestic Products of Agriculture 


I 




149.819.594 


206.507,812 


853,683,570 70.54 
290.697.354 24.02 
19.410.707 1.60 
37,900,171 3.13 
5.435.483 .45 
3,164,628 .26 
1,210,291,913 100.00 


784,999,009 65.20 
338,667.794 28.13 
28,832.547 2.39 
42,316,779 3.51 
6.025,446 .50 
3,281,559 .27 
1.204,123,134 100.00 












Forest 






Fisheries 












Total 












9,677.363! 45.67 
11.513,054 54.33 
21,190,417 100.00 


9.504,493 41.12 
13,577,792 58.88 
23,087,285 100.00 


Dutiable 






Total 












GOLD AND SILVER. 


TONNAGE. 


GOLD AND SILVER. 1898. 


1899. 


VESSELS. 1898. 


1899. 


Gold Imports 1120,391,674 


$88,954.603 
87.522.08fi 
;{0.(i75.056 
56.319,055 


Entered Sailing tons 4,611,094 
Steam tons 20.5*8,305 
Cleared Sailing tons 4.740,585 
Steam tons 21,007.647 


4,249,399 
21.852,825 
4.220,673 
21,928,021 


Exports 15.400.391 


Silver-Imports 30,927,781 
Exports 56,105.239 




TOTAL VALUE OF IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN 
MERCHANDISE BY COUNTRIES. 

[Fiscal years 1898-99.] 


COUNTRIES. 


IMPORTS. 


EXPORTS. 


1898. 


1899. 


1898. 


1899. 


EUROPE. 






$4,716,510 
23,797 
8J4L8H 

211,877 
52.730,848 
69,697,378 
32.519 
910,390 
144,227 
20,332.637 
13,476 
12.52o.OU5 
2.605,370 
12 
2.S25.608 
1,714.081 
12,095 


$6,551.256 

9,823 
10,552,777 
280,198 
62,145,337 
84,242.795 
17,996 
944,521 
78,408 
24,832.713 
9.770 
14,457,620 
2,975.504 


$5,697,912 

364,828 
47,619,201 
12,697.421 
90,459.25)0 
155.a39.972 
304.825 
127,558 
225 
23,290.85s 
64,352 
64.274,524 
3,532,057 
111.154 
6.251,202 
1,084,880 


$7,378,935 
361,252 
44.299,239 
16.605,828 
60.596.899 
155,772,279 
567.961 
213.507 
159 
25,034.940 
144,080 
79.305,998 
4,132.400 
146,048 
7.301.068 
1.185,599 
217 
9.077.807 
12.218.28!* 
267,732 
354.457 
511,816.475 
936.781.169 






























































Netherlands 


















2.830,223 
1,710,161 








Servia 












3.575.565 
2.075.053 
11.380.835 
2.119.337 
108.945,185 
305933.691 


3,982,363 
2.605.555 
14.826.694 
2.359.302 
118,472,048 
353.885.0fi4 


10.228,545 
0,313,781 
263.970 
139.075 
540,940.605 
973806.245 














Turkey in Europe 






Total Europe 






NORTH AMERICA. 


459,282 
171.920 


494,812 
198.203 


986,915 
576.111 


1.065.388 
499.839 


British Honduras 






British North America Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, etc. 


4,095.331 
23.143.411 
4,631,744 
372,115 
32.242,601 


3.70S,462 
23.044.926 
4,449.776 
383.168 
31.586.332 


4,538.968 
74.917,794 
4,257.324 
1,175,733 
84,889.815) 


4,710,543 
79,028,342 
4.239.227 
1.595,497 
89.573.609 


British Columbia 






Total British North America 







TOTAL, VALUB OF IMPORTS AND KXPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. 45 


COUNTRIES. 


IMPORTS. 


EXPORTS. 


1898. 


1899. 


1898. 


1899. 


Central American States Costa Kica 


$2.732,426 
1,854.303 
784,741 
1.095.8H5 
799,145 
7,266,480 


$3.581,899 
2,111.264 
911.849 
1,514,630 
1,085,703 
9,205,345 


$1.520.161 
1.201,714 
752.208 
1.049.505 
796,575 
5.320.158 


$1.241,191 
1.102,779 
831.9U8 
1.186.950 
625,414 
4.988.332 






Nicaragua 


Salvador 


Total Central American States 


19,004,863 


22,994,091 


21,206,939 
205,005 


25,480.281 
194.624 


Miquelon, Langley . etc 


161,030 


86,283 


West Indies British 


10,632.187 
327.759 
174,243 
30,888 
876,582 
2,382,189 
15,232,477 
2,414,356 
32,070,631 


14.1oO,482 
599,328 
246,902 
28,735 
826,426 
3,125,695 
25,411,410 
3,179,827 
47.568.805 


8,386,240 
707.622 
544,463 
1,617,130 
2,988,679 
1,151.258 
9,561,656 
1,505,946 
26.442,894 


8,751,817 
498.066 
474.435 
1,542,984 
2,455,1)66 
1,104,513 
18,615,707 
2,685,848 
36,129.336 




Dutch '. 


French 


Haiti 




Cuba 


Puerto Rico 


Total West Indies 


Total North America 


91.376.807 


112,133,871 


139.627,841 


157.931,409 


SOUTH AMKHICA. 


5,915.879 


5,112,561 


6,429,070 
20,675 
13,317,036 
2.351,727 
3,277,257 
855,193 
1010 


9,563,510 
31,298 
12,240,036 
2,107,124 
3.042,094 
882,621 


Bolivia 


Brazil 
Chile 


61,750,369 
3,736.307 
5,183,604 
765,590 


57,875,747 
2.931. 089 
5,126,731 
1,054,653 






Falkland Islands 


Guianas British , 


3,060,958 


3,500,207 
1.651,00!* 
37,929 
160 
1,496,978 
1.281.109 
6,507,847 

86.576.020 


1,747,375 
408.414 
150.041 
699 
1.302,695 
1,214,248 
2.746,261 
33,821,701 


1,749,545 

443.757 
170.090 
10,751 
1.325.650 
1.242.822 
2,851,634 
35,660,932 




12,551 




Peru 


714.247 
1,722,480 
7,772,564 
92.091,694 






Total South America '. 


ASIA. 
Aden 


2,017.756 

20,326.4;* 
27.238,459 
14.529,335 


1,924.941 

18,619,268 
32,5oO,312 
21,313,945 


593,345 

9,992,894 
4,696.013 
1,201,416 
152,265 


993,741 
14,498.440 
4,341,936 
1,548,973 
7,632 


China 


East Indies British 


Dutch 




Portuguese 




it 
2,479,274 
26,716,493 
408 
113,562 


Hongkong 


746.517 
25,223,610 


fi,265.200 
20.SSo.541 
126,936 
618,015 
243.190 
433,976 
44,707.791 


7,732,525 
17.264,688 
141,6?.) 
1,543,126 
167,607 
124,814 
48,360.161 








11105C 


Turkey in Asia 


2,325.078 
70.352 
92.594.593 


3,284,778 
78,431 
107.081.421 


All other Asia 


Total Asia 


OCEANICA. 

Auckland, Fiji, etc 


926,849 
3.002,402 
290,557 


4.743 

15.60!l,8ta 
300,684 
8.721 
5,907,155 
4,070 
39,982 
127,804 
22,003,022 


10,121 

19,777,129 
287.124 
27.573 
9,!i05,479 
0.883 
56,522 
404,171 
29,874,993 


British Australasia 


5,578,898 
185,121 




German Oceanica 


Hawaiian Islands 


17,187.380 
8,815 
68,605 
3,830,415 

26,859.230 

875,338 
26,283 
476.836 


17,831,463 
10,649 
25,814 
4,409,774 
26,997.508 


Spanish Oceanica 




Philippine Islands 


Total Oceanica 


AFRICA. 

British Africa 


1,311,282 
24,293 
585,629 


12.027,142 

274.827 
663,186 
2 139 


15.155.610 
216.626 
543.555 




French Africa 


German Africa 


Liberia 


6.670 
16,772 
15,343 

5,017,707 
65,810 
692.847 
7193,639 


9.390 
1.475 
7,169 

' 7,489.929 
00,06t> 
953,737 
10,442.970 


12.683 
2J6.733 
2,898.058 
29,674 
816,915 


18,412 
1,134 
1,506,008 

494.196 
278 
659.605 
18,594.424 














559,188 
17,515.730 


Total Africa 


Grand total 6:9,049,654 


697,116,854 


1231482330 


1227203088 



4fi CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


TOTAL VALUE OF IMPORTS AND EXPORTS INTO AND FROM THE UNITED STATES 
From Oct. 1. 1789, to June 30, 1898. 


FISCAL YEAR.* 


MERCHANDISE. 


SPECIE. 


MERCHANDISE AND SPECIE 
COMBINED. 


Imports. 


Exports. 


Exc'ss of 
imports 
\roman) 
or 
exports 
(italics). 


Imports, 
gold and 
silver. 


Exports. 
gold and 

silver. 


Total 
imports. 


Total 
exports. 


Excess of 
imports 
roman) or 
exports 
(italics-). 


1790 
1791 
1792 
1793 
1794 
1795 
1796 
1797 
1798 
1799 
1800.... 
1801 
1802 
1803 
1804 
1805 
1806 
1807 
1808 
1809 
1810. . . . 
1811 
1812 
1813 
1814 
1815 
1816 
1817 
1818 
1819 
1820 
1821 
1822 
1823 
1824 
1825 
1826 
1827 
1828 
1829 
1830 
1831 
1832 
1833 
1834 
1835 
1836 
1837.... 
1838 
1839 
1840.... 
1841.... 
1842.... 
1843.... 
1844.... 
1845.... 
1816.... 
1847.... 
1848. . . . 
1849.... 
I860.... 
1851.... 
1852.... 
1853.... 
1854.... 
1855. . . . 
1856.... 
1857. . . . 
1868.... 
1859.... 
I860.... 


J23.000.000 
29,200,000 
31,500.000 
31.100,000 
34.600,000 
69,756,268 
81,436,164 
75,379,406 
68.551,700 
79,069,148 
91,252,768 
111,363,511 
7083,838 
64,666,666 
85,000,000 
120,600,000 
129,410,000 
138,500,000 
56,990,000 
59,400,000 
85,400,000 
53,400,000 
77,030,00(1 
22,005,000 
12,965,000 
113,041,274 
147,103,OOC 
99,250,OOC 
121,750,000 
87,125,000 
74,450,000 
54,520,834 
T9,871,695 
72,481,371 
72,169,172 
90.189,310 
78,093,611 
71.332.938 
81,020.08< 
67,088,916 
62,720,956 
95,885,179 
95,121,762 
101,047,943 
108,609,700 
136,764.295 
176,579,154 
130.472.8tti 
95,970,288 
156.490,956 
98,258,706 
122,957,544 
96,075,071 
42,433,464 
102,604,601. 
113,184,32^ 
117,914.066 
122,424,349 
148.638,614 

141,206.199 

173,509,52b 
210,771,429 
207,440,898 
263,777,265 
297,803.794 
257,808.708 
310,432,310 
348,428,342 
263,338,654 
331,333,341 
353,616.119 


$20,205,156 
19,012,041 

20,753,098 
26,109,572 
33,043,725 
47.989,872 
58,574,625 
51,294,710 
61,327,411 
78,665,522 
70,971,780 
93,020,513 
71,957,144 
55.800.033 
77.699,074 
95,5H6,021 
101,536,963 
108,313.150 
22,430,960 
52,203,233 
66,757,970 
61,316,832 
38.527,236 
27,856,017 
6,927.441 
52,557,753 
81,920,052 
87,671,569 
93,281,133 
70,142,521 
69,691,669 
54,596.323 
61,350,101 
68,326.043 
68,972,105 
90,738,333 
72,890.789 
74,309,947 
64,021.210 
67,434,651 
71,670,735 
72,295,652 
81,520,603 
87,528,732 
102.260,215 
115,215,802 
121,338,704 
111.413,127 
104,978,570 
112,251,673 
123,668,932 
111.817.471 
99,877,995 
82,825,689 
105,745,832 
106,040,111 
109.583,248 
156,741,598 
138,190.515 
140,351,172 
144.375.72fa 
188,915,259 
1;.9S4,231 
203,489,282 
237.043,764 
218,909,503 
281,219,423 
293,823.760 
272,011,274 
292,902,051 
333.576,057 


$2,794.844 
10,187,959 
10,746.02 
4,990.428 
1,556,275 
21,766,396 
22,861,539 
24,084,<i9tf 
7,224.289 
403,626 
20,280.1>8S 
18.342,998 
4,376.189 
8.866,633 
7,300,92b 
25,033,979 
27,873,037 
30,156,850 
34,559.040 
7,193,767 
18,642.030 
7,916,832 
38,502,764 
5,851,017 
6,037,559 
60,483,521 
65,182.948 
11.578,431 
28.468.867 
16,982.479 
4,758,331 
75,489 
18,521,594 
4,155,328 
3,197,067 
5*9.023 
5,202,722 
2,977,009 
16,998,873 
345,736 
8,949,779 
23.589.527 
13,601.159 
13.519.211 
6,349,485 
21.548,493 
52.240.450 
19,029,676 
9,008.282 
44,245,285 
25,410,226 
11.140.073 
3,802,924 
40.392,225 
3,141,226 
7,144,211 
8,330.817 
34,317,249 
10,448,129 
865.027 
29.133,800 
21.856,170 
40,456,167 
60.28T,983 
60.7t50.aiO 
38.89it.205 
29,212,88" 
54.604,582 
8,672,S2t 
38.431.290 
20,040.062 






$23,000,000 
29,200,000 
31,500,000 
31.100,000 
34,1100,000 
69,756,268 
81,436,164 
75,379.406 
68.551,700 
79,080,148 
91.252,768 
111.363,511 
76,333,333 
64.666.6T.6 
85,000,000 
120,600,000 
129,410,000 
138,500,000 
66,990.000 
69,400,000 
85,400,000 
63,400.000 
77,030,000 
22.005,000 
12,965,000 
113,041,274 
147,103,000 
99,260,000 
121,750,000 
87,125,000 
74,450,000 
62,585,724 
83,241,541 
77,579.267 
80,648,142 
96.340,075 
84,974,477 
79,484,068 
88,509,824 
74.492,527 
70.876,920 
103,191,124 
101,029,266 
108,118,311 
126,521,332 
149,895,742 
189,980,035 
140.989,217 
113,717,404 
162.092,132 
107,141,519 
127,946.177 
100,162.087 
64,753.799 
108,435.035 
117,251,564 
121,691,797 
146,545,638 
154.9y8.928 
147,857.439 
178.138,318 
216,224,932 
212,945,442 
267,978,647 
304,562.381 
261,4)18,520 
314,639,942 
360.890.141 
282,618,161 
338,768,130 
362.166,254 


$20,205,156 
19.012,041 

20,753,098 
26,109,572 
33,043,725 
47,989,872 
68,574,625 
51,294.710 
61.327,411 
78,665,522 
70.971.780 
93.020.613 
71,957,144 
55,800.033 
77.699,074 
95.566.021 
101,536.963 
108,343.150 
22.430,960 
52,203,233 
66,757,970 
61,316.832 
38,527.236 
27,856,017 
6,927,441 
52,557.753 
81,920,052 
87.671,569 
93.281,133 
70,142.521 
69.691,669 
65.074. 382 
72,160.281 
74,699,030 
75,986,657 
99.535,388 
77,595,352 
82.324.827 
72.264,686 
72,358,671 
73.849,508 
81.310,583 
87,176.943 
90,140.433 
104,336.973 
121,693.577 
128,663,040 
117.419.376 
108,486.616 
121.028,416 
132,085.946 
121.851,803 
104.691.534 
84,316,480 
111.200,046 
114,64(1,6% 
113,488,516 
158,648,622 
154.032,131 
145.755,820 
151,898.720 
218,388,011 
209,658,366 
230,9r,15~ 
278,325,268 
275.156.846 
326,964,908 
362,960.68-- 
324.644.42 
356,789,462 
400.122.29b 


$2,794.844 
10,187,959 
10,746.902 
4,990.428 
1,556.275 
21.766,396 
22,861.539 
24,084 .696 
7,224.28!) 
403,626 
20,280,988 
18,342,998 
4,376,189 
8,866,633 
7.300.926 
25,033.979 
27,873,037 
30,156,850 
34,559.040 
7,198,767 
18.642.0W 
7,916,632 
38.502.764 
5,851.017 
6,037,559 
60.483.521 
66,182,948 
11.578.431 
28,468.867 
16,982,479 
4,758,331 
2,*<8,65S 
11,081.260 
2.880,237 
4,561.485 
3,195,313 
7,379,125 
2,840,759 
16.245, 138 
2,133,8J 
2.972.5S.S 
21.880,541 
13.852,323 
17,977.878 
22.184,aw 
28.202.165 
61.316.995 
23.569.841 
5,230.788 
41.063,716 
24,944,427 
6,094.374 
4.529.447 
19.392.6*1 
2,765,011 
2,607,958 
8.203.281 
12,1(12.9*4 
966.797; 
2,101,619! 
26.239,598 
2.163.079 
3.287,076 
37.002,490 i 
26,237.113 
13,etHi,326 
12.324,966 
2.070,541 
42,031,271 
10,021.332 
37,956,042 


















































Specie included with 
merchandise prior 
to 1821. 


















































$8,064,890 
3,369,846 
5.097,896 
8.378.970 
6.150,765 
6,880,966 
8,151,130 
7,489,741 
7.403.612 
8,155,964 
7,305,945 
5,907.504 
7,070,368 
17,911,632 
13.131,447 
13,400,881 
10,516,414 
17,747,116 
5,595,176 
8.882,813 
4.988,633 
4.087,016 
22,320,335 
5,830,429 
4,070.242 
3,777,732 
24,121,289 
6,360,284 
6,651,240 
4,628,792 
5.453,503 
5.505,044 
4,201,382 
6,758,587 
3,659.812 
4,207,632 
12.461.799 
19.274,496 
7,434.789 
8.550,135 


$10,478,059 
10,810,180 
6,372,987 
7,014,552 
8,797.055 
4,704,563 
8,014,880 
8.243,476 
4,921.020 
2,178.773 
9.014,931 
5,656,310 
2,611,701 
2,076,758 
6,477,775 
4,324,336 
5,976,249 
3,508,046 
8,776,743 
8,417,014 
10,034,332 
4.813,539 
1,520,791 
5,454,214 
8,606,495 
3,905,268 
1,907,024 
15,841 ,61b 
5,404,648 
7,522,994 
29,472,752 
42,674,135 
27,486,875 
41.281,504 
56,247,343 
45,745,485 
69,136,922 
52,633.147 
63,887,411 
66,546.239 


Fiscal year ended Sept. 30 prior to 1843; since that date ended June 30. 



IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF GOLD AND SILVER. 



47 



4 


MERCHANDISE. 


SPECIE. 


MERCHANDISE AND SPECIE 
COMBINED. 


FISCAL Y 


Imports. 


Exports. 


Exc'ss of 
imports 
(roman) 
or 
exports 
(italics). 


Imports, 
gold and 
silver. 


Exports, 
gold and 
silver. 


Total 
imports. 


Total 
exports. 


Excess of 
imports 
(r tman)or 
exports 
(italics). 


1861 


$289.310.542 


$219.553.833 


$69.756.709 


$46.339.611 


$29.791,080 


$335,650,163 


$249,344,913 


$86,305,240 


1862 


189.356,677 


190,670.501 


1.313.284 


16.415,052 


36,887,640 


205.771,729 


227.558,141 


21,786,412 


1863 


243.335.815 1 203.964,447 


39.871.368 


9,584,105 


64,156,611 


252,919,920 


268.121,058 


15,201,138 


1864 


316.447.283 158.837,988 


157.609.2S15 


13,115.612 


105.396.541 


329,51 .2.895 


261.234,529 


65,328.366 


1865 


238,745.580 166.02fl.303 


72,716.277 


9,810.072 


67.643.226 


248.555,652 


2:3,672,529 


14.883,123 


1866 


434.812.066 348,859,52-' 


85,952,544 


10,700,092 


86.044.071 


445,512,158 


434,903.593 


10,608.565 


1867 


395,761,096' 294,506,141 


101.254,955 


22,070.475 


60.868,372 


417,831.571 


355,374.513 


62,457.058 


1868 


357.436.440 281,952,899 


75,483,541 


14.188.368 


a3, 784,102 


371,624,808 


375,737.001 


4,112,193 


1869... . 


417,506,379: 286.117,697 


131.888 6S2 


19,807,876 


57.138,380 


437.314.255 


343.256,077 


94.058,178 


1870... . 
1871... . 


435.958,408 
520.223,684 


392,771,768 
442,820.178 


43,186,640 
77.403.506 


26,419.179 
21.270,024 


58,155,666 
9S,441,9S8 


462,377,587 
641.488,708 


450.927.431 
541,262,166 


11,450,153 
231.542 


1872... . 


626.595,077 


444.177.586 


182417.491 


13,743,689 


79,877,534 


640,338,766 


624,055.120 


116.2S3.646 


1873... . 


643,186,210 


522,479,922 


119.65ti.288 


21,480,937 


84,608,574 


663,617,147 


607.088.496 


66,528,651 


1874... . 


567.406,342 


586,283,040 


18.876 698 


28.454,906 


66,630.405 


595,861,248 


652,913,445 


57.052,197 


1875... . 


533.005,436 


513,442,711 


19.562.725 


20.900,717 


92,132,142 


553,906.153 


605.574.853 


51,668,700 


1876... . 


460.741,190 


540,384,671 


79.643.481 


15.936.681 


56.506.o02 


476.677,871 


596,890.973 


120313,102 


1877... . 


451,323,126 


602.475,220 


151.152.094 


40,774,414 


56.162.237 


492,097,510 


658,637.457 


166,539,917 


1878... . 


437.051.532 


694,865,766 


257.814.Z34 


29,821,314 


33,740,125 


466.872.846 


728,605,891 


261,733,045 


1879... . 


445.777,775 


710.439.441 


264.661.666 


20.296,000 


24,<,I97,441 


466,073,775 


735,436,882 


269.363,107 


1880... . 


667.954,746 


835,638,658 


167.683.912 


93.034,310 


17,142,919 


760,989,056 


852,781,577 


91,792,521 


1881... . 


642.664.628 


902,377.346 


259,712.718 


110,575.497 


19,406.847 


753,240.125 


921,784,193 


168,544.068 


1882... . 


724,639,574 


750.542,257 


25.902.683 


42,472,390 


49,417.479 


767.111.964 


799,956.736 


32,847,772 


1883... . 


7X1180.914 


838,830,402 


100.658.488 


28,489,391 


31.820.333 


751,670.305 


855,659,735 


103,989,430 


1884... 


667,697,688 


740.513,609 


72.815.916 


37,426,262 


67,133,383 


705.123.955 


80r.646.W2 


102,523.037 


1885... 


577,527.329 


742.189.755 


164.662.426 


43.242,323 


42.231,525 


620,769,652 


784,421,280 


163,651,628 


1886.... 


635.436,136 


679.524.a30 


44.088.694 


38,593,656 


72,463.410 


674.039,792 


751,988,240 


77.958,448 


1887.... 


692.319,768 


716,1,83,211 


23.863.443 


60.170,792 


35,997,691 


752.490.5fiO 


752,180.902 


309,658 


1838.... 


723,957,114 


695.954.507 


28.002.ti07 


59,337,986 


46,414,183 


783 295,100 


742.3f8.li90 


40,926,410 


18H9.... 


745.131,652 


742,401,375 


2.780.277 


28,963,073 


96,641.533 


774,094,725 


839,042,908 


64,948,183 


1890.... 


789.310,409 


857,828,684 


68.518275 


33.976,326 


62.148,420 


823,286,735 


909,977,104 


86,690,369 


1891.... 


814,916,196 


884,480,810 


39.564,614 


36,259.447 


108.a53.642 


881,175.643 


993,434,452 


112,258,809 


1892. . . . 


827.402.462 


1,030.278,148 


202.H75.fiH6 


69,654.540 


83,005,886 


897.057,002 


1,113,284.034 


216,227,032 


1893. . . . 


8ti6.400.932 


847,665,194 


18,735.728 


44.367,633 


149,41 8, Iti3 


910,768.555 


997,083,357 


86,314,802 


1894.... 


654.994,622 


892.140,572 


237.145.950 


85, 7*5.671 


127,429,326 


740,730.293 


1.019.569,898 


278 839 605 


1895.... 


731,969,965 


807,538,165 


75,568,200 


56.595.939 


113,763,767 


788,565,904 


921,301,932 


132,736,028 


1896.... 


779,724,674 


R82.tW6.93S 


102.H82.2fi4 


62.302.251 


172,951.617 


842.026.926 


1.055.558,555 


213.531.630 


1897.... 


764,730,412 


1,050,993.556 


286.263.144 


115,548,007 


102.308,218 


880,278.419 


1.153.301.774 


273,023,355 


1898. . . . 


616,049.654 


1,231.482.330 


615.432676 


151,319.455 


70.511.630 


767,369,109 


1,801,993.960 


534,624,851 


Total. 


29979,961.487 


30952,202,985 972241,498 


1.940.150.320 


3,400,623.581 


31920.111.807 


84352.826.56ti 


2,432,714,759 



Fiscal year ended Sept. 30 prior to 1843; since that date ended June 30. 
NOTE. Merchandise and specie are combined in the columns at right of table for the 
purpose of showing the total inward and outward movement of values by years. 



IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OP GOLD AND SILVER. 

[Fiscal years 1898-99.] 



IMPORTS BT COUNTRIES. 



GOLD. 



1898. 1899 



1898. 1899 



France 

Germany 

United Kingdom 

Other Europe 

British Honduras 

Dominion of Canada Quebec, Ontario, etc. 

British Columbia 

Central American States 

Mexico 

West Indies British 

Cuba 

Other West Indies 

Other North America 

Colombia 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

China 

Japan 

British Australasia 

Hawaiian Islands 



$22.799.157 

8,428.050 

43,133,538 

545,724 

35,976 

4.707,493 

3,427.358 

516,943 

5,122.282 

127.909 

5.165.0K3 

658.739 

535,484 

238.596 

620,287 

18,608 



?10,9fi2.144 

190.99U 

24,046,175 

26,744 

39,304 

13,314.842 

2,324,175 

643.174 

5,461.352 

44,013 



2,000,247 

22,279,470 

130,000 



366,0(8 

345.385 

203,887 

197.2351 

682.698 

244,235 

5,020,424 

24,755.599 

109,466 



$24.718 

3,240 

26,063 

1,982 

193,239 

69,821 

3,370.649 

790.646 

25.028.S8S 

18.746 

2.095 

654,046 

12,241 

137.553 

495 

576,956 
45 



$4,424 

1,940 

110,160 

73 

282.949 

161.198 

2,486.656 

765,226 

25,309.207 

40.259 

25,161 

482,185 

18,454 

264.050 

3,809 

598.545 

63.780 

18,000 

48,980 



48 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


IMPORTS BY 'COUNTRIES. 


GOLD. 


SILVER. 


1898. 


1899. 


1898. 


1899. 




$850 
120391,674 




$16,358 
30,927,781 




Total 


$88,954,603 


J30.675.056 


Ore and bullion 


31.287,488 
89,104.186 

4,016,535 
1,260.840 
444.109 


35.767,551 
53,187,052 

7,000.000 
3.018,0110 
9,052,215 


23,163,235 
7,764,546 

1,062,250 
945 
42,456,009 
100 
142,437 
23,743 
373,337 
1,199,071 

""960 
339,996 
33,341 
2.144 
27,137 


25.129,282 
5,545,774 

2,056.408 
59,612 
48,044,198 
1,882 
153,262 
22,971 
34,858 
56,809 
428,688 


Coin 


EXPORTS BY COUNTRIES. 




United Kingdom 


Other Europe 




3,191.196 
93,972 
113,778 
11,158 
4.197,546 
343,771 
182.559 
40,049 
211,901 
25,100 
106,422 
22,710 


4,550.004 
64,874 
27,959 
37,395 
10,886,916 
306.133 
124,842 
H5,604 
133.596 
19.922 
363,439 
975 








West Indies Cuba 
Haiti 




392,500 
91,699 
19.196 
2,923 


Other West Indies 


Other North America 


Colombia 






65,820 
973,458 
1,436,588 

6,824,747 
61.910 


98,120 
1,043,432 


China.. . ... 


East Indies (British) . .... 






Hongkong 


64,390 


76,022 


3,571,048 






1,080,355 


1.678,190 
6,000 
37,522,086 


75,000 
3.24C 
55,105,239 


237,704 
3,745 
56,319,055 




Total 


15.406,391 




2,069.155 
13,337,236 


86,115 
37,435,971 


47,717.444 
7,387,795 


50.420,tl-{ 
5,899,052 


Coin 


COAL PRODUCTION AND CONSUMPTION. 


The coal production and consumption of 
the world during the last fifteen years are 
presented in some tables recently prepared 
by the treasury bureau of statistics. These 
show that while the United Kingdom is 
still the largest coal producer of the world 
the United States is a close second, .and if 
the present rate of gain is continued will 
soon become the leading coal producing 
country of the world. The coal production 
of the United Kingdom in 1897 was 202,000,000 
tons; that of the United States, 179,000.000 
tons; Germany, 91,000,000; Prance, 30,000,000; 
Belgium, 22,000,000; Austria-Hungary, 12,- 
000,000; Russia, nearly 10,000,000; Australasia, 
nearly 5,000,000; Japan, over 5,000,000; Brit- 
ish India, 4,000,000; Canada, nearly 4,000,000, 
and Spain, 2,000,000, while no other country 
reached 1,000,000 tons in production. The 
United States, however, has gained much 
more rapidly during the fifteen years under 
consideration than has the United Kingdom, 
or indeed any of the important coal pro- 
ducing countries of the world, her gain dur- 
ing the fifteen years being over 73 per cent 
and that of the United Kingdom less than 
24 per cent. 
The announcement just made by the geo- 
logical survey that the coal product of the 
United States in 1898 was 219,836,000 short 
tons against 226,287,000 for Great Britain 
shows that the United States is rapidly 
gaining upon that country as a coal pro- 
ducer and will soon become the leading coal 
producing nation of the world. 
As an exporter of coal, however, the 
United States takes low rank in proportion 
to its production and stands fourth in the 
list of coal exporting countries. In 1897 the 
exportatlons of coal from the United King- 
dom were 48,000,000 tons, from Germany 
12,000,000, from Belgium over 6,000,000 and 


from the United States* a little less than 
4,000,000, though in 1898 the quantity ex- 
ported was slightly above 4,000,000 tons. 
Australasia comes next to the United 
States as a coal exporting country, her ex- 
ports amounting to nearly 3,000,000 tons, 
while France exported about 2,500,000, Japan 
2,000,000 and Canada about 1,230,000 tons in 
1897. 
France is the largest coal importing 
country, her importations in 1897 being 
nearly 12,000,000 tons, while Germany im- 
ported 6,000,000, Austria-Hungary 5,600,000, 
Italy 4,250,000, Canada nearly 4,000,000, 
Belgium nearly 3,000,000, Russia 2,500,000, 
Sweden over 2,250,000, the United States 
nearly 1,500,000 and Australasia 1,000,000 
tons. No other country imported as much 
as 1,000,000 tons. 
Great Britain is also the largest consumer 
of coal in proportion to population, her coal 
consumption in 1897 being 3.87 tons per 
capita; that of Belgium, 2.70 tons; the 
United States, 2.42; Germany, 1.58; Canada, 
1.25; France, 0.98; Australasia, 0.97; 
Sweden, 0.50; Austria-Hungary, 0.37; Spain, 
0.19; Italy, 0.13; Russia, 0.09, and Japan. 
0.07 of a ton per capita. 
According to these figures, which are 
summarized from a report of the coal 
production of the principal countries of the 
world, just issued by the British govern- 
ment, the United States now produces 
about 30 per cent of the coal of the world, 
the product of the fourteen countries 
enumerated in the tables being in 1897 
566,000,000 tons, of which the United States 
produced 179,000,000 tons, while in 1883 
she produced but 27 per cent of the total 
product of the countries enumerated. As 
above indicated the 1898 fiprures make an 
even more satisfactory showing for the 



STATISTICS OF AGRICULTURE. 



United States, whose product In long tons 
for that year Is 196,282,000, against 202,- 
042,000 long tons produced in Great Britain. 
The following table shows the coal mined 
in all countries producing more than 1,000,- 
000 tons annually, in 1883, 1890 and 1898, 
figures for 1897 being given in cases where 
those for 1898 are not accessible: 

1S83. 189(>. 1898. 

Long tons.t Long tons. Long tons. 
U K'gdom .163,737,000 181,614,000 202,042,000 
U. States... 102,868,000 140,883,000 196,282,000 



Germany 

France 

Belgium . . . 
Aus.-H'g'y 

Russia 

Australasia 

Japan 

Brit. India. 
Canada . . . 



55.953,000 
20,426,000 
18,178,000 
8,087,000 
3,964,000 
3,057,000 
1,021,000 
1,316,000 
1,609,000 



70,236,000 
25,180,000 
20,366,000 
9,926,000 
5,998,000 
4,045,000 
2,653,000 
2,169,000 
2,754,000 



91,655,000 
30,337,000 
21,720,000 
*11,611,000 
9,229,000 
5,862,000 
5,080,000 
4,063,000 
3,380,000 



1897. t2.2401bs. 1896. 

Note. In addition to the above the pro- 
duction of lignite in 1897 was: Germany, 
29,420,000 tons; Austria. 20,458,000; Hungary, 
3.871,000; France, 460,000; Italy, 314,000, and 
Spain, 54,000 tons. 

The following tables, summarized from 
the report above named, present the im- 
ports and exports and per capita consump- 
tion of coal in each of the leading coun- 
tries in 1883, 1890 and 1897: 

QUANTITY OF COAL IMPORTED. 
Tons of 2,240 Ibs. 

Countries into 1883. 1890. J897. 

which imported. Tons. Tons. Tons. 

France 11,053,000 11,164,000 11,546,000 

Germany 2.181,000 4,165,000 6,072.000 

Au. -Hungary .. 2,356,000 

Italy 2,352,000 

Canada 1,806,200 

Belgium 1,731,000 

Russia 2,264,000 

Sweden 1,033,000 

Spain 1,297,000 



3,625,000 
4,355,000 
3,085,000 
1,984,000 
1,743,000 
1,530,000 
1,718,000 



5.655,000 
4,260,000 
3,876,000 
2,756,000 
2,516,000 
2,300,000 
1,853,000 



Countries into 1883. 

which imported. Tons. 

United States. 723,000 

Australasia ... 717,000 

China *311,000 

Cape of G. H. 164,000 

Japan 17,000 

Un. Kingdom.. 11,000 



1897. 
Tons. 



1890. 

Tons 
952,000 1,402,000 
1,033,000 1,073,000 
306,000 625,000 
295,000 
12,000 



1,000 



450,000 
69,000 
9,000 



1886. 1896. 

QUANTITY OF COAL EXPORTED. 
Tons of 2,240 Ibs. 

1883. 1890. 1897. 

Tons. Tons. Tons. 

Un. Kingdom. .29,442,000 38,660,000 48,130,000 

Germany 8,705,000 9,145.000 12,390,000 

Belgium 6,867,000 6,114,000 6.261,000 

United States. 1,021,000 1,933,000 3,820,000 
Australasia ... 1,521,000 1,960,000 2,833,000 



1,850,000 

1,239,000 

812,000 

673,000 

27,000 

141,000 

7,000 

17.000 



2,440,000 
2,103,000 
1,221,000 
847,000 
212,000 
172,000 
23,000 
3.000 



France 1,165,000 

Japan 397,000 

Canada 469,000 

Au.-Hungary . 630,000 
British India.. 779 

Cape of G. H.. 99.000 

Italy 9,000 

Spain 11,000 

CONSUMPTION OF COAL PER CAPITA. 

t800. 1897. 
Tonf. 

United Kingdom 3.79 

Belgium 2.45 

United States 1.91 

Germany 1.09 

Canada 71 

France 81 

Australasia .74 

Sweden 26 

Austria-Hungary 25 

Spain 14 

Italy 08 

Russia 06 

Japan 02 



Tana. Tons. 

3.81 3.87 

2.68 2.70 

2.23 2.42 
1.32 



1.17 
.91 
.94 
.36 
.31 
.16 
.14 
.07 
.04 



1896. 1895. 



STATISTICS OF AGRICULTURE. 



WHEAT CROP OF THE WORLD-1894 TO 1898. 



COUNTRY. 



1894. 



1895. 



1896. 



1897. 



1898. 



United States 

Ontario 

Manitoba 

Rest of Canada... 
Total Canada. 



Bushels. 
460.267,000 



Bushels. 
467,103,000 



20.507.000 
17.714.000 
6.362.000 



18.18J.OOI I 
32,777,000 
6,500.000 



44.5SJ.OOO 



57,460,000 



Mexico 

Total North America. 



8,570,000 



10,035.01)0 



513.420.000 



534,51)8.000 



Chile 

Argentina 

Uruguay 

Total South America.. 

Great Britain 

Ireland 

Total United Kingdom. 



Norway . . 
Sweden . . 
Denmark 



lti.000,000 

SO.OU1.000 
4,79y,000 



15,000.000 

110.000.000 
8,915.(iUI 



100.799,000 



88,916,000 



61.038.000 
1,532.000 



62,570,000 



38.348.000 

I.Kf.l.OOO 

39,457.000 



275.000 

4.362,1100 
3,262,000 



2150.000 
3.705.1100 
3,467,000 



Bushels. 

427,684.000 



Bushels. 
530.149,000 



Sushels. 
675,149.000 



19,184,000 
14,825,000 
6,800,000 



29.7ti5.000 
18.SJ7.000 
7,500,000 



33.042.000 
26.112,000 
9.000,000 



40,809,000 



56,102.000 



88464,000 



12,700.000 



481,193,000 



^13.500.000 
599,751,000 



15,000,000 



758.30,1,000 



12.000.000 
4.000,000 
4,059,000 



64.059.000 



10.500.000 
32.000,000 
3.600.000 
46,100.000 



14.000,000 
52.000.000 
6,000.000 



72.000.000 



58.851.0)0 
1,191,000 



,. 
1,355,000 



60,042.000 



58.027,000 



300,000 

4,704.000 
3,689,000 



300,000 
4,678.000 
3.474,000 



75.SJO.OOO 
1.840.000 
77.170!6 



300.000 
4.542,000 
3.600.000 



50 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


WHEAT CROP OF THE WORLD. CONTINUED. 


COUNTRY. 


1894. 


1895. 


1896. 


1897. 


1898. 


Netherlands 


Bushels. 
4,166.000 
17.618.000 
347,531,000 
105,600.000 
9.000,000 
121.595.000 
4,500,000 
110.681.000 


Bushels. 

4,282,000 
18.730.000 
340.432,000 
81,218,000 
7.000.000 
118,162.000 
5.000.000 
103.160,000 


Bushels. 

5.045,000 
20,554,000 
339,793,000 
71,892,000 

5,eoo,ooo 

145.233.000 
4.800.000 
110,539,000 


Bushels. 
4.400.000 
17,728,000 
240,596.000 
94,637,000 
8,200.000 
86,919,000 
4,300,000 
107.015.000 


Bushels. 

5,000,000 
20.805.000 
371.881 .101 
99,OOO.OUU 
8.200,000 
133,372.000 
4,500,000! 

uwjawoo 






Portugal 


Italy 




Germany 




48.190.rxiO 
141.855,000 
8,786,000 
2,000,000 


41,767,000 
Io8.012.000 
8,661,000 
2.000.000 


43.991,000 
149,954,000 
9.614,000 

2,050.000 


35.859,000 
89.924.000 
6.2(1.000 
2,000,000 


41.200.0001 
119.638.000: 
8.000,0(10 
2,100.000 






Bosnia-Herzegovina 




43.587.000 
30.600.000 
7.500.000 

'moot 

20.000.000 
5.500.000 


68.502.000 
37.000.000 
9.400,000 
220.000 
21.500.000 
4,000.000 


71,194,000 
4H.275.000 
9,300.000 
220,000 
24,000,000 
4,800000 


36.448.000 
30,739.000 
7,000.000 
200.000 
17.800.000 
3,200,000 


58.457.CXX) 
35.000.OUi) 
ll.OOO.KKl 
220.000 
21.000.UUO 
4,000,000 




Servia 


Montenegro 


Turkey in Europe 


Greece 




H39.ti67.000 
16.749,000 


292.272.000 
17.3S7.000 
67.127.000 
100,000 


300,423.000 
19,476,000 
45,148,000 
98,000 


238.557,000 
17.808.000 
29,883,000 
90,000 


339,035.000 

24,862.000 
40,849,000 
100,000 


Poland . . . . 


North Caucasus 


61,678.000 
148,000 


Finland 


Total Russia in Europe 


418.242,000 


376.886,000 


365,145.000 


286,338,000 


404.836.000 


Total Europe 


1 517.670,000 


1,452,821,000 


1.501 ). oil. 000 


1.152.053,000 


1,548.881.000 


Siberia 


3,1,421,000 
0.000.000 
47.000,000 


30,899,000 

7,462,000 
47.000.000 


31.160.000 
12,830,000 
42.000.000 


42.835,00(1 
11,087,000 
40.000.000 


43,000.000 

11,000.000 
40,000.000 




Trans-Caucasia 


Total Russia in Asia 


88.421,000 


85,361,000 


88.990,000 


93,922,000 


94.000,000 


Turkey In Asia 


45.000.000 
2.000,000 
22.000.000 
252,781,000 

20.30H.iiUO 


46.000.000 
2,200,000 
22.000.000 
234.379,000 
20,341.000 


44.01 0.000 
2.400.000 
20.0(0.000 
205.610.000 
] 8,000.000 


48,000.000 
2.400.000 
20.OiiU.OOU 
182.667.000 
18.000,000 


44.000,000 

2.400.000 
20,000,000 
242.921.000 
18,000,000 




Persia 


British India 


Japan 


Total Asia 


430,513.000 


410.281.000 


379,000,000 


364.989.000 


421.321.000 


Algeria. 
Tunis 


28.900,000 
10.700.000 
12,000.000 
3,195.000 


24,400.000 
7.500.000 
14.000.000 

2.542.000 


17.600,000 

5.600,080 
12.000.000 
2,257,000 


16,000.000 
6.000.001 
12.000.000 
2.200.000 


22,000.000 
6.500.000 
14,000,000 
1.939.000 
44,439.000 


Egypt 


Cape Colony 


Total Africa 


54.795,000 


48.442.000 


37,457,000 


36,200,000 


West Australia 


537,000 
14,047.000 
426,000 
6,708,000 
15,736.000 
860.001 
5.046,000 


176.000 
8,027.000 
562.000 
7,263.000 
11.807.000 
899.000 
3,727,000 


194.000 
6,116,OOC 
128.000 
5,359.000 
5.848.000 
1.202.000 
7,059,000 


252,000 
2,893.000 
620.000 
9.132.000 
7,315,000 
1,327.000 
6,113,000 


421.000 
4,141,000 
1,041.000 
10.893,000 
10.914,000 
1,721.000 
5.849.000 




Queensland 


New South Wales 






New Zealand 


RECAPITULATION BY CONTINENTS. 






CONTINENTS. 


1894. 


1895. 


1896. 


1897. 


1898. 




Bushels. 
513,420,00( 
100,799.00 
1.517,670,001 
430.513.OfX 
54,79o,00( 
43,360,001 


Bushels. 

t 534,598,001 
83.915.00( 
1,452.821,001 
410.281, CKX 
48,442.00( 
32,461.001 


Bushels. 
) 481,193,001 
) (V4.059.00I 
) 1.500.734.001 
) 379.000,00( 
) 37,457.00 
) 25.906,001 


Bushels. 
) 599,761,OOC 
) 46,100,001 
M.152,053.0UC 

) 364.9S9.OOt 
3rt.200.OOC 
) 27,652,00t 


Bushels. 
758,303,000 

72,000.1 M 
1.5-KSSl.OlK 
421,321.000 
44,439.1 M 
34,980.0U 








Af ri ca 


Australasia 




2,660,557.00t 


2,562,518.00( 


) 2,488,349.001 


>2,226,745,00( 


2,879,924,000 




The most trustworthy estimates th 
countries of the southern hemisphere a 
Prod 
Countries. Bu. 


at can be 
nd for Ind 

uction. 
shfls. 
,000,000 A 
.000.000 ILJ 
,000,000 


obtained for the principal whe 
a for the year 1898-99 are given b< 

J 
Countries. 


at-growing 
Jlow: 
^roductinn 
BvthfU. 
57,000.000 
230,000,000 


ChUe ... 15 


dia 


Uruguay 7 





STATISTICS OF AGRICULTURE. 51 


STATISTICS OF THE PRINCIPAL FARM CROPS. 
Acreage, production and value* of the principal farm crops In the United States, 1868 to 1898. 


. YEAR. 


CORN. 


WHEAT. 


Area. 


Production. 


Value. 


Area. 


Production 


Value. 


18(56.... 


Acres. 
45,306.538 
32,520,249 

34.887,246 
37.103.245 
38,646.977 
34,091.137 
35,526,836 
39,197.148 
41,036,918 
44,841.371 
49,033,364 
50,369.113 
61,6864)00 
53.085,450 
62.317,842 
64,262.025 
65,659,545 
68,301,889 
69,683.780 
73,130,150 
75.694.208 
72,392,720 
75.672,763 
78,319.651 
71.970,763 
76.204,515 
70,836,668 
r2.03ti.465 
62.582,269 
82,075,830 
81.027,156 
80,095,051 
77,721,781 


Bushels. 
867.946,295 
768,320.000 
906,527.0(10 
874.320,000 
1,094,255.000 
991,898.000 
1.092,719.000 
932.274.000 
850,14aoOC 
1,321,069,000 
1,283,827,500 
1,342,558.000 
1,388.218,750 
1,547,901,790 
1,717,434,543 
1.194,916.000 
1,617,025.100 
1,551.066,895 
1,795.528,000 
1,936,176,000 
1,665.441,000 
1,456,161,000 
1,987,790,000 
2,112.892,000 
1,489,970,000 
2,1160,154.000 
1,628,464,000 
1.619,496,131 
1,212.770,052 
2,151.138.580 
2,283.875,165 
1,902,967,933 
1,924,184,660 


$411,450.830 
437,769.763 
424.056,649 
522,550,509 
640,520,456 
430,355.910 
385,736,210 
411,961,151 
496,271,255 
484.674.804 
436,108,521 
467,635,230 
440.280,517 
680,486.217 
679,714,499 
769,482,170 
783,867,175 
658,051,485 
640,735,560 
635,674,630 
610,311.000 
646,106,770 
677,561,680 
697,819,829 
754,433,451 
836,439.228 
642,146,630 
691.625.627 
654.719,162 
644,985,534 
491.006.1XJ7 
601.072,952 
652,023,428 


Acres. 

15,424,496 
18.321,561 
18,460,132 
19,181,004 
18,992,591 
19,943,893 
20,868,359 
22.171,676 
24,967,027 
26,381,512 
27,627,021 
26.277,546 
32,108,560 
32,646,950 
37,986,717 
37.709,020 
37,087,194 
36466,693 
39.475,885 
34.189,246 
36,806,184 
37,641,783 
37,336.138 
38,123,859 
36.087,154 
39.916,897 
38.654,430 
34,629,418 
34,882,436 
34,047,332 
34,618.646 
39.465,066 
44,055,278 


Bushels. 
151,91)9,906 
212,441,400 
224,036,600 
260.14<;.9UO 
235.884.700 
230,722,400 
249,997,100 
281,254,700 
308,102,700 
292,136.000 
289,356,500 
364,194,146 
420,122.400 
448,756,630 
498.549,868 
383,280,090 
604,185,470 
421,086,160 
612,765,000 
357.112.000 
457.218.000 
456,329,000 
416,868,000 
490.660,000 
399,262.000 
611.780,000 
615.949.000 
396,131,725 
460,267,416 
467.102,947 
427,684,346 
630,149.168 
675,148,705 


$232,109.630 
308.387.406 
243,032,746 
199,024,996 
222,766.%:! 
264,075. S.',1 
278,522.068 
300,669,533 
265.881,167 
261.396,926 
278,697,238 
:w,-,,0).444 
325,814.119 
497,030,142 
474.201,860 
456,880,427 
445,602,125 
383.649,272 
330,862,260 
275.320.:;'.*! 
314,226,020 
310,612.980 
385,248,030 
342.494,707 
334,773,678 
613.472.711 
322,111,881 ! 
213,171,381 
225.9CC.ll';.) 
237,938,998 
310,602,639 
428,547,121 
392,770,3201 


1867 


1868 


1869. . . . 


1870. . . . 


1871... 


1872 


1873 


1874 


1875 


1876. . . . 


1877 


1879 


1880.... 


1881... 


1882 


1883 


1884 


1885 


1886 


1887 


1888 


1889 


1890... 


1891... 


1892 


1893 


1894 


1895 


189P 


1897.... 


1898 




YEAR. 


OATS. 


RYE. 


Area. 


Production. 


Value. 


Area. 


Production. 


Value. 


1866. . . . 


Acres. 
8.864,219 
10,74,41fi 
9,665,736 
9,461,441 
8,792,3B6 
8,365,809 
9.000,769 
9,751,7110 
10,897,412 
11.915,075 
13,358,908 
12,826.148 
13,176,500 
12.683,500 
16,187,977 
16,331,600 
18,494,691 
20,324,962 
21,300,917 
22,783,630 
23.058,474 
25,920,906 
26,998,282 
27,462,316 
26,431,369 
25,581,861 
27.063,835 
27,273.033 
27,023.553 
27,878.406 
27,565,985 
25,730,375 
25,r77,110 


Bushels. 

268,141,078 
278,698,000 
254,960,800 
288,334,000 
247,277,400 
255,743,1X10 
271,747,000 
270,340,000 
240,369,000 
354,317,500 
320,884,000 
406,394.000 
413,578,560 
363,761,320 
417,885,380 
416,481,000 
488,250.<;iO 
571,302,400 
583,628,000 
629,409,000 
624.134,000 
659,618.000 
701,735,000 
751,515.000 
523,621,000 
738,394,000 
661,035.000 
638.854.850 
682,036.928 
824,443.537 
707,346.404 
698,767,809 
730,906,643 


$94.057.945 
123,902,556 
108,355,976 
109.621,734 
96,443,637 
92,591,359 
81,303,518 
93,474,161 
113,133,934 
113.441,491 
103,844.896 
115,546,194 
101,762,468 
120,533.294 
150,243,565 
193,198.97(1 
182,978.022 
187,040.264 
161,528,470 
179,631,860 
186,137,930 
200,699,790 
195.424,240 
171,781,008 
222.048,486 
232,312,267 
209,253,611 
187,576,092 
214.81 6,i20 
163,655.068 
132,485,033 
147,974,719 
186,405,364 


Acres. 
1,648,033 
1,689,175 
1,651.321 
1,657,584 
1,176,137 
1,089.531 
1,048.654 
1,150,355 
1,116,716 
1,359.788 
1,468.374 
1,412,902 
1,622,700 
1,625,450 
1,767.619 
1,789,1(10 
2,227,894 
2,314,754 
2,343,963 
2,129,301 
2,129.918 
2,053.447 
2,364,805 
2,171,493 
2.141,853 
2,176,466 
2,163.657 
2,038.185 
1,944,780 
1,890,315 
1,831.2111 
1.703.561 
1,643,207 


Bushels. 
20,864,944 
23,184,000 
22,604,800 
22,527,900 
15,473,600 
15,385,600 
14,888,600 
15,142.000 
14.990,906 
17.722,100 
20,374,800 
21,170.100 
25,842,790 
23,639,460 
24,640,829 
20,704,950 
29.960.037 
28,058.582 
28,640,000 
2i,7.v;.{ion 

24,489.000 
20,693.000 
28,415,000 
28,420,299 
25,807,472 
31,751,868 
27,978.824 
26,555.416 
26,727,615 
27,210.070 
24,369,047 
27,863.:4 
25,657,522 


7,149,716 
23.280,584 
21.349,190 
17,341,861 
11,326.967 
10,927,623 
10,071,061 
10.638,258 
11,610,339 
11,894.223 
12,504,970 
12,201,751) 
13,566.01)2 
15,507,431 
18,664.500 
19,327,415 
18,439.194 
16,300,603 
14,857, (MO 
12,594.82(1 
13.881.330 
11,283,140 
16,721.869 
12 009,752 
16,229,992 
24.589,217 
15,160,066 
13,612,222 
13,395,47<; 
11.964,826 
9,960.769 
12.239.f47 
11,875,350 


1867 


1868 . 


1869 


1870.... 


1871 


1872. . . . 


1873 


1874 


1875 


1876 


1877 


1878 . . 


1879 


1880 


1881 


1882 


1883 


1884 


1885 


1886 


1887 


1888 


1889 


1890 


1891 


1892 


1893 
1894 


1895 


1896 


1897 


1898 


'All values In this and the following tables are In Kold. 



52 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


STATISTICS OF THE PRINCIPAL FARM CROPS.-CONTINUED. 
Acreage, production and value of the principal farm crops in the United States, 1866 to 1898. 


YEAR. 


BARLEY. 


BUCKWHEAT. 


Area. 


Production. 


Value. 


Area. 


Production. 


Value. 


1866 


Acres. 
492,532 
1,131,217 
937.498 
1,025.795 
1.108.954 
1,177.735 
1,397.082 
1.387,106 
1,580,626 
1,789,902 
1,766,511 
1,1.14.654 
1.790.400 
1,680.700 
1.843,329 
1.967,510 
2.272,103 
2.379,009 
2,608,818 
2,729.359 
2,652,957 
2.901,953 
2,996.382 
3,220.834 
3.135,302 
3.352,579 
3,400,;*! 
3.220,371 
3,170,602 
3,299,973 
2.9.50.539 
2,719,116 
2,583,126 


Bushels. 
11.283.807 
25,727,000 
22,896,100 
28.652,200 
26,295,400 
26.718,500 
26,846.400 
32,044,491 
32,552,500 
36.908,600 
38,710,500 
34.441,400 
42,245,630 
40,283,100 
45,165,346 
41,161,330 
48,953.926 
50,136,097 
61,203.000 
58,360.000 
59,428,000 
56,812,000 
63,884.000 
78,332,976 
67.168.344 
86.SS9.153 
80.096,762 
69,869,495 
til. 400,465 
87.072,744 
69,695.223 
66.685.127 
55,792,257 


$7.916,342 
18,027.746 
54,948,127 
20,298,164 
20,792,213 
20,264,015 
18,415.839 
27,794.229 
27.997,824 
27,367,522 
24,402.691 
21,629,130 
24,454.301 
23.714.444 
30,090,742 
33,862,513 
30,768,015 
29,420.423 
29,779.170 
32,867.696 
31,840,510 
29.464,390 
37,672,032 
32,614,271 
42,140.502 
45,470,342 
38,026,062 
28,729,386 
27,134,127 
29,312,413 
22,491,241 
25,142,139 
23,064.359 


Acres. 
1.045,624 
1,227.826 
1.113.993 
1,028,693 
536,992 
413,915 
418.497 
454,152 
452,590 
575,530 
666,441 
649.923 
673,100 
639.900 
822.802 
828.815 
847,112 
857.349 
879,403 
914,394 
917,915 
910.506 
912.630 
837,162 
844,579 
849,364 
861,451 
815,614 
789,232 
763,277 
754,898 
717.836 
678,332 


Bushels. 
22,791.839 
21,359,000 
19.863,700 
17,431,100 
9,841,500 
8.328.700 
8,133,500 
7,837,700 
8,016.600 
10,082,100 
9,668.800 
10.177,000 
12.246.820 
13.140.0(10 
14,617,636 
9,486,200 
11,019.353 
7,668.954 
11,116,000 
12,626,000 
11,869.000 
10.844.000 
12.050.000 
12,110,329 
12,432,831 
12,760.932 
12.143.185 
12.122.311 
12,668,200 
15.341,399 
14,089.783 
14.997,451 
11,721,927 


$15,413,160 
16,812,070 
15,490,426 
12,534,851 
6,937,471 
6,208,165 
5.979,222 
5,878.tK> 
5,843,645 
6,254,564 
6.435,836 
6.808.180 
6,441.240 
7,856.191 
8,682.488 
8,205,705 
8,038,862 
6,303.980 
6,549,020 
7,057,363 
6,465,120 
6,122,820 
7.627,647 
6,113.119 
7.132.872 
7,271.506 
6.295.643 
7,074.450 
7,040.23* 
6,936.325 
5,522.339 
6.319.188 
5,271,462 


1807 


1868 


1869 


1870 


1871 


]872 


1873 


1874 


1875 


lS7ti 


18i'7 


1878 


1879 


1880 


1881 


1882 


1883 


1884 


1885 


1886 


1887 


1888 


1889 


181)0 


18!)] 


1892 .. .... 


181(3 


1894 


1895 


189(5 


1897 


1898 




YEAR. 


POTATOES. 


HAY. 


Area. 


Production, 


Value. 


Area. 


Production. 


Value. 


1866 


Acres. 
1.069,381 
1,192,195 
1.131,552 
1,222,250 
1,325.119 
1,220,913 
1.331.331 
1.295,139 
1,310,041 
1,510.041 
1.741,983 
1,792,287 
1,776,800 
1,836.800 
1.842,510 
2,041,670 
2.171.635 
2.289,275 
2.220,980 
2,265,823 
2.287,136 
2.357,322 
2.533,280 
2,647,989 
2,651,579 
2.714,770 
2.547,962 
2,605,186 
2.737,9(3 
2,954.952 
2,767,465 
2.534,577 
2,557,729 


Bushels. 
107,200.976 
97,783,000 
106,090.000 
133,886,000 
114,775,000 
120.461.700 
113.516.000 
106.089.000 
105,981,000 
166,877,000 
124,827,000 
170,092,000 
124,126.650 
181,626,400 
167,659,570 
109,145.494 
70,972.508 
208.164,425 
190,642.000 
175,029.000 
168,051,000 
134,103,000 
202,365.000 
204,990.345 
148,078,945 
254,426,971 
156.654,819 
183,034. 203 
170,787.338 
297,237,370 
252,234,540 
164.015,964 
192,30(5,338 


$50,722,553 
64.462.48ti 
62,918,660 
57,481,362 
74,621.019 
64,905,189 
60,692.129 
69,153.709 
65,223.314 
57.357,515 
77,319.541 
74,272,500 
72,923.575 
79,153,673 
81,062,214 
99,291,341 
95,304,844 
87,849.991 
75,524,290 
78,153,403 
78,441.940 
91,506.740 
81,413,589 
72,704.413 
112,205,235 
91.024,521 
103.567.520 
108,661.801 
91.526.787 
78.984.901 
72,182.350 
89.643,059 
79,574,772 


Acres. 
17.668.904 
20,020.554 
21,541,573 
18,591.281 
19.861.805 
19.009,052 
20.318.936 
21,894,084 
21.769,772 
23.507,964 
25,282,797 
25,367,708 
26.931,300 
27,484,991 
25,863.955 
30.888,700 
32,339.585 
35.515,948 
88,671,688 
39.849,701 
36.501,688 
37,664.739 
38.591.903 
52,947,236 
50,712.513 
51.044,490 
60,858,061 
49.613.469 
48.321,272 
44.206.453 
43,259.756 
42,426.770 
42,780,827 


Tons. 
21.778.627 
26,277,000 
26,141,900 
26.420.000 
24.525,000 
22.239.400 
23,812.8(10 
25.085.100 
25.133.900 
27,873.600 
30,867.100 
31.629,300 
39,608,296 
35,493,000 
31,925,233 
35,135.064 
38, 138.049 
46.864.009 
48,470.460 
44.731.550 
41,796,499 
41,454,458 
46,643,094 
66.829.612 
60.197.589 
60,817,771 
59,823.735 
65,766,158 
54.874,408 
47,078,541 
59,282,158 
60.664,876 
66,376,920 


$220.835.771 
268,300.623 
263,589.23.-i 
268.933.04S 
305,743.224 
317.939.71)ft 
308,024,517 
314.241,037 
300.222.454 
300.377,839 
276,991.422 
264.879.79t; 
285.015,625 
330.804.494 
371,811,081 
415,131.366 
371.17fl.:".V> 
384.834,451 
396.139.:*)!' 
389,752.873 
353.437.69? 


18(57 


18fJ8 


1869 


1870 


1871 


1872 


1873 


1874 


1875 


1876 


1877 


1878 


1879 


1880 


1881 


1882 


1883 


1884 


1885 


1886 


1887 
1888 


408,499.565 
470,374.948 
473,569,972 
494,113,61*5 
490,427,798 
570,882,872 
468 578 321 


1S89 


]8<)0 


IS 1 )! 


ltt<)2 


1893 


18H4 . .. 


1895 


393.185.61. 
388,145.614 
401,390,728 
398,060,647 


189(> 


1897 


1898 





STATISTICS OF AGRICULTURE. 



STATISTICS OF THE PRINCIPAL FARM CROPS. CONTINUED. 
Acreage, production and value of the principal farm crops in the United States, 1866 to 1897. 



YEAR. 




TOBACCO. 






COTTON. 






Area. 


Production. 


Value. 


Area. 


Production. 


Value. 


1866 .. 


Acres. 
520.107 


Pounds. 
388,128,684 


137,398,393 


Acres. 


Bales. 

2.097,254 


$204,561,896 


1867.. 


494.333 


313,724,000 


29.572.660 




2 619.554 


199.5sM.51U 


1868. 


427,189 


320.982,000 


29,822 873 




2 3ti6,467 


226,794,168 


18U9.... 


481,101 


273.775.000 


25,520.065 


7,933,01)0 


3,122.551 


261.067,037 


1870. . . . 


330.668 


950,628.000 


24,010,018 


9.985.090 


4,352,317 


292,703,086 


18H 


350.769 


263,196,100 


23.292,645 


8,911,000 


2,974,351 


242.672,804 


1872 


416.512 


342.304.UOO 


31,647,817 


9.560.000 


3.930.508 


280,552,629 


1873. . 


480.878 


372.810.000 


28 4'2l 703 


10.816,000 


4,170,388 


289,853.486 


1874..., 


281.662 


178,355.000 


21.OGti.515 


10.982.000 


3,832,991 


22S.113.USO 


1875 


559.049 


379,347.000 


26,453.881 


11.635.000 


4.632,313 


233,1U9,945 


1876 


540,457 


881,002,000 


25.923,89-1 


11,500.000 


4,474,069 


211,655,041 


1877... 








11.8'.'5.000 


4,773,865 


235,731,194 


18?8. . 


542,850 


392546,700 


22.093.240 


12, 260 SOU 


4,694,942 


193.467,706 


1879 


492 100 


391,278,350 


22,727,524 


12595500 


4,735 082 


242,140.987 


1880 


602,516 


446,296,889 


36,414.615 


15.475,300 


5,708,942 


280.266.242 


18S1 


646.239 


449,880,014 


43.372.336 


16,851.000 


5,456,048 


294,135.547 


1882. . 


671,522 


513,077.558 


411189,950 


16,791.557 


6,957,000 


309.696,500 


1883.... 


638,739 


451,545,641 


40,455,362 


16,777,993 


5,700,600 


250,594,750 


1884.... 


724,668 


541.504,000 


44,160.151 


17,439,612 


5.682.001) 


253,993.385 


1885 


752,520 


562,736.000 


43.265.5H8 


18.300.SIB 


6,575,300 


269,989,812 


1886 


750,210 


532,537,000 


39,468,218 


lS.454.li03 


6,254,460 


:i09.;iS1.93S 


1887 


598,620 


386,240,000 


40.977,259 


18.641.067 


7,020.209 


337.972,453 


1888.... 


747,326 


565.795.000 


43,666.665 


19.058,591 


6,940.898 


354,454,340 


1889. . . . 


695.301 


488.256,619 


32.396.740 


20.171.S06 


7,472.511 


402.951,814 


1890.... 


722,198 


522,215.116 


43,100,532 


20,809,053 


8,652,597 


369,668,858 


1891 


742.945 


656,877.039 


47.492.584 


20,714,937 


9,035,379 


326,513,298 


1893.... 


725,195 


498,621. 686 


46. 728,959 


18.067,924 


6,700,365 


262.252,286 


1893. . . . 


702.952 


483.02'..'.v,." 


39.155,442 


19,525,000 


7,493.000 


274.479 637 


1894.... 


523.103 


406.678.;>s.~> 


27.750,739 


23.687.950 


9,476,435 


2s7.120.S18 


1895.... 


633.950 


491.544.000 


35,574,220 


20.1S4.368 


7.161.094 


M),;s,01t6 


1896.. . 


694,749 


403.004,320 


24.258,070 


23.273.209 


8.532,705 


291,811,564 


1897 








24,319,684 


10,897,857 


319,491,412 

















NUMBER AND VALUE OF FARM ANIMALS IN THE UNITED STATES 1868-99. 



JANUARY l. 



HORSES. 



Number. Value, 



MULES. 



Number. Value, 



MILCH Gows. 



Number. Value 



. . 

ls7tl.. 
1871.. 
1872.. 
1873.. 
1874.. 
1875.. 
1876.. 
1877.. 
1878.. 
18 i 9.. 
1880.. 
1881.. 

iss:>. . 

1883. . 
1884.. 
18S5.. 
ISSii. . 



5,756.940 
6.332,793 

8,248,800 
8,702.000 
8.990,900 
9.222.470 



1890.. 
1891.. 
1892.. 
1893.. 
1894.. 
1895.. 
IS96.. 
1897.. 
1898.. 
1899.. 



. 

9.504.200 
9.735,300 
10.155.400 
10.329.700 
lU.lCiS.7liO 
11.2U1.SUO 
11,429.626 
10,521,554 
10.838,111 
11.169.683 
11. 5(4.572 
12,077.657 
12.496,744 
13,172,936 
13,663.294 
14.213,837 
14,056.750 



$482.<i96,226 
533,024.787 
671,319,461 
683.257,687 
659,707,916 
684.4t8.957 
666,927,406 
646,370,939 
632,446,985 
610,206.631 
600.813.681 
578,254.808 
613,296.611 
667.954,325 
615,824.914 
765,U41,308 
833.731,400 
852.282,947 
860.823.208 
901.685,755 
946.096,154 
982.194,827 
978,516,562 
941.823.222 



15.498,140 1,007,468,688 



16.206.802 
16,0*1, 139 



15.124,057 
14.864.667 
13.9IW.911 
13.665,307 



992.225.185 
769,224,799 
576,730.580 
500,140.186 
452.tM9.396 
478.Ii62.407 
511.074.813 



855.685 
921,662 
1,179.500 
1,242,300 
1,276,300 
1.310.000 
J, 339,350 
1,393.750 
1,414,500 
1,443.500 
1,1*37.500 
1.713.100 
1,729.500 
1,720,731 
1,835,166 
1,871.079 
1.914.126 
1,972.569 
2.052.5* 
2.117.141 
2,191,727 
2.257,574 
2.331,027 
2.296.532 
2,314.699 
2.331,128 
2,352.231 
2.383.108 
2.278,946 
2.215,654 
2.257.665 
2.134,213 



$66,415,769 
98,386.359 
128,584,796 
126,127,786 
121,027,316 
124,658,085 
119,50] .859 
111.502,713 
106,565,114 
99.4S0.976 
104.322.939 
96.OSi.971 
105.948,319 
120,096,164 
130,945,3r8 
148.732,390 
161,214,976 
162,497.097 
163.3S1.090 
167,057.538 
174.S53.5i 13 
179.444.481 
182.394.099 
178.847.370 
174.882,070 
164,763,751 
146,232.811 
110,927,834 
108,204.457 
92.8112.090 
99.032.UU2 
9o.9ia.2i>! 



8,691,568 
9.247,714 
10.095.600 
10,023,000 
10.303.500 
10.575.900 
10.706.300 
10.906.St 10 
11.085.400 
11,260.800 
11,300,100 
11,826,400 
12.027,000 
12.368.653 
12,611.632 
13,125,685 
13.501.206 
13.904,7* 
14.235.388 
14.522,083 
14.856,414 
15,298.625 
15,952.883 
16.019.591 
16.416,351 
16.424.087 
16,487,400 
16.504,629 
16,137,586 
15.941.727 
15.S40.S86 
15.990.115 



$319,681,153 
381,752,676 
394,940,745 
374,179,093 
329.304.983 
314.358,931 
299.609,309 
811,089.824 
320,846,728 
307,743,211 
298.499.8fi6 
256.953,928 
279,899,420 
296.277,060 
326.480,31(1 
396,575,405 
423,486.649 
412.903,093 
8S9.9Sr).;Y,'3 
37S.7S9.5S9 
366.252,178 
266,226,376 
352.152,133 
346,3117,901) 
351.378,132 
tS7.2W.7So 
358,998,661 
362.601.729 
363.955.545 
369.23St.993 
434.813.826 
474.233.925 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



NUMBER AND VALUE OF FARM ANIMALS. CONTINUED. 



JANUARY l. 



CATTLE, OTHEK 
THAN Cows. 



Number. Value. 



SHEEP. 



Number. Value 



SWINE. 



Number. Value 



Total value 
of farm 
animals. 



IStii).. 
1870.. 
1871.. 
1872.. 
1873.. 
1874.. 
1875.. 
1876.. 
1877.. 
1878.. 
1879.. 
1S80.. 
1881.. 
1882.. 
1883.. 



1886.. 
1887.. 
18S8.. 
1889.. 
1890.. 
1891.. 
1892.. 
1893.. 
1894.. 
KI.V. 
1896.. 



11.942.481 

12.ia5.385 
15.388.500 
16,212,200 
16,889.800 
16,413,800 
16,218.100 
16,313,400 
16.785,300 
17.956,100 
19,223.300 
.41,408,100 
21,231,000 
20.937,702 
23,280,238 
28,046,077 
29,046.101 
29,866,573 
31.275,242 



$249,144,599 
306,211,473 
346,926,440 



33,511,750 
34,378,363 
35,032,417 
36,849,024 

36,875,648 
37,651.239 
35,954,196 



34,364.216 
32,085,409 

30.508,408 
29,264.197 
27.994.225 



321.562,693 
329,298,755 
310,649,803 
304,858,859 
319,623,509 
307,105,386 
329,541,703 
329,543.327 
341,761,154 
362,861,509 
463,069,499 
611,549,109 
683,229,054 
694,382,913 
661.966,274 
663,137,926 
611,750,520 
597,236,812 
560,625,137 
544,127,908 
570,749,155 
547,882,204 
536,789,747 
482,999,129 
508,928.416 
507,929,421 
612,296.634 
637,931,135 



38,991,912 
37.724,279 
40,853,000 
31,851,000 

31,679,300 
33,002,400 
33,928,200 

33,783.600 
35,935,300 
35,804,200 
35.740,500 
38,123,800 
40.765,000 



82,139,979 
93,364,433 
74,035,837 
88,771,197 
97,922,350 



94.320.652 
93,666,318 



45.016,224 
49,237,291 
50,626,626 
50,360,243 
48.322.331 
44,759,314 
43,544,755 
42,59,079 
44,330,072 
43,431,136 
44,938,365 
47,273,553 
45,048,017 
12,294,064 



80.603,062 
79,023,984 
90,230.537 
104,070,759 
106,594,954 
124,366,835 
119,902,706 
107,960,650 
92.443.867 



24,317,258 
23,316,476 
26,751,400 
29,457,500 
31,796,300 
32.632,050 
30,860.900 
28,062,200 
25.726.800 
28,077.100 
32,262,500 
34,766,100 
34.034,100 
36,247,603 
44,122.200 
43.270,086 



$110,766.266 
146,188,755 
187,191,502 
182,602,352 
138,733.828 
133,729,615 
134.565,526 



89,279,926 



36.818,643 
37.656,960 
39,114,453 



100,659,761 
108.397,447 
116,121.290 
126,909,264 
89,186,110 
66.685,767 
65,167,735 
67.020,942 
92.721,133 
107,697,530 



45,142.657 
46,092,043 

44,612,836 
44.346,525 
50,301.592 
51,602,780 
50,625,106 
52.398,019 
46,094,807 
45,206,498 
44,165.716 
42,842,759 
40.600,276 
39,759,993 
38,651,631 



175,070.484 
171,077,196 
160,838,532 
110,613,044 
145.781,515 
170,535,435 
263,543,195 
291,951,221 
246,301,139 
226,401.683 



200.043,291 
220,811,082 
291,307,193 
243,418.336 
210,193,923 
241,031,415 
295.426,492 
270,384.626 
219,501,267 
186,529.745 
166.272,770 
174,351,409 
170.109.74S 



$1,277,111,822 

1,527,704.029 
1,822,327,377 
1,810,142.711 
1,659.211,933 
1,684,431,693 
1.619,944,472 
1.618,012,221 
1,647,719.138 
1,576.50(5,083 
1.574,620,783 
1,445,423,062 
1,576,917,556 
1,721,795,252 
1,906,459,250 
2,338,215,268 
2.467,868,924 
2,456,428,380 
2.365.159,862 
2,400.586,938 
2,409,043.418 
2,507,050,058 
2,418,766,028 
2,329,787,770 
2,461,755,698 
2.483.506,681 
2,170,816,764 
1,819.446.306 
1,727,926,084 
1.655,414,612 
1,891.677.471 
1.997,010,407 



NUMBERS OF FARM ANIMALS IN THE UNITED STATES-JAN. 1, 1899. 



STATES AND TERRITORIES. 



Maine 

New Hampshire. 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

Delaware 

Maryland 

Virginia 

North Carolina. .. 
south Carolina... 

Georgia 

Florida 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

Louisiana 

Texas 

Arkansas 

Tennessee 

West Virginia 

Kentucky 

Ohio 

Michigan 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

Kansas 

Nebraska 

South Dakota 



Horses. 



111.987 
55.028 
84,812 

63,478 



10,281 
43,682 

596,738 
79,180 
548.747 



129,662 
233,940 
146,697 
66,979 
110,266 
87,673 
132,224 
201,477 
143,593 

1,137,015 
234,596 
317,601 
151,847 
365,602 
653.499 
410,410 
601,271 

1,003.299 
409,822 
455,122 
981.352 
762,734 
734,881 
652,284 
290.746 



Mules. 



4,421 

7,269 

37,053 

4,928 

12,638 

35,998 

111,398 

97,357 

158,594 

8,354 

129.726 

163,082 

90,904 

265,880 

145.504 

151,265 

7,412 

106.547 

17,228 

2,646 

41,650 

82.225 

4,754 

8,416 

31,547 

183,362 

79,410 

43.016 

6.693 



Milch 
cows. 



197,878 
136,825 
271,602 
179,791 
25.611 
143,098 

1,458,251 
214,674 
924.260 
35.376 
165.022 
244,937 
248,263 
126,762 
297,324 
114,251 
254,727 
256,951 
125.747 
700,802 
196,808 
254.675 
163,895 
248,208 
736,735 
459,107 
611,975 

1,001,212 
895,822 
646,673 

1,250,775 
673.195 
680,457 
628,750 
372.321 



Other 
cattle. 



109,440 
79,380 
133.788 
74,876 
10,356 
68,688 
661,077 
41,558 
528,942 
22.995 
105.900 
338,542 
295,530 
141,509 
423,018 
325,774 
336.479 
304,118 
182,690 
4,533,897 
250,528 
322,293 
243,400 
341,181 
636,433 
341,635 
641,913 
1.265,066 
589,315 
670.165 
2.163.584 
1.460,647 
2.076,489 
1.395,82fl 
449,362 



Sheep. 



246,628 
78,289 

165.940 
40,437 
10,715 
31,745 

841,955 
42,299 

790,604 
12,981 

136.135 



261,400 
66,540 
327,584 



193,033 
239,720 
119,163 
2,543,917 
119,733 
286,063 
440,014 
597.643 
2,730.471 
1,396.053 
674,632 
613.191 
722,967 
410.998 
613,343 
616.102 
231,192 
292,779 
363.697 



Swine. 



75,306 

56,104 

76,208 

64,846 

13,722 

64,165 

645,237 

151,120 

1,043,331 

50,656 

331,853 

917,650 

1,369,703 

1,041,462 

2,093,987 

429,128 

1,866,640 

1,957,399 

796.498 

2,684,987 

1,280,120 

1,570,154 

331,663 

1,357,765 

2,307,051 

735.035 

1.340,231 

2,008,265 

929,763 

411.353 

3.408,281 

2,949,818 

1,591,341 

1,353.671 

145,469 



PRODUCTION OF PETROLEUM. 



FARM ANIMALS.-CONTINUEU. 



STATES AND TERRITORIES. 


Horses. 


Mules. 


Milch 
cows. 


Other 
cattle. 


Sheep. 


Swine. 


North Dakota 


175,137 


7,036 


171 073 


252640 


359721 


Ill 459 




164,923 


924 


43994 


962598 


3 377 547 


42 265 


Wyoming 


72,258 


1,514 


18,140 


694,978 


2,328,025 


22345 




146687 


8667 


91 666 


973 259 


1 655 5T>1 


20 713 


New Mexico 


83,361 


3.472 


19,317 


701 967 


3 12^ Wtt 


30204 




50,414 


1,041 


18404 


381 812 


1 014 287 


23286 


Utah 


68.295 


1,599 


67,787 


303,116 


2,116.949 


47,808 


Nevada 


44,305 


1,394 


18,069 


224,317 


576994 


10441 


Idaho 


128,077 


917 


31500 


384056 


2 311 880 


75718 




169,694 


1.441 


115,486 


265376 


759824 


166748 


Oregon 


185,844 


5,609 


116,581 


673,646 


2,575.468 


216430 


Cal if orn ia 


342,265 


62.915 


318,425 


664.704 


2,175.545 


374 141 


Oklahoma 


42,649 


8,407 


37,014 


257,505 


22.982 


&9,891 


Total . . . 


13,605.307 


2,184,213 


15.91)0,115 


27.994,225 


39.114.453 


38.651.631 



AVERAGE VALUE OF FARM ANIMALS IN THE UNITED STATES 
ON JAN. 1-1880 TO 1899. 



TEAR. 


Horses. 


Mules. 


Milch 
Cows. 


Other 
Cattle. 


Sheep. 


Swine. 


1880.... 


$54.75 


$61.26 


$23.27 


$16.10 


$221 


$428 


1881 


58.44 


69.79 


2395 


17.33 


239 


4 70 


1882 


58.63 


71 36 


2689 


1989 


237 


697 


1883 ... 


7059 


7949 


3021 


2181 


253 


675 


1884.... 


74.64 


84.22 


31.37 


23.62 


2.37 


657 


1885 


73.70 


82.38 


29.70 


23.25 


2.14 


502 


1886 


71.27 


79.60 


2740 


21 17 


1.91 


426 


1887 


72.15 


78.91 


26.08 


19.79 


2.01 


4.48 


1888. . . . 


71.82 


79.78 


24.(i5 


17.79 


2.05 


4.98 


1889 


71.89 


79.49 


23.94 


17.05 


2.13 


6.79 


1890 


68.84 


78.25 


22.14 


15.21 


2.27 


4.72 


1891... 


67.00 


77.88 


21.62 


14.76 


2.60 


4.15 


1892.... 


65.01 


75.55 


21.40 


15.16 


2.58 


4.60 


1893. . . . 


61.22 


70.68 


21.75 


15.24 


2.66 


6.41 


1894.... 


47.83 


62.17 


21.77 


14.66 


1.98 


5.98 


1895.... 


36.29 


47.55 


21.97 


14.06 


1.68 


4.97 


1896 


33.07 


45.29 


22.55 


15.86 


1.70 


435 


1897 


31.61 


41.66 


23.16 


16.65 


1.82 


4.10 


1898.... 


34.26 


43.88 


27.45 


20.92 


2.46 


4.30 


1899 


37.40 


44.96 


29.66 


22.79 


2.75 


4.40 

















PRODUCTION OF PETROLEUM. 

Production of crude petroleum (and its equivalent in refined Illuminating oil) in Russia and 
the United States, 1881 to 1897. 



TEAR. 


CRUDE PETROLEUM 
PRODUCED. 


EQUIVALENT IN REPINED 
ILLUMINATING OIL. 


Russia. 


United States. 


Russia. 


United States. 


1881... 


U. S. gallons. 
200.303,000 
249.951,000 
298.789,000 
446.531,000 
575.342.00U 
595,8'JO.(XX) 
825,80-.'.(X)0 
961,759.01)0 
1,000,291,000 
1,202.272,000 
1,437.032,000 
1,479,266.000 
1,750,054,000 
1,559.431, (XX) 
2,131.889,000 
2,161,932.000 
2.200,572.000 


U. H. gallons. 
1.104,017,000 
1,161,772,000 
1,281,455.000 
984.885,000 
1,017,174.000 
918,069.000 
1,178.723,000 
1.187.906.00(1 
1,159,705,000 
1,476,868,000 
1,924.552,000 
2,280,263,000 
2,121.884.000 
2.033.332;000 
2,072,470.000 
2,221.476.000 
2.560.335,000 


U. S. gallons. 
75,113,000 
93.733,000 
112016.000 
167,449,000 
215,753,000 
223,459,000 
309,676.000 
860,659,000 
875400,000 
450852.000 
538.887.000 
554,721.000 
656,270,000 
684,786,000 
799,458,000 
806.974,000 
847.715.000 


U. S. gallons. 
828,013,000 
871,829.000 
961,091,000 
738,664,000 
762.8H1.UX) 
688.5VMHK) 
884,(ir.OW 
890,980,000 
869.779,000 
1,107,651,000 
1.443,414,000 
J, 710, 198,000 

l,fii.uNum 

1,624.999.000 
1,554.353.000 
1,668,1(17.1100 
1.920.252.0(111 


18S2 


1883 


1884.... 


1885.... 


1886 


1887... 


1888 


1889 


1890 


1891 


1892 


1893.... 


1894... 


1895.... 


1896 


1897.... 



NOTE. One hundred gallons of American petroleum produce about 75 gallons of refined 
illuminatingoll; lOOgallonsof Russian petroleum about 37)6 gallons of refined Illuminating oil. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



THE PUBLIC DOMAIN. 
AREAS OF VACANT. RESERVED AND APPROPRIATED LANDS. 



STATES AND 
TERRITORIES. 



Reserved. 



Total 

government 
land. 



Appropriated. 



Total, 



Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Florida 

Idaho 

Indian Ter 

Kansas 

Louisiana 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Mexico.... 
North Dakota.. 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

South Dakota. . 

Utah 

Washington 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

Other states . . . 

Total h 

Alaska 

Hawaii 

Grand total/. 



Acres. 

522.373 
51,734, 

3,696,990 
42,443,023 
39,708.551 

1,757,275 
44,207,949 



1,060.883 

755,545 

505,895 

5,720.326 

383.950 

445,911 

71,567,296 

10.548,450 

61.358,609 

54.550,795 

20,574,613 

7,007.222 

35,897.869 

12,784,426 

43,870.05!; 

13.442.582 

413,799 

49,035,663 



573.994.Sil 

c369.526,U41 

fl,772,64d 



945,293,515 



Prct. 

1.60 

71.07 

11.02 

42.72 



Acres. Prct. Acres. 

86.240 .26 608,613 
015.372,262 21.12 67,107,045 
3,698,910 



59.81 
4.98 

83.68 



1,920 
Jl6,249,170 



9.38 45.934.0S4 



2.02 
2.62 
1.37 
11.07 
1.29 
1.02 
75.13 
21.47 
87.23 
69.76 
45.82 
28.31 
58.25 
26.55 
SU3 
31.49 
1.17 
78.54 



6,225.533 
19.840 
1,939.869 
19.575.040100.00 19, 

987.875 

1,474,834 

87,746 

4,983,409 



30.21 

clOO.OO 

41.71 



365,353 
a8.216,643 

232,119 
145,121,835 
...Id) .... 



41.57 



.01 

16.35 58,692,193 



.06 
3.67 



1.89 

5.11 

.24 

9.64 



1,777,115 

46,147,818 
1,575.040 
2.048,758 
2,230,379 
593,641 
10,703,735 
383,950 
445911 
all,464.533j 12.03 83,031,829 

70.522 
5,983,409 
a8,356.4,S8 
3,050.610 
'.207.160 
0,467.702 
all,120.906 
a5,451,307 



8.51 67.342,018 
62,907,283 
.79 23,625,223 
" 14,214,382 
41.365,571 
- 



10.37 



49.321,363 



11,131,345 26.08 24,573.927 



1.04 
13.16 
.04 



779.15S 
57.252.306 
232,119 



7.64^19,116.669 
369.526.041 
1,772.640 



Prct. 

1.86 

92.19 

11.03 

59.07 



Acres. \Prct~ 



32.049.387 
5,685.455 

29.S44.590 



69,19 
5.04 
87.35 
100.00 
3.91 
7.73 
1.61 
20.71 
1.29 
1.02 
87.16 
21.61 
95.74 
80.45 
52.61 
57.42 
67.12 
49.64 
93.80 
57.57 
2 21 
91.70 
.01 
ST. 

flOO.OO 
41.71 



20.456,566 
33.487.385 

6,682,382 



50,34,242 
26.632.809 
36,226^68 
40.985.705 
29.301,051) 
43.350,089 
12,227.891 
38.518.367 

2,994,482 
15.289.722 
21,277.764 
10,539.2s] 
20.260,617 
24,253.223 

3,258.63' 
18,110,157 
34.456,848 

5,180.694 
578,791,910 
85|1180.902,532 
3,559 

2.476.960 



47.96 01183383051 



98.14 
7.81 



30.81 
94.96 
12.65 



Acres. 

32.658.000 
72.792.500 
33.543,500 
99.361.OSi 
66.390,650 
35.264.500 
52.830.200 
19,575.040 
52.383.000 
28.863.188 
36,819.000 
51,689,440 
29,685.000 
43,796,000 
95,259,720 
8.391 49.137.339 
4.26 70,336.500 

19.55 78.197.005 
39 44,902,987 

42.58| 24.753,663 
61.626.218 

50.361 48,158.555 



'MM'. 
92.27 



. 

79.29 
98.71 



6.20 
42.43 
97.7 

8.30 



52.580,000 
42,684,084 
35.275.000 
62.433,007 



1.72 
3.83 
1.77 
5.23 
3.49 
1.86 
2.78 
1.03 
2.76 
1.52 
1.94 
2.72 
1.56 
2.30 
5.01 
2.59 
3.70 
4.12 
2.36 
1.30 
3.24 
2.53 
2.77 
2.25 
1.86 
3.29 



99.96t579(IMOB8 30.47 



62.1 
58.'29 



15)00019201 100.00 
369.529.600 
4.249.600 



52.04 2273798401 



a Including forest reserves withdrawn from entry since July 1, 1898. b Land area of Ohio, 
Indiana. Illinois and Iowa, formerly public-land states, as given in the General Land Office 
reports, 117,913.629 acres; land area of eighteen eastern states, the District of Columbia and 
Texas, according to the eleventh census, 461,110,400 acres, c Nearly, d Area unknown, e In- 
cluding leased lands. / Exclusive of Puerto Rico, Guam and the Philippine islands, a Total 
area disposed of by the national government, 720.027,810 acres, including 3,559 acres in Alaska. 
h Exclusive of outlying territories. 

PDBLIC LANDS FIT FOR PRODUCTIVE USES. 



Far more Important than the exact area 
of the public domain legally open to settle- 
ment is the question how much of this 
public land is actually fit for cultivation 
or for other productive uses. Having regard 
to present conditions, it must be admitted 
that all the best parts of the public domain 
have been appropriated, and that compara- 
tively very little good agricultural land 
remains open to settlement; the mineral 
value of that which remains may be very 
great, but even of the mineral deposits it 
may be said that the most accessible and 
most easily worked among them have proba- 
bly been appropriated. Looking into the fu- 
ture, the question becomes much more dim- 
cult, for no one can tell even approximately 
how much of the land now lying waste may 
be ultimately reclaimed to productive uses. 
The one thing needed, so far as concerns 
the greater part of the 573,995,000 acres of 
vacant public land in the United States 
proper, including nearly all west of the 
ninety-eighth or one hundredth meridian, 
is an adequate supply of water, and this 
applies to much of the mineral land as 
well as to that which it is desired to 
reclaim for agricultural purposes. Vast 
tracts of arid land in the western United 
States contain in an unusual degree all the 



elements of fertility except water, and with 
the aid of irrigation could be made to yield 
more abundantly than even the best land 
of the humid regions. It has been said that 
"sagebrush is unerring evidence of kindly 
soil and abundant sunshine." 

Estimates of the amount of this land 
which can be irrigated with the water at 
command vary greatly, but there is none 
for the arid region as a whole more authori- 
tative than those of Maj. J. W. Powell, 
formerly director of the United States 
geological survey, and Mr. F. H. Newell, 
chief hydrographer of that survey. Maj. 
Powell estimated that at least 150,000 square 
miles, or 96,000,000 acres, could be econom- 
ically reclaimed by irrigation within the 
present generation; or, as he said before a 
congressional committee in 1890. that about 
100,000.000 acres could be reclaimed by the 
utilization of perennial streams alone. Mr. 
Newell places the irrigable amount at 
74,000,000 acres, or about 7.6 per cent of the 
total area of the sixteen western public- 
land states and territories. This is a very 
conservative estimate, in which financial as 
well as engineering considerations are taken 
into account, and it looks not to the remote 
future, but only to what Is likely to be 
profitable and therefore practicable within 



THE PUBLIC DOMAIN. 



a generation. Future improvements in irri- 
gation engineering and methods and discov- 
eries of new underground water supplies, 
together with the increasing demand for 
agricultural products resulting from an in- 



creasing population, may in the course of 
time make it profitable to irrigate a much 
larger area, but any attempt to state the 
ultimate extent of Irrigation would be only 
conjecture. 



CLASSIFICATION OF LANDS RESERVED FROM SETTLEMENT IN THE UNITED 

STATES PROPER. 



STATES AND TERRI- 
TORIES. 


Indian 
reserva- 
tions. 


forest 
reserves. 


National 
parks. 


Reser- 
voir 
sites. 


Military 
reserva- 
tions. 


Other 
reserved 
land. 


Total. 


Alabama 


Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 
a\ 950 


Acres. 
84 290 


Acres. 
86240 


Arizona 


15,150,75? 


4,496,000 


2)480 


3960 


101 412 




19 752 009 


A rkansas 






c912 




' 15 


993 


' 1 920 


California 


406,556 


- 8,571794 


dl 130 240 


3463 


86907 


6 050 210 


16 249*170 


Colorado 


1,021,230 


3.103,360 




33,875 




2 067 068 


6'22d'oo3 


Florida 










15673 


' 4267 


19840 


Idaho 


1,364,500 


4,008,960 


e38400 


1561 


1 926 




5 415 34(; 


Indian Territory 


/19.575.040 












19 575 (140 


Kansas 


28,279 








22649 


936947 


987 875 


Louisiana 










1 616 


1 473 319 


1 474 834 


Michigan 


5,9*1 








2.728 


79074 


87 746 


Minnesota 


1,505,606 








*^ 


3 417 796 


4983409 


Mississippi. .' 
















Missouri 










1000 




1000 


Montana 


9,382.400 


6,040,000 


ellS 400 


33,201 


257 344 




14 831 345 


Nebraska 


124,053 








56,719 




180.772 


Nevada 


954,135 










6,029,274 


6,983,409 


New Mexico 
North Dakota 


1,667.485 
3,782,347 


2,758,080 




25,179 


159,240 


3,746,504 


8.356,488 

3,782,847 


Oklahoma 


6 949 715 








26880 


230665 


7 207 160 


Oregon 
South Dakota 
Utah 


1,484,039 

!>,835,781 
3972480 


4,653,440 
1,166,080 

1)13 -jtjQ 




139 7J2 


1,945 
11,185 
8957 


" 107,860' 
386798 


b. 139,424 
11,120.91* 
6 451 307 


Washington 


3 674 324 


7902 720 


0207360 




18633 




12 OD3 037 


Wisconsin....* 


393,177 








1,046 




394,223 


Wyoming 


1 810000 


3241760 


el 897000 




8458 


1,259 425 


8.216,643 


Other states 


M88.853 








i43,266 




232,119 


Total ... 


83,536.701 


45,885.554 


3.393,792 


240,951 


829,354 


24,W4,S> 


15S,75'J,712 



a Including a reservation partly in Mississippi. 

b Casa Grande ruin. 

c Hot Springs reservation. 

d Sequoia, Yosemite and General Grant national parks. 

e Part of the Yellowstone national park. 

/ Area according to the commissioner of Indian affairs, 19,822,888 acres. 

p Mount Ranier national park, created by act of March2, 1899. 

h New York. North Carolina and Iowa. 

t Connecticut. Delaware, District of Columbia, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, 
Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, 
Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia. 



CHARACTER OF THE VACANT PUBLIC LANDS IN FIFTEEN WESTERN STATES 
AND TERRITORIES. 



STATES AND TERRITORIES. 


Woodland 
and, forest. 


Grazing 
land. 


Desert. 


Total. 


Arizona 


Acres. 
6,900,000 


Acres. 
29,800,000 


Acres. 
15,000.000 


Acres. 
51.700.000 


California 


900(100 


22,500,000 


19.000,000 


42.400.000 




10,500000 


29,200.000 




39,700,000 




24600000 


19,600,000 




44,200,000 




19,800 000 


61,800,000 




71,MX),000 


Nebraska 




10,500,000 




10,500,000 


Nevada 


800,000 


40,600,000 


20.000.000 


61.400,000 




8UOOOUO 


46.000,000 




54,600,000 




200000 


20.400,000 




20,600,000 






7,000,000 




7.0UO.UX) 




19,200,000 


16,700,000 




35,900,000 






12800000 




12,800,000 


Utah 


17,000.000 


16,900,000 


10.000.000 


43,900,000 




7 1000UO 


t; :(m urn 




13.400.000 


Wyoming 


8,700,UOO 


35,300.000 


5.000.000 


49.000,000 


Total 


124,300.000 


365,400.000 


69,000,000 


658,700.000 



58 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOE 1900. 


RAILROAD BUILDING. 


[From Poor's Railroad Manual.] 
Number of miles of railroad In operation In each state and territory of the United States dur- 
ing the years ended Dec. 31, named In the heading. 


STATES AND GROUPS 
OF STATES. 


1880. 


1890. 


1891. 


1892. 


1893. 


1895. 


1897. 


1898. 


New England. 
Maine 


1,006 
1,015 

914 

1,916 
210 
923 
5,982 


1,377.47 

1,146.89 
988.45 
2,096.69 
234.43 
1,006.64 
6,840.57 


1,383.26 

1,144.88 
1,01)1.91 
2,100.32 
223.48 
1,006.54 
6,860.39 


1,401.64 

1,061.83 
996.01 
2,126.69 
223.48 
1,086.54 
6,914,69 


1,515.00 

1,155.88 
986.54 
2,121.26 
227.46 
1,013.22 
7,019.36 


1.704.71 

1,178.44 
974.99 
2,126.05 
226.37 
1,014.09 
7,224.65 


1,764.77 

1,173.64 
985.74 
2,120.29 
223.03 
1,008.15 
7,265.52 


1,897.98 
1,174.01 
987.3(i 
2,107.59 
223.i 
1,008.15 
7,380.72 


New Hampshire 






Rhode Island 


Connecticut 


Total 


Middle Atlantic. 
New York 


6,991 
1,684 
6,191 
275 

1,040 
15,181 


7,745.85 
2,063.81 
8,700.58 
314.95 
1,270.04 
20.66 
20,114.89 


7,765.22 
2,132.41 
8,919.98 
320.12 
1,269.44 
20.66 
20,427.83 


8.116.10 

2,201.91 
9,159.45 
314.94 
1,289.44 
20.66 
21,102.50 


8,110.51 
2,176.10 
9,435.56 
315.44 
1,300.80 
20.66 
21,359.07 


8,205.26 
2,208.07 
9.661.54 
315.44 
1,291.54 
22.88 
21,704.73 


8,241.15 

2.229.98 
9,965.49 
349.10 
1,315.04 
22.88 
22,123.64 


8,152.64 
2,243.02 
9,938.74 
350.11 
1,325.04 
24.88 
22,034.43 






Delaware 




District of Columbia. J 
Total 


Central Northern. 
Ohio 


6,792 
3,938 
4,873 
7,851 
8,156 
25,109 


7,987.99 
7,106.15 
1,106.19 
10,129.65 
5,614.95 
36.944.93 


8,167.63 
7,187.44 
6,135.25 
10,189.38 
5,785.61 
37,465.31 


8,351.88 
7,440.95 
6,292.12 
10,439.53 
6,927.97 
38,362.45 


8,558.74 
7.492.33 
6,321.07 
10.428.19 
5,970.07 
88,770.40 


8,699.12 
7,561.89 
6,416.03 
10,610.59 
6,106.89 
39,393.52 


8,766.79 
7,823.11 
6,421.37 
10.785.43 
6,315.44 
40,112,14 


8,844.10 

7,948.97 
6,440.92 
10.815.06 
6,380.69 
40,429.74 


Michigan 




Illinois 


Wisconsin 


Total 


South Atlantic. 


1,893 
691 
1,486 
1,427 
2,459 
618 
8,474 


3,367.65 
1,433.30 
8,128.17 
2,296.65 
4,592.83 
2,489.52 
17,308.12 


3,573.64 
1,547.1: 
3,205.46 
2,491.06 
4,870.25 
2,566.87 


3,576.69 
1,806.19 
3,229.57 
2,545.30 
4,946.39 
2,676.88 
19,781.02 


3,590.99 

1.883.33 
3,353.31 
2,561.72 
5,083.02 
2,840.26 
19,312.63 


3,603.38 
2,075.16 
3,397.45 
2.622.55 
6.210.04 


3,628.70 
2,161.19 
3,477.65 
2,666.07 
5 414.01 


8.674.53 
2.1911.51 
3.573.27 
2,655.46 
5,542.70 
3,100.65 
20,746.11 


West Virginia 


North Carolina 




Georgia 


Florida 


3,059.05 
19,967.63 


3,149.13 
20,496.75 


Total 


18,254.39 


Gulf and Miss. Valley. 
Kentucky 


1,630 
1,84; 
1,843 
1,127 
652 
6,995 


2,946.38 
2,798.98 
3,422.20 
2,470.85 
1,749.95 
13,388.36 


2,962.45 
2.996.20 
3,576.47 
2,440.39 
1,880.01 
13,856.62 


2,997.23 
3,064.26 
3,595.76 
2,448.37 
1,967.09 
14,072.71 


3,051.25 
3,091.43 
3.627.89 
2,459.22 
1,992.84 
14,222.63 


3,656.28 
3,116.64 
3,064.45 
2.497.78 
2,107.08 
14,442.13 


3,086.09 
3,106.82 
3,806.75 
2,645.08 
2,274.19 
14,918.93 


3.906.24 




2.691.38 
3.069.35 
3.086.46 
2,519.44 
15.272.87 








Total 


Southwestern. 
Missouri 


3,965 
859 
3,244 
3,400 
1,570 
758 

289 

14,08o 


6,142.02 
2,213.44 
8,709.85 
8,900.11 
4,291.11 
1,388.77 

1,260.66 
32,905.95 


6,178.45 
2,304.95 
8,812.6 
8,890.8 
4,441.33 
1,423.82 
1,272.08 
33,324.1 


6,360.56 
2,310.67 
9,040.73 


6,464.30 


6,571.58 
2,439.20 
9,434.12 


6,695.41 
2,660.69 
9,579.64 


6,810.65 

2.823.2" 
9.657.93 




2,369.9 


Texas 


9,184.61 


Kansas 
Colorado 


8,893.83 
4,451.52 
1,429.57 
1,375.02 
33,861.90 


8,931.28 
4,488.22 
1,439.50 
1,379.14 
34,256.96 


8,875.25 
4,503.1 
1,505.03 
1,152.50 
431.1 
34,912.04 


8,843.21 
4,575.86 
1.502.0 
1,202.03 
484.97 
35,533.88 


8,79ti.97 
4.6C8.85 
1.612.94 
1,263.60 
604.97 
86,179.20 


New Mexico 


In dlan Territory ) 


Total 


Northwestern. 


6,400 
3,15 
1,953 
1,225 

512 
lOfc 
12,34 


8,416.1 
5,545.3. 
5,407.4 
2,116.4 
2,610.4 
1,002.93 
2.195.56 
27,249.3- 


8,436.5 
5,670.88 
5,430.4 
2,222.7 
2,699.92 
1,048.7: 
2,290.82 
27,800.1 


8,506.00 
5,874,08 
5,524.28 
2,315.24 
2,707.89 
1,150.13 
2,667.87 
28,745.49 


8.513.44 
6,944.58 
5,564.32 
2,517.20 
2,792.15 
1,157.62 
2,721.63 
29,210.94 


8,5:3.1 
6,057.6 
5,542.2 
2,534.7 
2.800.8D 
1,177.93 
2,82S.5o 
29,405.06 


8,513.9 
6,176.7 
6.538.7 
2,603.9a 
2,801.4 
1.177.9S 
2,906.90 
29.719.50 


8,555.42 
6,402.87 
6,538,57 
2,661.99 
2,813.42 
1,170.57 
2,971.06 
30,113.90 


Minnesota 




North Dakota ) 


South Dakota 5 


Wyoming 




Total 


Pacific. 
California 


2,193 

60S 
28" 
73 
34 
84 
20c 
5,128 
98.29t 


4,336.4 
1,455.5. 
1.998.6S 
923.1 
1,094.8 
1,265.4 
946.1 
12,020.2* 
166.817.4 


4.484.63 
1.503.5 
2,309.23 
923.1 
1,079.5 
l,335.6t 
959.68 

12,613.4 

170.601.1 


4,623.65 
1,521.82 
2,722.13 
423.23 
1,161.97 
1,356.59 
1,073.28 
13,382.68 
175.223.4 


4,692.39 
1,527.1 
2,837.52 
932.23 
1,161.97 
1,369.08 
1,089.98 
13,601.37 
177.753.3f 


4,757.55 
1,513.66 
2,820.0, 
915.6 1 
1,412.21 
1,404.2< 
1,087.7* 
13.911.6C 
181.0R1.4 


5,198.71 
1.553.23 
2,811.9 
908.3 
1,412.6, 
1,436.2" 
1,111.6 
14,432.7 
lR4.fiO!U 


2,809,85 
1,615.88 
5,292.02 
920.37 
1,118.89 
1,416.18 
1.479.53 
14,652.7 
186.809.69 










Utah 




Total 
United States 



STATISTICS OF RAILWAYS OF THE UNITED STATES. 



STATISTICS OF RAILWAYS OF THE UNITED STATES. 
For the year ended June 80, 1898. 



The following is a synopsis of the elev- 
enth statistical report of the United States 
interstate-commerce commission for 1898, 
and from the summaries in their reports the 
figures below are taken: 

MILEAGE. 

On June 30, 1898, the total single-track 
railway mileage in the United States was 
186,396.32 miles, there being an Increase in 
this mileage during the year of 1,967.85 
miles. The states of Arkansas, California, 
Louisiana, Missouri, New York and Wis- 
consin show an increase In excess of 100 
miles. The aggregate length of railway 
mileage, including all tracks, on the date 
given was 247,532.52 miles, the Increase 
being shown as 4,088.11 miles. This aggre- 
gate mileage was distributed as follows: 
Single track, 186,396.32 miles; second track, 
11,293.25 miles; third track, 1,009.65 miles; 
fourth track, 793.57 miles; yard track and 
sidings, 48,039.73 miles. The length of the 



railway reports filed with the commission 
was 184,648.26 miles, which indicates that 
the mileage of the country is covered by 
reports in a substantially complete manner. 

CLASSIFICATION OF RAILWAYS. 

The number of railway corporations on 
June 30, 1898, included in the "statistics of 
railways in the United States," was 2,047. 
Of this number, 1,049 maintained operating 
accounts, 836 being classed as independent 
operating roads and 213 as subsidiary oper- 
ating roads. Of roads operated under lease 
or some other form of agreement, 317 re- 
ceived a fixed money rental, 172 a contin- 
gent money rental and 275 were operated 
under some form of contract or control not 
capable of description in a single phrase. 

The operated mileage covered by mergers, 
reorganizations and consolidations during 
the year under review was 7,220.42 miles. 
The corresponding figure for the previous 
year was 14,834.34 miles. 

EQUIPMENT. 

On June 30, 1898, there were 36,234 locomo- 
tives in the service of the railways. This 
number is larger by 248 than the previous 
year. Of the total number of locomotives 
reported, 9,956 are classed as passenger 
locomotives, 20.627 as freight locomotives 
and 5,234 &a switching locomotives, a small 
number being unclassed. The total number 
of cars of all classes reported as in the 
service of railways on the date named 
was 1,326,174. being an increase of 28,694 as 
compared with June 30, 1897. Of the total 
number, 33,595 were assigned to the pas- 
senger service and 1.248,826 to the freight 
service, 43,753 being assigned to the service 
of the railways themselves. The number of 
cars owned by private companies and In- 
dividuals that are used by railways in 
transportation is not covered by reports 
filed with the commission. 

An inspection of the summaries which are 
designed to show the density of equipment 
and the efficiency of its employment shows 
that during the year ended June 30, 1898, 
the railways in the United States used 
twenty locomotives and 718 cars per 100 
miles of line. Referring to the country at 
large, it appears that 50.328 passengers were 
carried and 1,343,906 passenger-miles were 



accomplished per passenger locomotive, and 
42,614 tons or freight were carried and 
>, 530,498 ton-miles accomplished per freight 
locomotive. All of these items show an 
increase as compared with those of the 
previous year, ended June 30, 1897. 

Including under the term equipment both 
locomotives and cars, it ^s noted that the 
total equipment of railways on June 30, 1898, 
was 1,362,408. Of this number 641,262 were 
Stted with train brakes, the increase being 
113,976, and 909,574 were fitted with auto- 
matic couplers, the increase in this case 
being 230,849. The summaries indicate that 
practically all of the locomotives and cars 
assigned to the passenger service are fitted 
with train brakes, and that out of a total 
of 9,956 locomotives assigned to this service 
5,105 are fitted with automatic couplers, and 
32,697 cars out of a total of 33,595 cars in 
the same service are also so fitted. A cor- 
responding statement for freight equipment 
is as follows: Out of a total of 20,627 loco- 
motives assigned to the freight service 
19.414 are fitted with train brakes and 6,229 
with automatic couplers, but out of a total 
of 1,248,826 cars assigned to the freight 
service only 567,409 are fitted with train 
brakes and 851,533 with automatic couplers. 
The number of switching locomotives fitted 
with train brakes was 3,877, and the number 
fitted with automatic couplers was 1,199. 
Of the total number of cars of all classes 
in service on June 30, 1898, 607,786 were 
fitted with train brakes, the increase during 
the year being 115,227, and 896,813 were 
fitted with automatic couplers, the increase 
in this case being 227,876. 

NUMBER OF EMPLOYES. 

The number of persons employed by the 
railways of the United States, as reported 
on June 30, 1898, was 874,558, which is 
equivalent to 474 employes per 100 miles of 
line. As compared with the number of em- 
ployes for the previous year, there was an 
Increase of 51,082. The number of employes 
on June 30, 1898, was 956 in excess of the 
number on June 30, 1893, and 89,524 in excess 
of the number on June 30, 1895. The em- 
ployes of railways, as reported to the com 
mission, are divided into eighteen classes. 
It thus appears that on June 30, 1898, there 
were in the employ of the railways 37,939 
enginemen, 38,925 firemen, 26,876 conductors 
and 66,968 other trainmen. There were 
47,124 switchmen, flagmen and watchmen. A 
distribution of employes conforming to the 
four general subdivisions of operating ex- 
penses shows that the services of 32.431 
employes were required for general admin 
istration, or eighteen per 100 miles of line; 
261,866 for maintenance of way and struc- 
tures, or 142 per 100 miles of line; 171,600 
for maintenance of equipment, or ninety- 
three per 100 miles of line, and 398,987 for 
conducting transportation, or 216 per 100 
miles of line. This statement does not In- 
clude 9,754 unclassified employes. 

The report contains a comparative state- 
ment of the average daily compensation of 



seven years 1892 to 1898. There is also 
given in the report a summary which shows 
the total amount of compensation reported 
as paid to the railway employes of the 
country during the four fiscal years ended 
June 30, 1895 to 1898. This summary shows 



00 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



that the aggregate amount of wages and 
salaries paid during the year ended June 
30, 1898, to more than 99 per cent of the 
persons on the pay rolls of railways was 
$495,065,618, the increase, as compared with 
the preceding year, being $29,454,037. This 
amount of compensation represents 60.52 per 
cent of the total operating expenses of 
railways and 39.69 per cent of their total 
gross earnings, or $2,681 per mile of line. 

CAPITALIZATION AND VALUATION OF 
RAILWAY PROPERTY. 

The amount of railway capital outstand- 
ing on June 30, 1898, not including current 
liabilities in the term, was $10,818,554,031. 
This amount, assigned to a mileage basis, 
represents a capital of $60,343 per mile of 
line. The amount of capital which existed 
in the form of stocks was $5,388,268,321, of 
which $4,269,271,714 was common stock and 
$1,118,996,607 was preferred stock. The 
amount which existed in the form of funded 
debt was $5,430,285,710, comprising mortgage 
bonds, $4,640,762,632; miscellaneous obliga- 
tions, $486,977,279; income bonds, $262,194,688, 
and equipment trust obligations, $40,351,111. 
The amount of capital stock paying no divi- 
dends was $3,570.155,239, or 66.26 per cent of 
the total amount outstanding. The amount 
of funded debt, excluding equipment trust 
obligations which paid no interest, was 
$852,402,622. 

Of the stock-paying dividends, 6.63 per 
cent of the total amount outstanding paid 
from 1 to 4 per cent; 7.15 per cent paid from 

4 to 5 per cent; 7.60 per cent paid from 

5 to 6 per cent; 3.69 per cent paid from 6 to 
7 per cent, and 4.54 per cent paid from 
7 to 8 per cent. The amount of dividends 
declared during the year ended June 30, 
1898, was $96,152,889, which would be pro- 
duced by an average rate of 5.29 per cent on 
stock on which some dividend was declared. 
The amount of mortgage bonds paying no 
interest was $526,124,188, or 11.34 per cent; 
of miscellaneous obligations, $146.116,874, or 
30.01 per cent; of income bonds, $180,161,560, 
or 68.71 per cent. The amount of current 
liabilities outstanding at the close of the 
year named was $540,013,995, or $3,012 per 
mile of line. 

PUBLIC SERVICE OF RAILWAYS. 

The aggregate number of passengers car- 
ried during the year ended June 30, 1898, as 
returned in the annual reports of railways, 
was 501,066,681, indicating an increase, as 
compared with the year ended June 30, 
1897, of 11,621,483. The number of passen- 
gers carried one mile during the year was 
13,379,930,004, there being an increase of 
1,122,990,357 as compared with the year pre- 
vious. The increased density of passenger 
traffic is shown by the fact that in 1898 the 
number of passengers carried one mile per 
mile of line was 72,462, as compared with 
66,874 for the previous year. The corre- 
sponding figure for 1893, however, was 83,809. 
The number of tons of freight carried dur- 
ing the year was 879,006,307, there being an 
increase of 137,300,361. The number of tons 
of freight carried one mile was 114,077,676,- 
305, which, compared with the previous 
year, shows the large increase of 18,938,- 
554,080. The number of tons of freight car- 
ried one milp per mile of line was 617,810, 
which is 98,731 greater than the correspond- 
ing item for the year preceding. 

EARNINGS AND EXPENSES. 

The gross earnings of the railways of the 
United States, covering an operated mile- 



age of 184,648.26 miles, were $1,247,325,621 
for the year ended June 30, 1898, being 
greater by $125,235,848 than the correspond- 
ing item for the fiscal year preceding. The 
operating expenses during the same period 
were $817,973,276, being an increase of 
$65,448,512 as compared with the year 1897. 
The items comprised In gross earnings from 
operation for the fiscal year under consid- 
eration were: Passenger revenue, $266,970,- 
490; increase as compared with the previous 
year, $15,834,563. Mail, $34.608,352; increase, 
$853,886. Express, $25,908,075; increase, 
$1,007,009. Other earnings from passenger 
service, $7,224,000. Freight revenue, $876.- 
727,719; increase, $103,878,405. Other earnings 
from freight service, $4,683,205; increase, 
$473,548. Other earnings from operation, In- 
cluding a few unclassified items, $31,203,780. 

The operating expenses for the year were 
assigned as follows: Maintenance of way 
and structures, $173,314,958; increase as com- 
pared with the preceding year, $13,880,555. 
Maintenance of equipment, $142,624,862; in- 
crease, $19,862.504. Conducting transporta- 
tion, $464,674,276; increase, $32,148,414. Gen- 
eral expenses, $36,476,686; decrease, $4,583. 
The gross earnings averaged $6,755 per mile 
of line and operating expenses $4,430 per 
mile of line. These amounts are. respec- 
tively, $633 and $324 greater than the corre- 
sponding figures for 1897. The report con- 
tains a further analysis of the operating 
expenses of railways in the United States 
for the years 1895 to 1898, in accordance 
with the fifty-three accounts embraced in 
the prescribed classification of these ex- 
penses. 

The income from operation that Is, the 
amount of gross earnings remaining after 
the deduction of operating expenses, and 
commonly termed net earnings was $429,- 
352,345. This amount is $59,787,336 greater 
than it was for the preceding year, ended 
June 30, 1897. The amount of Income from 
other sources was $138,202,779. The following 
items are embraced in this amount: Income 
from lease of road, $95,471,678; dividends on 
stocks owned, $15,614,638; Interest on bonds 
owned, $10,529.343, and miscellaneous in- 
come, $16,587,120. The total income of the 
railways, $567,555,124 that is, the income 
from operation and income from other 
sources is the item from which fixed 
charges and other analogous items are to be 
deducted before reaching the amount avail- 
able for dividends. Taking from this 
amount the total deductions from income, 
$427.235,703, leaves $140,319,421 as the net in- 
come for the year available for dividends or 
surplus. 

The total amount of dividends declared 
during the year, including $87,975, other 
payments from net income, was $96,240.864. 
It therefore appears that the surplus from 
the operations of the year was $44,078,557. 
An analysis of the total deductions from 
income, $427,235,703, mentioned above, shows 
that they were composed of the following 
items: Salaries and maintenance of organi- 
zation, $443.325; interest accrued on funded 
debt, $246,126.691: interest on interest-bear- 
ing current liabilities, $7,073,953; rents paid 
for lease of road, $92,391,008; taxes, $43,- 
828,224; permanent improvements charged to 
income account. $6,847,905, and other deduc- 
tions, $30,524,597. 

The railway companies make annual re- 
ports to the commission of two kinds. These 
are designated, respectively, as operating 
reports and financial reports. The former 



FAILURES AND AGGREGATE 


LIABILITIES. 


61 


are filed 


by such companies as maintain 


The number of passengers killed durlne 


full opei 


ating ; 


iccounts, i 


ind the 


latter by 


the yeai 


was J 


21 and th 


B nunil 


er injured 


sucb con 


ipanies 


as have 1 


eased i 


heir prop- 


was 2,9 


15. Cor 


responding 


figure 


s for the 


erty to ( 


>thers f 


or operati 


an, the 


r own in- 


previous 


year v 


cere 222 kl 


lied an 


d 2,795 in- 


come, a 


side fr 


im Invest! 


nents, 


being the 


jured. 1 


n conse 


quence of 


colllsio 


ns and de- 


annual t 


xed or 


contingeD 


t renta 


1 paid by 


railment 


s 72 E 


assengers 


were 


killed and 


their les 


sees. I 


t follows t 


hat cer 


tain items 


1,134 pa 


ssenger 


9 were in 


jured ( 


luring the 


of Incom 


e and 


expendltur 


e must 


be dupli- 


year em 


braced 


by this i 


eport. 


The total 


cated in 


compre 


hensive st 


itl'IllC'll 


s like the 


number 


3f persi 


>ns other t 


inn em 


ployes and 


foregoing 


, whicl 


i are comp 


iled fro 


m railway 


passenge 


rs klllc 


d was 4,6 


80; inji 


ired, 6,176. 


reports - 


)f both 


classes. 


These 


conditions 


These li 


Hires ii 


iclude cas 


laities 


to persons 


seem fu 


ly exp 


lained by 


the st 


atisticlan, 


classed i 


is tresi 


mssers, of 


whom 


4,063 were 


who inse 


rts Mis 


> in his re 


port a 


statement 


killed a 


nd 4,74 


> were in 


jured. 


The sum- 


which co 


nstitutt 


s an incot 


ae acco 


unt of the 


marles 


contain 


ng the r 


tio of 


casualties 


railways 


of the 


United 


tates i 


is if they 


show th 


at one 


out of ev 


ery 447 


employes 


were rep 


resente 


I by a siiit 


r le, sim 


ply organ- 


was kill 


ed and 


one out 


of evei 


y twenty- 


ized corp< 


oration 


the dupli 


Ml inn C 


f items of 


eight en 


JDloves 


was iiiiu 


red. \\ 


r ith refer- 


Income and expenditure due to Intercor- 
porate contractual relations being elimi- 


ence to trainmen including in 
enginemen, firemen, conductors 


the term 
and other 


nated th 


refrom 








trainmen 


it is 


shown tii: 


it one 


was killed 


RAILWAY ACCIDENTS. 
The total number of casualties to persons 
on account of railway accidents during the 
year ended June 30, 1898, was 47,741. The 


for every 150 employed ana one was injured 
for every eleven employed. One passenger 
was killed for every 2,267,270 carried and 
one injured for every 170,141 carried. Katios 
based upon the number of miles traveled, 


aggregate number of persons killed as a re- 
sult of railway accidents during the year 
was 6,859, and the number injured was 40,882. 


however, show that 60,542,670 passenger- 
miles were accomplished for each passenger 
killed and 4.543.270 imsseneer-rniles accom- 


Of railw 


ly emp 


loves, 1,958 


were 


killed and 


plished i 


or eact 


passengei 


injure 


d. 


31,761 we 


re inju 


red during 


the ye 


ar covered 












by this i 


eport. 


With resi 


>ect to 


the three 




C 


ONCLUSIC 


>N. 




general c 


lasses ( 


>f employe 


3, these 


casualties 


In the 


conclus 


ion of his 


report 


the statis- 


were div 


ided a 


j follows: 


Train 


nen, 1,141 


ticlan r 


epeats 


his previ 


aus ree 


ommenda- 


killed, 1 


..645 in 


jured; sw 


Ictllllcl 


, flagmen 


tions to 


the efl 


'ect that i 


eports 


should be 


and wat 


ehmen, 


242 kille 


a, 2,67' 


injured; 


secured 1 


rom es 


press com 


}anies < 


jngaged in 


other em 


ployes, 


575 klllei 


1, 13,43 


9 injured. 


interstat 


e traffl 


c; that r 


eports 


should be 


The casu 


alties 


:o employe 


s resul 


ting from 


secured 


from < 


orporatlon 


3 and 


companies 


coupling 


and inn 


oupllug ca 


rs were 


: Persons 


owning r 


oiling 


tock whlcl 


i is use 


d in inter- 


killed, 27 


9;-lnju- 


red, 6,988. 


The c 


orrespond- 


state tra 


fflc, an 


d also spe 


cial re 


x>rts from 


inur flgur 


es for 


the prece 


dine y 


ear were; 


corpora ti 


ons an 


d companl 


es owi 


ing depot 


Killed, 2 


L4; inju 


red, 6,283. 






property 


stock 


yards, el 


jvators 


and the 


The ct 


sualtie 


3 from c 


DUpling 


and un- 


like; an 


I that 


reports s 


lould t 


e secured 


coupling 


cars 


are assig 


led as 


follows: 


from ca 


friers 1 


>y water, 


so fai 


as their 


Trainmen 


, killed 


, 182, injui 


ed, 5,29 


0; switch- 


business 


is intei 


state traffl 


c. 




men, flag 


men ar 


d watchm 


?n, kill 


ed, 90, in- 


It is 


further 


stated t 


lat no 


thing has 


Jured, 1,' 


86; ott 


er employ 


es, kill 


ed, 7, in- 


occurred 


in t 


ie admini 


stratioi 


i of the 


jured, 21 


2. The 


casualtle 


3 resul 


ting from 


statistic! 


il divis 


Ion of th 


e com i 


nlssion to 


falling fr 


om tra! 


ns and en; 


ines ar 


i assigned 


weaken 


he con 


Idence ex] 


>ressed 


in former 


as follow 


r s: Tr 


inmen, ki 


led, 35 


3, injured, 


reports 


n the 


proposal 1 


hat th 


>re should 


2,979; SW 


'Itchme 


n, flagmet 


and 


watchmen, 


be estab 


ished i 


nder the J 


urisdict 


ion of the 


killed, 


0, inji 


ired, 359; 


other 


employes, 


commissi 


on a b 


nreau of e 


tatistic 


s and ac- 


killed, 6 


1, injui 


ed, 521. r 


rhe cas 


ualties to 


counts, \ 


vllirh 8 


hall have 


as its 


chief pur- 


the same 


three 


groups of 


emploj 


res caused 


pose the 


establi 


jhment of 


a unlfo 


rm system 


by collls 


Inns an 


d derailm 


ents w< 


>re as fol- 


of accon 


nts for 


the carri 


ers, ar 


d that it 


lows : T 


rainmei 


i. killed, 2 


62, Inju 


red, 1,367; 


would be 


deslra 1 


ilc also, at 


ould th 


e commis- 


switchnK 


'. flag 


men and 


vatchm 


en. killed, 


sion see 


at, to E 


rovide for 


a mont 


hly report 


13, injur 


ed, 69; 


other em 


Jloyes, 


killed, 38, 


of the ei 


irnings 


and expei 


ises of 


operating 


injured, 


367. 








railways. 










FAILURES AND AGGREGATE LIABILITIES--1879-1899. 


[From Dun's Review, New 


York.] 








CALEN- 
DAR 
! YEARS. 


No. of 
fail- 
ures. 


No. of 
concerns. 


Per ct. 
of fail- 
urea. 


LifiMl- 
CUM. 


CALEN- 
DAR 
YEARS. 


No. of 
fail- 
ures. 


No. of 
concerns. 


Per ct. 
of fail- 
ures. 


Liabil- 
ities. 


1879. . . . 


6.658 


702,157 


.95 


98,149,053 


1890 


10,907 


1,110.590 


.98 


189,856,9C4 


1880 


4,735 


746,823 


.63 


65,752,001) 


1891 


12,273 


1.I42.9.-)! 


1.07 


189.868.63S 


1881 


5,583 


781,689 


.71 


81.155,932 


1892 


10,344 


1,172,705 


.88 


114,044.167 


1882 


6,738 


822,256 


.82 


1 01. 547.541) 


1893 


15.242 


1,193,113 


1.28 


346,779,&S!) 


1883 


9,184 


863,993 


1.06 


172,874.172 


1894 


13,885 


1.114,174 


1.25 


172,992,856 


1884 


10,908 


904,759 


1.21 


226,343,427 


1895 


13.197 


1,209,282 


1.09 


173,19T.,OGO 


1885 


10,637 


919,990 


1.16 


124.220,321 


1896 


15.088 


1,151.579 


1.31 


226.090,834 


1386 


9,834 


969.841 


1.01 


114,644.119 


1897 


13.351 


1.058.521 


1.26 


154.332,071 


1887 


9,634 


994.281 


.90 


167.5tiO.944 


1898 


12.186 


1,005,830 


1.10 


ISO.l'itS.S'.K) 


1888 


10,679 


1.046.662 


1.02 


123,829.97:! 


1899* 


4,853 






42,0(52,933 


1889 


10,882 


1,051,140 


1.04 


148,784,337 












*Flrat six months. 



(32 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



FINANCIAL AND COMMERCIAL STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES. 
Upon a per capita basis 1870-98. 



YEAR. 


Popula- 
tion, 
June 1. 


GOVERNMENT FINANCE (Per Capita). 


GOLD AND SILVER. 


| 

1*, 

"* ?*^ 

a ^-S ^ 

ilfj 

^Sbs 


S 

Xs 
i 


,S 

06 SB 


^- ^ 

11 
* 


| 

g 


e 



|| 

If 

ge 


?S V 


|t 
^ *> 


.22 
^ ? 

Sfc 

D**~* 


&I 
ii 

% 

sa/ 

|P 


1*4 > 

1^ 

It2 
e.S^5 

J2l 


^i L 

^ 

ii*i 

!H&. 

S<o s S : 

|HI 


! 1 

!lV 

i^ll 

^35^ 


1870 
1871.... 


38,558.371 

iJ9,555,UUO 
40.596,000 
41,677,000 
42,790,000 
43,951,000 
45,137,000 
40,353,000 
47,598,000 
48,866.000 
50,165,783 
51,316,000 
52,495,000 
53,693,000 
54.911,000 
50,148.000 
57,404,000 
68,680.000 
59,974.000 
61,289.000 
(3.132,250 
63,975,000 
65,403,000 
66,826,000 
08,275,000 
69,763,000 
71,203.000 
72,807,000 
74,389,000 


$18.73 
18.75 
18.79 
18.68 
18.83 
18.16 
17.52 
16.46 
16.62 


J17.50 
18.101 
18.19 
18.04 
18.13 
17.16 
16.12 
15.58 
15.32 


580.46 
56.81 
62.90 

50.52 
49.17 
47.53 
45.00 
43.56 
42.01 


$3.08 
2.83 
2.56 
2.35 
2.31 
2.20 
2.11 
2.01 
1.99 


$10.6' 
9.6! 
9.25 
8.01 
7.1! 
6.6, 
6.55 
6.0" 
6.4 


$8.03 
7.39 
6.84 
6.97 
7.07 
6.26 
6.87 
6.21 
4.98 


$0.72 
.84 
.74 
.70 
.71 
.68 
.63 
.62 
.56 


$0.85.6 
.89 
.87. 
.86.4 
.91 
.87. 
.89. 
.94. 
.99. 


15.57 
15.57 
15.63 
15.92 
16.17 
16.59 
17.88 
17.22 
17.94 


$1.328. 
1.326. 
1.322. 
1.298 
1.278 
1.246 
1.156. 
1.201 
1.152 


j(X93.2 


1872 
1873 
1874 


1875 
1876 
1877 


1878.... 


1879 




21.52 
24.04 

27.41 
28.20 
30.61 
31.06 
32.37 
31.51 
32.39 
34.40 
33.86 
34.24 
34.31 
36.21 
34.75 
35.44 
34.38 
32.86 
34.25 
35.39 


16.75 
19.41 
21.71 
22.37 
22.91 
22.65 
23.02 
21.82 
22.45 
22.88 
22.62 
22.82 
23.41 
24.44 
23.87 
24.33 
22.96 
21.10 
22.49 
24.71 


40.85 
38.27 
35.40 
31.91 
28.66 
20.20 
24.50 
22.34 
20.03 
17.72, 
15.92 
14.22 
13.32 
12.86 
12.55 
13 17 
12.93 
13.41 
13.63 
13.81 


1.71 
1.69 
1.46 
1.09 
.96 
.87 
.84 
.79 
.71 
.65 
.63 
.47 
.37 
.36 
.34 
.37 
.44 
.49 
.47 
.51 


6.61 
6.6, 
7.0 
7.fr 
7.3' 
6.2' 
6.7' 
5.7( 
6.2< 
6.35 
6.01 
6.4- 
6.1i 
5.41 
6.7' 
4.3t 
4.4! 
4.5! 
4.7f 
6.4, 


6.46 
6.34 
6.07 
4.89 
4.90 
4.39 
4.64 
4.16 
4.47 
4.33 
4.38 
4.76 
S.55 
6.28 
6.87 
6.48 
6.11 
4.94 
5.02 
5.90 


.69 
1.14 
.98 
1.03 
1.13 
1.04 
1.17 
1.13 
1.27 
1.33 

!: 

1.&5 
2.16 
2.37 
2.07 
2.03 
1.96 
1.94 
1.98 


1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 


18.40 
18.05 
18-lfi 
18.19 
18.64 
18.57 
19.41 
20.78 
21.13 
21.99 
22.10 
19.76 
20.92 
23.72 
26.49 
32.66 
31.60 
30.32 
84.28 
35.03 


1.123 
1.145 
1.138 
1.136 
1.110 
1.113 
1.065 
.995 
.978 
.939 
.9?5 
1.046 
.988 
.871 
.780 
.635 
.664 
.682 
.604 
.590 


.86.7 
.88-5 
.88.1 
.87-9 
.80-5 
.80-1 
.84.5 
.79-8 
.76 
.74, 
.72-1 
.74-9 
.80-6 
.72.4 
.65 
.49-1 
.50.6 
.52-8 
.46-8 
.45- 


1880 


1881.. 


1882.... 


1883 


1884 


1885.. . 


1886.... 


1887.... 


1888.... 


1889. . . . 


1890.... 


1891.... 


1892 


1893 


1894 


1895.. 


1896.... 


1897.... 


1898 


YEAR. 


COINAGE 

PER 

CAPITA 

OF 


PRODUC- 
TION PER 
CAPITA 

OF 


a 

! 

1 
1 

I 


a 

! 
i 


INTEHN'L 

REVENUE. 


iii 

a v 

m 

gfi 

^s, 


CUSTOMS 
REVENUE. 


'g 
S ^ 

H 
_g 

Q* 1 


Average a 
valorem 
rateofdut 


I 

1 ^^ 


S 

"o 

9 


1 


S 

'o 
O 


1 
85 


TS'S? 

it 

l> 

gs 


It 

S V 

P 


i 

s . 
e 
*5 

o 


1,, 

511 
s* 


' ll 

"S 
fi 


1870 . . . 


$0.6C 
.K 
.54 
1.3' 
.85 
.7 
1 K 


$0.04 
.08 

.a 

.1C 

.11 

.3 
.54 


$1.3C 
1.11 
.8! 
.8t 
.78 
J 
.88 


$0.4 
.68 

.7: 

.86 
.8 
.72 
.86 


$0.68 
.64 
.34 
.62 
.66 
.48 
.35 


W.ai 
2.49 
1.97 
2.03 
1.56 
2.10 
1 ff} 


I$4.79 
3.62 
3.22 
2.75 
2.39 
3.52 
2.59 


$3.95 
5.3( 
4.3f 
4.6! 
4.4( 
3.8! 
3.35 


$11.00 
12.65 
13.80 
15.91 
13.26 
11.97 
10.29 


$4.90 
5.12 
6.23 
4.44 
3.75 
3.51 
3 ? 


$47.08 
43.95 
41.35 
38.07 
38. 63 
40.62 
44.74 


$42.2, 
38.9 
37.0( 
26.!* 
26.8 
.28.21 
30.1 


3 $:^.20 
J 3.18 
3 3.21 
*> 3.76 
3 4.49 
) 4.47 
1 4.53 


1871 


1872 


1873 

1874 . . . 


1875 


1876 


1877 
1878 


.9 
1.0 

.a 

1.24 

1.8! 

1.5 

.51 
.44 
.41 
.ft 
.41 
.K 
.3 
.Si- 


.61 
. 
M 
.K 
.64 
.K 
.54 
.55 
.5] 
.56 
.6C 
.57 
.65 
.6 


1.5 

1.06 

.8C 
.75 
.68 
.65 
. 

.at 

.57 
.61 
.66 
.5E 
.6J 
.55 


.86 
.9 
.84 
.7 
.84 
.8 
.8 
J 
.9C 
.8C 
.9 
.9S 
l.Oo 
1.1 


.88 
.63 
.42 
1.85 
2.16 
.81 
. 
.68 
.77 
.67 
1.03 
.99 
.47 
.54 


1.21 
.71 

!34 
.38 
.94 
.59 
1.22 
.75 
1.26 
.61 
.76 
1.68 
83 


2.56 
2.32 
2.32 
2.47 
2.64 
2.79 
2.69 
2.21 
2.00 
2.03 
2.02 
2.07 
2.13 
2 28 


2.9! 
2.9f 
3. 1C 
2.9E 
3.2( 
2.8C 
3.06 
3.41 
3.4$ 
3.0t 
3.25 
2.95 
2.8* 
2.0 


9.49 
9.21 
8.99 
12.51 
12.08 
13.64 
13.05 
12.10 
10.32 
10.89 
11 65 
11.88 
12.10 
12 35 


2.77 
2.67 
2.73 
3.04 
3.78 
4.12 
3.92 
3.47 
3.17 
3.30 
3.65 
3.60 
3.60 
3 02 


42.89 
42.75 
44.87 
43.48 
43.20 
42.66 
42.45 
41.01 
45.86 
45.55 
47.10 
45.03 
45.13 
44 41 


26.6, 
27.1 
28.9 
29.0 
29.7 
30.1 
29.9 
28.4 
30.5 
30.1 
31. (f 
29.9 1 
29.51 
29 1 


5 4.96 
1 4.47 
t 3.90 
" 3.23 
'> 3.22 
I 2.95 
J 3.07 
1 8.44 
3 3.58 
^ 3.33 
i 3.16 
) 3.27 
J 3.14 
2 2.98 
i 3.17 
> 3.75 
J 3.32 
> 6.15 
3 4.43 
" 4.52 
1 4.01 
1 4.78 


1879 
1880 
1881 


1882 


1883 


1884 

1885 


1886 . . . 


1887 


J888... 


1889 
1890 


1891 


.4t 
.K 

.8 

i.r 

.8 
6f 


.4? 
.! 

.13 
.13 
.OS 
33 


.55 
.5( 
.64 
.5i 

.5t 

7f 


1.1 
1.1 
1.1 
1.1 
1.1 
1 04 


.57 
1.07 
.67 
1.24 
.81 


1.70 
1.27 
2.24 
1.87 
1.63 


2.28 
8.35 
2.41 
2.16 
2.06 
2.06 
2.01 
2.30 


2.7f 
2.65 
2.5' 
2.5f 
2.05 
2.05 
2.4f 
2.1- 


13.36 
12.44 
12.64 
9.32 
10.48 
10.66 
10.84 
7.98 


3.39 
2.66 
2.97 
1.90 
2.14 
2.20 
2.43 
1.96 


40.28 
48.71 
49.58 
5000 
41.75 
40.18 
42.41 
40.20 


25.2. 
21.21 
23.4 
20.2 
20.2 
20.0 
21. S 
24.7 


1892 
1893 
1894 


1895 


1896 


1897 
1898 


1.05 

() 


.25 

(*) 


.44 
(*) 


.95 

(*) 




i6!27 



FINANCIAL AND COMMERCIAL. 



FINANCIAL AND COMMERCIAL STATISTICS OF THE U. S.-CONTINUED. 



YEAR. 



EXPORTS. 



Domestic Per cent of domestic 
merchandise. products exported. 



CONSUMPTION PER CAPITA. 



; 

II 



1870. 

1871. 
JS72. 
1S73! 
1874. 

l,S7. r >. 

isvt;! 

1877. 
1S78. 
1S79. 
1880, 
1881, 

1SS2. 
18b3 
1884 



1890.. 
1891.. 

IS'.W.. 
ls;.. 
l.s-.U.. 
IMIJ.. 
1896.. 
1897.. 
1898.. 



9.77 
10.83 
10.55 
12.12 



13.31 
11.36 
J1.64 
12.72 
14.30 
14.29 
16.43 
17.23 
13.97 
14.98 
13.20 
12.94 
11.60 
11.98 
11.40 
11.92 
13.50 
13.63 
15.53 
12.44 
12.73 
11.37 
12.11 
14.17 
16.27 



Per ct. 

78.40 
70.74 
74.13 
76.10 



79.37 
76.95 
71. b" 
72. 63 
77.07 
78 



72.39 2i 

67.44 

65.47 



70.03 



22.50 
S.30 
16.88 
20.80 



.24 

.98 

3.1* 



75.14 12.82 



78.9b 



32.54 



70.69 23.60 



CiS.1'7 
71.2 



25.34 



25.29 
.74 35.16 
83.251 65.73 40.18 
82.63 68.47 37.38 
76.31 07.23 31.82 
77.00 67.20 29.33 
73.98 07.66 26.49 
72.96 68.96 25.86 
72.82 61.68 26.48 



3.86 
3.6J 

3.86 

i.i 

6.49 



14.10 
11.10 
15.19 



Bu. 

6.41 



B.oa 



4.69 27.40 
4.79 21.09 
4.81 22.86 



40. 



97.02 



6.33 71.47 



43.22 

68.85 



5.4(i 

3.71 

2.58 

2.99 62.35 

2.95 67.24 



13.71 



19.04 
16.15 



4.46 
6.38 
4. 
6.01 



2U.95 



Lbs. 

6.00 
7.91 
7.28 
6.87 



74.40 68.71 



33.66 



47.22 20.80 
16.30 
15. l(i 
19.59 



73.23 65.83 26.28 



3.35 76.07 
2.48 60.13 16.84 



72.87 69.33 



74.51 



21.31 
68.151 22.31 



78.69 67.36 26.60 

78.69 65.13 36.88 

74.05 65.99 37.20 

72.28 71.20 41.47 

69.73 69.83 31.46 



1.74 
3.57 
4.85 
2.15 



57.77 



19.59 



5.72 26.3? 

5.58 26.61 

5.35 28.88 

6.09 31.64 

4.98 

6.64 

5.64 

6.77 

4.57 

6.17 



27.40 
31.04 
32.60 

27.68 



8.57J 63.30 17.22 
18.50 
43.801 22.02 



3.721 37.85 24.03 



2.89 45.10 



66.02 
66.23 
70.54 



65.00 27.07 
70.69 



4.11 

2.36 
8.78 
7. 
11. 



17.07' 



5.63 23.86 
5.34 31.28 
6.09 32.09 
22.79 
30.33 
4.851 23.66 



4.58 
6.91 



2.36 50.76 22.48 



. . 

7.83 55.06 18.46 
14 47.09 1 25.26 



3.41 

4.54 

4.78 

3.88 28.91 



22.7fi 
16.98 
14.73 



. 
42. 



61. 



52. 
56. 
51.8 



62.6 
61. 



6.59 
7.08 
7.33 
6.94 
6 24 
7.42 
8.78 
8.25 
8.30 
8.91 
9.26 
9.60 
9.36 
8.53 
6 81 
9.16 
7.83 
7.99 
9.61 
8.24 
8.01 
9.22 
8.04 
9.95 
11.45 



Lbs. 
1.10 
1.14 
1.46 
1.53 
1.27 
1.44 
1.35 
1.23 
1.33 
1.21 
1.39 
1.54 
1.47 
1.30 
1.09 
1.18 
1.87 
1.49 
1.40 
1.29 
1. 

1.29 
1.37 
1.32 
1.84 

I' 

1.55 
.91 



1.62 

1. 

l.i 

1.51 

1.50 

1.33 

1.09 
1.11 

1.27 

1. 

1.40 

1.46 

1.48 

1.26 

1.26 

1.21 

1.26 

1. 

1.40 

1.42 

1.50 

1.51 

1.33 

'..12 

1.00 

1.01 

1.101 



Gat. 
5.31 
6.10 
6.66 
7.21 
7.00 
6.71 
6.83 
6.68 
6.68 
7.05 
8.26 
8.65 
in. ii.; 
10.27 
10.74 
10. (B 
11.20 
11.23 
12.80 
12.72 
13.67 
15.28 
15.10 
16.08 
15.18 
14.95 
15. Id 
14. 69 
15.64 



Gal. 
.32 
.40 
.41 
.46 
.48 
.45 
.45 
.47 
.47 
.50 
.56 
.47 
.49 



.46 
.55 
.61 
.56 
.46 
.45 
.44 
.48 
.31 
.28 
.26 
.53 



YEAR. 



CONSUMPTION 
OP RAW WOOL. 



POSTOFFICE 
DEPARTMENT. 



PUBLIC 
SCHOOLS. 




is?0 . 
1*71 . 
1872. 
1873. 
1874. 
1875. 
1S76 . 
1877. 
1878. 
1S7M. 
1880. 
1881. 

1,-SL' . 

i.^:; . 

1SS4. 
1885. 

188(1. 
1887. 



. 
1890. 

1891 . 

1892 . 
1893. 
1894. 
1895. 

18!*; . 

1S97 . 



Lbs. 
5.43 
6.73 
6.75 
5.67 
4.81 
6.28 
5.21 
5.16 
6.28 
6.03 
6.11 
6.66 
6.36 
6.62 
6.86 
6.69 
7.39 
6.68 
6.31 
6.33 
6.03 
6.43 
6.72 
7.05 
5.08 

.: 

6.88 
8.26 
5.34 



32.7 
29.4 
45.3 
33.2 
17.5 
22.1 
18.3 
16.3 
16.9 
14.2 
34.9 
17.3 
19.0 
18.7 
20.6 
18.0 
28.9 
27.4 
28.9 
31.8 
27.0 
30.8 
33.1 
35.7 
14.2 
46.1 
45.9 
57.8 
48.09 



Per cent 
--2. 41 
-- .85 
--3.62 
--5.82 
--2.23 
-- 1.10 
-11.83 

.86 

.70 
-1.02 

2.43 

.25 
+ 2.66 
+ 1.67 
4- .84 

- .12 

3.16 

.60 
+ 2.10 
--2.74 
--2.71 
--5.88 
--1.71 

- - 1.26 

2.90 

1.02 
+ 1.47 
+ 1.38 

.40 



Per cent. 
35.6 
31.9 
29.2 
26.4 
27.2 
26.2 
27.7 
26.9 
26.3 
23.0 
17.4 
16.5 
15.8 
16.0 
17.2 
15.3 
15.6 
14.3 
14.0 
14.3 
12.9 
12.6 
12.3 
12.2 
13.3 
11.7 
12.0 
11.0 
9.03 



$0.51 
.51 
.54 
.66 
.62 
.61 
.63 
.59 
.62 
.62 
.66 
.72 
.80 
.86 
.79 
.76 
.77 



.97 
1.03 
1.08 
1.14 
1.10 
1.10 
1.16 
1.11 
1.20 



$0.62 
.62 
.66 
.70 
.75 
.79 
.74 
.72 
.72 
.69 
.73 
.77 
.77 
.81 
.86 



.91 
.94 
1.01 
1.11 
1.14 
1.19 
1.26 
1.25 
1.29 
1.32 
1.32 
1.36 



aaatont. 

12.1 
12.3 
12. 
12.8 
13.1 

1S.1 
14.0 
14.4 
14.7 
15.1 
15.4 
15.7 
16.0 
16.4 
16.7 
17.1 
17.4 
17.8 
18.2 
18.5 
18.8 
19.2 

20!l 
20.4 

2lll 

(*) 



5.24 
5.62 
5.90 
6.95 
6.11 
6.23 
6.06 
6.67 
5.49 
5.18 
5.17 
5.43 
5.67 
6.05 
6.29 
6.61 
6.63 
6.65 
6.98 
7.28 
7.60 
7.85 
8.12 
8.31 
8.49 
8.60 
8.84 
8.98 
(*) 



48.26 
32.24 
38.89 
42.53 
28.00 
19.70 
14.33 
11.67 
11.12 
14.02 
35.45 
67.71 
68.92 
60.44 
42.58 
81.96 
26.61 
38.41 
42.26 
34.06 
34.16 
41.41 
43.63 
35.34 
21.70 
21.19 
22.73 
14.09 
14.49 



No data. 



64 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES OF THE GOVERNMENT--1867-99. 
REVENUE BY FISCAL YEARS. 


YEAR 


Customs. 


Internal 
revenue. 


Direct 
tax. 


Sales of 
public 
lands. 


MISCELLANEOUS SOURCES 


Total 
revenue. 


Excess of 
revenue 
over ordi- 
nary ex- 
penditures 


Prem's on 
loans and 
sales of 
gold coin. 


Other mis- 
cellaneous 
items. 


1867. . . 

1868... 
1869... 
1870. . . 
1871. . . 
1872. . . 
1873... 
1874... 
1875. . . 
1876. . . 
1877... 
1878. . . 
1879... 
1880... 
1881... 
1882... 
1883... 
1884... 
1885... 
1886... 
1887. . . 
1888... 
1889... 
1890... 
1891. . . 
1892... 
1893... 
1894... 
1895... 
1896... 
1897... 
1898... 
1899... 


$176.417,811 
164,464,000 
180,048,427 
194,538,374 
206,270,408 
216,370,287 
188,089,523 
163,103,834 
157,167,722 
148,071,985 
130,956,493 
130,170,680 
137,250,048 
186,522,065 
198,159,676 
220,410,730 
214,706,497 
196,067,490 
181,471,939 
192,905,023 
217,286,893 
219,091,174 
223,832,742 
229,668,584 
219,522,205 
177.452.964 
203,355,017 
131.818,531 
152,158,617 
160,021,751 
176,554,126 
149,575,062 
206,128,148 


$266.027,537 
191,087,589 
158,356,461 
184,899,756 
143.098,154 
130,642,178 
113,729,314 
102,409,785 
118,007,494 
116,700,732 
118,630,408 
110,681,625 

124!009!374 

135,264,386 
140,497,595 
144,720,369 
121,586,073 
112,498,720 
116,805,936 
118,823,391 
124,296,872 
130,^81,514 
142,606,705 
145.686,249 
153.971,072 
161,027,624 
147.111,282 
143,421,672 
140,762.804 
146,608.774 
170,900,641 
273,437,161 


$4,200,234 
1,788,140 
765,686 
229,103 
580,355 


$1,163,576 
1,348,715 
4,020,344 
3,350,482 
2,388,647 
2,575,714 
2,882,312 
1,852,429 
1,413,640 
1,129,467 
976,254 
1,079,743 
924,781 
1,016,507 
2.201,863 
4.753,140 
7,955,864 
9,810,705 
5,705,986 
5.630,999 
9.254,286 
11.202,017 
8.03S.652 


$27,787,330 
29,203,629 
13,755,491 
15.295,644 
8,892,840 
9,412,638 
11,500,531 
5.037.005 
3,979,280 
4,029,281 
405,777 
317,102 
1,505,048 
110 


$15,037,522 
17,745,404 
13,997,339 
12,942,118 
22,093,541 
15,106,051 
17,101,270 
17,075,043 
15,431,915 
17,456,776 
18,031,655 
15,614,728 
20,585,697 
21,978,525 
25.151.851 
31,703.643 
30,796,695 
21,984,882 
24,014,055 
20,989.528 
26.006,815 
24,674,446 
24,297,151 
24.447,419 
23,374.457 
20,251,872 
18.253.898 
17,118.018 
16,706,438 
19.186,000 
23.614,422 
S3.602.r>01 
34,716.730 


4490,634,010 
405,638,083 
370,943,747 
411,255,478 
383.323.945 
374,106,868 
333,738,206 
289,478,755 
288,000,051 
287,482,039 
269,000,587 
257,763,879 
273,827,184 
333,526,611 
360.782.293 
403.525,259 
398,287,582 
348.519.870 
323,690.706 
336,439.727 
371,403,278 
379,266,075 
887,050,059 
403,080,982 
3d2.612.447 
354.397,784 
385,818,629 
297,722,019 
313,390,075 
326,976,200 
347,721,905 
405.321,335 
615.960,620 


1133,091,315 
28,297,798 
48,078,469 
101,601,917 
91,146,757 
96,588,905 
43,392,999 
2,344,882 
13,876,658 
29,022,242 
30,340,578 
20,799,552 
6,879,301 
65,883,653 
100,069,405 
145,543,811 
132,879,444 
104,393,626 
63,463,771 
93,956,589 
103,471,098 
111,341,274 
87,701,081 
85,040,272 
26,838,542 
9,914,454 
2,341,674 
69.803.2. -0 
*42,805,223 
25.203,245 
18.052,254 
*38.047.247 
'89,111,559 


315,255 




93,799 






31 

1,517 
160,142 

108,157 
70,721 

""108,240 

32,892 
1,566 




















6,358,272 
4,029,535 
3,261,870 
3.182,090 
1,673,637 
1,103,347 
1,005,523 
804.581 
1,243,129 
1.678,240 



























Expenditures In excess of revenue. 
EXPENDITURES BY FISCAL YEARS. 


YEAR 


CIVIL AND MISC'LLANEOUS 


War 
depart- 
ment. 


Navy 
depart- 
ment. 


Indians. 


Pensions. 


Interest 
on public 
debt. 


Total ordi- 
nary ex- 
penditures 


Prem. on 
loans, pur- 
chase of 
bonds, etc. 


Other civil 
and mis- 
cellaneous 
items. 


1867. 
1868. 
1869. 
1870. 
1871. 
1872. 
1873. 
1874. 
1875. . . 


$10.813,349 
7,001,151 
1,674,680 
15,996,556 
9.016,795 
6,958.267 
5,105,920 
1,395,074 


$51,110,224 
53,009,868 

50,474,002 
53.237,462 
60,481.910 
60,984,757 
73,328,110 
09.f41.593 
71.070,703 
06,958,374 
50,252,067 
53,177,704 
65,741.555 
54,713,530 
04.410.325 
57,219,751 
08,678,022 


$95,224,416 
123,240,649 
78,501,991 
57,655,675 
35,799,5)92 
35.372,157 
4' ; ,323,138 
42,313,927 
41,120,046 
38,070,889 
87,082,736 
32.154,148 
40,425,661 
38,110,916 
40.466,461 
43,570,494 
48,911,383 
39,429,603 


$31,034.011 
25,775,503 
20,000,758 
21.780,230 
19.431,027 
21,249.810 
23,526,257 
30,932,587 
21,497,020 
18,963.310 
14,959.935 
17,365.301 
15,125,127 
13,536,985 
15,686,672 
15,032,046 
15,283,437 
17,292.001 
16,021,080 
13,907,888 
15.141,127 
16.926:438 
21,378,809 
22,006,206 
26,113,896 
29,174,139 
30.136,084 
31.701,294 
28,797,795 
27,147,732 
34,561,546 
58,823,667 
63,942.104 


$4,642,532 
4,100,682 
7,042,923 
3,407,938 
7,426,997 
7,061,729 
7,051,705 
6,692,162 
8,384,657 
5,966,558 
5,277,007 
4,629,280 
5,206,109 
5,945,457 
6,514,161 
9,736,747 
7,362,590 
6,475,999 
6,652,495 
6,099,158 
6,194,523 
6,249,308 
6,892,208 
0,708,017 
8,627,469 
11,150,578 
13,345,347 
10.293,482 
9,939,754 
12,165,528 
13,016.802 
10,994.607 
12,805,711 


$20,930,552 
23,782,387 
28,476,662 
28,340,202 
34,443.895 
28,533,403 
29,359,427 
29,038,415 
29,456,216 
28,257,396 
27,903,752 
27,137,019 
35,121,482 
56,777,174 
50,069,280 
01.315.194 
66.012,574 
55,429,228 
56,102,267 
63,404,864 
75,029,102 
80,288.509 
87,024,779 
100,930.855 
124.415.951 
134.5S3.053 
159,357,585 
141,177,285 
141,395.228 
139,434,000 
141.053.104 
147.452.368 
139,394.929 


$143,781,592 
140,424,046 
130,694,243 
129,235,498 
125,576,566 
117,357,840 
104,750,088 
107,119.815 
103,093,545 
100.243,271 
97,124,512 
102,500,875 
105,327.949 
95.757,575 
82.508,741 
71,077,207 
59,160,131 
54,578,378 
51,380,250 
50,580,146 
47,741,577 
44,715,007 
41.001.484 
30.099.2S4 
37,547,135 
23,378,116 
27,264,392 
27,841,406 
30,978,030 
35,385,028 
37,791.110 
37,585.056 
39,896.925 


$357,542,675 
377,340,286 
322,865.278 
309,653,561 
292,177.188 
277,517,963 
290,345.245 
287,133,873 
274,623.393 
258,459,797 
238,660,009 
236,964,327 
206,947,883 
267,642,958 
260,712,888 
257,981,440 
265,408,138 
244,126,244 
260,226,935 
242.483,138 
207,932,180 
207,924,801 
229,288,978 
318,040,711 
365,773,905 
345,023,330 
383,477.954 
365. 195.298 
350,195,296 
352,179.448 
365.774,159 
443,368.:>-j 
606,072.179 


1876. . . 




1877. . . 




1878... 




1879 . 




1880... 
1881... 
1882... 


2,795,320 
1,061,249 


1883. . 




1884 




1885... 




87.494,258 
74,166,930 
85.264.826 
72,952,261 
80,0'V4,004 
81,403,250 
110.04.8,107 
99,846,988 
103,732,799 
101,943,730 
93,279,730 
87.216.234 
90.401,207 
96,520,505 
119,191,255 


42,670,578 
34,324,153 
38,561,026 
38,522,436 
44,435,271 
44,582,838 
48.720,065 
46,895,450 
49,641,773 
54.567,930 
51.804,759 
50.830,920 
48.950,267 
91,992,000 
229.841.254 


1886... 




1887... 




1888... 
1889... 
1890... 
1891... 
1892... 


8.270,842 
17,292,363 
20,304,244 
10,401,221 


1898... 




1894 




1895. . . 




1896... 




1897... 




1898... 




1899... 





AMERICAN TRUSTS. 



AMERICAN TRUSTS. 



Monopolies, trusts, syndicates, or by 
whatever other name -organizations formed 
for the purpose of controlling the output 
of manufactured products, for regulating 
prices or for adjusting wages, may be 
known, are not peculiar to either the pres- 
ent age or to our own country. 

In the sixteenth century the people of 
England complained of the extortions of 
the monopolies which had been granted by 
the crown and the whole system was at- 
tacked in parliament in 1597. No restrain- 
ing law was passed, because of the personal 
solicitation of the queen, but in 1601 par- 
liament took up the subject and a list of 
the most objectionable monopolies was read 
in the house of commons. One member 
of that body caused a sensation at the time 
by asking, "Is not bread among the num- 
ber?" 

In 1623 the so-called statute of monopolies 
was passed, which provided that all monop- 
olies should be illegal, except such as 
might be granted by parliament, the only 
exceptions being the control of new manu- 
factures and Inventions. For a time this 
law put an end to the formation of monop- 
olies which have now become so common 
in nearly every civilized country on the 
globe. In England, despite the industrial 
energy of the country and its extensive 
commerce, the trust system has not made 
the advance It has in some other countries 
in Europe or In America. A recent writer 
In explaining this apparent anomaly says 
that "this is doubtless due in some degree 
to the thorough application of the princi- 
ple of free trade, for it is well known that 
the largest trusts are powerless unless their 
Interests are secured by a protective tariff 
excluding from home markets the products 
of foreign countries." 

Technical Journals In Germany credited 
the empire with 180 trusts, or private mo- 
nopolies, In 1897, and the number has con- 
siderably increased since then. In such 
industries as brick, stone, plaster of paris, 
glue, mortar and the like there are over 
forty trusts, of which a recent writer says: 
"Of these trusts in the widest sense of 
the word it may be said that by hindering 
unlimited underbidding they have proved 
an actual blessing to the trades concerned, 
without becoming a menace to the public 
welfare." The same writer says: "The 
activity and extension of trusts in Ger- 
many has not yet led to serious apprehen- 



sions or open hatred on the part of large 
portions of the population as now appears 
to exist in the United States. Although 
aiming primarily at the establishment of 
better prices, German trusts cannot be ac- 
cused of the exploitation of the public at 
large or of the working classes. As re- 
gards the establishment of prices, also, the 
trusts have hitherto displayed a wise mod- 
eration." 

In Austria-Hungary there have been 
fewer trusts organized, chiefly because op- 
posed to them there is a strong and pro- 
nounced public sentiment. As a rule they 
have been censured because of their atti- 
tude regarding the subject of wages. 

Perhaps in no country in Europe has the 
trust system assumed the proportions it 
has acquired in France. The iron trade, 
the chemical industries, the bottle-glass, 
sugar refining, zinc and many other im- 
portant lines of industry are controlled by 
trusts and have been so for many years. 

In Belgium and Denmark there are large 
Interests in international trusts. In Russia, 
while the courts do not recognize the for- 
mation of trusts as legal, strong industrial 
organizations control many of the commodi- 
ties. Iron, brandy, sugar, petroleum and a 
vast number of other products are in the 
hands of monopolies which oppress the 
people. Not only is no resistance offered 
them by the government, but "many of 
them have been organized under the protec- 
tion and with the assistance of the govern- 
ment." 

In the United States trusts are of com- 
paratively recent origin, but the rapidity 
with which they have, of late years, been 
formed indicates the popularity of a system 
that is centuries old in Europe. The fol- 
lowing table, giving a list of the principal 
trusts in this country, has been prepared 
with care from several reliable sources of 
Information and is as nearly complete as 
it has been possible to make It. Many 
small combinations, of a local character, 
have been purposely omitted. That It is 
free from all errors is not claimed, for 
authentic Information is in many instances 
impossible to reach. It Is believed to be 
the largest and most reliable list of Amer- 
ican trusts yet published. The (*) indi- 
cates that the amount of capital stock Is 
estimated, no authentic figures being at- 
tainable. Credit Is given to the Investor, 
American Monthly, Review of Reviews, 
Chicago Securities and other publications: 
Common Preferred 

Name of trust. stock. stock. 

| A. Booth & Co. (fish and oysters) $3,000,000 $2,500,000 

Acker Process company 3,000,000 

Acker Process Patent company 2,000,000 

Amalgamated Copper company *75,000,000 

American Actuation company of New York city (manufacturers of 
power-regulating machinery) 5,000,000 

American Agricultural Chemical company (twenty-three fertilizer 
plants) 20,000,000 20,000,000 

American Air Power company (controls Hoadley patents on air mo- 
tors for cars) 7,000,000 

American Alkali company 24,000,000 6,000,000 

American Automatic Weighing Machine company (three companies). 775,000 775,000 

American Beet Sugar company (four factories, 7,500 acres of land 
west of Missouri) 15,000,000 4,000,000 

American Bicycle company (100 plants 75 per cent all in country)... 20,000,000 10,000,000 

American Birch company (to control New York market) 4,000,000 6,000,000 

American Brass company, Waterbury, Conn 20,000,000 

American Brick company 7,500,000 7,500,000 



6(5 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



Common Preferred 

Name of trust. stock. stock. 
American Bridge company (to control 75 per cent of bridge-building 

trade) $30,000,000 $20,000,000 

American Car and Foundry company (eight leading car manufactur- 
ing companies, including Michigan Peninsular Car company) 30,000,000 30,000,000 

American Car Supply company (manufacturers railroad supplies).... 50,000,000 

American Caramel company 1,000,000 500,000 

American Cereal company 3,400,000 

American Chicle company (forming with chewing gum plants) 6,000,000 3,000,000 

Anaconda Copper Mining company 30,000,000 

American Cotton Oil company (123 properties) 20,327,100 10,189,600 

American Kdible Nut company 5,000,000 

American Electric Heating company 10,000,000 

American Felt company 2,500,000 2,500.000 

American Fisheries company (Menhd. oil, 15-18 companies) 8,000,000 2,000,000 

American Gas and Electric Lighting Fixture company (forming with 

fourteen plants) 9,000,000 6,000,000 

American Ginning company 5,000,000 

American Glass company (window glass dealers) 1,200,000 

American Glucose Sugar Refining company 3,000,000 

American Glue company > 1,400,000 

American Grass Twine company 15,000,000 

American Hard Rubber company (three companies) *2,500,000 

American Hat company 15,000,010 10,000,000 

American-Hawaiian Steam Navigation company 750,000 

American Hay company (100 firms) *5,000,000 

American Hide and Leather company (proposed combination of upper 

leather tanneries) 30,000,000 30,000,000 

American Honduras company of Augusta, Me *10,000,000 

American Ice company (Maine ice companies and artificial ice) 30,000,000 30,000,000 

An-erican Incandescent Light company 2,000,000 

American Indies company (sas, electric, etc., in new colonies) 13,000,000 5,000,000 

American Iron and Steel Manufacturing company (nut and bolt 

combine total capital, $30,000,000), to be issued now 12,000,000 3,000,000 

American Lamp Chimney company (one-third total supply in United 

States) 500,000 250,000 

American Last company (combination of manufacturers of lasts) 2,000,000 1,500,000 

American Linseed Oil company (eighty-two plants), reorganization 

and consolidation 16,760,000 16,750,000 

American Lithograph company 3,000,000 3,500,000 

American Machine (sewing) company *10,000,000 

American Malting company (thirty companies) 15,000,000 15,000,000 

American Mica company 3,500,000 

American Pastry and Manufacturing company 2,000,000 1,000,000 

American Pipe and Foundry company (five iron pipe companies) *10,000,000 

American Plow company (seventeen manufacturers, Chicago) 65,000,000 

American Pneumatic company (pneumatic companies, Boston) 10,000,000 5,000,000 

American Power and Transportation company 12,500,000 

American Radiator company (incorporated to combine boiler, ra- 
diator and heating apparatus manufacturing) 5,000.000 5,000,000 

American Railways company *25,000,000 

American Railway Equipment company *9,730,000 7,730,000 

American Saddle company (manufacture of bicycle saddles).... 1,000,000 800,000 

American Sardine company (embracing all companies outside Chi- 
cago syndicate, or about 25 per cent) *3,000,000 

American Sardine Trust (embracing 75 per cent of factories Chicago 

syndicate) 

American School Furniture company 10,000,000 

American Sewer Pipe company (proposed to include forty-eight com- 
panies) 12,500.000 12,500,000 

American Shear company 1,000,000 

American Shipbuilding company , 15,000.000 15,000,000 

American Shot and Lead company 3,000,000 

American Silk Manufacturing company *50,000.000 50,000,000 

American Silk Ribbon company *50,000,000 

American Spirits Manufacturing company (whisky, 18 districts) 27,000,000 27,000,000 

American Steel and Wire company (fifteen to twenty companies) 40,000,000 50,000,000 

American Steel Hoop company 19,000,000 14,000,000 

American Stoneware company (forming twenty-five potteries east of 

Mississippi river) 2,500,000 

American Strawboard (nineteen plants) 6,000,000 

American Sugar Refining company 36,96S,000 36,968,000 

American Switch company 5,500,000 5,500,000 

American Thread company (thirteen companies) 5,000,000 5,000,000 

American Tin Plate company (281 millsi 20,000,000 30,000.000 

American Tobacco company (plug) 33,500,000 14,000,000 

American Warp Drawing Machine company 2,300,000 700,000 



AMERICAN TRUSTS. 



Common 
stock. 



Preferred 
stock. 



Name of trust. 
American Window Glass company (forming to control 80 to 90 per 

cent of all) $15,000,000 ?15,000,000 

Associate Wine Dealers (agreement with California corporation) 5,000,000 

American Wood Working Machinery company (fourteen fii-ms) 2,000,000 2,000,000 

American Woolen company (combination worsted manufacturers) 30,000,000 20,000,000 

American Writing Paper company (twenty-seven mills 76 per cent 

of the fine writing paper output) 12,500,000 12,500,000 

American Zinc company (all leading manufactories) 5,000,000 

American Smelting and Heflning company 32,500,000 32,500,000 

American Enameled Paper company 5,000,000 

American Vinegar company 7,000,000 4,000,000 

Arizona United Copper Mining company 10,000,000 

Arizona Water company (several laud, improvement and canal com- 

anies) 1,500,000 



Asphalt Company of America 30,000,000 

Association of Boat Oar Manufacturers of the United States (agree- 
ment on prices) 600,000 

Atlantic Brass company 1,000,000 

Atlantic Clay company 2,000,000 1,000,000 

Atlantic Snuff company (all but two big companies) 2,000,000 8,000,000 

Atlas Cement (Increase capital) 6,000,000 

Automobile Machine and Screw company (forming nine screw 
manufacturers in United States) 6,000,000 4,000,000 

Automobile Trust 3,000,000 

Autotruck Combine (forming to control exclusive rights under 
Hoadley-Knight patents in Europe and America) 200,000,000 

Autotruck Electric company (to acquire patents and work the same). 1,000,000 

Baltimore Brick Concerns 4,000,000 

Baltimore Electric Light company (three electric light companies 
of Baltimore) 5,000,000 

Banana Trust (combine southern importers) 

Banana Trust (forming to compete with United Fruit company) 

Barrelmakers" Combine - 

Bessemer Ore association (lake mines) *20,000,000 

Bethlehem Steel company 15,000,000 

Billiard Table Trust 

Bituminous Coal Trust (proposed to consolidate bituminous coal 
interests about Pittsburg) 30,000,000 30,000,000 

Blast Furnace Combine (five Pennsylvania concerns forming) *25, 000,000 

Boiler Manufacturers' Trust 

Bolt and Nut (several associations carriage, stove, tire, etc.) "10,000,000 

Borax Consolidated Limited International Consolidation United 
States and foreign countries 3,000,000 5,000,000 

Borden Condensed Milk company 20,000,000 

Boston and Seven Devils Copper company 5,000,000 

Boston Breweries company 4,000,000 

Boston Coal, Dock and Warehouse company ("J. P. Morgan's Coal 
Combine") 

Boston Drug Jobbers' Trust 

Boxmakers' Combine (of California and Oregon) *1, 000,000 

Brass Foundry and Machine company (iron, steel and brass castings) 6,000,000 

Bread and Cake Combine *250,000 

Breweries Trust 

Brewers' Combine (Conn.) (now forming) 2,500,000 

Brewers' Combine (Mass.) (now forming) 2,500,000 

Brewers' Combine (western to control Omaha plants) 

Brooklyn Wharf and Warehouse company 5,000,000 

Broom Manufacturers' Association of United States (regulates 
prices) *10,000,000 

Broom Twine (selling combine) 500,000 

Buffalo Gas company (all gas interests of Buffalo) 7,000,000 2,000,000 

California Fruit Growers' association (formed to fight refrigerator 
car combine 

California Fruit Packers' association (twenty-six canneries) 2,500,000 

California Raisin Growers' association (2,000 growers and sixty 
packers; controls 95 per cent of the crop) 5,001,000 

California Wine Makers' Corporation 10.000,000 

Cambria Steel company (plants in five counties in Pennsylvania) 16,000,009 

Candy Manufacturers *75, 000,000 

Canned Goods Trust (proposed) 20,000,000 

Canning Machinery Pool '. . 

Carnegie Steel company (forming includes fifteen Carnegie & Frick 

iron, steel and coke companies) 100,000,000230,000,000 

Carpet Manufactui "rs* Combine (proposed) 

Casket Trust (consolidation proposed of casket manufacturing inter- 
ests) 25,000.000 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOB 1900. 



Common Preferred 

Name of trust. stock. stock. 

Cast Iron Pipe Trust (six companies agreement) *$15,000,000 

Cedar Shingles Manufacturers' association (Washington state, limits 

product) *5,000,000 

Cement Combine (proposed) . . 12,000,000 

Central Coal and Coke Company of Ohio (selling agency) 500,000 

Central Electric railway of Kansas City (consolidation of present 

companies) 500,000 

Central Foundry company (soil pipe combine) 7,000,000 $7,000,000 

Central Hudson Steamboat company (nine Hudson river boats) 1,000,000 

Central Lumber Company of California *70, 000,000 

Central Mattress Manufacturers' association (thirty-one western 

manufacturers) *2,000,000 

Central New York Brewing company (consolidation of nine leading 

breweries of Syracuse, N. Y.) 2,200,000 1,800,000 

Central Union Gas company 5,000,000 9,000,000 

Central Union Telephone company (consolidation of Bell telephone in 

Indiana, Illinois and Ohio, except certain cities) 6,605,300 

Chain Trust (proposed) *12,500,000 *12,500,000 

Chair Trust (proposed) 

Chamber Furniture Manufacturers' association (fifty manufacturers 

of sideboards, etc., fixed prices) *10,000,000 

Champagne Trust (proposed) '. 25,000,000 25,000,000 

Charleston (S. C.) Consolidated Railway, Gas and Electric com- 
pany 1,500,000 

Chemical company (pharmaceutical manufacturers) *50,000,000 

Chicago and Northwestern Granaries company (177 country elevators 

and two warehouses, five breweries and malt houses) 3,125,000 3,125,000 

Chicago Breweries, Limited 2,000,000 

Chicago City Railway company 14,000,000 

Chicago Consolidated Traction company (eight suburban companies) 14,400,000 

Chicago Edison company (absorbed four companies) 4,975,900 

Chicago Laundry company (three-fourths of the laundries of Chicago) *7,000,000 

Chicago Milk company (to control milk output in vicinity of Chicago) 3,000,000 3.000,000 

Chicago Packing and Provision company (two plants} 1,000,000 1 ('00,000 

Chicago Bailway Terminal Elevator company (five elevators) 1,402,920 1,330,850 

Chicago Sash, Door and Blind company (thirty-five Chicago com- 
panies) 3,500,000 2,500,000 

Chicago Telephone company 4,336,500 

Chicago Union Traction company 32,000,000 

Chicago Vehicle company 1,000,000 

Cigar Trust (proposed twenty-three Tampa and Key West cigar 

manufacturers) 20,000,000 

Cincinnati Coal Elevator Combine 

City of Chicago Brewing and Malting company (English and 

American companies) 3,125,000 3,125,000 

Cleveland and Sandusky Brewing company (eleven breweries) 3,000,000 3,000,000 

Cloth Finishers' Combine 

Coal Trust (proposed all mines in Pittsburg district) 25,000,000 

Cocoanut Trust *7,000,000 

Cold Storage Combine (proposed) 12,000,000 

Colorado Fuel and Iron company 11,000,000 2,000,000 

Columbia Automobile company 3,000,000 

Columbia Chemical company (soda-ash makers proposed) 45,000,000 

Columbia Electric Vehicle Manufacturing company 5,000,000 

Columbia Electric Car Lighting and Brake company (three com- 
panies) 11,000,000 

Columbia River Canneries company 2,000,000 

Columbian Electric Car Lighting and Brake company 10,000,000 

Columbus (O.) Gas Light and Heating company (will own two big 

companies) 1,700,000 3,300,000 

Commercial Chemical Company of United States (paris green manu- 
facturers form selling agency) 2,000,000 

Commonwealth Electric company (twelve companies Chicago light- 
ingpools with Chicago Edison company) 3,000,000 

Compania de la Hacienda de Coahuayula 5,000,000 

Compressed Gas Capsule company 15,000,000 

Consolidated City Water company (three companies, Los Angeles, 

Cal.) 2,400,000 

Consolidated Gas company of Newark, N. J. (all gas companies be- 
tween Passaic and Elizabeth) 6,000,000 

Consolidated Gas of Pittsburg (companies in Pittsburg and Alle- 
gheny) 4,000,000 2,500,000 

Consolidated Gas, New York (all gas companies but New Amster- 
dam) 36,730,000 

Consolidated Ice company (Pittshnrg concerns) 2,000,000 2,000,000 

Consolidated Ice company (New York and Maine companies) 6,500,000 3,500,000 



AMERICAN TRUSTS. 



69 



Common Preferred 

Name of trust. stock. stock. 

Consolidated Smelting and Refining company $27,000,000 $27,000,000 

Consolidated Street Oar company 10,000,OUO 8,000,000 

Consolidated Traction of New Jersey (consolidated trolleys in 
northern New Jersey) 15,000,000 

Consumers' Alliance, New Jersey 500,000 

Consumers' Ice company (all ice dealers of Indianapolis) 1,000,000 

Continental Cement company 6,000,000 5,000,000 

Continental Cotton Oil company (seven southern companies) 3,OuO,000 3,000,000 

Continental Cracker company (consolidation of several companies).. *10,000,000 

Continental Compressed Air company 15,000,000 

Continental Manufacturing company (to manufacture chemicals) 1,000,000 600,000 

Continental Oil company 3,000,000 3,000,000 

Consolidated Rubber Tire company 10,000,000 

Continental Tobacco company (plug with late Increase of capital).. 85,000,000 

Copper Sheets and Bolts Manufacturers' association (fixes prices)... *5.,000,000 

Cornstalk Combine (proposed) 50,000,000 

Corset Trust *30,000,000 

Cotton Duck Manufacturers 

Cotton Yarn Combination (forming seven mills In Massachusetts).. 8,460,000 

Cox Electric Cart company 1,000,000 

Cuban Steel company 

Cuban Tobacco Trust 12,500,000 7,500,000 

Derby Hat Pool (four big companies sell together) 3,000,000 

Detroit City Gas (all natural and artificial gas companies in the 
city) 4,650,000 

Denver City Tramway company (consolidated street lines) 5,000,000 

Denver Trust (combination proposed of all railway, water, electric 
light, coal, gas and telephone companies in Denver, Col.) 60,000,000 

Diamond Match company (six mills in various places) 11,000,000 

Dietrichs Gear company 1,000,000 

Distilling Company of America (a whisky trust) 55,000,000 70,000,000 

Dominion Steel company *15,000,000 

Drug Pool (wholesale dealers of New York city) 5,000,000 

East Jersey Electric company 1,000,000 

Edison Portland Cement company 9,000,000 2,000,000 

Electrolytic Chemical company 5,000,000 

Electrical Lead Reduction company 12,000,000 

Electric Axle, Light and Power company 25,000,000 

Electric Boat company 5,000,000 5,000,000 

Electric Company of America; 25,000,000 

Electric Storage Battery company (total capital) 13,000,000 5,000,000 

Electric Vehicle Company of Washington 

Electric Vehicle Transportation company 25,000,000 

Encaustic Tile company (to control all companies) 4,000,000 3,000,000 

Ewing-Essick Engine company 6,000,000 

Express Company General 1,000,000 

Factory Insurance association (twenty-nine companies) 31.655,000 

Farming Machinery Trust (proposed) *50, 000,000 

Federal Ink and Supply company 16,000.000 4,000,000 

Federal Sewer Pipe company 12.500.000 12,500,000 

Federal Steel (five or six big iron and steel companies) 53,261,000 46,484,300 

Federal Varnish company (capital to be Increased to $30,000,000 
later on) 100,000 

Feed Dealers' Trust (proposed) 

File Manufacturers' Trust (proposed) 

Fire Clay Sewer Pipe Trust (forming with thirty-one companies) *20. 000,000 

Fireproofing company 1,000,000 1,000,000 

Fireprooflng (nine Ohio companies sell together) *3, 000,000 

Fish and Oyster Trust (St. Louis corporation to control trade in 
south, west and southwest) 5,500,000 

Five States Milk Producers' association (farmers to keep up prices 
of milk, as against the trust) 20,000,000 

Forged Steel Joint Trust (proposed) 100,000 

Foundry Supply Combine 

Fowler Bros., Limited, of Chicago (five English and American com- 
panies), provisions 3,755,000 

Fox River Brick and Tile company, consolidated (fifteen brick 
yards in Wisconsin) 200,000 

Francis Gowdy Distilling company (combination eastern gin com- 
panies) 100.000 

Fuller Round Bale company 5,750,000 2,250,000 

Gardiner Artificial Wood company 9,000,000 3,000.000 

Gas Fixtures Trust 9,000,000 6,000,000 

Gas Self-Lighting company 1,500,000 

General Carriage company 20,000.000 



70 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



Common Preferred 

Name of trust. stock. stock. 

General Chemical company (combination of manufacturers of 

"heavy chemicals," conservative capitalization) $12,500,000 $12,500,000 

General Electric company of Minneapolis (light, heat and power)... 2,100,000 

General Electric company (New York) 18,276,000 2,557,200 

G. H. Hammond company of Chicago (packers and shippers of 
dressed meats, with a large number of domestic and foreign 
agencies) 4,700,000 

Glass Combination *10,000,000 

Glass Tableware Trust (proposed) *25, 000,000 

Glove Trust (proposed) 12,000,000 8,000,000 

Glucose Sugar Kenning company 26,000,000 14,000,000 

Granite Combine (to include New England granite quarries) *12,000,000 

Granite Ware Trust (four companies combining) *20,000,000 

Grape Growers' Pool (agree on prices in northern Ohio) 2,000,000 

Great Lakes Towing company 2,500,000 2,500,000 

Grocery Combine (proposed) 

Hanover Street Railway company (lines between Plymouth and 
Nantasket Beach, Mass.) 660,000 

Havana Commercial company (Cuban tobacco trust) 12,500,000 7,500,000 

Havana Electric railway (electric, gas, telephone, etc.) 5,000,000 

Hawaiian Commercial and Sugar company 2,312,755 

Herkimer County Light and Power company (companies in three 
cities in Herkimer county, New York) 400,000 

Home company (Delaware) 1,000,000 

Hoop Iron Trust (proposed) 

Hot-Air Furnace Manufacturers' association (fixed prices) 5,000,000 

Horseshoe Combine (proposed) 

Horseshoe Trust 7,000,000 

Illinois Electric Vehicle and Transportation company 25,000,000 

Illinois State Board Fire Underwriters (seventy-two companies) 49,430,760 

Indiana League of Fire Underwriters (twenty-seven companies) 10,028567 

International Air Power company (controls nearly all patents of 

American Air Power company general manufacturing) 6,400,000 600,000 

International Automobile and Vehicle Tire company (three com- 
panies) 1,500,000 1,500,000 

International Car Wheel company 10,000,000 5,000,000 

International Cement company 25,000,000 25,000,000 

International Copper company 

International Heater company (four companies) 900,000 900,000 

International Needle company 1,000,000 2,000,000 

International Packing company of Chicago (seven plants) 1,000 1,500,000 

International Paper company (twenty-five manufacturers of news 

and printing paper) 16,040,400 20,530,700 

International Power company (steam and air power machinery) 

International Silver company (twenty-four companies 75 per cent 

of silver plate companies) 11,000,000 5,000,000 

International Smokeless Powder and Dynamite company 9,000,000 l.OOO.OOC 

International Steam Pump company (five companies) 12,500.000 15,000,00f 

International Zinc Mining and Smelting company of Camden 250,000 

Iron Mills Trust (embracing thirty-four iron mills in Chicago- 
proposed) 

Jersey City Water Supply company 1,000,000 

Jewelry Manufacturers' Trust (300 firms in New England and 200 
firms in middle Atlantic states) *30,000,000 

Kanawha and New River Consolidated Coal and Coke company 40,000,000 

Kentucky Distilleries and Warehouse company (fifty-seven Bourbon 

plants) 18,500,000 10,500.00f 

Kern Gaslight Lamp company 8,000,000 4,000,000 

Keystone Watch company 3,000,000 

Key West Cigar Combine 

Kings County Electric Light and Power company (all companies in 
Brooklyn except one) 1,968,000 

Kings County (N. Y.) Traction company (consolidation of Nassau 
lines) 15,000,000 

Knickerbocker Ice company, Chicago (twenty-eight companies) 4,000,000 3,000,000 

Knit Goods company (many plants in New York and New England). 15,000,000 5,000,000 

Kodak Limited company (consolidated English, French, German- 
American companies) 5,000,000 3,000,000 

Lake Carriers' association (three lines pool prices) -. 10,000,000 

Lake Shipyards Combination (comprising six companies) *30,000,000 

Lake Superior Consolidated Iron Mines 28,722.000 

Lamp and Tableware Combine 2,000,000 4,000,000 

Lanyon Zinc company 1,000,000 2,000,000 

Leather Combine 

Ledger Paper Trust (Massachusetts companies proposed) *42,000,000 

Lewis Motor Vehicle company 4,500,000 450,000 

Lexington (Ky.) railroad (four companies) 800.000 



AMERICAN TRUSTS. 



71 



Common Preferred 

Name of trust. stock. stock. 

Liquor Organization (proposed combination of liquor interests of 

Greater New ork) fl,000,000 

Linen Thread company (selling agency for three manufacturers) 4,000,000 

Lumber Carriers' association (vessels on great lakes) 6,000,000 

Lumber Mill Consolidation (proposed combination of North Caro- 
lina pine lumber mills) 20,000,000 

Macbeth-Evans Glass company (forming five chimney concerns, all 

in the United States) 2,000,000 

Maine Woolen Mill Trust (proposed) *100,000,000 

Manufactured Rubber company (to control output) 5,000,000 ?1,COO,000 

Manufacturers' Paper company of Chicago (selling agency for many 

mills) 10,000,000 

Maple Flooring Manufacturers' association (fixed prices) 2,000,000 

Maritime Improvement company (total capital) 3,000,000 

Marsden company of Pennsylvania (cellulose trust) 30,752,200 1,515,000 

Maryland Brewing company (seventeen brewery companies of Balti- 
more) 3,250,000 3,250,000 

Massachusetts Consolidation (consolidation five copper ore mines in 

Michigan) 2,500,000 

McClurg Publishing Corporation (incorporated in Ohio) 600,000 / 

Merchants' Distributing and Distilling company (total capital) 5,000,000 

Merchants' Wire and Nail company (formed to compete With 

American Wire and Steel company) 500,000 500,000 

Merritt Electric Air Brake company 1,000,000 

Metropolitan Street Railway company (most street railways la New 

York city) 40,000,000 

Metropolitan Tobacco company (selling combine) 500,000 500,000 

Mexican Coal and Coke company (to operate coal mines and oil and 

gas wells in Mexico) 6,000,000 

Milk Combine of Scranton, Pa. (entire supply) 1,000,000 

Milwaukee and Chicago Breweries company (English and American) 3,875,000 3,875,000 

Milwaukee Electric Railway and Light company (all in city) 5,494,500 

Mineral Water Combine 4,000,000 

Mississippi River Steamboat Pool (three companies) *10, 000,000 

Monongahela Light and Power company 

Monongahela River Consolidated Coal and Coke company 20,000,000 10,000,000 

Montana Coal and Coke company .'. 5,000,000 

Monumental Ginger Ale and Mineral Water company (Ginger Ale 

Trust capital will be increased later to ?1, 000,000), capital 100,000 

Mount Vernon-Woodbury Cotton Duck company (proposed to be or- 
ganized in Delaware to control 90 per cent of United States duck 

product) 23,500,000 

Mutual Mercantile Agency 2,000,000 

National Abrasive Manufacturing company (controls corundum and 

other abrasive materials) 1,000,000 

National Association of Wagon Manufacturers (fixed prices) *40, 000,000 

National Biscuit company (90 per cent large bakeries in United 

States) 29,000,000 23,000,000 

National Carbon company 5,500,000 4,500,000 

National Car Equipment company (forming in California) 10,000,000 

National Carpet company (forming nearly all mills in the United 

States) 25,000,000 25,000,000 

National Dining Table association (thirty -nine firms fixed prices).. *2. 000, 000 

National Electric company 25,000,000 

National Enameling and Stamping company (controls patents and 

four plants) 20,000.000 10,000,000 

National Glass company (seventeen flint bottle, etc., companies) 4,000,000 8,000,000 

National Glove company (proposed) 12,000,000 8,000,000 

National High Temperature Furnace company 600.000 

National Lead company (twenty-six white lead plants) 14.905.400 14,904,000 

National Leather Belting company (about fourteen plants) *10,000,000 10000,000 

National Light and Power company 15,000,000 

National Metallic Roofing Trust (allied with National Steel com- 
panycapital nominal and to be increased to $12,000,000 later), total 

capital 100,000 

National Mirror Manufacturers' association (forty companies, fix 

prices, etc.) 5,000,000 

National Molasses and Simp Dealers' association 

National Oil Engine company 3,000,000 

National Salt company of New Jersey (to combine 90 per cent of salt 

manufactured by evaporation) 7,000,000 5,000,000 

National Screw company (forming includes American and thirteen 

other companies) 10000,000 

National Shear company 1,500,000 1,500,000 

National Starch company (price agreement with other companies in 

1898) 4,450,700 4,036,200 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



Common Preferred 

Name of trust. stock. stock. 

National Steel company (eight plants) $32,000,000 $27,000,000 

National Strawboard company (50 per cent of the business of the en- 
tire country forming) 2,000.000 2,000,000 

National Tin Plate and Stamped Ware company 20,000,003 

National Traction Company of Dayton, 10,000 

National Tube company (combination of steel pipe manufacturers).. 40,000,000 40.000,000 

National Tube company (thirteen companies) 40,000,000 40,000,000 

National Wall Paper company (thirty companies) 27,931,500 7,503,003 

National Woolen company (now forming) *50,000,000 

Natural Gas Trust (total capital) 5,000,000 

Naugatuck Valley Brass Trust 20,000,000 

New Amsterdam Gas company (consolidated three companies) 13,000,000 10,000000 

Newark (N. J.) Consolidated Gas company (consolidated seven com- 
panies) 6,000,000 

New Brick and Tile company 200,000 

New England Cotton Yarn company 6,000,000 6,500,000 

New England Dairy company (to control butter, milk and cheese 

production capital to be increased to $30,000,000) 600,000 250,000 

New England Electric Vehicle Transportation company (sub-com- 
pany of New York Electric Vehicle Transportation company) 25,000,000 25,000,000 

New England Zinc company 1,000,000 

New York Autotruck company 10,000,000 

New York Electric Vehicle Transportation company (enlargement of 

Electric Vehicle company) 25,000,000 

New York Gas and Electric Light, Heat and Power company of 

New York city 36,000,000 

New York Suburban Gas company 1,500,000 

Nicholson Tile company (five plants 70 per cent product) 2,000,COO 

Nicholson File company (70 per cent product five plants) 2,000,030 

Niles-Bement-Pond company (combine to manufacture machine tools) 5,000,000 3,000,000 

North American Ore and Metal company 1.000,000 

North Carolina Pine Timber association 20,000,000 

North Jersey Street Railway company (consolidated trolleys and 

two ferries) 5,000,000 

North River Light, Heat and Power company 300,000 

North Star Mines company 5,000,000 

North Texas Construction company (square bale cotton gins in 

Texas capital to be increased later) 100,000 

Northwestern Grass Twine company (consolidation of three western 

concerns will be absorbed by American Grass Twine company)... 7,500,000 

Northwestern Plow and Implement association 

Northwestern Underwriters' Agency (Minneapolis and St. Paul com- 
panies) 10,000 

Oil Stove Trust 

Oil Trust (now forming) 

Onward Construction company (chartered to erect buildings and run 
hotels) 

Orange Growers' Trust *20,000,000 

Otis Elevator company (thirteen passenger companies 85 per cent 

product) 6,500,000 4,500,000 

Oyster Trust (capital may be doubled later total capital) 5,000,000 

Pacific American Fisheries company (will control 70 per cent of all 

salmon caught In Puget sound waters) 4,000,000 5,000,000 

Pacific Biscuit company (proposed) 

Pacific Coast Fruit association (controls prune output of California).. 1,000,000 

Pacific States Telephone (four telegraph and telephone systems of 

Pacific coast) 10,000,000 

Paducah (Ky.) Railway and Electric Light company (all rai'way and 

electric light plants of Paducah) 200,000 

Paint Manufacturing Trust (proposed) , 12,000,000 

Park Steel .company 15,000,000 

Passenger Coach Trust (proposed) 

Patent Medicine Trust (proposed) 25,000,000 

Pennsylvania Manufacturing, Light and Power company (eight elec- 

tric'light companies of Philadelphia) 15,000,000 

People's Gas Light and Coke Company of Chicago (agreement with 

three others, absorb others) 28,750,000 

People's Gas Light and Coke company, Buffalo (consolidated) 4,975,000 3,025,000 

Philadelphia Fish and Game company 350,000 650,000 

Photographic Paper (twenty-four companies manufacturers of sensi- 
tized paper) *2,000,000 

Pittsburg Brewing company 6.500,000 6,500,000 

Pittsburg Plate Glass company 9,850,000 150,009 

Plate Glass Trust (now forming) 

Pressed Steel Car company (controls 138 patents and two principal 

plants for making cars, etc., from pressed steel) 12,500,000.12,500,000 



AMERICAN TRUSTS. 



Common Preferred 

Aame of trust. xtck. stock. 

Print Cloth Pool (thirty mills, restricts production and fixes prices).. *$50,000,000 

Puerto Rico company (to operate properties In Puerto Rico Phila- 
delphia and Pittsbnrg), capital 1,000,000 

Pud Trust 

Papeterie Combine 

Patent Leather Trust (sixteen Newark, N. J., concerns) 11,000,000 

Paterson and Passalc Gas and Electric company (consolidation of 

four companies) 5,000,000 

Paterson Brewing and Malting company 6,000,000 

Pennsylvania Manufacturing Light and Power company (all electric 
companies of Philadelphia) 15,000,000 

Pennsylvania Sugar Refining company 8,000,000 

Pennsylvania Smelting company 

Pennsylvania Worsted Spinning company , 

People's Light and Power company (fourteen companies In New 

J ersey) 20,000,000 , 

People's Telephone Corporation 5.COO.OOO ; , 

Petersburg (Va.) Railway and Electric (consolidation all companies) 600,000 , 

Philadelphia and Maryland Pure Rye Distilling company 30,000,000 

Pillsbury-Washburn Flour Mills company (limited) 2,500,000 $2,500,000 

Pittsburg Coal Combine 

Plttsburg Laundry company 1,750,000 1,750,000 

Pittsburg Stove and Range company , 

Plumbers' Combine 35,000,000 

Powder Smokeless company 9,000,000 1,000,000 

Puget Sound Packers' association (eight big salmon packers fixed 

prices) IjOOO.OOO 

Pulley Manufacturers' Trust 

Reading company (Anthracite Coal Trust) *150,000,000 

Reed Tide Power company (now forming) *40,000,000 

Refrigerator Trust (thirty-six firms 80 per cent of trade) 8,000,000 

Republic Iron and Steel company (thirvy-one bar and forge iron com- 
panies, etc.) 30,000,000 25,000,000 

Reynolds Tobacco company.. 5,000,000 

River Coal Operators' company (Pittsburg to New Orleans) *li,000,000 

Rolling Mill Trust (thirty-live mills) 30,000,000 25,000,000 

Royal Baking Powder company (consolidation of five leading con- 
cerns) 10,000,000 10,000,000 

Rubber Goods Manufacturers' company 25,000,000 25,000,000 

Rye Gin Combine (embracing two-thirds output United States) "lO.OOt) 

Safe Trust (ten companies) 2,500,000 15,000,000 

Saginaw Valley Traction company (consolidation four companies).... 700,000 400,000 

San Francisco Breweries, Limited (agreement with other breweries) 20,000,000 

Santy-Kalsomlne company (plaster trust) 3,000,000 

Sash and Door Combine (twenty-six companies) 15,000,000 

Scott-Jenney Electric company 30,000,000 

Sergeant Automobile company (railroad semaphore signals) 2,000,000 

Severy Process company 7,500.000 

Sheet Steel Trust 50,000,000 

Siemens & Halske Electric company 1,300,000 700,000 

Sloss-Sbeffield Steel and Iron company 10,000,000 10,000,000 

Smelters' Trust (proposed) 25.000.0JO 25,000,000 

Soap Trust *25,000,000 25,000,000 

Southern Car and Foundry company (increase) 2,750,000 

Southern New England Brick Manufacturers *5, 000,000 

Spanish-American Mining company 5,000,000 5,000,000 

Sperry Flour company (California) 10,000,000 

Springfield (Mass.) Breweries company (four breweries) 1,150,000 1,150,000 

Spruce Lumber Combine (proposed to control spruce lumber in north- 
ern New England) 100,000,000 

S. S. McClure company (alliance between Harper & Brothers and 
S. S. McClure company) 

Stauffer Chemical company (California companies combine to fight 
the big combine) 

Standard Chain company (forming 95 per cent machine-made 

chains) 3,250,000 3,250,000 

Standard Distilling and Distributing company (twelve whisky dis- 
tilleries) 16,000,000 8,000,000 

Standard Gas Stove and Manufacturing company (proposed by manu- 
facturers of Cleveland, controlling about 80 per cent of gas stoves, 

etc., manufactured in United States) 3,000,000 2,500,000 

Standard Metal company (forming ten companies car journal bear- 
Ings, etc.) 4.000.000 1,800,000 

Standard Oil company ; 110,000,000 

Standard Phosphate and Fertilizer company 600,000 400,000 

Standard Rope and Twine company 12,000.000 



74 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



Name of trust. 

Standard Sardine company (consolidation of leading Maine canner- 
ies) 



Common Preferred 
stock. stuck. 



$5 000 OGO 

Standard Shoe Machinery company (to rival the United Shoe Ma- 
chinery company) 2,500,000 $2,500,000 

Standard Telephone company 10,000,000 

Steel Beams association *20,000,000 

Steel Bridge Trust (proposed) 40,000,000 

Steel Rail Manufacturing association 50,000,000 

Steel Steamers (forming with all manufacturers on great lakes) 15,000,000 15,000,000 

Steel Tired Car Wheel company (six or seven car wheel companies).. *2,000,000 

St. Louis & North Arkansas Railroad company 1,250,000 

St. Louis Breweries, Limited (seventeen plants) 9,000,000 

Swift & Co., Chicago (beef) 20,000,000 

Tanners' Trust .. 50,000,000 

Telephone Trust (opposition to Bell company, embracing 90 per cent 

factories producing independent apparatus proposed) 7,000,000 

Tennessee Coke, Coal and By-Product company 20,000,000 1,000,000 

Temple Iron company (consolidation seven anthracite coal companies 
in Pennsylvania) 

Texas Cattle Combine (proposed) 40,000,000 

The Art Manufacturing Company of New Jersey 500,000 

Theatrical Trust (fifty big ones work together) 30,000,000 

Thrashing Machine Trust (proposed) 

Thrasher Combine (twenty-eight factories) 

Tin Sign Combine 4,000,000 

Tobacco Warehouse Trust (said to have been formed in Danville, 

Va., comprising eight warehouses) 1,000,000 

Torrington Needle company 1,500,000 1,500,000 

Trenton Gas and Electric company (four companies) 2,000,000 

Tubular Dispatch company (consolidation two companies) 2,100,000 

Umbrella Hardware company (formed to control prices) 2,000,000 

Union Bag and Paper company (will control, as claimed, entire 

paper bag business of the country) 16,000,000 11,000,000 

Union Carbide company (acetylene consolidated) 6,000,000 

Union Copper Mining company 3,000,000 

Union Light and Power company (four companies of Salt Lake and 

Ogden, Utah) 1 4,250,000 300,000 

Union Match company 10,000,000 

Union Steel and Chain company 30,000,000 30,000,000 

Union Switch and Signal company (consolidated with National 

Switch and Signal company) *2.000,000 

Union Tobacco company (Blackwell's Durham consolidation) 12,000,000 7,350,000 

Union Typewriter company (five companies) 10,000,000 8,015,000 

United American Glue company (proposed) 20,000,000 15,000,000 

United Breweries company (thirteen breweries, Chicago) 5,463,000 

United Electric Company of New Jersey *20,000,000 

United Fruit company (ten big companies tropical fruits, Including 

Boston Fruit company) 20,000,000 

United Ice Cream company (four companies in Chicago) 300,000 

United Laundries company 1,000,000 

United Lighting and Heating company 6,000,000 6,000,000 

United Power and Transportation company (to control street rail- 
ways in Pennsylvania) 12,500,000 

United Railways and Electric company of Baltimore (all in city)... 24,000,000 14,000,000 

United Shoe Machinery company 8,625,000 8,625,000 

United States Biscuit company (all big biscuit and cracker com- 
panies in the United States) 30,000,000 25,000,000 

United States Bobbin and Shuttle company (proposed) 1,200,000 800,000 

United States Cast Iron Pipe and Foundry company (ten companies) 15,000,000 15,000,000 

United States Can company (all preferred stock) 25,000.000 

United States Dry Paint company (forming mineral paints) 3,000.000 4,500,003 

United -States Dry Paint company (mineral paint combine) 7,500,000 

United States Dyewood and Extract company (leading manufactur- 
ers of dyestuffs and extracts) 4,000,000 6,000,000 

United States Envelope company (ten companies) 750,000 3,750,000 

United States Finishing company (three New Jersey companies 

proposed) 5,000,000 

United States Flour Milling company (nineteen mills, including 

Hecker-Jojues-Jewell company) 35,000.000 5.000,000 

United States GUicose company 3,000.000 2,000,000 

United States Glue company (forming to control glue product) 15,000,000 10,000,000 

United States Leather company 62.854,600 62,254,600 

United States Mining company of Portland, Me *10,000,000 

United States Oil company 1.250,000 

United States Plate Glass company 1,000,000 

United States Playing Card company (allied with three other com- 
panies) 3,600,000 



THE WORLD'S COFFEE 


TRADE. 




75 


Name of trust. 
United States Rubber compa 
United States Sugar Refining 
United States Varnish compa 
United States Vehicle compai 
United States Worsted com 
United Traction and Electric 


ny 






t'unimo 
stock. 


n Preferred 
stock. 
)0 $23,525,500 
X) 
)0 18,000,000 
10 


company (glucose) 
ny (fifteen leading varn 
y (incorporated in Dela 
>anv 


2,000,0 
sh concerns)... 18,000,0 
ware) 2s.non.ft 




. 4n.ftftft.m 


)0 30,000,000 

K) .. 


company (all rouds in and near Provi- 
8.000.0 


United Traction company (controls all electric roads in Reading, 
Fa.) 1.400.000 


United Wine and Trading co 
United Zinc and Lead coinpai 








7ftn.n 


)3 . 


iy (to unite 


mills in Missouri aud Kan- 
K nnn ni 


1,000,000 
)0 


Universal Fuel company 








1,000 














Valve Manufacturers' Trust 
Virginia and Carolina Fertil 
Virginia Electric company o 
In city) 


(proposed) 










zer company 
f Norfolk (consolidation 


24,000,000 
all companies 
45n.nnn 


Virginia Iron, Coal and Coke 
Warehouse Combine (propose 
Watch Case Trust (proposed 
Watch Combine (proposed).. 


company... 






7 500 


)0 


1) 










) 
















... *30,000,0 


X) 


Western Drug Jobbers (western comblna 
Western Elevator association (forty in 1 
Western Pennsylvania Stove Manufactur 
Western Stone company of Chicago (eigh 
Western Strawboard company (proposed 


tion) 




*15,000,0 


)0 15,000,000 
)0 


Buffalo) 




... is.ono.n 


ng Trust (now forming)... 15,000.0 
t quarries) 2,250,0 
combination of Strawboard 

9L Kftft ft 


)0 
)0 

)0 2,500,000 
)0 


Westinghouse Air-Brake company (bought American and Boyden 
companies in 1898) 10.950.0 


Wholesale Druggists' Nationj 
Wholesale Grocers of New P 
Wholesale Wine and Liquor 


il association (twenty-fli 
ngland 
company 


re firms) .... 


. . . . *25,000 01 


)ft .. 




. ... *75,000,000 
500,00ft 








. 30.000.0 


X) .. 


Wire Cloth Manufacturers' 


Association 


of America 


(twelve firms 
5.000.500 


Wire Fence Trust (to compel 
Woods Motor Vehicle compa 


e with Steel and Wire 


Trust) 








7,500,0 


)0 2,500,000 






























... *30,000,0 


)0 










a.ftnn.n 


)ft .. 


Writing Paper Trust (forming 


with thirty-five mills in the Connecti- 
. . *40 ono ono . 


Yarn (cotton hosiery) Manufacturers (fixed prices) 2,500,000 
Xinc Trust (proposed to consolidate zinc and lead mines in the Jop- 
lin district) 


Total 








. . . .7,318,844,0 


10 2.232,340,950 
,184,956 










9.55 


THE WORLD'S COFFEE 


TRADE. 




The following statistics will convey a fairly complete impression of the volume of the 
world's coffee trade and of the relative importance of the various producing and consuming 
countries: 


COUNTRY. 


1899-1900. 


1898-99. 


1897-98. 


1896-97. 


1895-96. 


Brazil liio 


t lings. 

3,250,000 

5,750,000 
400,000 
400,000 
550.000 
55.000 
28.000 
3*0.000 

sauioo 

250.000 
350.000 
426,000 
120,000 
80,000 
475.000 
200,000 
100,000 


Bags. 

3.000.000 
5,100.000 
350,000 
370.000 
244,000 
52.000 
.S5.000 
267.000 
900.0(10 
21(7,000 

as.ooo 

475,000 
150.000 
100,000 
485.000 
2(50,000 
100.000 


HlUlK. 

4.530.000 
0,050.000 
150.000 
440,000 
772.000 
45,000 
46,000 
240,0110 
775.000 
295,000 
300,000 

| 850,000 

482,000 

250.000 
100,000 


Rags. 
3,411,000 

4,!MK).(KIO 
308.000 
2SKI.OOO 
705.000 
66,000 
43,000 
2SO.OOO 
1,000.000 
290,000 
250,000 

800,000 

350,000 

300,000 
100,000 


Bags. 
2.390.000 
3,135.000 

3tx),iioo 

426.000 

072,000 
59,000 
48,000 

800.000 

1,000,000 
19(1,000 
300,000 

900.000 
530,000 

2tio.o(x) 

1 25.01 




Victoria ~ .... 










Ceylon and British East India. 












Haiti 




Jamaica and British W. Indies. 
Total 


13,008,000 


12,410,000 


15,574.000 


13,153,000 


10,634,000 




'Estimated. tK^lbs. 



76 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


MINERAL PRODUCTS OF THE UNITED STATES--1896-98. 


[United States Geological Survey.] 


PRODUCTS. 


1896. 


1897. 


1898. 


Quanftji 


Value. 


Quant'ty 


Value. 


QuanVty 


Value. 


METALLIC. 
Pig iron (spot value) long tons 
Silver, coining value troy ozs. 
Gold, coining value trov ozs. 
Copper, value at N.Y. city.... Ibs. 
Lead.vul. at N.Y. city, shorttons 
Zinc, val. at N. Y. city, shorttons 
Quicksilver, value at San Fran- 
cisco flasks 


8.623.127 
58,831,800 
2.5ti8.132 
460.0 il.430 
188.000 
81,499 

30.765 
1,300,000 

601 
17,170 
(none.) 

163 


J90.250.000 
76.0tS),23b 
63,088.000 
49.456.(Wi 
10.528,000 
6,519,920 

1,075.449 
620,000 

84,290 
4,464 

944 


9.652,fi80 

53.8tiO.OOU 
2,774,935 
4SU.078.274 
212,000 
99,980 

26,648 
4,000,000 

75f 
23,707 
(none.) 

150 


$95.122.299 
69,637.172 
57,363.000 
54.080.1SO 
11.885.728 
8,498,300 

993,445 

1,500,000 

109.655 
7,823 


11.773.934 
54,488,001 

3.118.398 
52(5875691 
231.26! 
115,399 

31.097 
5,200,000 

1,120 
13,411 


$llfi.557.0GO 
70.384.4so 
64.463,000 
61.849. i: 
17.345.175 
10,385,9 10 j 

1,188.627 
1,716,000, 

184.050 
4.694 


Aluminium, val. at Pittsburg.lbs. 
Antimony, value at San Fran- 
cisco short tons 


Nickel, val. at Philadelphia, Ibs. 
Tin Ibs. 
Platinum, value (crude) at San 
Francisco troy ounces 


900 


225 


1,913 


Total val.of metallic products 
NONMETALLIC (spot value). 




287,596,906 




302,198,502 




314,079,9811 


137.C40.276 
48,523,287 


114,891,515 
81,748,651 
30,142,661 


147.609.985 
46,974,714 


119,567,224 
79,301,954 
34.667,772 


166592.023 
47,663,075 


132,586.313 
75,414.537 
36.607,2(11 
44.1S3,:U 
14.750.1 X HI 
9,000.000 
1,000,000 
9,781.501 
8,051,833 
3.453,460 
6,212.554 
2,688.000 
2,310.000 
755.2HO 
1,120,01)0 
694,856 
489.7(19 
411.430 
675,649 
287,112 
160,920 
577,731 
275,064 ' 
180,738 ! 
86,850' 
103.534 
27,564 
108,339 
126,1114 
68,060 
32,395 
129,185 
42,670 
12,462 

| 75,200 
75.437 
32.960 
10i;,500 
30.000 
16,691 
13.2i.iO 
25,934 
(none.) 
11.772 
19,075 
10.300 
700 


Pen ua. anthracite long tons 
Stone 


Petroleum barrels 


00,960,361 


58,518.709 
13.002,512 
9,000.000 


60,568,081 


40,929,611 
13.826,422 
8.000,000 


55,354,233 


Natural gas 


Clay (other than brick), longtons 
Cement barrels 


360,000 
9.513.47S 
25,795.312 
930,779 
13,850.726 
4,120.10-2 
20,000 
224.139 
13,508.000 
48,032 


800,000 
6,473,213 
4,136,192 
2,803,372 
4,040,839 
2,0(10,000 
1,400.000 
673344 
675,400 
530,455 
326,8.i6 
399.443 
577,563 
354,065 
97,850 
320,163 
113,246 
127,098 




1,000,001 




10.989,463 
22.3tS.282 
1,039.845 
15.973.202 
4.247.6S8 
25,000 
288.982 
16,000,000 
60,913 


8,178.283 
4,505.620 
2,673.202 
4,920.020 
2,124.0110 
1,750.000 
755,864 
1.080,000 
795, 793 
368.058 
396,936 
664,632 
3t>"),6->9 
130.675 
391,541 
106,574 
149,970 
80.853 
80,774 
14.452 
58,296 
129,094 
37,159 
43.100 
95.505 
26,227 
1,980 

I 54,277 

57,652 
45,590 
112.272 
30,000 
22,835 


11. 968.708 
28,853,464 
1,308,885 
17,612.634 
5,275.819 
33,000 
291,638 
16,000,000 
58,850 


Mineral waters gallons sold 


Salt barrels 


Limestone for iron flux, long tons 
Zinc white shorttons 


Gypsum short tons 


Borax pounds 


Mineral paints shorttons 




Fibrous talc shorttons 


46,089 
80.503 
22.183 


67.009 
75,945 
21.923 


54.;iT6 
76,337 
22,231 




Soapstone short tons 




Pyrite longtons 


115.483 
2,120 


143.201 
2,165 

2,554 

82,676 
t740 
26,042 
487,149 
5.062 
11.175 
11,108 
11,952 
44.000 
U.254,402 
41,108 
20.590 
2.275 
17,113 
60,000 
3,833 
158 


190,150 
4,064 


Corundum and emery .. short tons 


Garnet for abrasive pur..sh't tons 
Mica ". pounds 


2,967 
*129,520 
t3,999 
31,306 
486,979 
7,675 
12,000 
15,957 
19,130 
230.776 
2,300,000 
5890 
25,149 
1,200 
14,860 
60,000 
2.733 
600 


| 


HS.441 
tl.750 
46.513 
144,501 
52,000 
35.200 
90,927 
24,226 
1,500 
I 48.460 

47,338 
87,200 
59,360 
30.000 
26.792 

'"22,567 
6,667 
15.301 
11.000 
6.100 
350 




17.068 
546,580 
6,500 
9.114 
10,088 
11,124 
30,000 
#35.858 
760 
18,364 
5,260 
9.872 
60,000 
3,846 


Bromine pounds 


Fluorspar short tons 


Feldspar longtons 




Flint longtons 


Monazite pounds 


Graphite pounds 


Bauxite long tons 


Sulphur shorttons 




Marls short tons 


Infusorialearth&tripoli.sh'ttons 
Pumice stone short tons 


25.932 
(none.) 
31.232 
13,671 
6,450 
350 


Chromic iron ore long tons 


78G 
10,700 
1,500 
504 
100 


(.none.) 
19,520 
1,143 
680 
100 


(none.) 
7,848 
1,263 
605 
140 


Cobalt oxide pounds 


Magnesite shorttons 


Asbestos short tons 


Ruti le pounds 


Total value of nonmetallic 
Kstimated value of mineral 
products unspecified 




333,93o,310 
1.000,000 




327,617,480 
1,000,000 




352,767,802 
1.000.000 




622,533,216 




630,815,982 




(197,847,788 






* Sheet, pounds, t Scrap, tons, t Crystalline, pounds. Amorphous, tons. 



GOLD AND SILVER. 


77 


GOLD AND SILVER. 


WORLD'S PRODUCTION OF GOLD AND SILVER. 


[From the Report of the Director of the Mint, 1898.] 


CALENDAR /-,_,., 
YEARS. ""* 


Silrer 
(coining 
value). 


It 


C -~ 
,g 

fel 


CALENDAR. 
YEARS. 


Gold. 


SUrer 
(cointna 
value). 


f 


lg 

Ii 






^ 


OH" 








l^ a 




1492-1520. $107,931,000 


$54.703.000 


66.4 


33.6 


18561860. . 


$670.415.000 


$188,092,000 


78.1 


21.9 


1521-1544. 114.205.000 


98.986.000 


55.9 


44.1 


18611865. 


614,5(44.000 


228.861.000 


72 9 


27.1 


i 1545-151*. 90.4SI2.000 


207.240.1KIO 


30.4 


69.6 


1866-1870. 


648,071.000 


278,313,000 


TO!O 


30.0 


1 1561-1580. 00.917.0(10 


248.9ilO.000 


26.7 


73.3 


1871-1875. 


577,883.000 


409,332.000 


58.5 


41 5 


1 1581-lliOO. 98.(C.i..,iHl 


348.254,0(10 


22.0 


78.0 


1876-1880. 


572.931,000 


509,256,000 


53.0 


47.0 


1601 -1620. 113.24H.OOO 


351,579,000 


24.4 


75.6 


1881-1885. 


4S15.582.000 


594,778,000 


45.5 


54.5 


16211640. 110,324.000 


327,221,000 


25.2 


74.8 


1886. . . . 


106,163,900 


120.li26.800 


46.8 


53 2 


1641-1(560. 116,571.000 


304,525,000 


27.7 


72.3 


1887 


105.774.900 


124,281,000 


45.9 


54.1 


16611680. 123.04S.000 


280.166.000 


30.5 


69.5 


1888 


110 196,900 


140 706 400 


43.9 


56.1 


lt',81 1700. l*iOS8,Oil() 


284,240.000 


33.5 


66.5 


1889 


123489200 


155 427 700 


44 g 


55.7 


170117^0. 170.403.1X10 


295,629,000 


36.6 


63.4 


1890 


118,848.700 


163 fti2 000 


42.1 




17211740. 253.611.000 


358,480,0011 


41.4 


58.6 


1891 


130.ft50.000 


177852300 


42 4 


57 - 6 


1741-1760. 827.1C,l.(ini 


443,232,000 


42.5 


57.5 


1892 


146.IS1.500 


198.014,400 


42.5 


57'.5 


17(11-1780. 275.21 1.OHl 


542.658,000 


33.7 


66.3 


1893 


157,494,800 


213.944,400 


42.4 


57.6 


1181-1800. 236.4C,i.lHKI 


730,810.000 


24.4 


75.6 


1894 


180.567,800 


212.829.fflO 


46.3 


53.7 


1801-1810. 118.15-MIW 


371,677,000 


24.1 


75.9 


1895 


200.406,000 


217.610,800 


47.7 


52.3 


18111820. 76.0a;in) 


224.786.000 


25.3 


74.7^ 


1896 


202956,000 


213,468 700 


48 7 


51 3 


18211830. 5M.4ln.Oi m 


191.444.00CJ 


33.0 


67.0 


1897 


237,504,800 


236.730,300 


58.6 


41.4 


1831-1840. 134,841 .000 


247,930.000 
324 4(10 000 


35.2 
52 9 


64.8 

A? 1 ' 












ij^ji 1855 662 566 000 


ISjUIRKUOO 


78.'3 


. 1 

21.7 


Total ... 


9.220,725.400 


10,793.437,100 


41 


59 


PRICE OF BAR SILVER. 


Highest, lowest and average price of bar silver in London, per ounce British standard 
(.925), since 1833. and the equivalent in United States gold coin of an ounce 1,000 fine, taken at 


; the average price. 


























rai 


ue of 














Value of 


CALEN- 


Lowest 


Hir, 


kest 


Avtrag 


t 


a 


nne 


CALEN- 





yicest 


Hig 


hest 


Average 


a 


fine 


DAR 
YEAR. 


quota- 
tion. 


quota- 
tion. 


quota- 
tion. 


ounce at 
average 


DAR 
YEAR. 


quota- 
tion. 


quota- 
tion. 


quota- 
tion. 


ounce at 
average 














quotat'n. 














quotatn. 


1833. 


d. 

58k 


d. 

59% 


d. 




$1.297 


186fi. 


d. 

60^ 


d, 
62 


d. 
OM 


$1.339 


,1834. 




m 


4 


59 1.V 


i'c, 




1.318 


1867. 





HM 


61 


i 


effS-w 




328 


'183.1. 


5SH 


60 




5911- 


ii; 




1.3U8 


1868. 


( 


SB 


61 


< 


60 


1 


326 


tan 


ffiQ 


60= 


% 


60 






1.315 


186S. 


. i 


i 


61 




(* 7-16 


1 


325 




69 


60- 


3 


599-1 


; 




1.305 


1870. 


1 


*M 


60 


K 


609-16 


1 


328 


1888! 


M 


60 


1 


59^ 






1.304 


1871. 


i 


503-16 


61 




60^ 


1 


326 


1839. 


60 


60 




0QN 






1.323 


1872. 


l 


>OJi 


61 





605-16 


1 


322 


1840. 






I 


SSS 






1.323 


1873. 


: 


7% 


59 


15-16 


59^ 


1 


298 


1841. 


59% 


60 


4 


601-1 


1 




1.316 


1874. 


j 




59 


- 


585-16 


1 


278 


11842. 


SQ 


60 




597-1 


; 




1.303 


1875. 


1 


ii 


67 


i 


56% 


1 


246 


1843. 


59 


591 


* 


593-1 


; 




1.297 


1876. 


, 


16% 


58 


* 






156 


1844. 


59!^ 


59- 


I 








1.304 


1877. 


i 




58 


4 


5413-16 


j 


201 


1845. 


B8H 


69- 


* 


59H 






1.298 


1878. 




Si 


55 


2 


529-16 


1 


152 


1846. 
1847. 

1848. 


59 

58% 
58^ 


60 
60 


i 


5911-16 
59^ 




1.300 
1.308 
1.304 


1879. 
1880. 
1881. 


48% 
50% 


53 
52 
52 




51 

HH 

51K-16 


1 
1 
1 


123 
145 
138 


1849. 




60 




GBR 






1.309 


1882. 




>0 


52 


. 


51 13-16 




136 


18TO. 


GBK 


61 


>4 


611-1 


; 




1.316 


1888. 


| 





51 


3-1G 




] 


110 


1851. 


60 


61' 


l 


61 






1.337 


1884. 


< 


9^ 


51 


H 


B^B 


1 


113 


11852. 


59% 


61' 


j 


60^ 






1.326 


1885. 


i 


6% 


50 




48SH6 


1 


0645 


1853. 




61' 


2 


ATI 






1.348 


188K. 




2 


47 




45% 




9946 


1854. 


SSil 


61 


2 


61W 






1.348 


1887. 




3J^ 


47 


^ 


44&Z 




97823 


1855. 


60 


61- 


I 


61 5-1 


\ 




1.344 


1888. 




|K 


44 


S?-16 


42% 




93897 


1856. 




a 


2 


615-1 


; 




1.344 


1889. 




12 


44 


M 


41 11-16 




98512 


1857. 

1858. 


61 


62 
61 


3 


61&-16 




1.353 
1.344 


1890. 
1891. 


4396 
43^ 


54 
48 


i 


8*16 


1 


04633 

98782 


1859. 


61% 


62- 


I 


IB 1-1 


1 




1.360 


1892. 


. 


^N 


43 


3 


;M 




87106 


1860. 


Ira 


a 


i 


6111- 


16 




1.352 


1893. 




W*6 


38 


9 


35S-16 




78031 


1861. 




61 


i 


6013- 


hi 




.333 


1894. 






31 


9 


287-16 




63479 


1862. 


61 


62 


1 


617-1 


t> 




.346 


1895. 




273-16 


31 


M 


297-8 




65406 


1863. 


61 


61 


I 


OM 






.845 


11896. 




293-4 


31 


15-16 


303-4 




61437 


HM. 




62 




61*1 






.345 


1897. 




24 13-16 


25 


Sf 


279-16 




60462 


1865. 


_Jj>M 133 LB6 J8_ 


1898. 25 


2S& 2615-16 .59010 



78 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



SILVER WITH GOLD. 

The following table exhibits the value of the pure silver in the silver dollar, reckoned at 
the commercial price of silver bullion, from 60 cents to $1.21)29 (parity of our coining rate) per 
fine ounce. [From report on precious metals in the United States, 1892, and subsequent ad- 
ditional reports by the director of the mint.J 



Price of 
silver per 
fine ounce. 



Value of the 

pure silver 

in a silver 

dollar. 



Price of 
silver per 
fine ounce. 



Value of the 

pure silver 

in a silver 

dollar. 



Price of 
silver per 
fine ounce. 



Value of the 

pure silver 

in a silver 

dollar. 



Price of 
silver per 
fine ounce. 



Value of the 

pure silver 

in a silver 

dollar. 



$0.00 
.61. 
.62 
.3 
.64 
.65 
.06 
.67 
.68 
.69 
.70. 
.71 
.72 
.73 
.74 
.75 
.76 
.77. 



SO. 464 
.471 
.480 
.487 
.495 



$0.78. 
.TO. 
.80. 

.a. 



.503. 
.510 
.518 
.520 
.534 
.541 
.549 
.557 
.565 
.572 



.595 



.83. 
.84. 
.85. 



$0.003 
.611 
.619 
.626 
.634 
.642 
.649 
.657 
.665 
.673 



.90. 
.91. 
.92. 
.93. 
.94. 
.95. 



.681 
.688 
.696 
.704 
.712 
.719 
.727 
.735 



$0.1)6. 
.1)7. 

.'.w. 

.99. 

.00. 

.01. 

.02. 

.in. 

.((4. 

05. 



.06. 
1.07. 
1.08. 
1.09. 
1.10. 
1.11. 
1.12. 
1.13. 



.742 
.750 
.758 
.766 
.773 
.781 
.789 
.797 
.804 
.812 
.820 
.828 
.835 
.843 
.851 
.859 
.866 
.874 



$1.14... 
1.15... 
1.10... 
1.17... 
1.18... 
1.19... 
1.20... 
1.21... 
1.22... 

.23... 

.24... 

.25... 

.26... 

.27... 

.28... 

.29... 
1.2929. 



JO. 882 



.905 
.913 
.920 
.928 
.936 
.944 
.951 
.959 
.967 
.975 
.982 
.990 
.998 
1.000 



COMMERCIAL RATIO OF SILVER TO GOLD EACH YEAR SINCE 1688. 

From 1688 to 1832 the ratios are taken from Dr. A. Soetbeer; from 1833 to 1878 from Pixley and 
Abell's tables; and from 1879 to 1898 from daily cablegrams from London to the bureau of the 
mint: 



YEAH. 



Ratio. 



Ratio. 



YEAR. 



Ratio. 



YEAR. 



Ratio. 



1688. 
1689. 
1690. 
1691. 

KM. 



. 

1698. 
K/.r.t. 
1700. 
1701. 
1702. 
1703. 
1704. 
1705. 
1706. 
1707. 
1708. 
1709. 
1710. 
1711. 
1712. 
1713. 
1714. 
1715. 
1716. 
1717. 
1718. 
1719. 
1720. 
1721. 
1722. 
1723. 



14.94 
15.02 
15.02 
14.98 
14.92 
14.83 
14.87 
15.02 
15.00 
15.20 
15.07 
14.94 
14.81 
15.07 
15.52 
15.17 
15.22 
15.11 
15.27 
15.44 
15.41 
15.31 
15.22 
15.29 
15.31 
15.24 
15.13 
15.11 
15.09 
15.13 
15.11 
15.09 
15.04 
15.05 
15.17 
15.20 



1726. 
1727. 
1728. 
1T29. 
1730. 
1731. 
1732. 



1735. 
1736. 
1737. 
1738. 
1739. 
1740. 
1741. 
1742. 
1743. 
1744. 
1745. 
1740. 
1747. 
1748. 
174'J. 
1750. 
1751. 
1752. 
1753. 
1754. 
1755. 
1756. 
1757. 
1758. 



15.11 
15.11 
15.15 
15.24 
15.11 
14.92 
14.81 
14.94 
15.09 
15.18 
15.39 
15.41 
15.18 
15.02 
14.91 
14.91 
14.94 
14.92 
14.85 
14.85 
14.87 
14.98 
15.13 
15.26 
15.11 
14.80 
14.55 
14.39 
14.54 
14.54 
14.48 
14.68 



1759. 
1760. 
1761. 
1762. 

ITlM. 

1764. 
1765. 
1766. 



1770. 



1773. 
1774. 
1775. 
1776. 



1779. 
1780. 
1781. 

1782. 
1783. 
1784. 

i;xv 

1786. 



17.W. 
1791. 
1792. 
1793. 



15.27 
14.99 
14.70 
14.83 
14.80 
14.85 
14.80 
14.72 
14.62 
14. 66 
14.52 



14.72 
14.55 
14.54 
14.68 
14.80 
14.72 
14.78 
14.42 
14.48 
14.70 
14.92 
14.96 
14.92 
14. 65 
14.75 
15.04 
15.05 
15.17 
15.00 



1794. 



1798. 
I ',99. 
1800. 
1801. 
1802. 
1803. 

i sot: 

1SII.-I. 



1810. 
1811. 
1812. 
1813. 



1816. 
1817 
1818. 

ISI'.l. 
K:0. 
1821. 



. 

K.'i. 
K.'5. 
1S26. 
IS::?! 
1828. 



15.37 
15.55 



15.41 
15.59 



15.26 
15.41 
15.41 



16.08 
15.96 
15.77 
15.53 
16.11 
16.25 
15.04 
15.26 
15.28 
15.11 
15.35 



. 

15.95 
15.80 



. 
15.70 



1829.. 
1830. . 
1831.. 

1S32.. 



1836.. 
1837.. 



1841.. 
1842.. 
1843.. 
1844.. 
1845.. 
1816. . 
1847.. 
1848.. 
1849.. 
1850.. 



. . 
1854.. 

1855.. 



. . 

1858.. 
1S59.. 
I860.. 



18o3. 



15.78 
15.82 
15.72 



15.73 
15.80 



15.62 
15.62 
15.70 
15.87 
15.93 
15.85 
15.92 
15. IK) 
15.80 
15.85 
15.78 
15.70 
15.46 
15.59 
15.33 
15.33 
15.38 
15.38 
15.27 
15.38 



15.87 



1868. . . 
1869. . . 
1870... 
1871... 
1872... 
1S73. . . 
1874... 
1875... 
1876... 
1877... 
1878... 
1879... 
1880... 
1881... 
1882... 
1883... 



1887... 



1890... 



15.37 
15.44 
15.43 
15.57 
15.59 
15.60 
15.57 
15.57 
15. 03 
15.92 
16.17 
16.59 
17.88 
17.22 
17.94 
18.40 
18.05 
18.16 
18.19 
18.04 
18.57 
19.41 
20.78 
21.13 
21.99 
22.10 
19.76 

L'll.'.V' 

23.72 
26.49 
32.56 
31.00 
30.66 
34.28 



GOLD AND SILVER. 



PRODUCT OF GOLD AND SILVER IN THE UNITED STATES. 

Approximate distribution, by producing states and territories, of the product of gold and 
silver in the United States for the calendar year 1897, as estimated by the director of the mint. 



STATES AND TERRITORIES. 



GOLD. 



Fine 

ounces. 



SILVER. 



Fine 
ounces. 



Coining 
value. 



Total 

value. 



Alabama 

Alaska 

A rizona 

California 

Colorado 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Iowa 

Maryland 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Montana 

Nevada 

New Mexico 

North Carolina 

Oregon 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

Wyoming 

Total 



86.011 

140.08'.) 

707.it;o 

924.1CO 

7,222 

82,820 

5 

5 

3,033 
145 

211,5(13 

143.983 

17,241! 

1,074 

05,45(i 

4,097 

275,491 

358 

83,500 

5 

189 
20.312 

542 



$7.400 

1,778.000 

2.895.9CO 

14,018.3IX) 

111, 104 .2(10 

149.300 

1,701,700 

100 

100 

62,700 

3,000 

4.373,400 

2,97(5,400 

356,500 

34,600 

1,353.100 

84,700 

5,694,900 

100 

7.400 

1.785.100 

100 

3,900 

419,9(10 

11.200 



100 
116.400 

2,239,900 

474,400 

21,036,400 

(500 

4,901,200 



$129 

150,4'J7 

2,890,032 

613,366 

27.974,335 

776 

0,330,905 



00,300 

'i5.667.9o6' 

1,228,900 

539,500 

300 

69,000 

200 

147,000 



77,964 

20.257,487' 

1.5S8.8S1 

697,535 

388 

89.212 

259 

190,830 



404,700 
6,205,600 



523.249 
8,100,978 



10(5.900 
100 



138,214 
129 



2,774,935 



68,860,000 



60,637,172 



$7.529 

1928.497 

5,791.982 

15.231.6H6 

47,078.535 

150,070 

8,038.005 

100 

100 

140.664 

3.000 

24.630.887 

4.565.281 

1,051035 

34.988 

1,442312 

84.169 

5.885,73(5 

100 

530,649 

9,827,0(8 

100 

MOO 

558,114 

11329 

12 



PRODUCT OF GOLD AND SILVER IN THE UNITED STATES FROM 1793 TO 1897. 

The estimate for 1792-1873 is byK. W. Raymond, commissioner, and since by the director of 

the mint. 



Gold. 



Silver. 



Gold. 



April 2, 1792- 
July 31. 1834 

July 31. 1834- 
Dec. 31, 1844 

1845 

1846 

1847 

1848 

1849 

1*50 

1851 

1852 

1853 

1854 

1855 

1856 

1857.... 



1S59 

I860 

1861 

1862 

1863 

1864 

1865 

1860 

1807 

1808 

1809 

1870 



$14,000,000 

7,500.000 
1,008,327 
1,139,357 

889,085 
10,000,000 
40,000.000 
50.000,IXK) 
55,000.000 
60,000,000 
(55.000,000 
60.000,000 
55.000,000 
55,000,000 
5T..OOO.IIOO 
50,000,000 
50.000,1X10 
40,00(1,000 
43.000,000 
39,200,000 
40.000.1X10 
40,100,000 
53,225.000 
53,50! 1,000 
51,725,000 
48.000.OlW 
49.500.000 
50,000,000 



InsigniU- 
cant. 

250,000 

50.000 

50,000 

50,000 

50,000 

50,000 

50.000 

50,000 

50,000 

50.000 

50,000 

50,000 

50,000 

50.000 

500,000 

100,000 

150.000 

2,000.000 

4,500,000 

8,500,000 

11,000,000 

ll,2iV),000 

10,000.000 

13,500.000 

12.000.000 

12,000.000 

16,000,000 



$14,000,000 

7,750,000 
1,058.327 
1,189,357 
939,085 
10,050,000 
40,050.000 
50.050,000 



.. 

!S74.. 
1875.. 



.. 

is ;. 

1-vSO. 



66.050,000 ,1881 



60,050.1 XX! 
(55.050.000 
00,050.(KX) 
55,050.000 
55,050,000 
55,060,000 
i50.5lW.000 
50.100,000 
46,150,000 
45,000,000 
43.700,000 
48,f)00,000 
57,100,000 
64.475,0.10 
,500.000 
(55.225.01 W 
60.000.tWO 
01.500,000 
06,000,000 



1882.. 

188,'?.. 
INS,}.! 
1SS-).. 
1880.. 
1887.. 
18S.S.. 
l;-9.. 
1890.. 
1891.. 



. 

1894.. 

iSMf,.. 



. 
1897.. 



$43,500,000 
36,000,000 

:56.(X)0.000 
38,500.000 

33,400.000 

39,'.WO.OOO 
4ti.lKIO.000 
51,200.000 

38,9(w.ooo 

36,000,01 W 
34,700,(XW 
32.5IW.UW 
30,(WO.O(X) 
S0.8UUWO 
31. H(X 1,000 
85,000,000 
33,(WO,000 
33,175.000 
32,800,000 
32,845,000 
33,175,000 
33,UX),U)0 
35,955,000 
39.500,000 
40,610,0<X) 
53,088.000 
67.3t>3,000 



$23,UM.IO 
28.750.1WO 
35,750,UW 
37,300,000 
31.700.IWO 
38,800,000 
39,800,(XW 
45,200,0(W 
40,8(W,000 

39,200,000 

43,OIW.(XW 
4(>,SOO.(WO 
4(>.200.0(W 
48,S(X),IXW 
51,600.(WO 
51,000,000 
53,350.000 
59,195,000 
(54.I540.UW 
70,465.000 
75.417,WX) 
82.101.IXW 
77.576,000 
154.000,000 
72.051, (XX) 
76,069,000 
69,037.172 



$66,500.000 
04,7f>0,0(X) 
71.750,000 
70,800.000 
li5.HM,(XW 
78,700,000 
86,700.000 
96,400,0110 
79,700,(XW 
75.2CW.OlX) 
77.7(W,000 
79,800.100 
76.2U),(WO 
79,6<W,IXW 
83.400,000 
8)5.000.000 
80.350 000 
92.370.000 
97.440,000 
103.310.000 
108,592.01 W 
115,101.000 
113.M1.01W 
lU3,5tW,OlW 
118.Oin.UX) 
129.157.UW 
127.WW.172 



Total 



2,170,31)7,709 1,5]4,(507,172 3,085,004,881 



80 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOE 1000. 



STOCK OF GOLD AND SILVER IN THE UNITED STATES FROM 1873 TO 1898. 

The stock of gold and silver and the amount per capita at the close of each fiscal year, from 
1873 to 1898, In the United States, is exhibited in the following table, compiled from the reports 
of the director of the mint: 



FISCAL YEAB ENDED 
JUNE 30. 


POPULA- 
TION. 


TOTAL COIN A> - D BULLION. 


PEK CAPITA. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Gold. 


Stiver. 


Total 
metaVc 


873.... 


41.677,000 
42,196,000 
48.951,000 
45,137,000 
46.35S.OU) 
47,598,(K)0 
48,866,000 
50.155,783 
51.316,000 
52,495,000 
53,693,000 
54.911,000 
56,148,000 
57,404,000 
58,680,000 
59,974,000 
61.289,000 
62,622,250 
63,975,000 
65.520.000 
66,94ti.OOO 
68,397,000 
69,878.000 
71,390,000 
72,937,000 
74,522,000 


$135.000,000 
147,379.493 
121,134.906 
180,056.907 
167.501.472 
213,199.977 
245,741,837 
351,841,206 
478,484,538 
506,757,715 
542,732.063 
545,500,797 
588,607,036 
590.774,461 
654,520.335 
705,818.855 
680.063,505 
695,563.029 
646.582.852 
664.275.335 
597.697.685 
627.293.201 
636,229.825 
599,597.964 
696,270.542 
861,514,780 


$6,149,305 
10,355,478 
19,367.995 
36.415.992 
56,464,427 
88,047,907 
117,526,341 
148.522,678 
175,384.144 
203,217,124 
2*5,007.985 
255,568,142 
283,478,788 
312,252,844 
352.993.5(16 
386.611,108 
420,548,929 
463,211.919 
522.277,740 
570,313.544 
615.861.484 
624,347,757 
625,854,949 
628,728,071 
634,509.781 
637,672,743 


$3.23 
3.44 
2.75 
2.88 
3.61 
4.47 
5.02 
7.01 
9.32 
9.65 
10.10 
9.93 
10.48 
10.29 
11.15 
11.76 
11.09 
11.10 
10.10 
10.15 
8.93 
9.18 
9.10 
8.40 
9.55 
11.56 


$0.15 
.24 
.44 
.81 
1.21 
1.85 
2.40 
2.96 
3.41 
3.87 
4.34 
4.65 
5.05 
5.44 
6.00 
6.44 
6.86 
7.39 
8.16 
8.70 
9.20 
9.13 
8.97 
8.81 
8.70 
8.56 


$3.38 
3.68 
3.19 
3.69 
4.82 
6.32 
7.42 
9.97 
12.73 
13.62 
14.44 
14.58 
15.53 
15.73 
17.15 
18.20 
17.95 
18.49 
18.26 
18.85 
18.13 
18.31 
18.07 
17.21 
18.25 
20.12 


874 


875... 


876.... 


877.... 


878 


879 


880.... 


881.... 


882 


883 


884 


885 


886 


887 


888.... 


889 


890 


891 


892 


893 


894 


895 


896 


897.. . 


898 





CIRCULATION OF MONEY IN THE UNITED STATES. 



JULY 1. 


Amount of 
money in 
United States. 


Amount in 
circulation. 


Population 
June 1. 


Money per 
capita. 


Circula- 
tion per 
capita. 


1872 


$762,721,565 


$738,309,549 


40,596,000 


$18.79 


$18 19 


1873 


774,445,610 


751,881,809 


41,677,000 


18.58 


18 04 


1874 


806,024,781 


776,083,031 


42,796,000 


18.83 


18 13 


1875 
1876 


798,273,509 
790,683,284 


754,101,947 
727,609,388 


43,951,000 
45,137,000 


18.16 
17.52 


17.16 
16 12 


1877 


763,053,847 


722,314,883 


46,353,000 


16.46 


15 58 


1878 . 


791,253,576 


729, 132, 634 


47,598,000 


16.62 


15 33 


1879 


1,051,521,541 


818,631,793 


48,866,000 


21.52 


16.75 


1880 


1,205,929,197 


973,382,228 


50,155,783 


24.04 


19 41 


1881 


1,406,541,823 


1,114,238.119 


51,316,000 


27.41 


21 71 


1882 


1,480,531.719 


1,174,290.419 


52,495,000 


28.20 


22 37 


1883 


1,643,489,816 


1,230, 305. H9H 


53,693,000 


30.61 


22 91 


]S84 


1,705,454,189 


1,243,925,969 


54,911,000 


31.06 


22. <>5 


1885 


1,817,658,336 


1,292,568,615 


56,148,000 


32.37 


23 02 


1886 


1,808, 559,694 


1,252,700.525 


57,404,000 


31.51 


21.82 


1887 


1,900, 442, 672 


1,317,539,143 


58,680,000 


32.39 


23.45 


1888 


2,062,955,949 


1,372,170,870 


59,974,000 


34.40 


22.88 


1889... 


2,075,350,711 


1,380,361,649 


61,289,000 


33.86 


22.52 


1890 


2,144,226,159 


1,429,251,270 


62,622,250 


34.24 


22 82 


1891 


2,195,224,075 


1,497,440,707 


63,975,000 


34.31 


23.41 


1892 
1893 


2,323,402,392 


1,596,701,245 


66,826,000 


34.75 


23.87 


1894 


2,249,325,276 


1,664.081,232 


68,397,000 


32.88 


24.33 


1895 


2,209,215, 665 


1,606,179,556 


69,753,000 


31.68 


23.02 


1896 . .... 


2,345,631,328 


1.5u6.631,026 


71,390,000 


32.86 


21.10 


1897 


2,368,110,531 


1,646,028,246 


72,937,000 


32.46 


22.57 


1398 


2,442,523,241 


1,843.435,749 


74,522,000 


32.77 


24.74 


1899 


2,555,838,955 


1,932,484,239 


76,148,000 


33.54 


25.38 















The difference between the amount of money in the country and the amount in circula- 
tion represents the money in the treasury. Currency certificates, act of June 8. 1872, are in- 
cluded in the amount of United States notes in circulation in tables for years 1873 to 1891, in- 
clusive; since 1891 they are reported separately. 



GOLD AND SILVER. 



81 



GOVERNMENT PAPER CURRENCY IN CIRCULATION. 



JUNE 30. 



Legal- 
tendfr 
notes. 



Treasury 
notes 
1890. 



Currency 
certifi- 
cates. 



Gold 
certifi- 
cates. 



Silver 
certifi- 
cates. 



Total 

governm't 

paper. 



1881 

1882 

1883. . . . 

1884 

1885 

1886.... 



J316.476.924 
812,010.427 



1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 



310.182.177 
306,497,214 
301.633,637 
30tV.fW.fWl 
317.897,219 
294.282.812 
300.344.931 
323.046.X26 



828,714372 

311,814.840 
320.875.ti83 
2tiS,772,371 
2tS, 109.456 
225,562,755 
248.583,578 
286.572,329 
310.547,349 



WO.4tS.lft 1 ) 
98.051,657 
140,861,W 

134.862,009 
ll.S.978.708 

98.080.. r i()t; 
83.905.197 
98.6tS.5riO 
92,605,792 



m.fiso.ooo 

13.245.000 
13.0tiO.OlO 
12.190,000 
2SI.585.000 
18.250,000 
8.770.000 
14.415.000 
16.735.000 
11.830.000 
21.365.000 
29.830.000 
11.935.000 
58,935,000 
55,405.000 
33.430.000 
61.130.000 
26.045.000 
20.855.000 



5,759.520 
5.02SUI20 
59.807.370 
71.146.640 
126,729,730 
76,044.375 
91,225.437 
119.887.370 
116.792.759 
131.380.019 
120.a r )0.3S19 
141.235.Sf9 
92,970.019 
66,344,409 
48.381.569 
42.961.909 
37,285,919 
32.ti56.29ti 



$89,110.720 

54,506,090 
72.B20.(Wi 
96,427.011 
101,530,946 
88.116.225 
142.118.017 
200.387,376 
257,102,445 
297.210,043 
307.364.148 
326,880.803 
326.489.lti5 
327.094.381 
319,731,752 
336,313.080 
358.336.368 
390.659.080 
401,869,343 



f372.997.173 
384.790.537 
455.670.283 
48ti.260.8ti5 
559.479.313 
487,973.299 
560,010.673 



690.975.135 
763.46t>,888 
813,756,984 
907.812,(i39 
8St2.931.561 
85ti.008.170 
804.606,485 
736.348.250 
789.241.062 
928,162,628 
858.433.780 



GOLD AND SILVER IN CIRCULATION IN THE UNITED STATES. 
The treasury notes of 1890 are not Included in the total for silver, although presented in 
the table, as they are based upon silver: 



JUNK 30. 


Gold 
coin. 


Gold 
certifi- 
cates. 


Total 
gold. 


Silver 
dollars. 


Silver 
certifi- 
cates. 


Treasu'y 
notes of 
1*90. 


Subsid- 
iary 
silver. 


Total 
silver. 


Rat to sil- 
ver to gold 
Per cent. 


1881. 
1882. 
1883. 
1884. 
1885. 
1886. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1893. 
1894. 
1895. 
1896. 
1897. 
1898. 
1899. 


*3ia312,877 
358.251.325 
S44.653.495 
340,624.203 
341,668,411 
357,936.337 
37li.419.22H 
392.0ti6.854 
376,055.482 
374.396.381 
-IOS.07:;.80i 
408.767.740 
403.633.700 
497.87a990 
480.275.057 
45ti.128.483 
519.146.675 
660.959.880 
702,060.459 


J5.759.520 
5,029,020 
5il.807.370 
71,146,040 
126,729.730 
7ti,044,375 
91,235,437 
119.887,370 
1lt>.79->.759 
131.aso.019 
120350.899 
141.235.339 
92,97a019 
66,344,409 
48,381,569 
12.320.759 
37,285,919 
35.820.639 
32,656269 


321.072,397 

363,280.345 
404,460,8H5 
411.770.843 
46S,3S8.U1 
4ai.980.712 
467.644,6ti6 
511.954,224 
492,848.241 
505.770.400 
528.924.205 
550.003,079 
496,603,719 
564.218.399 
528.656.62fi 
498.449,242 
556.432.594 
ti96.780.519 

7:u.7it;.;:>- 


$28327.983 
31.990.964 
35.341.880 
39.71(4.913 
38.471.2fi9 
52,469,720 
55,506,147 
55,545,303 
54,417,967 
66,166.356 
57.683.041 
56.79Sl.481 
57,029.743 
51.191.377 
51,983.162 
52.175,998 
52.001.202 
57,259.791 
63.381.751 


$39.110.729 
54.506.090 

;-'.t;2i M H; 

96.427.011 
101.530.!46 
SS.116.22r> 
14-.MKOK 
.JIO.8S7.87t; 
257.102.445 
.W.210.043 
f07.364.14S 
^26,880,803 

t26.4s9.i6.-> 

C7.tOt.3Sl 
319.731.752 
1.259.509 
358.386.368 
-590.659.080 
401.8ti9.343 




$62.839364 
52,379,S*49 
52,474.299 
45.titiO.808 
43.702.SC1 
46.156.255 
48.570,305 
50.354,635 
51.476.834 
54.069.743 
58.290,924 
62.386.618 
65.400.268 
58.233.344 
60.219.718 
51l.SW.805 
59.228,540 
64,323,747 
70.67o.682 


$120,77a076 

138,877,003 
Iti0.436.8fi5 
181.SS2.782 
183.705,136 
186.742,200 
24ti,194,469 
306.087.314 
:i6V.!l! 17.246 
407,446,142 
423538,113 
446.066305 
448,919,176 
436.519,102 
431,934,632 
443.435,312 
553,471.307 
512.242.618 
535.SI26.776 


37.6 
38.2 
39.7 
44.2 
39.2 
43.0 
52.6 
69.8 
73.6 
80.6 
80.0 
81.1 
90.4 
77.4 
81.7 
89.0 
65.0 
73.5 


















$40.463,165 

sis.o.->i,65; 

140,661.694 
I84.sr,2.00!t 
11;V.7S.TOS 
95,217.361 
83.905.197 
98.ti65.580 
ili.605,795 



COINAGE OF GOLD AND SILVER OF THE WORLD FOR THE YEARS 1874-97. 



CALENDAR YEARS. 


GOLD. 


SILVER. 


Fine 
ounces. 


Value. 


Fine 
ounces. 


Coining 
value. 


1874 


6,568.279 
SI.480.S92 
10,309,645 
9.753.196 
9,113,202 
4.390.167 
7,242.951 
7,111304 
4,822.851 
5.071.SS-.' 
4,810,061 
4,632,273 
4.578.310 
6.046.510 
6.522.346 
8.170,611 
7.219.725 
5.782,463 
8,8*8,837 


$135.778,387 
195.987.428 
213.119,278 
201,616,466 
188,386,611 
90,752,811 
149.725,081 
147,015,275 
99.697.170 
104,845,114 
99,432,795 
95,757,582 
94,642.070 
124,992,465 
134,828,& 
168,901,519 
149.244,965 
119,534.122 
172,473,124 
232,420,517 
237,921,032 
231,087,438 
195,899,517 
437,719.345 


79,610,875 
92,747,118 
97,85)9.525 
88.449.796 
124,671,870 
81,124,555 
65,442.074 
83.539.051 
85,685,996 
84,541,904 
74.120,127 
98,044.475 
. 96.566,844 
126.388,502 
104.354.000 
107,788.256 
117,789.228 
106.962,049 
120,282,947 
106.697,783 
87,472,523 
94,057,903 
118,612,018 


$102,931,232 
119,915.467 
126,577.164 
114.359,332 
161,191,913 
104,888,313 
84,611.974 
1H8.010.086 
no.785.tt-M 
109.306, 105 
95,S3-.',084 
126,764,574 
124,854,101 
163.411,397 
134.922.344 
139.362.595 
152.293,144 
138,294,367 
155,517,347 
137,952,690 
113,095,788 
121,610.219 
153,395,740 
167.760,297 


1875 


1876 


1877 


1878 


1879 


1880 


1881 


1882 


1883 


1884 


1885 


1886 ... 


1887 


1888 . 


1889 


1890 


1891 


1892 


1893 


11,243,342 
11,025,680 
11,178,855 
9,476,620 


1895 '.'.'. 


1896 


1897 


Total 




4.269,409,769 




3,199,898,271] 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



TREASURY HOLDINGS OF GOLD AXD SILVER. 



JUNE 30. 



Total gold 
coin and 
bullion. 



Gold less 
certificates 
outstand- 
ing. 



Total . 
silver dol- 
lars and 
bullion. 



Silver dol- 
lars and 
bullion 
less certifl- 
cates out- 
standing. 



Subsid- 
iary 
silver. 



Total net 

silver. 



1878. 

IK'. II. 



. 

1884. 
1SS5. 
1SS6 . 

1SS7. 
1888. 
iSS'.l. 
18-JO. 
1891 . 
1S-.I2 . 

1H93 . 

IS'.'t. 
IS!'.') . 
1896. 

1897. 

1MN . 

1899. 



H2&MQ.90B 

135,236,475 
126,145,42, 
163,171,661 
148,506.390 
198,078,568 
204,876.594 
247,028,625 
232,83s, 124 
278.101.10fi 
31S.753.fil7 
H03.504.320 



321.612,423 
238.518,122 
255.577,706 
188,455.433 
131,217.434 
155.893.932 
151,307.143 
178.076.654 
202.825.047 
261,201.428 



$103,562.523 
119,956.655 
118,181.527 
157,412.141 
143,477.370 
138,271.198 
133,729,954 
120.29H.895 
156.793,749 
186.875,669 
193,866,247 
186,7)1,561 



190,232.404 
117.667,723 
114.342.367 
95.485.414 
64,873,025 
107,512,363 
108.34.").234 
140.790,735 
167,004,419 
228.545.159 



$15,059,828 
33,239.917 
49.549,851 
65,854,671 
90.384,724 
116,396535 
139,616,414 
169,451,998 
184,345.764 
222,401,405 
254.499,241 
289,688,374 



323,909,360 
379.705.279 
433,858.402 
480,476,527 
495.409.17S 
495.785.908 
496.562,413 
504.583.579 
504.932.225 
501.516,817 



$15,052,748 
32,825,437 
48,760,282 
26.743.U42 
35.878,634 
43,775,549 
43,189,403 
(17,921,052 
96,229,539 
80.283,388 
54,111,865 
32.585,929 



26,699,31 
72.341,131 
106.977,599 
153,987,362 
168,314,797 
176.054.154 
160.249.333 
146.247,211 
141,273,145 
99,647,474 



$6,860.506 
8,903,401 
24,350,482 
27,247,697 
28.048.631 
28,486.001 
29,600.720 
31,236.89!) 
28.904.682 
26,977,494 
26,051.741 
25.129,733 
22.805,226 
19,656.695 
14.224.714 
11.855.944 
17,889,531 
16.552.845 
15.637,424 
16.210.344 
12,097,682 
6,070,497 



$21.913,254 
41,728,838 
68,110,764 
53,991,639 
63,927,265 
72,261,550 
72,790,123 
99,157,951 
125,134,221 
107.260.882 
80,1*3,606 
57,715.662 
49.504,543 
91 : 9117.826 
121,202,313 
165.843.306 
186,204,328 
192,606,999 
175,886,757 
162.457.555 
153.370.827 
105,717,971 



MONEY OF THE WORLD. 

Monetary systems and approximate stocks of money in the principal countries of the world 
as reported by the treasury department's bureau of mint. 



COUNTRIES. 




PER CAPITA. 



United States*... 
United Kingdom 

France 

Germany 

Belgium 

Italy 

Switzerland 

Greece 

Spain 

PortugaL 

Rouniania 

Servia 

Austria-Hung'y . 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Sweden 

Denmark 

Russia 

Turkey 

Australia 

Mexico 

Cent. Am. st'tes. 
So. Am. states. . . 

Japan 

India 

China 

Straits Settl'm'ts 

Canada 

Cuba 

Haiti 

Bulgaria 

Siam 

Hawaii 

Cape Colony 

S.A.Rep 

Finland 

Total ... 



J.&S. 
iold . . 
G.&S. 
Jold . . 
J.&S. 
G.&S. 
G.&S. 
G.&S. 
G.&S. 
Gold . . 
G.&S. 
G.&S. 
Gold . . 
G.&S. 
Gold.. 
Gold.. 
Gold . . 
Silver, 
G.&S. 
Gold . . 
Gold . . 
Silver. 
Silver. 
Silver. 
G.&S. 
G.&S. 
Silver. 
G.&S. 
Gold . 
G.&S. 
G.&S. 
G.&S. 
Silver. 
G.&S. 
Gold . 
Gold . 
Silver 



1 to 15.98 1 to 11.95 
1 to 14.28 
1 to 15.50 1 to 14.38 

toia9 
1 to 15.501 to 14. 
1 to 15.501 to 14 



1 to 15.i 
1 to 15.50 1 



to 14. 38 
to 14. 38 



1 to 15.501 to 14.38 
1 to 14.08 



1 to 15% 



1 to 13.69 
1 to 15 
1 to 14. 
1 to 14.88 
1 to 14.88 

1 to 15.50 1 to 12.90 

1 to 15% 1 to 

1 to 14.28 

.... 1 to 15.68 

1 to 16.50 

1 to 15.50 

1 to 15. 50 

1 to 16. 18 

1 to 15 



1 to 15.50 
1 to 15.50 



1 to 14.95 
1 to 15.98 



1 to 14.38 



1 to 15.50 1 to 12.90 



72.9 

39.6 

38.5 

52.3 

6.4 

31.3 

3.0 

2.2 

18.0 

5.1 

5.4 

2.3 

45.0 

4.9 

2.0 

5.0 

2.3 

126.0 

22.0 

5.0 

7.8 

13.0 

3.? 

37.5 

45.0 

296.0 

360.0 

3.S 

5.3 

1.8 

1.0 

3 

5.0 

.1 

1.7 

.8 

126.0 



$925.1 
438.0 
810.6 
668.5 
30.0 
96.5 
24.0 
.5 

45.5 

5.2 

14.5 

1.2 

227.7 

21.9 

7.8 

8.6 

15.3 

756.6 

60.0 

132.1 

30.0 

8.6 

1.3 

77.5 

79.9 



$038.2 

121.7 

419.8 

212.8 

45.0 

42.5 

10.7 

1.5 

49.8 

6.1 

10.6 

2.7 

145.5 

56.1 

2.3 

6.7 

5.4 

128.4 

40.0 

7.0 

6.4 

106.0 

19.0 

35.0 

60.4 

592.0 



$326.1 
112.0 
124.6 
132.2 
79.1 
69.5 
14.3 
30.6 
137.5 
39.0 
83.7 
2.7 
86.2 
45.5 
3.8 
27.7 
7.0 



22.5 

'"i.'o 

8.4 
750.6 



$12.42 
11.01 



3.08 
8.00 

.21 
2.53 
1.02 
2.69 

.52 
5.02 
4.47 
3.90 
1.75 
6.65 
5.86 
2.07 



2.07 



16.0 
2.0 
4.0 
1.0 

20.0 
4.0 

37.5 

251.2 
4.8 



750.0 

242.0 

6.0 

1.5 

4.5 

6.8 

193.4 

1.0 

1.0 

1.2 

.4 



35.0 

"iii 



9.4 



3.01 
1.11 

4.00 
.30 

4.00 
40.00 
20.83 
32.44 



$8.56 
3.06 
10.90 



3.56 



1.20 
1.96 

.17 
3.20 
11.45 
1.15 
1.14 
2.35 

.99 
1.66 
1.40 



5.76 

.93 

1.34 

1.99 

1.96 

62.05 

.95 

.83 

4.50 

2.06 

38.68 



$4. 38 $25.31) 



2.81 
3.23 



12.17 



12.75 



1.90 
5.44 



4.50 



20.01 



16.88 
85. 1<) 
19.3s 
23.71 
9.85 
16.33 



10.811 
2.N' 

10.12 

25.20 
6.95 
8.40 

12.04 



32.32 
3. 

11.89 
8.6S 

23.01 
3.11 
2.39 
1.9T 

62.05 

10. 5t 



2.1-1 
42. (8 
50. U 
21.38 
33. 

5.42 



4,594.9 13,977.5 



2.322.8 



'Nov. 1, 1898; all other countries Jan. 1, : 



GOLD AND SILVER. 83 


MONETARY SYSTEM OF THE UNITED STATES. 
[From Muhleman's Monetary Systems of the World.] 




Wgt. 


Fine- 
ness. 


Ha- 

tio to 
gold. 


Limit of 
issue. 


Denomi- 
nations. 


Legal-ten- 
der qual- 
ity. 


Receiv- 
able. 


Exchange- 
able. 


Redeem- 
able. 


Gold coin.. 


25.8 
r. to 
dol- 
lar. 


'JOO-1000 




None. 


$20 
10 
5 
2^ 


Unlimited 


For all 
dues. 


For certif- 
icates un- 
der limita- 
tions. 






(j old cer- 
tificates.. 








Issue sus- 
pended so 
long as 
free gold 
in treas'ry 
is below 
*10(>.000,000. 


$10,000 
5.000 
1,000 
500 
100 
50 
20 


None. 


For all 
public 
dues. 


Fer gold 
coin at 
treasury 
oranyoth- 
er money. 


In gold 
coin at 
treasury. 








Silver dol- 
lars 


412.5 
(jr. to 
dol- 
lar. 


DOO 1000 


15.988 
to 1. 


Req uire- 
men t to 
redeem 
treasury 
notes. 


$1 


Unlimited 
unless 
otherwise 
contract- 
ed. 


For all 
dues. 


For silver 
c'rtittc'tes 
or smaller 
coins at 
treasury. 


May be 
deposited 
for silver 
certifi- 
cates. 


Silver cer- 
tificates. 








Silver dol- 
lars in use 


$1.000 $20 
500 1( 
101) 5 
50 2 
1 


None. 


For all 
public 
dues. 


For dol- 
lars or 

s in ;i 1 ler 
coins. 


In silver 
dollars. 








U.S. notes. 








$346,681.016. 


Same as 
silver cer- 
tificates. 


Same as 
silver dol- 
lars. 


For all 
dues. 


For all 
kinds of 
money ex- 
cept gold 
c e r t T f i- 
cates. 


In coin at 
sub-treas- 
ury in N. 
Y.and San 
Francisco 
in sums of 
$oO or over 








Tre a s u r y 
notes of 
1890 








H56.044,615. 


Same as 
silver cer- 
tificates. 


Same as 
silver dol- 
lars. 


For all 
dues. 


For U. S. 
notes. 


In coin at 
treasury. 











Cu rrency 
c e r 1 1 f i- 






Same as 
U.S. notes. 


$10,000 


None. 


Not re- 
ceivable. 


For U. 8. 
notes. 


In U. S 
notes a t 
subtreas- 
ury when 1 
issued. 










N a 1 1 onal 
bk. notes. 








Volume of 
U.S. bonds 
and their 
cost. 


fl.OOO 
500 
100 
50 
20 
10 
5 


None. 


For all 
dues ex- 
cept du- 
ties and 
interest 
on public 
debt. 


For silver 
and minor 
coins. 


In lawful 
money at 
treasury 
or bank of 
issue. 








Subsidiary 
coins 


385.8 
Kr. to 
dol- 
lar. 


WO-1000 


14.953 
tol. 


Needs of 
the coun- 
try. 


50c 

B 


Not to ex- 
ceed $10. 


To amo'nt 
of HO for 
ill dues. 


For minor 
coins. 


In lawful 
money at 
treasury 
in sums of 
$20 or any 
multiple. 


Minor 
coins 


5-ct. 

DCS.. 

77.16 
gr. 

t-ct. 

pcs., 

48 gr. 


5c-% 
copper 
% nick- 
el. 
lc-95 
% cop- 
ier, 5% 
in and 
zinc. 




Needs of 
the coun- 
try. 


KB 
lc 


Not to ex- 
ceed 25c. 


To amo'nt 
of 25c for 
all dues. 




In lawful 
money at 
treasury | 
in sums of 
$20 or over. 




Duties on imports by regulation only. 



-CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



COINS OF THE UNITED STATES. 



Authority for coining and changes in weight and fineness, total amount coined, legal-tender 

quality. 

fineness. .900. Total amount coined. $10,005.75. 
Legal tender. $10. 

Twenty-Cent Piece Authorized to be coined, 
act of March 3. 1875; weight, 5 grams, or 77.1(5 
grains; fineness, .900; coinage prohibited, act 
of May 2, 1878. Total amount coined. $271.1100. 

Dime Authorized to be coined, act of April 
2, 1792; weight. 41.6 grains; fineness, .892.4; 
weight changed, act of Jan. 18, 1837, to 4154 
grains; fineness changed, act of Jan. 18. 1837. 
to .900; weight changed, act of Feb. 21, 1853, to 
38.4 grains: weight changed, act of Feb. 12. 



GOLD COINS. 

Double EaQles Authorized to be coined, act 
of March 3, 1849; weight, 516 grains; fineness, 
.900. Total amount coined to June 30, 1898, 
$1,384,472.500. Full legal tender. 



weight changi 

grains; fineness changed, act of June 28. 1834, 
to .899225; fineness changed, act of Jan. 18, 1S37, 
to .900. Total amount coined to June 30, 1898, 
$284,512,900. Kull legal tender. 



Half-Eagles Authorized to be coined, act of 
April 2, 1792; weight, 135 grains; fineness, .91t%; 
weight changed, act of June 28, 1834. to 129 
grains; fineness changed, act of June 28, 1834, 
to .899225; fineness changed, act of Jan. 18, 
1837. to .900. Total amount coined to June 30, 
1898, $232,050,380. Full legal tender. 

Quarter-Eagle Authorized to be coined, act 
Of April 2, 1792; weight, 67.5 grains; fineness. 
.916%; weight changed, act of June 28, 1834, to 
64.5 grains; fineness changed, act of June 28, 
1834. to .899225; fineness changed, act of Jan. 
18, 1837, to .900. Total amount coined to June 
30, 1898, $28,819,330. Full leaal tender. 

Three-Dollar Piece Authorized to be coined, 
act of Feb. 21, 1853; weight, 77.4 grains; fine- 
ness, .900; coinage discontinued, act of Sept. 
26. 1890. Total amount coined, $1,619,376. Full 
legal tender. 

One Dollar Authorized to be coined, act 

March 3, 1849; weight, 25.8 grains; fineness, .900; 

coinage discontinued.act of Sept. 26. 1890. Total 

amount coined, $19,499.337. B^ull legal tender. 

SILVER COINS. 

Dollar Authorized to be coined, act of 
April 2, 1792; weight, 416 grains: fineness, .892.4; 
weight changed, act of Jan. 18, 1837, to 412^ 
grains; fineness changed, act of Jan. 18, 1837, 
to .900; coinage discontinued, act of Feb. 12, 
1873. Total amount coined to Feb. 12, 1873, 
$8,031,238. Coinage reauthorized, act of Feb. 28, 
1878. Coinage discontinued after July 1, 1891, 
except for certain purposes, act July 14, 1890. 
Amount coined to June 30, 1898, $470.1127.760. Full 
legal tender except when otherwise provided 
In the contract. 

Trade Dollar Authorized to be coined, act 
of Feb. 12, 1873; weight, 420 grains; fineness, 
.900; legal tender limited to $3, act of June 22, 
1874 (rev. stat. ); coinage limited to export de- 
mand and legal-tender quality repealed, joint 
resolution, July 22, 1876; coinage discpntinued, 
act Feb. 19, 1887. Total amount coined, $35,- 
965 ^24 

Half-Dollar Authorized to be coined, act of 
April'2, 1792; weight, 208 grains; fineness, .892.4; 
weight changed, act of Jan. 18, 1837, to agM 
grams; fineness changed, act of Jan. 18, 18S7, 
to .900; weight changed, act of Feb. 21, 1S53, to 
192 grains; weight changed, act of Feb. 12. 1873. 
to 12W grams, or 192.9 grains. Total amount 
coined to June 30, 1898, $136,427,021. Legal 

^Columbian Half-Dottar Authorized to be 
coined, act of Aug. 5. 1892; weight. 11)2.9 grams; 
fineness, .900. Total amount coined, $2,o01,- 
! U52i50. Legal tender. $10. 

Quart er-DoUnr Authorized to be coined, act 
of April 2. 1792; weight. 104 grains; fineness, 
.892.4; weight changed, act of Jan. 18. ran. to 
KRV6 grains; fineness changed, act of Jan. is, 
1837. to .900; weight changed, act of Feb. 21, 
1853. to 96 grains; weight changed, act of 1 eb. 
12. 1873, tc 6H grams, or 96 4o grains. Total 

.* ~~{.?,4 +^ T.inn Oft IfiQS Sfcrvn ft3Q Q--V> 



amount coined to June 
Legal tender, $10. 



1898, $55,039,962. 



1873. to 2^ grams, or 38.58 grains. Total amount 



gra 
Jun 



coined to June 30, 1898, $30,872,691.90. Legal 
tender, $10. 

Half-Dime Authorized to be coined, act of 
April2. 1792; weight. 20.8 grains; fineness. .892.4; 
weight changed, act of Jan. 18, 1837, to 2(% 
grains; fineness changed, act of Jan. 18. 1857. 
to .900: weight changed, act of Feb. 21, 1853, to 
19.2 grains; coinage discontinued, act of Feb. 
12. 1873. Total amount coined, $4,880.219.40. 

Three-Cent Piece Authorized to be coined, 
act of March 3. 1851; weight. 12% grains; fine- 
ness. .750; weight changed, act of March 3, 
1853, to 11.52 grains; fineness changed, act of 
March 3, 1853, to .900; coinage discontinued, act 
of Feb. 12, 1873. Total amount coined, $1,282,- 
087.20. 

MINOR COINS. 

Five-Cent (nickel) Authorized to be coined, 
act of May 16, 1866; weight, 77.16 grains, com- 
posed of 75 per cent copper and 25 per cent 
nickel. Total amount coined to June 30, 1898, 
$15.852.821.90. Legal tender for $1, but reduced 
to 25 cents by act of Feb. 12, 1873. 

Three-Cent (nickel) Authorized to be coined, 
act of March 3, 1865; weight, 30 grains, com 
posed of 75 per cent copper and 25 per cent 
nickel. Total amount coined, $941,349.48. Le- 
gal tender for 60 cents, but reduced to 25 cents 
by act Feb. 12, 1873. Coinage discontinued, act 
of Sept. 26, 1890. 

Two-Cent (bronze) Authorized to be coined, 
act of April 22, 1864; weight, 96 grains, com- 
posed of 95 per cent copper and 5 per cent tin 
and zinc. Coinage discontinued, act of Feb. 
12, 1873. Total amount coined, $912.020. 

Cent (copper) Authorized to be coined, act 
of April 2, 1792; weight, 264 grains; weight 
changed, act of Jan. 14, 1793. to 208 grains; 
weight changed by proclamation of the presi- 
dent, Jan. 26. 1796. In conformity with act of 
March 3, 1795, to 168 grains: coinage discon- 
' 1857. Total amount 



Cent (nickel) Authorized to be coined, act of 
Feb. 21, 1857; weight, 72 grains, composed of 88 
per cent copper and 12 per cent nickel. Coin- 
age discontinued, act of April 22, 1864. Total 
amount coined, $2.007,?20. 

Cent (bronze) Coinage authorized, act of 
April 22. 1864; weight. 48 grains, composed of 
95 per cent copper and 6 per cent tin and zinc. 
Total amount coined to June 30, 1898, $3,987,- 
317.44. Legal tender, 25 cents. 

Half-Cent (copper) Authorized to be coined, 
act of April 2, 1T92; weight. 132 grains; weight 
changed; act of Jan. 14. 1793. to 104 grains; 
weightchanged by proclamation of the presi- 
dent. Jan. <*!. 1796rin conformity with act of 
March 3, 1795. to 84 grains; coinage discon- 
tinued, act of Feb. 21, 1857. Total amount 
coined, ?o9.926.11. 



tinned, act of Feb 
coined, $1,562,887.44. 



8 gr; 
. 21, 



TOTAL COINAGE. 



COINAGE 



Gold . . . .Sl.!).97o.3-:S.OO Gold $64.634,865.00 



Silver... 
Minor... 



Uumbt, n QVarter-Donar-Authorized t 9 be r - _? 
nert.actof MarchS, 1893; weight. 96.45grams; i Total.. $2. 1 18, 



713.75J Silver 16.485,584.00 

30.301.04-.'.3r I Minor 1.489.484.11 



.V>.V,;'.U2 1 Total 



GOLD AND SILVER. 85 


COINAGE OF NATIONS. 


COtTNTRIES. 


1895. 


1896. 


1897. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


United States 


159,616.358 
504,193 
18.547.229 
33,695,008 

'"20.845.337' 

25.5*8,334 
38,590,432 


$5,698,010 
24,832,351 
5,776,584 

4,044,935 

1,544.000 
l,S26.0:iS 
3,696,192 


$47,053,060 
565.9H5 
23.402.560 
34,602,786 

' '21,719,886' 

25,133.476 
10,284 


$23,089.899 
21,092,397 
6,470,352 

5,579,692 


$76,089,485 
417,176 
8,654,71)4 
37.298,873 

' 42,726,251' 
30,145,51)5 
170,614,861 


$18,487.297 
19,608,459 
4,583,688 




Great Britain 


Australasia 


India* 
France 


25,272,996 
8.492 


Germany 


2,718,368 
30,985,566 


Russiat 


35,392,493 


Finland 


Austria-Hur.garyJ 


18,208,728 


9,056,188 


33,898,739 


7,904,911 
771,800 


33.640,553 


5,722,330 


Eritrea 


Spain 




205,649 




6,386,942 

13,399,062 

1,900,800 
428,130 
67,000 

109,007 


2,890,407 
147,965 

"si',6bb',4i6' 


6,724,106 

307,957 
1.014,624 
4,2ti6.028 
864,000 

964,800 
147.400 
535,319 
135,513 




1,515,000 


23,883.505 
119.880 
140,^00 
80,400 


1,125,000 


Portugal 


Netherlands 


135,692 


Norway 




Sweden .' 


896,921 


Denmark 








Switzerland 


772,000 
3,420,717 


. 44.390 
414,483 


1,544.000 
50,114 


1,930 
7,473 

562,770 
376 
12,000 




Turkey 




Egypt 


1,544,000 

920.9(3 


Abyssinia 








440.435 
519.830 
720,133 










Hongkong 




2,200,000 
8.253.340 




1,700,000 




China 






8,638,630 




Indo-China 
Tunis 


""232" 


6,092,709 
347 


'"'232' 


12,542,772 
347 
140,000 




23,rt3H,427 
10.3*>,8f5 
2,773,428 

347 
65,964 


Canada 




Newfoundland 








98,000 


632,500 


Costa Klca... 








Haiti 




730,285 














982.715 




465,433 




Bolivia . . . 








1,508,087 




Peru. .. . 




4 073,270 




2,704,831 


















1,189,282 
449,807 

552,480 
623,687 


Ecuador 




1,102,073 




169,798 
















Chile 


8.353,212 


4.213.919 
l.OOO.IXK) 


5.424.68(i 


677,877 




Uruguay 


49 




145 


500,000 
30,000 


















British West Indies 










20,000 
606,071 






8,389,222 




167,240 

392 














11,900 








127,440 




386,000 




386,000 








450446 




453,554 














193,000 




134,000 


Morocco 




354,630 




589,985 














873,509 
50.000 
150,000 














Ceylon 




236,850 








Slam 




2,589,823 




3,322,752 




Total 




231,087.438 


121,610,219 


195,899,517 


153,395,7-10 


437,719,345 


167,760,297 




Rupee calculated at coining rate, $0.4737. 
tSilvcr ruble calculated at coining rate. J0.7718. 
JFlorin calculated at coining rate, 0.4052. under the coinage act of Aug. 2. 1892. 



86 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


VALUE OF FOREIGN COINS-OCT. 1, 1899. 
[Prepared by the Director of the Mint.] 


COUNTRIES. 


Standard. 


Monetary unit. 


Value 
Oct. 1, W9. 


Argentina 


Gold and silver 


Peso 


$.96.5 

.aej 

14 'i 




Gold 






Gold and silver. ... 




Bolivia 


Silver 


Boliviano. .. . 


.43. H 
.54.6 

1.000 
l.OU.O 

46.5 
.43.6 

.30.5 

.7fl.fi 
70 3 


! Brazil 


Gold 


Milreis 


British possessions. N. A. (except 
i Newfoundland).... 


Gold . . . 


Dollar 


British Honduras 
Central American States- 
Costa Rica 


Gold 
Gold 


Dollar 
Colon 




Silver 


Peso 


Honduras ( 




Gold and silver 
Silver 
Silver 


Peso 
f Amoy 


Chile 
China 
I Colombia 


Canton 


Chefoo 


.C.7.4 
.68.9 
.65.2 

.71.8 
.6.0 
tt> 
.U 
.67.8 
.64.4 
.(S.I 
.71.0 
.08.3 

.43.6 
.92 6 


Chin Kiang.... 


Haikwan (cus- 
toms) 
Tae) ....' Hankow 


Hongkong 
Nichwang 
Ningpo 


Shanghai 
Swatow.. .. 


Takao.. 


Tientsin 
Peso 


Cuba 


Gold and silver .. . 


Peso . . . 


Denmark 


Gold Crown 


.26.8 
.43. ti 
4.94.3 
.19.3 




Silver |Sncr 


Egypt .... 


Gold 


Pound (100 piasters) 
Mark 


Finland 


Gold 


France 


Gold and silver 
Gold 


Franc 
Mark 


.19.3 
.23.8 
4.86.6^ 
.19.3 
.96.5 
.20.7 
.19.3 
.49.8 




Great Britain 


Gold 
Gold and silver 
Gold and silver 
Silver 


Pound sterling 
Drachma 


Haiti. 




Rupee . . . 


Italv 


Gold and silver 


Lira 


Japan 


Gold and silver' 
Gold . . . 


Vpn (Gold 


Li beria 


Dollar 


1.00.0 
.47.4 
.40.2 
1.01.4 
.26.8 
.(6.2 
.43.6 
1.08.0 
.51.6 


Mexico 


Silver 


Dollar 


Netherlands 


Gold and silver 
Gold 


Florin 
Dollar 




Gold 


Crown 


i Persia 


Silver 


Kran 


1 Peru 


Silver 


Sol.... 


Portugal 


Gold 


Milreis 


Russia 


Silver! 


Ruble... } old r 


Spain 


Gold and silver 
Gold 


Peseta 
Crown 


.19.3 
.2(1.8 
.19.3 








Tripoli 


Silver 


Mahbub of 20 piasters. . 




Gold 




.(.4 
1.03.4 
.19.3 




Gold 


Peso 




Gold and silver 


Bolivar 






*Gold the nominal standard. Silver practically the standard, 
t Silver the nominal standard. Paper the actual currency, the depreciation of which is 
measured by the gold standard. 
JThe "British dollar" has the same legal value as the Mexican dollar in Hongkong, the 
Straits settlements and Labuan. 
The law of February 11, 1895. introduced the gold standard, with an ideal gold peso 
weighing .599 grams as the monetary unit. 



STATISTICS OF EDUCATION. 87 


STATISTICS OF EDUCATION. 
[By Alexander Summers, Statistician U. S. Bureau of Education.] 


POPULATION, ENROLLMENT, AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE, NUMBER AND SEX 
OK TEACHERS IN COMMON SCHOOLS-1897-98. 


STATE OH TERRITORY. 


Est. 
total 
popula- 
tion 
in ItiaS. 


Enrolled 
in element- 
ary and 
secondary 
schools. 


Per 
cent 
of pan- 
ulatin 
en- 
rolled. 


Arerage 
daily 
attend- 
ance. 


TEACHERS. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


United States 


72,737,100 


15,038,036 


20.68 


10,286,092 


131,750 


277,443 


409.193 


North Atlantic Division.. . . 
South Atlantic Division 
South Central Division 
North Central Division 
Western Division 


20,247,100 
9.868,500 
12.8B8.tXX) 
25.737.600 
4,015,300 


3.614.4(3 
2,134.725 
2.875,866 
5,669.572 
744.510 


17.85 
21.63 
22.34 
22.03 
18.54 


2,587,4(* 
1,314.622 
1.870.510 
8.996.895 
516,597 


19.231 
20.199 
31,317 
54.911 
6,092 


80.732 
26.605 
29,167 
124.442 
16.497 


99.963 
46.804 
<,484 
179.353 
22,589 


North Atlantic Division- 


655.400 
398.700 
334,100 
2.694,000 
417.000 
863,900 
(i.851,000 
1.837.000 
6,19ii,000 

173.200 
1,200.000 
285,300 
1.701.000 
8H6.0QU 
1,754.000 
1.274.000 
2.097.000 
515,000 

2,016.000 
1.877.000 
1.741.000 
1,448.000 
1,347.000 
2.S21 .000 
1.295.000 
323,600 


134,405 
04,207 
155,532 
456,141 
65.384 
147,833 
1,203,199 
304,680 
1,173,082 

33.174 
236.003 
44.698 
367,817 
236,1*8 
39P.375 
258.183 
450.832 
108,455 

501.893 
481.585 
348,899 
367,579 
182.341 
612,140 
303,808 
77,121 


20.51 
16.10 
19.61 
16.93 
15.C8 
17.11 
17.56 
16.59 
18.93 

19.15 
19.67 
15.67 
21.59 
27.27 
22.77 
20.27 
21.50 
21.06 

24.90 
25. 66 
20.04 
25.39 
13.54 
21.70 
23.46 
23.83 


97,616 
47.718 
48,060 
349.147 
47.370 
105,002 
827,652 
200.278 
864,626 

22.693 
134.539 
34.383 
213.421 
159.768 
214.540 
182.559 
278.715 
74,004 

30S.697 
338,176 
222,690 
223.900 
132,04ti 
404.372 
191.447 
49,182 


*1,257 
202 
389 
1,174 
193 
373 
5,461 
834 
9,348 

218 
1,144 

148 
3.013 
4.096 
3.095 
2,245 
4.519 
1,121 

4.909 
5,121 
*4,74l 
3,649 
1.362 
6.179 
4,515 
841 


*5.470 
2,509 
2,397 
12,029 
1,659 
3,570 
28,924 
5.442 
18,732 

622 
3,843 
959 
5,562 
2,712 
3.522 
2.728 
4,986 
1,671 

6.051 
4,014 
*2,778 
4,254 
2.472 
6,774 
2,558 
1,206 


6,727 
2,711 
2,786 
13,203 
1.852 
3.943 
84.385 
6.276 
28,080 

840 
4.987 
1.107 
8,575 
6,808 
7.217 
4.973 
9,505 
2,792 

9.960 
9.135 
7.519 
7.903 
3,834 
12.953 
7,073 
2,107 


















South Atlantic Division- 




District of Columbia 
Virginia! 


West Virgin ia 






Geonfia 


South Central Division- 
















Indian Territory 


North Central Division 

OhlO 


3 917.000 


810.285 
666,157 
939,163 
496,025 
435,914 
384,063 
548,a r >2 
688.583 
67,375 
89.001 
273.914 
370,240 

35.070 
13.042 
104,733 
26.484 
14.613 
70.878 
7.348 
29.737 
97.916 
85,230 
259,459 


20.69 
25.06 
18.72 
22.01 
20.09 
21.75 
26.12 
22.49 
19.12 
21.91 
23.47 
27.86 

14.26 
11.61 
17.91 
14.59 
Hi. 79 
26.76 
17.89 
18.92 
20.74 
22.83 
17.36 


618,667 
432,931 
729.227 
*347.714 
287,000 
'243,200 
370.845 
440,692 
41.155 
54,600 
173.930 
256,934 

23,400 
8.700 
69.973 
16,950 
9.011 
t49,638 
4.982 
21.528 
64.192 
62.799 
185,424 


10.358 
7,197 
6,713 
3,635 
2,654 
2,304 
5,855 
5,951 
1,115 
1.321 
2.433 
5,380 

201 

102 
744 
333 
156 
6ff3 
40 
324 
1.033 
1,250 
1,407 


14,898 
8.026 
18.549 
13,048 
9,811 
8,939 
22,839 
9,315 
2,522 
3,187 
7.175 
7,133 

885 
434 

2,238 
270 
279 

as7 

274 
524 

2.288 
2.443 
6,025 


25,256 
15.223 
25.267 
15,673 
12.465 
11.243 
28.ffif4 
15.266 
3.ti37 
4.508 
9,<>08 
12,513 

1.086 
536 
2.982 
603 
435 
1.339 
314 
848 
3.321 
3.693 
7,432 




2.259,000 
5.017.000 
2.254.000 
2,107.000 
1.706,000 
2.101.000 
3,01)2.000 
352,300 
406.300 
1.167.000 
1,329,000 

245,!)00 
112.3110 
581.S100 
181.500 
87.020 
204.900 
41.080 
157.200 
472,100 
37;{ 400 














North Dakota 


South Dttkota 






Western Division * 










Utah 












1,435,000 




Approximately. tSalt Lake City estimated, tin 1892. ln 1896. ] In 1897. 



88 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS TAUGHT, SALARIES OF TEACHERS, VALUE OF 
SCHOOL PROPERTY, STATE AND LOCAL TAXAT1ON-1897-98. 


STATE OR TEURITORY. 


Average No. 
days schools 
were kept, (a) 


AVERAGE 
MONTHLY 

SALAKIES 

OF 

TEACHERS. 


Value 
of public 

SC/WXli 

property. 


Raised 
from state 
taxes. 


Raised 
from local 
taxes. 


Raised 
from 
other 
sources, 
state and 
local, 
etc. 


Males. 


Fe- 
males. 


United States 


143.1 


6S45.16 


fo$38.74 


$492,703,781 


$35.600,643 


$134.104.053 


$20.399,578 


North Atlantic Division 
South Atlantic Division 
South Central Division 


174.5 
112.7 
98.fi 
152.4 
151.8 


666.18 
681.31 

WO. 21 
46.63 

658.59 


641.00 
631.45 
634.74 
38.14 
650.92 


198.197.537 
22.266,065 
21.700,411 
211,848.908 
38,630,860 


12,590,732 

4.445,868 
6,530,317 
7,289,537 
4,735,189 


52.358.675 
6.492.677 
4,380.672 
62,450.015 
8,422,014 


ll,418.aS8 
1,020.565 
679.413 
5 8(8.475 
1.412,287 


North Central Division 
Western Division 


North Atlantic Division- 


137 
C134.5 
154 
186 
191 
188.8 
176 


40.61 
C37.10 
41.40 
137.50 
1M.68 
88.49 


26.32 
C27.64 
26.04 
51.44 
51.00 
43.03 


4,225,401 
c3.284.121 
1.800.1100 
39.077.405 
4,579.334 
9,879,922 
71,832.511 
14,601.840 
c48,917,003 

/904.426 
B4.600.000 

3.750,000 
3.090,777 
3,471.667 
970,675 
845.596 
3.977.070 
755,824 

C5.44&814 
d3.l33.780 
cq\, 500.000 
f 1.636.055 
ol.OU6.UOO 
6.0S1.356 
2,291.397 
600,000 


513,066 
d58,831 
87,196 


1,076,160 
d857.388 
721.506 
13,31.7.878 
1,302.167 
2.154,301 
dl7.1C7,893 
3,265.485 
12,505,897 

eh 209.000 
1,797,761 
fcl,251,655 
840,241 
1.439.758 
21.522 
S5,03.3 
415,607 
432,100 

cl,108,395 


"'d63,366 
18.821 
91.955 
54.152 
242,403 
(27.300.000 
97.299 
3,550,848 










122,487 
291.849 
(J3.850.000 
2.194,895 
5,481.408 

hi 6.000 
602,958 

"'937,5i2 
342.680 
760.460 
c666,919 
992.810 
136,529 

el, 326,230 
dl.330,219 
d505,034 
c30.225 
234,011 
2,051,724 
331,487 
121,384 


Connecticut 


New York 




185 
159.4 

/160 
C182 
185 
120.2 
111 
68.8 
C83.2 
cllii 9 


85.82 
42.69 

gJi 36.60 
961.30 

94.48 
31.98 


49.72 
38.45 

gli 34. 08 
g43.10 
64.31 
26.67 




South Atlantic Division- 




548,800 

'"39,893 
108.527 
147,683 
C23.553 
124,743 
27,366 

C197.140 
<J205,m 
d239 
c66,34 
31,826 
129.806 
33.912 
14,722 


District of Columbia 


Virginia c 


North Carolina d 


23.78 
25.18 


2i.98 
24.29 






Florida. .. .... 


104 

ce 115.4 
d'J0.2 
c80 1 


35.04 

d44.03 
0*31.88 


32.40 

d37.18 
0J26.18 


South Central Division- 






d150,000 
C?n413.911 
m670,002 
806,690 
T)i890,047 
341.627 


Mississippi 


clOl.6 
106.3 
106 
69 
86.3 


e32 18 
34.26 
51.81 
38.50 
37.00 


C26.69 
29.60 
44.87 
36.75 
31.08 








Oklahoma 


Indian Territory 


North Central Division- 
Ohio 


162 
144 
158.7 
160.8 
n!60 
156 
1(>2 
141.7 
122 
de138.4 
131 
124.3 

d!49.2 
ellO 
d!59.7 
96.6 


41.75 
C48.25 
60.87 
43.02 
41.00 
61.90 
37.10 
49.40 
39.92 
M9.00 
42.61 
d43.82 

69.28 
60.40 
{64.07 


C39.80 
40.25 
51 84 
35.24 
29.50 
36.72 
31.20 
42.40 
35.51 
fc37.00 
H6.04 
035.58 

48.61 
42.86 
/ 53.74 


41,428,289 
21.536,212 
43,705943 
18.138.589 
al4.800.000 
14,559.564 
17. 450,534 
16.718.410 
2.132,738 
d 2,929.744 
8,943,924 
9,504,961 

1,857,964 
441,460 
5,987,703 
9281,000 
472,108 
2,652.595 
265,011 
597,718 
4,977,679 
3,748,154 
17,349,468 


1,748.888 
1,558.276 
1,000.000 
C673.647 
602.576 
516,107 


10.316.661 

4,806,354 
15,142,098 
C4.903.854 
4.081.350 
3,012.289 
7.571.634 
4.791.982 
1,110.441 
dl,181.037 
2,053.054 
3,479,261 

159.094 
203.370 
2,129,421 


447.037 
461,130 
5(18.993 
C530.308 
602.728 
899.266 
937,291 
283.117 
51,802 
d52.928 
9K9.115 
124,758 

58,667 
1.407 
783,633 
pllO,995 
1,833 
61,871 
86 
30.934 
47,7(8 
219,128 
95.971 


Indiana 


Illinois 












680.050 
0349,900 


North Dakota d 






160,093 




Western Division- 


575,332 




Colorado . 
New Mexico 


""9^224 
(or* 
338.588 
8,149 
85,388 
r792,245 

e2.843.263 




130 
157 
154 
100 
148 
123.9 
172.4 


73.23 
61.75 
101.00 
5<U1 
42.13 
42.02 
77.40 


63.17 
41.66 
61.50 
47.47 
34.53 
33.75 
64.55 


233,548 
754.183 
87,266 
156.690 
1.128,548 
885,478 
2,684,41( 


Utah 


Nevada 


Idaho 




Oregon d 
California 


a Certain states report their school term in months. These months have been reduced to 
days by multiplying them bv 20. h Average for those states reporting, c In 18flt'r97. d In 1895-96. 
e Approximately. /In 1891-92. Estimated, hln 188SMtU. iState appropriation for colored 
schools, k Includes money appropriated from the federal treasury. fin 1894-95. in Includes 
poll tax. 11 In 1SI3-94. o Includes some miscellaneous receipts, p Includes all .receipts in 
cities. (/Included in local taxes, r Includes some funds. 



STATISTICS OF EDDCATION. 



COMMON-SCHOOL STATISTICS, CLASSIFIED BY RACES-1897-98. 



STATE. 



Estimated num- 
ber of persons 5 to 
Iti years of age. 



White. Colored. 



Percentage of 
the whole. 



White. Colored. 



Pupils enrolled 

in the 
public schools. 



White. Colored. 



Per cent nf per- 
sons 5 to 1M 
years enrolled. 



White. Colored. 



Alabama (1896-97) 

Arkansas 

Delaware (1891-18) . . . 
District of Columbia. 

Florida 

Georgia 

Kentucky (1896-97)... 

Louisiana 

Maryland 

Mississippi (1896-97).. 

Missouri 

N. Carolina 

So. Carolina(18i)6-97). 
Tennessee (1895-96).. 

Texas (1896-97) 

Virginia (1896-97) 

West Virginia 



334.700 
338,000 
39.850 
46,720 
95.460 
384,100 
SfXVJOO 
222.100 
272.701) 
21<>,300 
807 .'.WO 
387.600 
176.700 
4S0.300 
757.850 
340.100 
279,700 



2S6.900 



8,!)80 
25.700 
75.640 
3M.400 
WUiOO 

2i;6.500 

78.700 
315,000 

54, (WO 
232.400 
25)6.5(10 
162.000 
232,050 
242,0110 

11,500 



53.84 
72.08 
81.61 
64.51 
55.80 
51.59 
85.39 
48.42 
77.64 
40.71 
94.26 
62.51 
37.34 
74.78 
74.53 
58.43 
96.04 



Total 5,828,980 2,844,570 67.35 

Total (1889-90). . *5,132,948 *2.510.847 67.15 



46.16 
27.92 
18.39 
35.49 
44.20 
48.41 
14.61 
51.58 
22.36 
59.29 

5.74 
37.49 
62. 116 
25.22 
25.47 
41.57 

3. 96 

32. 65 
32.85 



216.6S6 
224.247 
28,316 
29,311 
67,657 
270.267 
432.572 
109.732 
1110,745 
170,811 
656,816 
261.223 
1 19.027 
386,483 
477,659 
244.588 
227,676 



132.213 
79.561 
4,858 
15.387 
40.79H 

180.56.5 
69.321 
71,609 
45,258 

196,768 
31.767 

138.152 

139,156 
95,102 

134.481 

123.234 
8,512 



64.74 
67.34 
71.08 
62.74 
70.87 
70. 36 
76.71 
49.41 
69.95 
78.97 
73.15 
67.39 
67.36 
80.47 
63.03 
71.92 
81.40 



46.08 
lil .63 
54.10 
59.8' 
53.94 
50.10 
71. 7t> 
30.28 
57.51 
62.4' 
58.18 
59.45 
46.5)3 
58.70 
57.95 
50.92 
74.02 



4,113,811 1,506,742 
3.402.420 1.296,959 



70.58 
66.29 



52.97 
51.65 



STATE. 



Average daily 
attendance. 



Per cent of 
enrollment. 



yumber of 
teachers. 



White. 



Colored. 



White. Colored. 



White, 



Alabama (1898-97) 

A rkansas 

Delaware (1891-92) 

District of Columbia . . . 

Florida 

Georgia 

Kentucky (1896-97) 

Louisiana 

Maryland 

Mississippi (1896-97) 

Missouri 

North Carolina 

South Carolina (1896-97). 

Tennessee < !8!5-96) 

Texas (1896-97) 

Virginia (1896-97) 

West Virginia 

Total 

Total (1889-90) 



t 135.429 
142.800 
t!9.746 
22,656 
46,029 
169.329 
- 



t87,261 
48,647 
t2,947 
11,727 
27,675 



. 

82,294 
112,019 
103,353 
424.448 
145.646 



. 

43.074 
49,752 
22,520 
120,547 
16.244 
68.894 



272,963 
335,175 
145.218 
154.154 



65,213 
69,197 
68.203 
5,614 



62.50 
63.68 
69.73 
77.30 
68.48 
62.65 
61.41 
75.00 
58.73 
60.51 
64.62 
65.76 
69.42 
70.63 
70.17 
59.37 
67.71 



66.00 
61.14 
fiO.66 
76.21 
67.83 
60.58 
62.14 
69.48 
49.76 
61.26 
51.13 
49.87 
71.81 
68.57 
51.45 
55.34 
65.95 



5,053 
5,536 
734 
739 
2,108 
6.186 
8.564 
2,815 
4,200 
4.747 

14,6f>9 
4.954 
2,928 
7,257 

10.045 
6,448 
6,565 



2.659.S09 
2,165.249 



916,833 
813,710 



64.66 
63.64 



60.85 
62.74 



93..VM 
78,903 



2.466 

1,537 

106 

36: 

684 

3,318 

1.396 

1,019 

787 

3,156 

607 

2,263 

2,045 

1.878 

2.9C8 

2,127 

243 

26.900 
24,072 



United States census. t Approximately. 
SIXTEEN FORMER SLAVE STATES AND THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 



YEAR. 



Common school 
enrollment. 



White. 



Colored. 



Expendi- 
tures (both 
races). 



YEAR. 



Common school 
enrollment. 



White. Colored. 



Expendi- 
tures (both 
races). 



1870-71 

1871-72 

1872-73 

1K73-74 

1874-75 

1875-76 

1876-77 

1877-78 

1878-79 

1H79-80 

18SO-81 .... 

1881-82 

1882-83 

1883-84 

1884-85 . . . 



1.827,139 
2.031.946 
2,013,684 
2.215.674 
2.'?34,S77 
2.2 19.263 
2.370.110 
2.516,448 
2.676.911 



571,50fi 

675,150 

B85.942 

784,709 

802.374 

802.982 

817.240 

1.002.313 

1.030.463 



110886,404 

11.623,288 
11.176,048 
11.823,775 
13.021.514 
12.033.865 
11.231.073 
12.093.091 
12,174,141 
12.678.685 
13,656,814 
15.241.740 
16.363,471 
17.884,558 
19.253,874 



1885-86 . . 
1886-87 . . 
INST-SS!! 
1888-89 . . 
1889-90.. 
1890-91 .. 
1891-92 . . 
1892-93 . . 
1893-94 . . 
1891-95 . . 
1895-96 . . 
1896-97 . . 
1897-98*.. 



2,773,145 
2.975,773 
3.110,606 
3.197,830 
3.402.420 
8.570,624 
3.607.549 
3.69i',899 
3.S48.541 
3.8)6.267 
8.943.801 
8.937.!>92 
4.113.811 



1.048.659 
1.118,556 
1.140,405 
1.213,092 
1.296.959 
1.329.549 
1.354.316 
1.367.515 
1.432.198 
1.423.593 
1,449,325 
1.460.084 
1,506,742 



820,208,118 
20.821 ,9fi9 
21,810,158 
23,171.878 
24,880,107 
26,690.310 
27,691.488 
28.5:!5.7as 
29.223,546 
29,448.584 
31,149.721 
31.144.801 
31.217,479 



Total, 



66.195.310 



24313.672 546.630.246 



Subject to correction. 



90 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


INSTRUCTORS AND STUDENTS IN PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS AND IN PRIVATE 
HIGH SCHOOLS AND ACADEMIES 1897-98. 


STATE OR TERRI- 
TORY. 


PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS. 


PRIVATE SECONDARY 
SCHOOLS. 


Number. 


Secondary 
teachers. 


Secondary 
students. 


Number. 


Secondary 
teachers. 


Secondary 
students. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


United States 

North Atlantic Div... . 
South Atlantic Div. .. 
South Central Div 
North Central Div 


5.315 


8,542 


9.399 


189.187 


260,413 


1.990 


4,075 


5,282 


52,172 


53,053 


L316 
387 
552 

2,832 
228 


2,245 
512 
862 
4,434 

489 


3.441 
564 
700 
4,204 
490 


61.651 
9,742 
13.607 
94,163 
10,024 


80.09T. 
14.641 
19.281 
131,415 
14,980 


668 
373 
436 
384 
129 


1,788 
600 
639 
803 
245 


2,412 
692 
731 
1,112 

335 


20.576 

8.745 
10,307 
10.261 
2,283 


19.738 
8.164 
10.7SU 
11.406 
2,954 


North Atlantic Div. 


154 
52 
55 

227 
16 

68 
367 
85 
292 

14 
46 
5 
66 
28 
14 
85 
105 
24 

61 

93 
48 
85 
20 
192 
48 
2 
3 

598 
349 
328 
282 
182 
112 
326 
201 
24 
29 
225 
176 

15 
5 

39 

2 
4 
8 
6 
36 
13 
96 


170 
58 
55 
495 
73 
112 
616 
134 
532 

16 
T5 
49 
70 
36 
22 
93 
116 
35 

103 

130 
55 
93 
37 
358 
78 
3 
5 

911 

628 
636 
411 
282 
178 
435 
353 
25 
33 
286 
256 

16 
6 
110 
5 
5 
17 
6 
8 
59 
25 
232 


162 

87 
86' 
861 
8-3 
195 
1,198 
-Mi 
490 

31 
68 
73 
96 
43 
15 
84 
121 
33 

111 
93 
62 
93 
51 
242 
40 
4 
4 

647 
355 
631 
588 
327 
3.'6 
5> 
301 
25 
35 
225 
178 

23 
6 
98 
2 
3 
16 
17 
15 
42 
22 
246 


3.873 
1.467 
1.348 
14,6(M 
1,33) 
3,106 
21.491 
3,842 
10,581 

449 
1,533 
1,203 
1,615 
644 
399 
1.298 
2,173 
428 

1.985 
2,2; 
1.036 
1,566 
560 
4.790 
1,204 
97 
76 

17,601 
10.042 
13,921 
11,650 
7.339 
4,780 
10.959 
6,776 
360 
677 
5.381 
4,677 

365 
137 
1,963 
48 
65 
371 
191 
141 
1,044 
638 
5,0bl 


4.695 
1,858 
1.808 
18,718 
1,810 
3.775 
25,083 
5,848 
16,501 

655 
2.389 
1.753 
2.296 
1.134 
493 
2.014 
3,281 
626 

2,769 
3.064 
1.541 
1.9U6 
1.195 
7,053 
1.582 
149 
22 

23.207 
12.770 
21,147 
15,808 
9.457 
6.930 
15,303 
10.367 
548 
938 
8.022 
6,918 

531 

170 
2,965 
79 
91 
620 
318 
205 
1,586 
956 
7,559 


35 
29 
23 
96 
13 

a 

205 
70 
135 

3 
39 
19 
80 
14 
111 
34 
67 
6 

87 
102 
66 
50 
25 
71 
24 
2 
9 

54 
29 
62 
21 
26 
30 
44 
SO 
2 
7 
14 
15 

4 
1 
5 

3 

14 


59 
100 
44 
256 
45 
121 
597 
177 
389 

11 
84 
37 
151 
23 

163 

51 
79 

119 
151 

87 
56 
28 
138 
48 
3 
9 

101 
6ft 
138 
30 
76 
84 
76 
163 
4 
11 
23 
28 


87 
59 
73 

392 

191 

863 
209 
467 

5 
113 
98 
127 
33 
138 
48 
114 
16 

187 
123 
77 
88 
69 
149 
27 
6 
15 

190 
99 
211 
73 
69 
93 
101 
181 
4 
18 
38 
35 

14 
1 

10 

2 
33 


1,342 
1,331 
1.016 
2,798 
325 
1.253 
5,539 
2.214 
4,758 

127 

836 
303 
1,799 
284 
2,969 
763 
1,649 
15 

1,766 
2,570 
1,484 
1,067 
417 
2,127 
645 
21 
210 

1,152 
890 
1,804 
445 
727 
907 
1,373 
2,244 
17 
162 
196 
344 

3 
11 
62 
59 


1,543 
687 
1.060 
2,776 
437 
1,481 
6,425 
1,469 
3,860 

102 
1,060 
535 
1.347 
371 
2.173 
711 
1,741 
124 

1.855 
2.329 
1.277 
1,318 
570 
2.619 
563 
24 
206 

1,537 
1.158 
2,218 
762 
473 
658 
1.403 
2222 
31 
208 
317 
419 

121 
12 

77 
16 
8 
611 


New Hampshire 














South Atlantic Div. 




Dist. of Columbia. . . 
Virginia 


West Virginia 


North Carolina 
South Carolina 




South Central Div. 
















Indian Territory 

North Central Div. 
Ohio 




Illinois 












North Dakota 






Kansas 


Western Div. 




2 

7 


Colorado 






Utah 


54 


563 






7 
12 
l! 
63 


11 
11 
44 
112 


i 

41 
43 
181 


70 
146 

489 
8SO 


106 
273 
372 
1,358 











STATISTICS OF EDDCATION. 91 


UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES OF LIBERAL ARTS IN THE UNITED 

STATES-1897-98. 


STATES AND TERRI- 
TORIES, 1897-98. 


Number of institu- 
tions. 


PROFESS- 
ORS AND 
INSTRUCT- 
ORS. 


STUDENTS. 


Total 
number. 


Prepara- 
tory depts. 


Collegiate 
depts. 


Graduate 
depts. 


Profession- 
al depts. 


Total 
number. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


Male 


Fe- 
male. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


United States. . . . 

North Atlantic Div. 
South Atlantic Div.. 
South Central Div.. . 
North Central Div. . 
Western Division... 

North Atlantic Div. 


JSO 

81 
78 
BB 

198 

42 

4 
2 
jj 


11,571 


1.577 


31,647 


14.292 


54,738 


16,708 


3,669 


1.057 


26,378 


983 


118820 


35,236 


3,619 
1,252 
1.241 
4,337 
1,122 


122 
133 
298 
863 
161 


5.714 
2.756 
5.844 

14,946 

2.387 


687 
858 
3,440 
7,781 
1,526 


20.235 

6,1193 
6.3611 
18,622 
3.419 


2,311 
795 
2,297 
9,374 
1.931 


1,512 
444 
107 
1,409 
197 


I'M 
23 
92 
625 
123 


8.476 
2.61)7 
4,050 
10,191 
964 


168 
63 
80 
571 
101 


36,427 
12. OT 
16. 443 
46,425 
7,289 


3,590 
2265 
5.991 
19,238 
4,152 


107 
64 
81 


I 






843 
564 


189 


7 




183 
115 


5 


1,033 
691 


194 


New Hampshire... 


12 










361 
3,674 
610 
2,115 
5.190 
1.202 
5,676 

102 
837 
472 
1,112 
363 
1.340 
733 
970 
164 

1,196 
1,721 
699 
415 
669 
1,209 
430 
20 
16 

3,334 
1.791) 
3.154 
1,681 
1.600 
1,640 
1.540 
1,986 
82 
139 
864 
1,184 

34 

33 
255 
42 
50 
116 
M 
337 
245 
2,265 


99 
380 
149 
58 
607 


1 

405 
24 
217 
547 
125 




283 




646 
6,9)9 
671 
2,798 
11,984 
1,562 
10,073 

124 
1.771 
2.443 
1,760 
664 
2,289 
954 
1,732 
499 

2,993 
5.326 
1,359 
646 
1.535 
3.231 
1,072 
212 
69 

7.785 
3.190 
10 301) 
3.968 
2.649 
3,335 
4.267 
4,714 
322 
493 
2.241 
3,161 

112 
88 
926 
100 
449 
MB 
148 
746 
780 
3,774 


99 
558 
189 
165 
1,023 
39 
1,323 

14 
219 
280 
149 
144 
688: 

115 
445 
311 

1,079 

1,813 
464 
123 
382 
1,346 
564 
155 
65 

3,454 
1,154 
3,487 
1,426 
655 
1,222 
2.160 
1,799 
289 
454 
1.349 
1,789 

141 
80 
491 
57 
456 
161 
100 
356 
537 
1,773 


Massachusetts 
Rhode Island 
Connecticut 


9 
1 
J 

23 
4 

H 

g 
1) 
1 

10 

8 
11 

<) 
11 
6 

U 

21 
'.' 
4 
9 
16 
| 

2 
86 

H 

n 
11 

10 
9 
B 

M 
3 

ti 

U 

111 

3 
1 
4 

1 
2 

1 

9 

8 

H 


743 

301 
1,230 
141 
881 

19 
SM 

403 
128 
51 
153 
84 
109 
51 

190 
452 
102 

m 

138 
220 

78 
8 

7 

787 
269 
1,035 
299 
225 
341 
332 
403 
22 
46 
273 
306 

19 
11 
204 
11 
32 
16 
15 
84 
125 
605 


10 
1 


477 


19 


37 
29 
37 
56 


2,246 


123 






428 
2,682 
30 


""34 




58 
4 
48 

1 

16 
10 
3 
12 

28 
8 
26 
29 

51 
97 
12 
6 
28 
59 
90 
2 
13 

139 
29 
171 
68 
29 
40 
99 
114 
9 
30 
65 
70 

12 
3 
21 
3 
5 
3 
6 
22 
30 
56 


3,486 
203 
1,536 

19 
475 
385 
279 
163 
559 
180 
442 
254 

1,213 
1,546 
468 
155 
320 
1,428 
475 
186 
53 

2,748 
1.068 
2,705 
798 
641 
431) 
1.678 
2.051) 
236 
271 
850 
1,456 

78 
50 
382 
58 
252 
58 
92 
402 
384 
631 


217 
39 
412 

9 
73 
27 
85 
21 
262 
51 
169 
161 

709 
959 
292 
85 
126 
787 
290 
145 
47 

1,271 

358 
1,352 
399 
97 
175 
1,017 
1,047 
245 
274 
650 
896 

92 

56 
252 
41 
169 
34 
69 
214 
338 
261 


New Jersey 
Pennsylvania 

South Atlantic Div.- 


829 

5 

105 
126 
58 
113 
140 
62 
80 
106 

320 
783 
172 
34 
182 
519 
262 

18 

1,725 
751 
1,734 
876 
517 
765 
915 
723 
44 
87 
567 
670 

49 
22 
205 
16 
56 
58 
31 
141 
183 
1,170 


186 

3 
217 
153 
35 
5 
13 
3 
10 
5 

12 
60 
4 
4 
9 
17 
1 


35 


2,509 


6 




""is 


24*1 
1,374 
350 


ii 

18 


Dist. of Columbia. 


West Virginia 
North Carolina 
South Carolina 


6 
1 
1 

"*2 

1 

10 

""68 
11 
2 


123 

298 
30 
281 


3 
1 




South Central Div. 


588 
1.971 
159 
72 
454 
630 
170 
6 


""24 

'" - 6 
47 

""3 










Texas 






Indian Territory . . 

North Central Div. 
Ohio 






129 
86 
657 
53 
8S 
138 
38 
87 
1 
3 
93 
36 


67 
28 
323 
25 
30 
49 
27 
6 


1,232 

319 
3,593 
1,496 
259 
961 
916 
637 


70 

12 
201 
112 
6 
32 
82 










Minnesota 






North Dakota 
South Dakota 


2 
53 
15 






423 
355 


22 

27 


Kansas 


Western Division- 




4 
14 


2 

8 








256 


21 




Utah 


2 
3 
3 
6 

164 


1 

1 




















1 
2 

108 








150 
558 


12 
68 







92 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES OF LIBERAL ARTS IN THE:UNITED STATES. 


STATES 

AND 

TERRITORIES, 
1897-98. 


INCOME IN 1897-98. 


Libra- 
ries, 
bound 
vol- 
umes. 


Value of 
scien- 
tific 
appara- 
tus. 


Value of 
grounds 
and 
build- 
ings. 


Produc- 
tive 
funds. 


Bene- 
fac- 
tions. 


From 
tuition 
fees. 


From 
pro- 
ductive 
funds. 


From 
U.S. 
govern- 
ment, 
state or 
munic- 
ipal 
appro- 
pria- 
tions. 


Total 
income. 


United States... 

North Atlantic Div. 
South Atlantic Div. 
South Central Div.. 
North Central Div.. 


$7139952 


$5653683 


$4242908 


$19.21*371 


7,096.325 


$11,004.532 


$126211099 


?119632651 


$7532239 


i259.410 
828,003 

628,631 
2.366.093 
257.815 


2502.886 
391,174 

492,583 
1.580.198 
386,842 


816,702 
460.351 
323,90fi 
1.748.332 
887,617 


7.926,196 
1.691,804 
1,599,152 
6,367,137 
1,629,082 


3.215.855 
797.215 
516,21 1 
2.226.133 
340,911 


5.472,755 
598,377 
713,540 
3,359,122 
860.738 


54.209.825 
13,552,126 
10,404.700 
38,867.653 
9,176,795 


63.230,216 
9,265.485 
7,654,724 
31,434,468 
8,047,758 


3.859.243 
728,213 
320,372 
2.309.916 
314.495 


North Atl'tic Div 


67.030 
37,000 
15,992 
824,886 
101,721 
521 .293 
813,041) 
158,41)9 
720,464 

300 
199,045 
161.835 
102,808 
7.836 
80.693 
25.000 
36.636 
13,850 

78,689 
178.286 
81.632 
14,200 
55.914 
178.587 
30,451 


71,978 
65.000 
34,619 
695,747 
28,661 
293,263 
1.082.580 
171.000 
360,038 

4,980 
80,395 
64,949 
93,405 
6.408 
45.218 
27.572 
47,970 
20,277 

96,537 
129,019 
29.200 
42,043 
100.556 
76.022 
11.206 
8,000 


58,000 
5,000 
34,383 


213,196 
107,000 
104,489 
1,712,316 
131,752 
847.420 
2,744,844 
489.499 
1,575,680 

44,869 
393,-SU 
392,610 
273,769 
90,836 
177,204 
99,872 
148,920 
70,420 

254,523 
455,623 
115,115 
67,243 
214,974 
344,183 
112,591 
21,100 
13,800 

1,121,827 
491,073 
1,613,185 
649,061 
497,903 
400,514 
391.395 
580.970 
44,300 
62,215 
245,061 
209.633 

41.500 
47,243 
236,067 


129.682 
80,000 
88,268 
719.959 
100.000 
323,000 
949.342 
186,762 
638,842 

10,500 
185,310 
138,700 
160.425 
18.600 
110,100 
71,300 
83,410 
18,870 

82,187 
169.997 
61,250 
30.000 
71,700 
74,569 
22,708 
2,200 
1,600 

434,641 

200.905 
601.049 
226.661 
131,142 
92,000 
130,506 
195.495 
10,500 
17,857 
77.520 
107,857 

6,700 
5,750 
55,257 


143,625 

102.000 
105,000 
1,313.450 
340,000 
400.755 
1,413.727 
570,000 
1,084,198 

23,000 
182,377 
96,500 
95.200 
51.000 
33,550 
22,300 
75,450 
19,000 

68,940 
276,025 
70.350 
38,800 
126.25U 
93,075 
33.500 
6,000 
600 

442,800 
185,750 
565,580 
612,212 
382,500 
132.900 
287,850 
319.105 
12.850 
6.750 
235.650 
185,175 

8,800 
60,000 
69,100 


1,091,566 

650,000 
725,000 
8,142.425 
1,177,967 
6,743.030 
20.891,155 
2,525.000 
12,263,082 

101,500 
2.017,626 
4,377,500 
2,159.000 
520.000 
1,523.500 
845.000 
1,560,000 
450,000 

1,265,500 
3,414.700 
865,000 
440.000 
1,845,000 
1.959.5011 
495,000 
60.000 
60,000 

8,072.956 
3.710.000 
8.073.235 
2.333.704 
2.596.000 
2,747,560 
2.173.798 
4.884.000 
250.000 
390,500 
1,844.400 
1,811,500 

225,000 
111,540 
1,406,400 


1.661,512 
1.500,000 
755,000 
15.421,277 
807,481 
5,919,771 
24,199.969 
3,500,000 
9,465.206 

83,000 

3,407,500 
1.279,075 
1.779.000 
114,750 
770.942 
550,800 
855.618 
424,800 

1,372,495 

2,406.20(1 
365.000 
692,500 
1,947.313 
720,716 
150,500 


114,500 

156,200 
34.640 
1,559,355 
13.800 
127,500 
1,190.861 
4.000 
658,387 

200 
72,958 
43,073 
155,381 


New IJainpshire.. 


Massachusetts 
Rhode Island 
Connecticut 


273,104 
38,000 
408,215 

38,000 
79,100 
111.128 
62.500 
69.550 
25,000 
27.000 
38.073 
16,000 

66,341 
61,200 
350 
5.000 
40,138 
72,500 
66,377 
12,000 




Pennsylvania 
South Atl'tic Div. 




Dist. of Columbia. 
Virginia 


West Virginia 
North Carolina. . . 
South Carolina... 


151,573 
31.514 
59.749 
213,765 

36,881 
180.461 
300 
7.000 
7.800 
83.500 
4,430 




South Centr'l Div. 
















Indian Territory . 

North Cent'l Div. 
Ohio 


10,872 

329,671 
270.506 
672,940 
252.998 
51,140 
133.049 
201.526 
250.339 
3,099 
21,575 
68,564 
120,691 

10,500 
610 
37,040 






375,500 
115,977 
486,706 
97.042 
80,887 
82,942 
98,671 
191.390 
4.059 
3,300 
17,497 
26,227 

11,000 


334.924 
80,000 
248,000 
213.000 
293,000 
128.905 
72.979 
71,784 
30.000 
23,950 
164.250 
88,540 

19,000 
46,076 
126,000 


7.843,200 
2,041.283 
10,499.217 
1,609.983 
1,482,479 
1,61)2.091 
1,556.769 
3,771.839 
34,000 
82.500 
453.952 
397,155 


508.314 
171.550 
553,204 
252.851 
80,129 
36,421 
153.356 
360,207 
14,203 
22.800 
33,007 
123,874 

2,000 






Michigan 








North Dakota 
South Dakota 




Western Div. 








32,548 


616,910 


67,075 










48,700 
60.000 
50.450 
44.000 
40.2JO 
30.000 
423.141 


48,700 
82,948 
54.878 
45,680 
111,688 
78.732 
881.646 


3.400 
19.000 
6.457 
6,100 
27,146 
27,413 
183.63S 


40,000 
20,500 
17,030 
35.000 
23.9J8 
23.650 
562.700 


85,000 
325,000 
156.184 
130.000 
644,000 
832.000 
5.261.671 






Utah 


8,180 
40,200 
518 
40,208 
21580 
137.17< 


7.193 

3,800 
412 
8,OUO 
20,992 

302,897 


196,427 
96.000 
7.472 
150.000 
342,000 
6.639.949 


300 




Idaho 


500 
32,250 
11,600 
200.770 


Washington 
Oregon 
California 



STATISTICS OF EDUCATION. 93 


INSTRUCTORS AND STUDENTS IN CO-EDUCATIONAL COLLEGES AND UNIVERSI- 
TIES AND IN COLLEGES FOR MEN ONLY-1897-98. 


STATE OB TERRITORY. 


No. of institu- 
tions. 


PROFESS'KS 
AND IN- 
STRUCTORS 


STUDENTS. 


Total 
income. 


Preparatory 


Collegiate. 


Graduate. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male 


Male. 


Fe- 
male 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male 


United States 


480 

81 
73 

80 
108 
42 


7,788 


1,524 


31,647 


14,292 


54,7^8 


16,708 


3.669 


1,057 


$19,218,371 


North Atlantic Division 
South Atlantic Division. 
South Central Division. 
North Central Division. 
Western Division 


2,468 
8(8 
815 
2.940 

97 


116 
133 

296 
821 
158 


5,714 
2.756 
5,844 
14,946 
2.387 


687 
858 
3.440 
7,781 
1.526 


20.235 
6.093 
6.369 
18.622 
3,419 


2.311 
795 
2.297 
9.374 
1.931 


1,512 
444 
107 

1,409 
197 


194 
23 

92 
625 
123 


7.926,196 
1.691,804 
1.599,152 
6.3W.137 
1.629.082 


North Atlantic Division- 


4 
2 
8 

9 
1 
1 
23 
4 
32 

2 
11 
I 
10 
3 
15 
9 
11 
6 

13 

24 
9 
4 
9 
16 
8 
1 
2 

35 
14 
31 
11 
10 
9 
22 

26 

3 
6 
12 
19 

1 

1 

4 


86 
60 
55 
428 
71 
207 
840 
141 
590 

19 
200 
170 
97 
47 
124 
80 
80 
51 

134 

233 
77 
37 
97 
M 
59 
8 
7 

558 
235 
616 
190 
178 
148 
219 
314 
B 
46 
157 
227 

19 
11 
91 


1 






843 
564 
361 
3,674 
610 
2,115 
6,190 
1.202 
5,676 

102 

837 
472 
1,112 
313 
1,340 
733 
970 
164 

1.190 
1,721 
699 
415 
669 
1,209 
430 
20 
16 

3,324 
1,799 
3.154 
1.631 
1,600 
1,640 
1,540 
1,065 
82 
139 
864 
1,184 

34 
33 
256 


189 


7 




213,196 

107.000 
104.489 
1,712,316 
131,752 
847.420 
2^744,844 
489.499 
1,575,680 

44,869 
393,299 
392,610 
273,769 
!.836 
177,204 
99.872 
148.925 
70,420 

254,523 
455,623 
115,115 
(17,243 
214,974 
344.183 
112.591 
21,100 
13,800 

1,121.827 

491,073 
1,613.185 
64'.1.0<>1 
497.1)03 
400,514 
391.395 
680.970 
44.300 
62,215 
245.061 
269,633 

41.600 

47.243 
236,067 




12 






99 
380 
149 
S8 
607 


1 
405 
24 

217 
547 
125 


"'37 
29 
37 
66 


Massachusetts 


5 
1 


477 


19 


Rhode Island 










57 
4 

48 

1 
16 
10 
3 
12 
28 
8 
26 
29 

51 
96 
12 
6 
28 
58 
30 
2 
13 

137 
28 
144 

tit; 

29 
40 
97 
112 
9 
30 
M 
65 

12 
3 
20 


3.486 
203 
1,536 

19 
475 
385 
279 
KB 
559 
180 
442 
254 

1.213 
1,546 
468 
155 
320 
1,428 
475 
IN 
53 

2.748 
1.0U8 
2,705 
798 
641 
4% 
1678 
2.059 
236 
271 
850 
1,456 

78 
50 
382 


217 
39 
412 

9 
73 
27 
85 
21 
262 
51 
169 
161 

709 
959 
292 
86 
126 
787 
290 
145 
47 

1.271 
35S 
1.352 
399 
97 
175 
1.017 
1,047 
245 
274 
650 
890 

92 
66 
252 


New Jersey 


Pennsylvania 


829 

5 
105 
126 
68 
113 
140 
62 
80 
100 

320 
783 
172 
34 
182 
519 
262 
7 
18 

1.725 
751 
1.734 
876 
617 
765 
915 
723 
44 
87 
567 
670 

49 
22 
205 


186 

3 
217 
153 
35 
5 
13 
3 
10 
5 

12 
60 
4 
4 
9 
17 
1 


35 

"is' 

....... 

1 
1 

""2" 

1 
10 

"68" 
11 


South Atlantic Division- 
Delaware 


Maryland 


District of Columbia. .. 
Virginia 


West Virginia. .. . 


North Carolina 


South Carolina 


Georgia 


Florida 


South Central Division- 
Kentucky 




Alabama 


Mississippi 


Louisiana 


Texas 












North Central Division- 
Ohio 


129 
86 
657 
63 
88 
138 
38 
87 
1 
3 
93 
36 


67 
28 
323 
25 
30 
49 
27 
6 

'"2" 
53 
15 










Minnesota 






North Dakota 




Nebraska 


Kansas 


Western Division 




4 

14 


2 

8 








1 
2 
1 

9 
8 
12 


11 
32 
16 
15 

84 
77 
341 


3 
5 
3 
6 
23 
30 
54 


68 
252 
58 
92 

402 

384 
031 


41 

169 
84 
69 
214 
338 
261 


42 
60 
105 

Ki 
337 
245 
2,265 


16 

66 
58 
31 
141 
183 
1,170 






48,700 
82,948 
54,878 
45.tJ80 
111,688 
78.732 
881,046 


Utah 


2 
8 

3 
6 
1 

1C4 


1 
1 

"T 

2 

108 




Idaho 











94 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


INSTRUCTORS AND STUDENTS IN COLLEGES AND SEMINARIES FOR WOMEN 
WHICH CONFER DEGREES-1897-98. 


STATE OB TERRITORY. 


CO 

3 

1 

5 
& 

o 

<; 


PROFESSORS 

AND 

INSTRUCTORS 


FEMALE STUDENTS. 


Total 
income. 


"u 

1 


Female. 


It 

1 


fi 


Gradu- 
ate. 


United States 


148 


642 


1,834 


5,004 


14,556 


430 


$3325,261 


North Atlantic Division 


21 

48 
51 

26 

2 


276 
191 
105 
67 
3 


421 
519 
518 
322 
54 


1.132 
1.212 
1.390 
1,113 
157 


4,537 
4,789 
3,720 
1,446 
64 


244 
79 
80 
25 
2 


1,520,285 
719.732 
5;.'5,361 
452,478 
107,405 


South Atlantic Division 


South Central Division 


North Central Division 


Western Division ... 


North Atlantic Division- 
Maine 


2 
5 

5 
1 

8 

5 

ia 

i 

9 
9 
11 

11 
12 
9 
18 

;-! 

i 

g 

4 
1 

1 
Vi 

I 

2 


10 

138 
88 

8 
54 

29 
67 

29 
38 
37 

24 

28 
14 
28 
4 
(i 
1 

9 



170 
117 
8 
120 

58 
135 
3 
98 
81 
144 

108 

152 
87 
121 
17 
23 
ID 

90 
61 

7 
188 

18 

54 


287 
14 
511 
50 
270 

144 

282 
10 
322 
194 

no 

244 
382 
141 
457 
46 
70 
50 

220 
217 
144 
22 
399 
111 

157 


27 
2.50fi 
1,168 
2 
834 

557 
1.229 
2 
764 
980 
1,257 

789 
937 
655 
911 
85 
283 
60 

317 
2fW 
26 
10 
769 
60 

64 


5 
1P1 

84 


18.32.") 
655.144 
489.222 
12.000 
345,594 

102.046 
177.086 
4.500 
115,100 
1 23.200 
197,800 

87.406 
155.300 
H3.500 
117,427 
14.950 
52,778 
14,000 

140.523 
90.856 
31.500 
5.970 
157.579 
23,050 

107,405 


Massachusetts 


New York 




Pennsylvania 


64 

6 

7 


South Atlantic Division- 


Virginia 






11 
17 

38 

11 
22 
15 
19 


South Carolina 




South Central Division- 












13 




North Central Division- 
Ohio 


10 
10 


Illinois 








""'ft' 




46 

5 

3 




Western Division- 
California 


2 




SCHOOL AND COLLEGE POPULATION IN 1897-98. 


GRADES. 


NUMBER OF PUPILS. 


Public. Private. 


Total. 


Elementary (primary and grammar) 


14,589.036 1,249,665 
459,813 166.302 
29.728 71.330 
8.096 46,135 
46,245 21.293 
70,950 


15.838,701 
626.115 
101.058 
54.231 
67.538 
70,950 
23,501 
10.878 
3.744 
9.232 












23,501 


Schools for deaf 


10.395 483 
3,744 




Institutions for feeble-minded 


8.866 366 


Total 


15,179,424 l,6->6,524 


16.805,948 




The number of business schools in 1837-98 was 337; reform schools, 90; schools for the deaf, 
105; schools for the blind, 30; institutions for the feeble-minded, 29. 



PRESIDENTIAL VOTE 1828-86. 



GROWTH OF PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS IN THE UNITED STATES. 



YEARS. 


THEOLOGICAL 
SCHOOLS. 


LAW SCHOOLS. 


MEDICAL SCHOOLS.* 


REGULAR. 


HOM'OPATHIC. 


Number. 


Teachers. 


Pupils. 


5 
fei 

M 

68 

87 

72 
18 

V7 
83 


Teachers. 





Number. 


Teachers. 


A 


B 

= 

Si 

14 

14 
16 

n 

20 
ffi 
21 


Teachers. 


| 


1890-m . . . 


143 
141 
142 
147 
149 
144 
157 
155 


734 

854 
802 
963 
906 
869 
980 
958 


7.328 
7,729 
7.836 
7.(i58 
8,050 
8.017 
8.173 
8.371 


406 
507 
587 
621 
604 
658 
744 
845 


5.252 
6.073 
6,776 
7,311 
8.950 
9.780 
10,449 
11.615 


95 
95 
94 
109 
113 
116 
118 
122 


2,147 
2.423 
2,494 
3,077 
2.738 
2,902 
3,142 
3,423 


14.538 
14.934 
16,130 
17.601 
18.660 
19.999 
21.438 
21.002 


311 
299 
390 
478 
476 
493 
582 
629 


1,220 
l.lHi 
1,445 

1,666 
1.875 
1,956 
2,038 
1.786 


1891-M2 


1892-5)3 


1893-94 


1891-1)3 




1896-97 


1897-98 




DENTAL 
SCHOOLS. 


SCHOOLS OF 
PHARMACY. 


NURSE TRAINING 
SCHOOLS. 


VETERINARY 
SCHOOLS. 


1890-91 . 


28 
28 
29 
35 
45 
46 

50 


518 
698 
513 
794 
963 
854 

961 


2.016 

2.874 
2.852 
4,152 
5.347 
6,399 
6.460 
6,774 


30 
88 
81 

gs 

88 
M 

4:> 
45 


194 
216 
264 
283 
317 
354 
362 
401 


2.8S4 
2,799 
3,394 
3,658 
3,859 
3,873 
3.426 
3,538 


34 
36 
47 
66 
131 
177 
21)8 
377 


255 
457 
556 


1.C13 
1.862 
2.338 
2,710 
3,985 
5,094 
7.263 
8.805 


9 
8 

8 

9 
HI 

a 

14 


95 
105 
114 
118 
132 
139 
153 
173 


513 
533 
564 
554 
474 
&82 
364 
326 


1891-92 


1892-1":; . 


1893-94 


1894-95.. . 




1895-96 


1896-97 




1897-98 





"There were also In 1897-98 six eclectic schools, with 147 Instructors and 5! 
physio-medical schools, with 48 instructors and 107 students. 



538 students; two 



PRESIDENTIAL VOTE-1828-96. 



YR, Candidates. 



1828, Jackson 

1838 Adams 

1832 Jackson 

1832 Clay 

1832 Floyd 

1832 Win 

1836 Van Buren.. 
1831) Harrison.... 

1836 White 

1836 Webster 

183ti Blangum 

1840! Van Buren.. 

1840' Harrison 

1840 Birney 

18441 Polk 

1844<Clay 

1844 Birney 

1848 Taylor 

1848 Cass 

18481 Van Buren.. 

1852 Pierce 

IBStiSoott 

1852 Hale 

lsV> Buchanan... 

1S56 Fremont 

1856 Fillmore 

1860 Donslae 
I860 Breckinr'ge. 

18tM Lincoln 

I860 Bell 

1864 JMcClel Ian... 

1864 Lincoln 

1868, Seymour. 



Party. 



Democrat. . 
Federal 
Democrat.. 

Whig 

Whig 

Whig 

Democrat.. 

Whig 

Whig 

Whig 

Whig 

Democrat. . 

Whig 

Liberty 

Democrat. . 

Whig 

Liberty 

Whig 

Democrat. . 
Free Soil... 
Democrat. . 

Whig 

Free Soil... 
Democrat. . 
Republican 
American.. 
I Democrat.. 
Democrat.. 
'Republican 

I Union 

Democrat. . 
Republican 
Democrat. . 



Popular 
vote. 

647,231 
509.097 
687,502 
550,189 

33,108 
761,549 

736,656 

1,128,702 

1,275,017 

7,059 

1,337,243 

1,229.0(8 

62.300 

1.3(50.101 

1.220.544 

291,263 
1,601,474 
1.386.678 

156,149 
1,S38,1(!9 
1,341,264 

874,534 
1.375,157 

845.763 
1.866.352 

589.581 
1.K08.725 
2.216.067 
2.709,613 



Elec- 
toral YR. Candidates, 
vote. 



'J74 
114 
8 
12 
72 
180 
M 
21 
216 

sot 



1868 Grant 

1872i(ireeley.... 
1872 O'Conor.... 

1872 Grant 

1872 Black 

1876Tilden 

1876 Hayes 

1876 Cooper 

1876 Smith 

1880 Hancock.. 
l&SOGartield.... 
1880 Weaver.... 

]m now 

1884 Cleveland. 

1884 Blaine 

18841 Butler 

1884 St. John.... 
1888 Cleveland. 
1888 Harrison.. 
1888 Streeter.... 
18*8 Fisk. 



Cleveland. 
1S92 Harrison. . 



Weaver . . . 



Wing . 



1892 

1896 McKinley . 

18>'6 Bryan 

1896. Bryan 

1896 Levering . 



1S96 



189ti Palmer 



Bentley 

Matchett 



Party. 



Republican 
Democrat.. 
Ind. Dem... 
Republican 
T'mpera'ce 
Democrat. . 
Republican 
Greenback. 
Prohibition 
Democrat.. 
Republican 
Greenback. 
Prohibition 
Democrat. . 
Republican 
Greenback. 
Prohibition 
Democrat.. 
Republican 

Labor 

Prohibition 
Democrat. . 
Republican 
Prohibition 

People's 

Socialist.. .. 
Republican 
Democrat. . 
People's .. . . 
Prohibition 
National... 
Soc. Labo 



Nat. Dem... 



Popular 
vote. 



3.015,071 

2,834,079 

29,408 

3,597,070 

5,608 

4,284.885 

4,033,950 

81,740 

9,522 

4,442,035 

4,449,053 

307,306 

10,487 

4,874,986 

4,851,981 

173,370 

150,369 

5388,660 

5,441,902 

147,521 

249,937 

5.556.562 

5.162.874 

264,066 

1,065.424 

22.613 

7.107,82-' 

6,288.M>; 

222.207 

130.683 

13,95< 

33,54? 



133,801) 



Elec 
tor Hi 
vote. 

214 

66 

'"292 

'"i84 
185 



Owing to the death of Mr. Greeley, the 66 electoral votes were variously cast: Thomas A. 
HendricKs receiving 42, B.Gratz Brown 18. Horace Greeley 3, Charles J.Jenkins 2, David Davis 1. 



96 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


INTERNAL REVENUE. 




Comparative statement showing the receipts from the several objects of internal taxation 
in the United States during the fiscal years ended June 30, 1898 and 1899. 


OBJECTS OP TAXATION. 


1898. 


1899. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


SPIRITS. 

Spirits distilled from apples, peaches, grapes, 
pears, pineapples, -oranges, apricots, berries 
and prunes 


$1.552,592.94 
86.188.630.91 
221.22o.24 
4,152,572.5H 
393.2115.74 
822.91 
1,690.00 
2.fi78.00 
33.570.50 


$1.436,839.50 
92,201,245.77 
259.899.41 
4.895,086.63 
469,874.64 
1,077.11 
2.380.00 
2,563.10 
14.568.00 




$115,753.44 


Spirits distilled from other materials 


$6,012,614.8U 
38.674. 17 
742,514.10 
76.657.90 
25450 
690.00 


Rectifiers (special tax) 


Hetail liquor dealers (special tax) 




Wholesale liquor dealers (special tax) 




Manufacturers of stills (special tax) 




Stills and worms, manufactured (special tax).. 
Stamps for distilled spirits intended for export 
Case stamps for distilled spirits bottled in bond 
Total.... 




114.90 
19.002.50 




TOBACCO. 

Cigars weighing more than 3 pounds per thou- 


13,626,049.71 
405,676.88 
3,593,011.09 

6.693.47 
931,869.04 
17,657,276.45 


*16,307,108.05 
547,415.52 
4,203,753.86 

9,461.39 

+1.751,797.44 
i28.4.W>n.:.'t: 
73.657.46 
22.462.00 
29.139.12 
324,090.01 
770.333.5Ji 


2,681,058.34 
141,738.64 
610,742.17 

2.767.92 
819.928.40 
10.796.712.81 
73,657.46 
22,462.00 
29.139.12 
324.090.01 
7M.3S8.40 




Cigars weighing not more than 3 pounds per 




Cigarettes weighing not more than 3 pounds 




Cigarettes weighing more than 3 pounds per 




Snuff 






Dealers in leaf tobacco 




Manufacturers of tobacco 
Manufacturers of cigars 
Miscellaneous collections relating to tooacco.. 

Total 

FERMENTED LIQUORS. 

Ale, beer, lager beer, porter and other similar 
fermented liquors 


""fl,946.i3 




3fi.230.522.37 


52.493,207.64 


16.2fi2.685.27 




38,885.151.63 
152.647.81 
201.150.15 
276,471.75 


67,673,301.31 
179.357.40 
232.H99.56 
382,409.34 

177.090.84 


28,788.149.68 
26,709.79 
31.249.41 
105,937.59 

177.090.84 




Retail dealers in malt liquors (special tax) 
Wholesale dealers in maltliquors (special tax) 
Additional collections on fermented liquors 
stored in warehouse, act of June 13, 1898 
Total 






39.515.421.14 


68,644,558,45 


29,129,137.31 




OLEOMA RGARINE. 

Oleomargarine, domestic and Imported 
Manufacturers of oleomargarine (special tax). 
Retail dealers In oleomargarine (special tax) . . 
Wholesale dealers in oleomargarine (special 
tax) 


1,107.774.54 

7.600.00 
156,134.00 

44.272.00 


1,609.912.56 

11.500.00 
263,322.00 

71,884.00 


502.138.02 
3.900.00 
107,188.00 

27.612.00 






Total 


1,315,780.54 


1,956,618.56 


6W.838.02 




FILLED CHEESE. 

Filled cheese, domestic and Imported 


14,129.23 
2,233.32 
156.00 


16.886.41 
1,200.01 
12.00 


2,757.18 




Manufacturers of filled cheese (special tax)... . 
Retail dealers in filled cheese (special tax) 
Wholesale dealers in filled cheese (special tax) 
Total 


1.033.31 
144.00 






16.518.55 


1S.09S.42 


1.579.87 




MIXED FLOUR. 

Per barrel of 196 Ibs., or more than 98 IDS 
Half barrel of 98 Ibs.. or more than 49 Ibs 
Quarter barrel of 49 Ibs., or more than 24J^ Ibs.. 




1.787.10 
1,961.23 
532.01 
1,700.88 

1.859.40 


1.787.10 
1.961 .Si 
532.01 
1.700.88 

1.859.40 




Eighth barrel of 24"^ Ibs. or less 






Manufacturers, packers, or repackers of mixed 
flour (special tax) 






Total 




7.840.62 


7.840.H2 




SPECIAL TAXES NOT ELSEWHERE ENUMER- 
ATED. 

Bankers, capital not exceeding $25.000 


2.500.00 
44.473.00 


448,702.08 
3,302,134.91 


446,202.08 
3.257.661.91 




Bankers, capital exceeding $25.000. for each ad- 
ditional $1 .000 in excess of $20.000 




* Includes $2,1<J1.23. at $3 per M. J Includes $1.935.92, at cents per pound, 
t Includes $3,455.27, at 6 cents per pound. Includes $2,070.31. at $1 per barrel. 



INTERNAL REVENUE. 97 


COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS OF INTERNAL TAXATION. CONTINUED. 


OBJECTS OP TAXATION. 


1898. 


1899. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


SPECIAL TAXES. CONTINUED. 
Billiard rooms 
Brokers, stocks, bonds, etc 




1367,074.65 
357.010.70 
181.919.42 
8.105.01 
50,522.73 
61,319.22 


$367,074.65 
357,010.70 
181.919.42 
8,105.01 
50,522.73 
61.349.22 










Brokers, pawn 
Bowl ing alleys , 






Circuses 




18.233.17 
72,161.93 
54,376.39 


18,233.17 
72,164.93 
64,376.39 




Exh i l ii MI i us not otherwise provided for 
Theaters, museums and concert halls 






LEGACIES AND DISTRIBUTIVE SHARES OP 
PERSONAL PROPERTY. 

Legacies, lineal issue or ancestor, brother or 
sister 




558.247.00 
225,568.08 

48,630.55 
6,721.99 
396,267.63 


553,247.00 
225,568.08 

48,630.55 
6,721.99 
396,267.63 




Legacies, brother or sister of the father or 
mother, or a descendant of a brother or sis- 






Legacies, brother or sister of the grandfather 
or grandmother, or a descendant of the 
brother or sister of the same 






Legacies, any other degree of collateral con- 
sanguinity than is hereinbefore stated, or 
stranger in blood 






Total 




1.235,435.25 


1,235,435.25 




SCHEDULES A AND B. 

Schedule A 


724,073.9* 
70,343,66 


38.618.081.20 
5.219,737.41 


37,894.007.26 
5,149,393.80 




Schedule B 
Total 

BANKS, BANKERS, ETC. 




794,417.60 


43,837,818.61 


43,043,401.00 












Notes of persons, state banks, towns, cities, 
etc., paid out 


1.180.00 






$1,180.00 


Total 


1,180.0 






1,180.00 


M ISCELLA N EOUS. 




643,446,41 


643,446 41 






114.90 
2fil.080.tfc 
13ii.750.OT 
1,060.76 
T99 000 3* 




114;90 




271.128.84 

166,570.25 
4.716.97 

I IHJ SliS 17 


10.048.18 
29.S26.18 
3.656.21 






Collections not otherwise herein provided for. 






170,866,819.36 


273,484,573.44 


102617,754.08 








D1STILLEI 

Number of gallons of spirits rectified In th 
1399, by states and territories. 
States and Territories. Gallons. 
Alabama auy.lfio.nO 
Arkansas 7.332. 74 


) SPIRITS, 
e United Sta 

States am 
Montana, I( 
Nebraska a 
New Hamp 


tes during the year end 

Territories. 
laho and Utah 


ed June 30, 

Gallons. 
58.728.00 
389.266.16 

1,400.27 

365.8111. 33 
17.457.62 
12, 192.291. (B 
524.158.27 
10.503,099.14 
190,172.84 
8.608.fi06.41 
693.494.84 
294.661.43 
919,342.42 
159.717.11 
1,379.888. 18 


California and Nevada 2,421.12(1.90 


shire, Maine and Ver- 


Colorado and Wyoming 71,968.50 


Connecticut and Rhode Island 532.OTO.iH 
Georgia 176.720.84 


New Jersey 
New Mexic< 
New York . 




) and Arizon 




Illinois 6.283520 ii 




Indiana . 1,192 tii ;' 7,s 


North Caro 
Ohio 


Una. 


Iowa 7872059 




Kansas 2,402.50 


Oregon and 
Pennsylvai 
Tennessee 
Texas 


Washington 
ia 




Kentucky 6,880.202.50 
Louisiana and Mississippi 950,979.19 




Maryland, Delaware and District 
ofColumbla 5,214.241.73 




Virginia 


Massachusetts . 3,81(1 ;">s7 .~>7 


West Virgi 
Wisconsin 

Total . . 


ala 


Michigan 321.97:1.51 




Missouri 2.912,834.05 


67,055,508.07 



98 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


PRODUCTION OF FERMENTED LIQUORS F 
States and Territories. Barrels. 
Alabama 51,605 


DR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1899. 
States and Territories. Barrels. 
Montana 164344 


Arkansas.... 8.243 


Nebraska 216665 


California 712.529 


New Hampshire . 301823 


Colorado 244.201 


New Jersey 2 043 999 


Connecticut C73,299 


New Mexico. . 4038 


Florida 10,121 
Georgia ,.. .. . 117,488 


NewYork 9,065,347 
North Carolina 107 


Illinois .. . ... 3549534 


Ohio 2 785 489 


Indiana 766,896 


Oregon 254159 


Iowa 187,892 
Kansas 7,812 


Pennsylvania 4,299.00t; 
South Carolina . 7 022 


Kentucky 434,528 
Louisiana 193 761 


Tennessee 126,427 
Texas 299 861 


Maryland 976,293 
Massachusetts 1,763.989 


Virginia 137'.079 
West Virginia . 140 738 


Michigan 804,480 
Minnesota 581 212 


Wisconsin 2,797,188 


Missouri 2254039 


Total 36 581 114 






RECEIPTS BY STATES AND TERRITC 
States and Territories. Collections. 
Alabama $508.296.92 
Arkansas 269.931! 30 


RIES DURING THE FISCAL YEAR 1899. 
States and Territories. Collections. 
Montana g $681,097. 21 
Nebraska h 3,42807938 


California a . 4,348,693 48 


New Hampshire i 1,34103609 


Colorado b 1,248.135.22 


New Jersey 8,074,261.18 


Connecticut c 2,916,759.03 
Florida 682,422.50 
Georgia 941,726.30 


New Mexico j 132,867.28 
New York 46.634,980. 98 
North Carolina 4,921016.91 


Illinois.... 47,359,523.87 


Ohio 21341065.75 


Indiana 17.213,070 97 


Oregon k 1 074 921 . 81 


Iowa.... . 2,003,256.26 


Pennsylvania 23.335.573.53 
South Carolina 284,278 15 


Kansas d . 944.S25.37 


Kentucky. .. 22,215,234.23 


Tennessee 2,173,895 50 


Louisiana e 2,254,173.74 
Maryland/ 813040941 


Texas 1.577,833. 59 
Virginia 481585108 


Massachusetts 8,153.620.36 
Michigan 4.643,795.49 


West Virginia 1.430.106.57 
Wisconsin 9.467,065.41 


Minnesota 2,587,688.23 
Missouri 1636907534 


Tot.nl .-. . . . . 273.484.573 44 


a Including the state of Nevada, b Including the state of Wyoming, c Including the state 
of Rhode Island, d Including the Indian Territory and the territory of Oklahoma, e Includ- 
ing the state of Mississippi. /Including the state of Delaware, District of Columbia and two 
counties of Virginia, g including the states of Idaho and Utah. ft. Including the states of 
North Dakota and South Dakota, i Including the states of Maine and Vermont, j Includ- 
ing the territory of Arizona, k Including the state of Washington and the territory of Alaska 

STILLS SEIZED AND CASUALTIES TO OFFICERS AND EMPLOYES FOR THE 
LAST TEN YEARS. 


1890. 1891. 1892. 1893. 1894. 1895. 1896. 1897. 1898. 1899. Total. 


Stillsseized '. 583 795 8 


52 806 1.016 1,874 1,905 2,273 2,391 2,190 14,685 
3 ... 1 ... 1 2 1 10 








ILLICIT STILI 

. Stills Seized , Persons 
Districts. Destroyed. Removed, arrested 
Alabama 187 3 138 


S SEIZED. 1899. 

Stills Seized , Persons 
Districts. Destroyed. Removed, arrested 
Third New York 9 8 


Arkansas . . 88 115 


Fourteenth New York 112 
Fourth N. Carolina... 171 


Fourth California 1 


Florida .. 1 1 


Fifth North Carolina. 368 62 
Twenty-third Penn.... 2 1 
South Carolina 145 4 72 


Georgia G0 66 260 




Fifth Kentucky . . . 14 


Second Tennessee 41 2 4 
Fifth Tennessee 46 8 


Seventh Kentucky ... 11 
Eighth Kentucky 155 6 9 
Louisiana (embracing 
Mississippi) 38 


Second Virginia 5 


Sixth Virginia 204 


First Michigan 1 


West Virginia 3 7 


1 Fifth New Jersey 
First New York 236 


Tntal ... 2.101 88 711 


Casualties J. A. Robertson and J. F. Miller, possemen. wounded. Sept. 9, 1898. In Polk county, 
North Carolina. Deputy Marshal Taylor Harr s seriously wounded April 17, 1899. in Haywood 
county, North Carolina. Sheriff J. S. Dawson killed April 21, 1899, in Haywood county, North 
Carolina. 



INTERNAL REVENUE. 



'.Hi 



QUANTITY OF LEAF TOBACCO USED BY MANUFACTURERS DURING THE LAST 

TEN YEAKS. 



YEAK. 



Pounds. 



Product. 



Total. 



) 83,513,1162 Cigars and cigarettes ) vaaaniA 

889 -"- ! 220,423,612 Tobacco and snuff .. \ *B-937.4 

\ 91,746,311 Cigars and cigarettes j -*iia97(u 

* i 220,116,473 Tobacco and snuff \ dll,8M,7B* 

85,435,928 Cigars .. ) 

1891.... 9,115,810 Cigarettes } 332,511,067 

237,959.329 Tobacco and snuff ... .. ) 

90,875,830 Cigars > 

1S92.... 9,907.222 Cigarettes 339,012,619 

"38,229,567 Tobacco and snuff ) 

84.428,797 Cigars ) 

1393.... 12,497,185 Cigarettes } 312,907,679 

215,981,699 Tobacco and snuff. > 

77.359,405 Cigars > 

1894.... 12,614,409 Cigarettes > 317,640,403 

227,666,589 Tobacco and snuff ) 

77,499,875 Cigars > 

16.094,838 Cigarettes V 323,656,332 

230,062,119 Tobacco and snuff ) 

76,938.866 Cigars ) 

19,114,190 Cigarettes V 308,398,583 

213,345,527 Tobacco and snuff ) 

77,452,711 Cigars (large) I 

1,283.360 Cigars (small) I wr 171 KB 

17,477,402 Cigarettes f W'Bif* 

2i.957,5f Tobacco and snuff ) 

83,460,874 Cigarsdarge) 1 

1,977.100 Cigars (small) 1 y&KZ'lTV 

17,081,349 Cigarettes \ "' 

247,358,414 Tobacco and snuff. J 

NOTE. The quantity of leaf tobacco reported used in 1898 includes scraps and stems. 



MATERIALS USED FOR THE PRODUCTION OF DISTILLED SPIRITS-1899. 



STATES. 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maryland 

Massachusetts.. . 

Missouri 

Nebraska 

New Hampshire. 

New Jersey 

New York 

North Carolina. . 

Ohio 

Oklahoma Ter.... 

Pennsylvania 

South Carolina . . 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia.... 
Wisconsin 
Total 



Malt. IT heat 



Bu. 

4,874 

1,831) 

6,753 

17 

4,519 

184 

10,051 

33 

834.514 

305,6)2 

62 

il.VlIM 



81,654 
863 



. 

73.269 
26.271 
197,581 
163 

204.812 
3,748 
18,46' 
672 
31 

3.538 
16 

6.509 
70,636 



2,471,417 



13 

2,904 



246 



13 

5,360 



674 
' 1,246 



1,562 
3,143 



3,46 



19.182 



Bar- 
ley. 



1.518 



Rye. 



Bu. 
1,544 
1,057 
15,253 

12.182 
685 

""is 

200.946 

70,083 

19 

740.802 



. 

4,665 
4,522 
15,324 



48,000 
208.991 
26,630 
li'.b.'.CI 
232 

1,099.916 

2,837 

15,096 

45'. 

31 

11,729 



Com. 



Bu. 

28,704 
12,792 
4,238 

146 
11.467 

623 
58,644 



6,442,927 

2,557.765 

669 

3,182,647 



43,928 

4,463 

178.942 

415.654 



48.000 

361.452 

221.837 

1,503.795 

1,471 

79.642 

30,053 

169,505 

4,772 

256 

24,918 

380 

606 

289,723 



15.682.80S) 14.805 



6 

7.645 



4,896 
"638 



1.356 



25.S 
2t> 



13? 

vie. 



Gals. 



109.362 
943,355 



20.480 



6,540 



1.3501 2.920,660 



* Total. 
terials. 



5,520 



5,520 



Bu. 

35,152 
15,715 
28.148 
180 
28,168 
1,392 



565 

7.47S.593 

2,941,368 

663 

4,448,844 



9,971 

201.7(17 
479,667 



128,000 

643,715 

279,637 

2,01)5,511 

1,866 

1,388,103 

36,844 

203.678 

5,934 

318 

40.1448 

396 

65,497 

454.207 



21,580,468 



96 295 933 
The average yield per bushel of grain used was 21 '580' 468" ~* *** + K allons of spirits. 

The average yield per gallon of molasses used for the production of spirits was 
.814 + of a gallon. 

The average yield per gallon of molasses used in the production of rum was 
+ of a gallon. 



.755 



100 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



OPERATIONS OF MANUFACTURERS OF TOBACCO AND CIGARS. 
(Calendar year 1898.) 

Number of registered manufacturers of tobacco 3,186 

Number who qualified as manufacturers for the purpose of buying and selling refuse 

scraps, cuttings and clippings 60 

Number who qualified as manufacturers for the purpose of disposing of the old stock of 

manufactured tobacco 135 

Number o f persons who produced perique tobacco 57 

Number who qualified as manufacturers and confined their operations exclusively to 

the manufacture of snuff 105 

Number who qualified as tobacco manufacturers who also operated cigar factories 1,800 

Number who qualified for the express purpose of manufacturing plug, twist and smok- 
ing tobacco and snuff T 1,029 

Total 3,186 

QUANTITY OF TOBACCO AND SNUFF MANUFACTURED. Pounds. 

Quan ti ty of plug and twist tobacco produced 160.876,541 

Quantity of fl ne-cut chewing tobacco produced 11,415,231 

Quantity of smoking tobacco produced 89.240,526 

Quantity of snuff produced 13.607.631 

Total quantity of tobacco and snuff produced -. 275,139,929 

CIGARS AND CIGARETTES MANUFACTURED. 

Number of cigars weighing more than 3 pounds per 1.000 produced 4,458,836,966 

Number of cigars weighing not more than 3 pounds per 1,000 produced 466,8X1,334 

Number of cigarettes weighing not more than 3 pounds per 1.000 produced 4,384,037.982 

Numberof cigarettes weighing more than 3 pounds per 1,000 produced 1,745,915 

CIGAR FACTORIES. 

Number of cigar and cigarette factories operated 30, 856 

Number making cigarettes exclusively 339 

LEAK TOBACCO. Pounds. 

Quantity of leaf tobacco used in the production of large cigars 83,460,874 

Quantity of leaf tobacco used in the production of small cigars 1,977,100 

Quantity of leaf tobacco used in the production of cigarettes 17,081,349 

Quantity of leaf and scrap tobacco used in the production of chewing and smoking 

tobacco and snuff 247,358,414 

Total leaf tobacco used 349.877,737 

Average quantity of leaf tobacco used per 1.000 large cigars 18.67 

Average quantity of leaf tobacco used per 1.000 smal 1 cigars 4.32 

Average quantity of leaf tobacco used per 1,000 large cigarettes 13.21 

Average quantity of leaf tobacco used per 1,000 smal 1 cigarettes 3.84 



SUGAR STATISTICS. 

Quantity of sugar imported Into the United States from the principal countries of supply 
during each fiscal year from 1895 to 1898, inclusive. 



COUNTRIES FROM 
WHICH IMPORTED. 



1894. 



1895. 



1896. 



1897. 



1898. 



Annual average. 



Cuba 

Germany 

Dutch East Indies... 

Hawaii 

British West Indies 

Brazil 

British Guiana 

Santo Domingo 

Philippine Islands .. 

Porto Rico 

Belgium 

Egypt 

United Kingdom.... 
Austria-Hungary... . 

N etherlands 

France 

China 

Dutch Guiana 

British Africa 

Danish West Indies 

Hongkong 

Canada 

Other countries 

Total . . . 



Pounds. 



Pounds. 



Pounds. 



2,127.502.819 1,845,763.398 1.093.171.312 



358,649,535 
2Stj.013.620 
326,574,584 
256.821,752 
258.447,122 
134.455,359 
89,421,821 
124.052.343 
75,546.030 
80,479,170 



58.241.416 
44.53C.822 
23.S2U.54S 
13.909.622 
21.189.075 
12,787.452 

8,595.345 
15,558.54<i 
11.203.621) 

3.846.249 
11.532.522 



311,182,968 
280.464.270 
274.385.228 
193.498,237 
180.262,039 
110,848.960 
66.492,169 
68,770.492 
56,352.954 
24.338,139 
23.250,815 
40.610,295 
7,411,234 
12,600.203 
35,832 
23.R96.923 
8.794.544 
3,776.030 
9,131.539 
8.aM.495 
8,329.961 
16.162.679 



525.991.65: 
567,670,780 
352,175,269 
217,421,118 
191,457,878 
146.433.256 
116.972,841 
145,075,344 
81.582,810 
72.721,186 
100.SS5.S1 7 
56,992.162 
40,703.929 
40.9ii5.863 
34.810,370 
31.827.859 
12,209.609 
26.564.115 
12.202.619 
12.646.973 
1.304,837 
15.611.403 



Pounds. 

577,790.173 

1,604,233.071 

634,171,629 

431,217,116 

322.103.866 

140.773 692 

175.639,179 

131,279,582 

72,463,577 

86.607,317 

130.423.987 

124.055.211 

68.250.019 

105,138.128 

82,248.664 

92.ltffl.241 

11,437.760 

18.043.833 

25.895,460 

16.999,34' 

3.243.630 

1,098.330 

62.622.921 



Pounds. Pounds. 
440.2-'5.111 1,216,890.463 
175,275,440 595,066,534 
621,731.4r,2 478,410.352 
490,776396 376.825,819 
231.401,746 244.249,344 
I39.426.2S5: 
139.145.529 

94.336.444 

29,489,600 



98,452,421 

1.366.370 
52.S54.144 
21.10ii.706 

2,788.767 

38,659.827 

17,781 

7,lfil,604 
25,688,841 
12.081.142 
14.832.991 

4.ia3,246 

717.532 

39.753,407 



4.345.193.881 3.574,510.454 3.896.3>.'>.Y 



182,073,403 
141.304,457 
99,700,572 
87,970.271 
79,708.306 
61,865.770 
5!.999,097 
49,040.120 
40.115.776 
39.1)60.821 
28,188,569 
19.062.656 
15.512.S56 
15.382.418 
13.745.018 
7,805,795 
3.059.392 
29.336.586 



4.918.905.733 2.IVS9.920.851 3.S34.987.39 



Per ct. 

31.32 

15.32 

12.31 

9.70 

6.29 

4.69 

3.64 

2.57 

2.26 

2.05 

1.59 

1.54 

1.26 

1.03 

1.02 

.73 

.49 

.40 

.40 

.35 

.20 

.08 

.76 

100.00 



THE PEACE CONFERENCE. 



101 



THE PEACE CONFERENCE. 



In pursuance of the rescript of Nicholas 
II., czar of Russia (a copy of which may be 
found in The Daily News Almanac for 1899, 
page 102), for the limitation of the evils 
of militarism, an international conference 
was appointed to be held at The Hague on 
the 18th of May, 1899, to which the various 
governments of the world were invited to 
send delegates to represent them in the 
proposed deliberations. On the llth of Jan- 
uary, 1899, a circular was issued by Count 
Muravieff, Russian minister of foreign af- 
fairs, to all the powers having diplomatic 
representatives at St. Petersburg, in which 
the various proposals to be submitted for 
discussion at the conference were outlined. 

PROPOSALS SUBMITTED. 

This circular was as follows: 

"When, in the month of August last, my 
august master instructed me to propose to 
the governments which have representa- 
tives in St. Petersburg the holding of a 
conference with the object of seeking more 
efficacious means for assuring to all peoples 
the blessings of real and lasting peace, 
and, before all, In order to put a stop to 
the progressive development of the present 
armaments, there appeared to be no obstacle 
in the way of the realization, at no distant 
date, of this humanitarian scheme. The 
cordial manner in which the step taken by 
the imperial government was greeted by 
nearly all the powers could not fail to 
strengthen this view. While highly appre- 
ciating the sympathetic terms in which the 
adhesions of most of the powers were 
drafted, the imperial cabinet also feels 
lively satisfaction at the testimonies of 
very warm approval which have been ad- 
dressed to it and continue to be received 
from all classes of society in various parts 
of the globe. Notwithstanding the strong 
current of opinion which set in in favor of 
the idea of general pacification, the polit- 
ical horizon has undergone a sensible 
change in this last respect. Several pow- 
ers nave undertaken fresh armaments, 
striving to further increase their military 
forces, and in the presence of this uncer- 
tain situation it might be asked whether 
the powers considered the present moment 
opportune for the international discussion 
of the ideas set forth in the circular of 
Oct. 12 (old style), 1898. 

"Hoping, however, that the elements of 
trouble agitating the political spheres will 
soon give place to a calmer disposition, of 
a nature to favor the success of the pro- 
posed conference, the imperial government 
is of opinion that it would be possible to 
proceed forthwith to a preliminary ex- 
change of views between the powers with 
the object (a) of seeking without delay 
means for putting a stop to the progressive 
increase of military and naval armaments, 
a question the solution of which becomes 
evidently more and more urgent in view of 
the fresh extension given to these arma- 
ments; and (b) of preparing the way for a 
discussion of the questions relating to the 
possibility of preventing armed conflicts by 
the pacific means at the disposal of inter- 
national diplomacy. 

"In the event of the powers considering 
the present moment favorable for the meet- 
Ing of a conference on these bases, it would 
certainly be useful for the cabinets to come 



to an understanding on the subject of the 
programme of their labors. The proposals 
to be submitted for international discussion 
at the conference could, in general terms, 
be summarized as follows: 

"1. An understanding not to increase for 
a fixed period the present effective of the 
armed military and naval forces, and, at 
the same time, not to increase the budgets 
pertaining thereto; a preliminary examina- 
tion of the means by which a reduction 
might even be effected in future in the 
forces and budgets above mentioned. 

"2. To prohibit the use in the armies and 
fleets Of any new kind of firearms what- 
ever, and of new explosives, or any pow- 
ders more powerful than those now In use 
either for rifles or cannon. 

"3. To restrict the use in military war- 
fare of the formidable explosives already 
existing, and to prohibit the throwing of 

Erojectiles or explosives of any kind from 
alloons or by any similar means. 

"4. To prohibit the use in naval warfare 
of submarine torpedo-boats or plungers, or 
other similar engines of destruction; to 
give an undertaking not to construct ves- 
sels with rams in the future. 

"6. To apply to naval warfare the stipu- 
lations of the Geneva convention of 1864, 
on the basis of the articles added to the 
convention of 1868. 

"6. To neutralize ships and boats em- 
ployed in saving those overboard during or 
after an engagement. 

"7. To revise the declaration concerning 
the laws and customs of war elaborated in 
1874 by the conference of Brussels, which 
has remained unratifled to the present day. 

"8. To accept in principle the employ- 
ment of the good offices of mediation and 
facultative arbitration in cases lending 
themselves thereto, with the object of pre- 
venting armed conflicts between nations; 
an understanding with respect to the mode 
of applying these good offices, and the 
establishment of a uniform practice in 
using them. 

"It is well understood that all questions 
concerning the political relations of states 
and the order of things established by 
treaties, as generally all questions which 
do not directly fall within the programme 
adopted by the cabinets, must be absolutely 
excluded from the deliberations of the con- 
ference. 

"In requesting you, monsieur, to be good 
enough to apply to your government for 
instructions on the subject of my present 
communication, I beg you at the same time 
to inform it that, in the interest of the 
great cause which my august master has so 
much at heart, his imperial majesty con- 
siders it advisable that the conference 
should not sit In the capital of one of the 
great powers, where so many political In- 
terests are centered which might, perhaps, 
impede the progress of a work in which 
all the countries of the universe are equally 
interested." 

PERSONNEL OP THE CONFERENCE. 

Notwithstanding the very general feeling 
of skepticism as to the results of the con- 
ference, the czar's invitation was accepted 
by twenty powers, which are named below, 
with their delegates: 

United States Seth Low, president of the 



102 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



Columbia university, New York; Andrew L>. 
White, ambassador at Berlin; Stanford 
Newell, minister at The Hague; Capt. Wil- 
liam Crozier of the ordnance department of 
the army, Capt. A. T. Manan of the navy, 
Frederick Holls, secretary of the delega- 
tion. 

Great Britain Sir Julian Pauncefote, G. 
C. B., her majesty's ambassador at Wash- 
ington; Sir Henry Howard, K. C. M. G., 
minister at The Hague. They were as- 
sisted, as naval and military experts, by 
Vice-Admiral Sir John Fisher, K. O. B., 
and Maj.-Gen. Sir John Ardagh, K. C. I. E. 

France M. Leon Bourgeois, ex -premier; 
M. d'Estournelles, deputy for La Sarthe 
and formerly charge d'affaires at the 
French embassy in London. 

Germany Count Munster, ambassador at 
Paris; Baron von Stengel of the Munich 
university. Prof. Dr. Zorn of the University 
of Konigsberg; Capt. Siegel, naval attache 
at the German embassy in Paris; Col. 
Gross von Schwarzhoff, commanding the 
94th regiment of infantry. 

Denmark M. de Bille, Danish minister 
in London; Col. Schnaek, ex-war minister; 
Baron Reedtz Thott. 

Austria-HungaryCount Rudolph Welser- 
sheimb, first under secretary at the foreign 
office in Vienna; Herr von Okolicsanyl, 
Austro-Hungarian minister at The Hague, 
assisted by an expert in international law, 
and Lieut. -Col. Kuepach, chief of the gen- 
eral staff of the 3d infantry division at 
Linz, acted as military adviser to Count 
Welsersheimb. 

Russia M. de Staal, ambassador In Lon- 
don (president of the conference); Prof. 
Martens of the St. Petersburg university; 
M. de Struve, minister resident at The 
Hague. 

Italy Count Nigra, ambassador at Vi- 
enna; Count Zanini, minister plenipoten- 
tiary at The Hague; Gen. Zuccari, formerly 
military attache at Berlin; Capt. Blanco, 
naval attache in London. 

Portugal Count de Macedo, Portuguese 
minister at Madrid; Angostinho d'Ornellas, 
Portuguese minister at St. Petersburg; 
Count de Sellr, Portuguese minister at The 
Hague. 

Spain Duke de Tetuan, life senator and 
ex-minister of foreign affairs; Senator 
Lamirez de Villaurrutia, minister plenipo- 
tentiary at Brussels; M. de Baguer, minis- 
ter plenipotentiary at The Hague. 

Holland M. de Beaufort, minister for for- 
eign affairs; Prof. Asser, another great au- 
thority on international law. 

Belgium M. Beernaet, president of the 
chamber of deputies and minister of state; 
Chevalier Descamps-David, senator; Count 
de Grelle-Kogiar, minister plenipotentiary 
at The Hague. 

Switzerland Dr. Roth, Swiss minister at 
Berlin; Col. Kuenzli, member of the na- 
tional council (Aargua): M. Ddier, national 
council (Geneva); Dr. Suter, an official in 
the political department, secretary to the 
Swiss delegates. 

Sweden and Norway Baron de Bildt, 
Swedish minister In Rome, assisted on the 
part of Sweden by Col. Brandstrom and 
Commander Hjulhammar as military and 
naval experts, and on the part of Norway 
by M. W. Konow, president of the odel- 
sting, and Gen. Thaulow. 

Turkey Tnrkhan Pasha, member of the 
council of state and formerly minister for 



foreign affairs; Nouri Bey, general secre- 
tary at the Porte. 

Persia Mirza Riza Khan (Arfa-ed-Dow- 
leh), minister resident at St. Petersburg, a 
soldier as well as a diplomat. 

Slam Marquis Suriya, minister to France. 

Servia M. Myatovitch, minister to Great 
Britain. 

Japan Baron Hayashi, minister plenipo- 
tentiary at St. Petersburg; M. Motono, 
Japanese minister at Brussels; Col. Uye- 
hara, for the army; Capt. Sakomolo, for 
the navy. 

Roumania M. Al Beldimano, Roumanian 
minister in Berlin; M. Papiniu, Roumanian 
minister at The Hague; Col. Coanda, direc- 
tor of artillery from the war office at 
Bucharest. 

China Yang-Yu, ambassador at St. Pe- 
tersburg, also accredited to The Hague. 
ASSEMBLING OF THE CONFERENCE. 

The delegates met at The Hague on the 
18th of May, 1899, and the conference was 
organized by the election of M. de Staal, a 
Russian delegate, to preside over the de- 
liberations of the body. The conference 
held its sessions until the 29th of July, 
1899, when it adjourned. 

THE RESULTS. 

It is not within the scope of this article 
to give an account of the routine work of 
the conference, but simply its accomplish- 
ments. In a word, disarmament failed, but 
arbitration won a most signal victory. In 
brief, the conference appointed three com- 
missioners to deal with the three groups 
of questions contained in the Russian cir- 
cular given above, which were known as the 
first, second and third commissions. The 
first dealt with the subject of disarmament, 
limitation of expenditure, prohibition of 
new styles of firearms, limitation of the 
use of explosives and prohibition of the 
use of rams or of submarine boats. The 
American members on this commission were 
Messrs. White, Mahan and Crozier. 

The second commission considered the 
laws of warfare, application of the Geneva 
convention to naval warfare, neutralization 
of vessels engaged In saving the ship- 
wrecked during or after a naval engage- 
ment, and a revision of the declaration of 
Brussels of 1874 on the notification and the 
customs of war. The American members 
of this commission were Messrs. White, 
Newell. Mahan and Crozier. 

The third commission had charge of the 
subjects of mediation and arbitration, 
which were regarded by both Great Britain 
and the United States as the most im- 
portant ones before the conference. The 
American members of this commission were 
Messrs. White, Low and Holls. 

At the final session of the conference the 
president announced that sixteen states had 
signed the arbitration convention, fifteen 
the convention relating to the laws and 
customs of war and that relating to the 
adaptation of the Geneva convention to 
naval warfare, seventeen the declaration 
prohibiting the throwing of projectiles or 
explosives from balloons, sixteen the dec- 
laration prohibiting the use of asphyxiating 
gases and fifteen the declaration prohibit- 
ing the use of expansive bullets. 

THE ARBITRATION PROJECT. 

We give in full the text of the project of 
the convention for the peaceful regulation 
of international conflicts: 



THE PEACE CONFERENCE. 



103 



SECTION 1. THE MAINTENANCE OF 

THE GENERAL, PEACE. 
Article 1. In order to prevent as far as 
possible the recourse to force in interna- 
tional relations, the signatory powers agree 
to employ all their efforts to bring about, 
by pacific means, the solution of the differ- 
ences which may arise between states. 

SEC. 2. GOOD OFFICES AND MEDIA- 
TION. 

Art. 2. The signatory powers agree that 
in case of grave disagreement of conflict, 
before appealing to arms, they will have re- 
course, so far as circumstances allow it, to 
the good offices or mediation of one or more 
of the friendly powers. 

Art. 3. Independently of this recourse, the 
signatory powers consider it useful that one 
or more powers that are not concerned in 
the conflict should offer of their own initia- 
tive, so far as the circumstances lend them- 
selves to it, their good offices or their me- 
diation to the disputing states. 

The powers not concerned In the conflict 
have the right of offering their good offices 
or their mediation even during the course 
of hostilities. 

The exercise of this right can never be 
considered by either of the disputing 
parties as an unfriendly act. 

Art. 4. The part of the mediator consists 
In the reconciliation of contrary preten- 
sions and in the allaying of the resentments 
which may be caused between the disputing 
states. 

Art. 5. The duties of the mediator cease 
from the moment when it is announced, 
whether by one of the disputing parties or 
by the mediator himself, that the compro- 
mise or the basis of a friendly understand- 
ing proposed by him have not been ac- 
cepted. 

Art. 6. Good offices and mediation, 
whether recourse Is had to them by one of 
the disputing parties or on the Initiative of 
powers not concerned in the conflict, have 
exclusively the character of counsel and are 
devoid of any obligatory force. 

Art. 7. The acceptance of mediation can- 
not have the effect, unless it be agreed to 
the contrary, of interrupting, retarding, or 
impeding mobilization and other measures 
preparatory to war. 

If it (mediation) intervenes before the 
opening of hostilities, it does not, unless 
the contrary be agreed upon, interrupt the 
current military operations. 

Art. 8. The signatory powers agree to rec- 
ommend the application, in circumstances 
which permit of it, of a special mediation 
in the following form: 

In the case of a grave disagreement en- 
dangering peace, the disputing states 
should each choose one power to which they 
may intrust the mission of entering into 
direct communication with the power 
chosen by the other side, for the purpose of 
preventing the rupture of pacific relations. 

During the continuance of their mandate 
the duration of which, unless the contrary 
is stipulated, cannot exceed thirty days, the 
question in dispute is considered as referred 
exclusively to these powers. They must 
apply all their efforts to arranging the dif- 
ference. 

In case of the actual rupture of pacific 
relations, these powers remain charged with 
the common mission of profiting by every 
opportunity of re-establishing peace. 



SEC. 3. INTERNATIONAL COMMISSION 
OF 



Art. 9. In cases in which differences ol 
opinion should arise between the signatory 
powers with regard to the local circum- 
stances which have given rise to a disagree- 
ment of an international , character which 
could not be settled by the ordinary diplo- 
matic methods, and in which neither the 
honor nor the vital interests of these pow- 
ers are at stake, the interested parties 
agree to have recourse, so far as the cir- 
cumstances permit it, to the institution of 
international commissions of inquiry, in 
order to establish the circumstances which 
have given rise to dispute and to clear up, 
by an impartial and conscientious inquiry 
on the spot, all questions of fact. 

Art. 10. The International commissions of 
inquiry are constituted, unless it is stipu- 
lated to thju contrary. In the manner deter- 
mined by article 31 of the present conven- 
tion. 

Art. 11. The interested powers undertake 
to furnish to the International commission 
of inquiry, to the fullest extent that they 
shall consider possible, all the means and 
all the facilities necessary for the complete 
knowledge and exact appreciation of the 
facts in question. 

Art. 12. The international commission of 
inquiry shall present to the Interested pow- 
ers its report signed by all the members of 
the commission. 

Art. 13. The report of the international 

commission of inquiry has in nowise the 

character of an arbitral decision. It leaves 

the disputing powers entire freedom, either 

to conclude a friendly arrangement on the 

basis of this report, or have recourse ulti- 

mately to mediation or arbitration. 

II. OF INTERNATIONAL ARBITRATION. 

SECTION 1. OF ARBITRATION. 

(Justice Arbltrale.) 

Art. 14. International arbitration has for 
its object the settlement of disputes be- 
tween states by judges of their own choos- 
ing and in conformity with their reciprocal 
rights. 

Art. 15. In questions of right, and espe- 
cially in questions of the interpretation or 
application of international conventions. 
arbitration is recognized by the signatory 
powers as the most effective and at the 
same time the most equitable means of set- 
tling disputes not arranged by diplomatic 
methods. 

Art. 16. The agreement to arbitrate may 
be concluded for disputes already In exist- 
ence, or for disputes about to arise (con- 
testations eventuelles). It can deal with 
every sort of dispute or only with disputes 
of a specified category. 

Art. 17. The arbitral convention involves 
an engagement to submit in good faith to 
the arbitral decision. 

Art. 18. Independently of general or spe- 
cial treaties, which may already bind the 
signatory powers to have recourse to arbi- 
tration, these powers reserve to themselves 
the liberty to conclude, either before the 
ratification of the present article or after- 
ward, new agreements, general or particu- 
lar, with the object of extending compul- 
sory arbitration to all cases which they 
judge capable of being submitted to it. 

Art. 19. With the object of promoting the 
development of arbitration, the signatory 
powers consider it useful to lay down cer- 



104 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



tain rules concerning arbitral jurisdiction 
and procedure. 

These provisions are only applicable in 
case the parties themselves do not adopt 
other rules with reference to this matter. 

SEC. 2. OF THE PERMANENT COURT 
OF ARBITRATION. 

Art. 20. With the object of facilitating 
immediate recourse to the arbitration of 
international differences not settled by dip- 
lomatic means, the signatory powers pledge 
themselves to organize in the following 
manner a permanent court of arbitration, 
accessible at all times and working, except 
there be a contrary stipulation of the dis- 
puting parties, in conformity with the rules 
of procedure inserted in the present con- 
vention. 

Art. 21. This court has competence in all 
cases of arbitration, unless the disputing 
parties agree to establish a special arbitral 
Jurisdiction. 

Art. 22. An international bureau estab- 
lished at The Hague and placed under the 
direction of a permanent secretary-general 
is to act as the officer (greffe) of the court. 

It is to be the intermediary for the com- 
munications dealing with the meetings of 
the latter. 

It is to have care of the archives and the 
conduct of all the administrative business. 

Art. 23. Each of the signatory powers 
shall designate in the three months follow- 
ing the ratification of the present act four 
persons at the most, of recognized compe- 
tence in questions of international law, and 
enjoying the highest esteem (jouissant de 
la plus haute consideration morale), and 
ready to accept the duties of arbitrators. 

The persons thus nominated will be en- 
tered, with the title of members of the 
court, on a list which will be communicated 
by the bureau to all the signatory powers. 

Every modification of the list of arbitra- 
tors shall be brought to the notice of the 
signatory powers by the bureau. 

Two or more powers may agree to nom- 
inate one or more members in common. 

The same person may be nominated by 
different powers. 

The members of the court are appointed 
for a term of six years. Their appointment 
may be renewed. 

In the case of the decease or of the re- 
tirement of a member of the tribunal, the 
vacancy will be filled in accordance with 
the rules established for nomination. 

Art. 24. The signatory powers which de- 
sire to apply to the court for the settlement, 
of differences which have arisen between 
them choose out of the general list the 
number of arbitrators jointly agreed upon. 

They give notice to the bureau of their 
intention to apply to the court and of the 
names of the arbitrators whom they have 
nominated. 

Art. 25. The tribunal sits usually at The 
Hague. 

It has the right to sit elsewhere, with the 
consent of the parties in litigation. 

Art. 26. Every power, though not a signa- 
tory of this act, can apply to the court 
under the conditions prescribed by the pres- 
ent convention. 

Art. 27. The signatory powers consider it 
a duty, in case a sharp conflict should 
threaten to break out between two or more 
of them, to remind these that the perma- 
nent court is open to them. 

Consequently, they declare the fact that 



one or several of them reminding the dis- 
puting states of the provisions of the pres- 
ent convention, and the advice given, in 
the higher interest of peace, to apply to 
the permanent court, can only be considered 
an exercise of good offices. 

Art. 28. A. permanent council, composed 
of the diplomatic representatives of the 
signatory powers resident at The Hague, 
and the Dutch minister for foreign affairs, 
who shall discharge the functions of presi- 
dent, shall be constituted in that city as 
soon as possible after the ratification of 
the present act. 

This council shall be charged with estab- 
lishing and organizing the international 
bureau, which shall remain under its direc- 
tion and under its control. 

It shall notify the powers of the constitu- 
tion of the court, and shall provide for its 
installation. 

It shall decree its procedure, as well as 
all other necessary regulations. 

It shall decide all questions which may 
arise touching the working of the tribunal. 

It shall have absolute powers as to the 
nomination, suspension or recall of the 
functionaries and employes of the bureau. 

It shall fix the pay and salaries and con- 
trol the general expenditure. 

The presence of five members at meetings 
duly convoked shall suffice to enable the 
council to deliberate in valid form. De- 
cisions are taken by a majority of votes. 

The council addresses each year to the 
signatory powers a report on the labors of 
the court, on the discharge of the adminis- 
trative services and on the expenditure. 

Art. 29. The costs of the bureau shall be 
borne by the signatory powers in the pro- 
portion fixed by the international bureau 
of the Universal Postal union. 

SEC. 3. OF ARBITRATION PROCEDURE 

Art. 30. The powers which accept arbitra- 
tion will sign a special agreement or com- 
promise (acte special; compromis), in 
which is clearly laid down the object of 
the dispute, as well as the extent of the 
arbitrators' powers. This document shall 
confirm the undertaking of the parties to 
submit themselves in good faith to the 
arbitrators' decision. 

Art. 31. The arbitral functions may be 
conferred on one single arbitrator or on 
several arbitrators, named by the parties at 
their own discretion, or chosen by them 
among the members of the permanent arbi- 
tration court established by this act. 

In the absence of a contrary agreement, 
the formation of the tribunal of arbitration 
shall be proceeded with as follows: 

Each party shall name two arbitrators, 
and they shall choose together an umpire 
(sur-arbitre). 

In case of a division of votes, the choice 
of the umpire shall be intrusted to a third 
power, named in agreement by the parties. 

If an agreement is not come to on this 
subject, each party shall designate a dif- 
ferent power, and the choice of the umpire 
shall be made in concert by the powers so 
designated. 

Art. 32. When the arbitrator is a sover- 
eign, or the chief of a state, the arbitra- 
tion procedure shall be exclusively settled 
by his high determination. 

Art. 33. The umpire is president de jure 
of the tribunal. 

When the tribunal does not include an 
umpire, it shall itself name its president. 



THE PEACE CONFERENCE. 



105 



Art. 34. Except there be a stipulation to 
the contrary, in case of the decease or 
resignation of one of the arbitrators, or his 
inability from any cause whatever to act, 
the vacancy will be filled in accordance 
with the rules established for nomination. 

Art. 35. The seat of the tribunal Is desig- 
nated by the disputing parties, or, in de- 
fault of such designation, by the tribunal of 
arbitration. 

The seat thus fixed upon can only be 
changed in consequence of a new agreement 
between the interested states, or, in case 
of necessity (raison majeure), by decision 
of the tribunal itself. 

Art. 36. The disputing parties have the 
right to name to the tribunal delegates or 
special agents, to serve as intermediaries 
between the tribunal and the litigants. 

They are, moreover, authorized to intrust 
the defense of their rights and interests be- 
fore the tribunal to counsel or advocates 
named by them for that purpose. 

Art. 37. The tribunal decides upon the 
choice of languages authorized to be em- 
ployed before It. 

Art. 38. The arbitral procedure comprises 
as a general rule two phases, the prelim- 
inary phase and the definitive phase. 

The first consists in the communication 
made by the agents of the disputing parties 
to the members of the tribunal and to the 
opposing party of all printed or written 
deeds and of all documents containing the 
cases of the parties. 

The second is oral and consists in the 
hearing before the tribnoal. 

Art. 39. Every document produced by one 
of the parties must be communicated to 
the other party. 

Art. 40. The hearing before the tribunal 
is directed by the president. It is recorded 
in reports set forth by secretaries ap- 
pointed by the president. These reports 
alone are to be regarded as authentic. 

Art. 41. The preliminary procedure being 
private and the debates being public, the 
tribunal has the right to refuse all new 
deeds or documents which the representa- 
tives of one of the parties wish to submit 
to it without the consent of the other. 

Art. 42. The tribunal remains free to take 
Into consideration new documents or proofs 
of which the agents or counsel of the dis- 
puting parties have made use in their argu- 
ments before It. 

It has the right to demand the production 
of these documents or proofs apart from 
the obligation of making them known to 
the opposite party. 

Art. 43. The tribunal can, moreover, re- 
quire from the agents of the parties the 
production of all the documents and expla- 
nations which it requires. In case of re- 
fusal the tribunal takes note of the fact. 

Art. 44. The agents and counsel of the 
litigating parties are authorized to present 
orally to the tribunal all the arguments 
they consider useful for the defense of 
their cause. 

Art. 45. They have the right to raise ob- 
jections or incidental points. The decisions 
of the tribunal upon these points settle the 
controversy, and cannot give rise to any 
further discussion. 

Art. 46. The members of the tribunal 
have the right to ask questions bf the 
agents and counsel of the disputing par- 



ties, and to demand from them explana- 
tions of doubtful points. 

Neither the questions put nor the observa- 
tions made by the members of the tribunal 
in the course of the debates can be re- 
garded as enunciations of the opinion of 
the tribunal in general or of its members 
in particular. 

Art. 47. The tribunal alone is authorized 
to settle its competence, by the interpreta- 
tion of the agreement to arbitrate as well 
as of other treaties which may be Invoked 
in the matter, and by the application of 
the principles of international law. 

Art. 48. The tribunal has the right to 
make rules of procedure for the direction 
of the arbitration, to settle the forms and 
periods within which each party will be 
obliged to finish its case, and to carry out 
all the formalities necessary for the receiv- 
ing of evidence. 

Art. 49. The agents and counsel of the 
disputing parties having presented all ex- 
planations and evidence on behalf of their 
cause, the president of the tribunal an- 
nounces the closing of the hearing. 

Art. 50. The 'deliberations of the tribunal 
take place with closed doors. 

Every decision is taken by a majority of 
members of the tribunal. 

The refusal of a member to give his vote 
must be noted in the report. 

Art. 51. The arbitral decision voted by a 
majority must state the reasons on which 
it is based. It is to be set down In writing 
and signed by all the members of the 
tribunal. 

Those members who are in a minority 
may, when signing, record their dissent. 

Art. 52. The arbitral decision is read out 
at a public sitting of the tribunal in the 
presence of the agents ftnd counsel of the 
disputing parties, or after they have been 
duly summoned. 

Art. 53. The arbitral decision, duly pro- 
nounced and notified to the agents of the 
disputing parties, definitely decides the 
question at issue, and closes the arbitration 
proceedings instituted by the agreement to 
arbitrate. 

Art. 54. Except In the case of a contrary 
provision contained in the agreement to ar- 
bitrate, revision of the arbitral decision 
may be demanded of the tribunal which has 
given the decision, but only on the ground 
of a discovery of a new fact, which would 
have been of such a nature as to exercise 
a decisive influence on the judgment, and 
which at the moment of such judgment was 
unknown to the tribunal itself and to the 
parties. 

The procedure of revision can only be 
opened by a decision of the tribunal ex- 
pressly declaring the existence of the new 
fact, possessing the character set forth in 
the preceding paragraph, and declaring that 
the demand is admissible on that ground. 

No demand for revision can be accepted 
three months after notification of the de- 
cision. 

Art. 55. The arbitral decision Is only ob- 
ligatory on the parties who have concluded 
the agreement to arbitrate. 

When it is a question of the interpreta- 
tion of a convention existing between a 
greater number of powers than those be- 
tween which the difference at issue has 
arisen, the disputing parties notify to the 
other powers who have signed the conven- 
tion the agreement to arbitrate which they 



106 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



have made. Each of those powers has the 
right to intervene in the proceedings. If 
one or more of them have availed them- 
selves of this privilege, the interpretation 
contained in the judgment is equally oblig- 
atory on them also. 

Art. 56. Each party bears its own ex- 
penses and an equal share of the expenses 
of the tribunal, without prejudice to the 
penalties which may be imposed by the tri- 
bunal against one or another of the parties. 



It is proposed to add the three following 
articles to those relating to the permanent 
court of arbitration: 

"Article A. The members of the court 
shall enjoy diplomatic privileges and im- 



munities in the exercise of their func- 
tions. 

"Article B. The bureau is authorized to 
place its premises and its organization at 
the disposal of the signatory powers for 
any cases of special arbitration. (Four le 
fonctionnement de toute juridiction spp- 
ciale d'arbitrage.) 

"Article C. The signatory powers pledge 
themselves to communicate to the bureau a 
copy of every arbitral stipulation agreed 
upon between them, and of all judgments 
resulting from arbitral jurisdictions other 
than that of the court. They pledge them- 
selves to communicate to the bureau the 
laws and regulations and all documents 
registering the execution of the judgments 
pronounced by the court." 



CLOSE OF THE SPANISH WAR. 



Our record of the Spanish-American -war 
closed last year with a very fragmentary 
and incomplete synopsis of the treaty 
adopted by the commissioners at the Paris 
conference on the 10th of December, 1898, 
That document is of so much importance 
and interest to the American people and 
may be so far-reaching in its effects upon 
the foreign policy of the United States that 
it Is worthy of an unabridged publication in 
this volume. The treaty was transmitted 
by the president to the senate for ratifica- 
tion on the 4th day of January, 1899, and is 
as follows: 

"The United States of America and her 
majesty the queen regent of Spain, in the 
name of her august son, Don Alfonso XIII., 
desiring to end the state of war now exist- 
ing between the two countries, have for 
that purpose appointed as plenipotentiaries: 

"The president of the United States- 
William R. Day, Cushman K. Davis, Wil- 
liam P. Frye, George Gray and Whitelaw 
Reid, citizens of the United States. 

"And her majesty the queen regent of 
Spain Don Eugenio Montero RIos, presi- 
dent of the senate; Don Buenaventura de 
Abarzuza, senator <jf the kingdom and ex- 
minister of the crown; Don Jose de Garnlca, 
deputy to the cortes and associate justice 
of the Supreme court; Don Wenceslao 
Ramirez de Villa-Urrutia, envoy extraor- 
dinary and minister plenipotentiary at 
Brussels, and Don Rafael Cerrero, general 
of division; 

"Who, having assembled In Paris, and 
having exchanged their full powers, which 
were found to be In due and proper form, 
have, after discussion of the matters before 
them, agreed upon the following articles: 

"Article 1. Spain relinquishes all claim of 
sovereignty over and title to Cuba. 

"And as the island is, upon its evacua- 
tion by Spain, to be occupied by the United 
States, the United States will, so long as 
such occupation shall last, assume and dis- 
charge the obligations that may, under In- 
ternational law, result from the fact of its 
occupation, for the protection of life and 
property. 

"Art. 2. Spain cedes to the United States 
the island of Puerto Rico and other islands 
now under Spanish sovereignty in the West 
Indies, and the Island of Guam in the 
Marianas, or Ladrones. 

"Art. 3. Spain cedes to the United States 
the archipelago known as the Philippine 



Islands, and comprehending the islands 
lying within the following line: 

"A line running from west to east along 
or near the twentieth parallel of north lati- 
tude and through the middle of the naviga- 
ble channel of Bachi, from the one hundred 
and eighteenth (118th) to the one hundred 
and twenty-seventh (127th) degree meridian 
of longitude east of Greenwich, thence along 
the one hundred and twenty-seventh (127th) 
degree meridian of longitude east of Green- 
wich to the parallel of four degrees and 
forty-five minutes (4.45) north latitude, 
thence along the parallel of four degrees 
and forty-five minutes (4.45) north latitude 
to its Intersection with the meridian of 
longitude one hundred and nineteen degrees 
and thirty-five minutes (119.35) east of 
Greenwich, thence along the meridian of 
longitude one hundred and nineteen degrees 
and thirty-five minutes (119.35), east of 
Greenwich, to the parallel of latitude seven 
degrees and forty minutes (7.40) north, 
thence along the parallel of latitude seven 
degrees and forty minutes (7.40) north to 
its intersection with the one hundred and 
sixteenth (116th) degree meridian of longi- 
tude east of Greenwich, thence by a direct 
line to the intersection of the tenth (10th) 
degree parallel of north latitude with the 
one hundred and eighteenth (118th) degree 
meridian of longitude east of Greenwich, 
and thence along the one hundred and 
eighteenth (118th) degree meridian of longi- 
tude east of Greenwich to the point of 
beginning. 

"The United States will pay to Spain the 
sum of twenty million dollars (120,000,000) 
within three mouths after the exchange of 
the ratifications of the present treaty. 

"Art. 4. The United States will, for the 
term of ten years from the date of the ex- 
change of the ratifications of the present 
treaty, admit Spanish ships and merchan- 
dise to the ports of the Philippine islands 
on the same terms as ships and merchan- 
dise of the United States. 

"Art. 5. The United States will, upon the 
signature of the present treaty, send back 
to Spain, at its own cost, the Spanish sol- 
diers taken as prisoners of war on the 
capture of Manila by the American forces. 
The arms of the soldiers in question shall 
be restored to them. 

"Spain will, upon the exchange of the 
ratifications of the present treaty, proceed 
to evacuate the Philippines as well as the 



CLOSE OF THE SPANISH WAR. 



107 



island of Guam, on terms similar to those 
agreed upon by the commissioner appointed 
to arrange tor the evacuation ot Puerto 
Kico and other islands in the West Indies 
under the protocol of Aug. 12, 1898, which is 
to continue in force till its provisions are 
completely executed. The time within 
which the evacuation of the Philippine 
islands and Guam shall be completed 
shall be fixed by the two governments. 
Stands of colors, uncaptured war vessels, 
small arms, guns of all calibers, with their 
carriages and accessories, powder, ammuni- 
tion, live stock and materials and supplies 
of all kinds belonging to the land and naval 
forces of Spain in the Philippines and 
Guam remain the property of Spain. Pieces 
of heavy ordnance, exclusive of field artil- 
lery, in the fortifications and coast defenses, 
shall remain in their emplacements for the 
term of six months, to be reckoned from 
the exchange of ratifications of the treaty; 
and the United States may. In the mean- 
time, purchase such material from Spain 
if a satisfactory agreement between the 
two governments on the subject shall be 
reached. 

"Art. 6. Spain will, upon the signature of 
the present treaty, release all prisoners of 
war and all persons detained or imprisoned 
for political offenses in connection with the 
insurrections in Cuba and the Philippines 
and the war with the United States. 

"Reciprocally, the United States will re- 
lease all persons made prisoners of war by 
the American forces and will undertake to 
obtain the release of all Spanish prisoners 
in the hands of the insurgents in Cuba and 
the Philippines. 

"The government of the United States 
will, at Its own cost, return to Spain and 
the government of Spain will, at Us own 
cost, return to the United States, Cuba, 
Puerto Rico and the Philippines, according 
to the situation of their respective homes, 
prisoners released or caused to be released 
by them respectively under this article. 

"Art. 7. The United States and Spain mu- 
tually relinquish all claims for indemnity, 
national and individual, of every kind, of 
either government, or of its citizens or sub- 
jects against the other government that 
may have arisen since the beginning of the 
late insurrection in Cuba and prior to the 
exchange of ratification of the present 
treaty, including all claims for indemnity 
for the cost of war. . 

"The United States will adjudicate and 
settle the claims of its citizens against 
Spain relinquished in this article. 

"Art 8 In conformity with the provisions 
of articles 1, 2 and 3 of this treaty, Spain 
relinquishes in Cuba and cedes in Puerto 
Rico and other islands in the West Indies, 
in the island of Guam, and in the Philip- 
pine archipelago, all the buildings, wharves, 
barracks, forts, structures, public highways 
and other immovable property, which, in 
conformity with law, belong to the public 
domain, and as such belong to the crown of 

^Vn'd It is hereby declared that the re- 
linqulshment or cession, as the case may 
be to which the preceding paragraph 
refers, cannot In any respect impair the 
property or rights which by law belong to 
the peaceful possession of property of all 
kinds of provinces, municipalities public 
or private establishments, ecclesiastical or 



ivic bodies, or any other associations hav- 
ng legal capacity to acquire and possess 
property In the aforesaid territories re- 
nounced or ceded, or of private individuals, 
of whatsoever nationality such individuals 
may be. 

"The aforesaid relinquishment or cession, 
as the case may be, includes all documents 
exclusively referring to the sovereignty 
relinquished or ceded that may exist in the 
archives of the peninsula. Where any docu- 
ment in such archives only In part relates 
to said sovereignty, a copy of such part 
will be furnished whenever it shall be 
requested. Like rules shall be reciprocally 
observed in favor of Spain in respect of 
documents In the archives of the islands 
above referred to. 

"In the aforesaid relinquishment or ces- 
sion, as the case may be, are also included 
such rights as the crown of Spain and its 
authorities possess in respect of the ofiicial 
archives and records, executive as well as 
judicial, in the islands above referred to, 
which relate to said islands or the rights 
and property of their inhabitants. Such 
archives and records shall be carefully pre- 
served and private persons shall without 
distinction have the right to require, in 
accordance with law, authenticated copies 
of the contracts, wills and other instru- 
ments forming part of notarial protocols or 
files, or which may be contained in the 
executive or judicial archives, be the latter 
in Spain or in the Islands aforesaid. 

"Art. 9. Spanish subjects, natives of the 
peninsula, residing in the territory over 
which Spain, by the. present treaty, relin- 
quishes or cedes her sovereignty, may 
remain In such territory or may remove 
therefrom, retaining in either event all 
their rights of property, including the right 
to sell or dispose of such property or of its 
proceeds; and they shall also have the righl 
to carry on their industry, commerce anc 
professions, being subject in respect thereof 
to such laws as are applicable to other 
foreigners. In case they remain in the 
territory they may preserve their allegiance 
to the crown of Spain by making, before 
a court of record, within a year from the 
date of the exchange of ratifications of this 
treaty, a declaration of their decision to 
preserve such allegiance; in default of 
which declaration they shall be held to 
have renounced it and to have adopted the 
nationality of the territory in which they 
may reside. 

"The civil rights and political status of 
the native inhabitants of the territories 
hereby ceded to the United States shall be 
determined by the congress. 

"Art. 10. The inhabitants of the territories 
over which Spain relinquishes or cedes her 
sovereignty shall be secured in the free 
exercise of their religion. 

"Art. 11. The Spaniards residing In the 
territories over which Spain by this treaty 
cedes or relinquishes her sovereignty shal 
be subject in matters civil as well as 
criminal to the jurisdiction of the courts o' 
the country wherein they reside, pursuan 
to the ordinary laws governing the same 
and they shall have the right to appea 
before such courts and to pursue the same 
course as citizens of the country to which 
the courts belong. 

"Art. 12. Judicial proceedings pending a 



108 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



the time of the exchange of ratifications of 
this treaty in 'the territories over which 
Spain relinquishes or cedes her sovereignty 
shall be determined according to the follow- 
ing rules: 

"1. Judgments rendered either in civil 
suits between private individuals or in 
criminal matters before the date mentioned, 
and with respect to which there is no re- 
course or right of review under the Spanish 
law, shall be deemed to be final and shall 
be executed in due form by competent 
authorities in the territory within which 
such judgments should be carried out. 

"2. Civil suits between private individuals 
which may on the date mentioned be unde- 
termined shall be prosecuted to judgment 
before the court in which they may then be 
pending or in the court that may be substi- 
tuted therefor. 

"3. Criminal actions pending on the date 
mentioned before the Supreme court of 
Spain against citizens of the territory 
which by this treaty ceases to be Spanish 
shall continue under its jurisdiction until 
final judgment; but, such judgment having 
been rendered, the execution thereof shall 
be committed to the competent authority of 
the place in which the case arose. 

"Art. 13. The rights of property secured 
by copyrights and patents acquired by 
Spaniards in the Island de Cuba and in 
Puerto Rico, the Philippines and other 
ceded territories at the time of the ex- 
change of the ratifications of this treaty, 
shall continue to be respected. Spanish 
scientific, literary and artistic works, not 
subversive of public order in the territories 
in question, shall continue to be admitted 
free of duty into such territories for the 
period of ten years, to be reckoned from 
the date of the exchange of the ratifications 
of this treaty. 

"Art. 14. Spain will have the power to 
establish consular offices in the ports and 
places of the territories the sovereignty 
over which has been either relinquished or 
ceded by the present treaty. 

"Art. 15. The government of each country 
will, for the term of ten years, accord to 
the merchant vessels of the other country 
the same treatment in respect of all port 
charges, including entrance and clearance 
dues, light dues and tonnage duties, as it 
accords to its own merchant vessels not 
engaged in the coastwise trade. 

"This article may at any time be ter- 
minated on six months' notice given by 
either government to the other. 

"Art. 16. It is understood that any obliga- 
tions assumed in this treaty by the United 
States with respect to Cuba are limited to 
the time of its occupancy thereof; but it 
will, upon the termination of such occu- 
pancy, advise any government established 
in the island to assume the same obliga- 
tions. 

"Art. 17. The present treaty shall be rati- 
fied by the president of the United States 
by and with the advice and consent of the 
senate thereof and by her majesty the 
queen regent of Spain, and the ratifications 
shall be exchanged at Washington within 
six months from the date hereof, or earlier 
if possible. 

"In faith whereof, we, the respective 
plenipotentiaries, have signed this treaty 
and have hereunto affixed our seals. 

"Done in duplicate at Paris, the 10th day 



of December, in the year of our Lord one 
thousand eight hundred and ninety-eight. 

"WILLIAM R. DAY. 

"CUSHMAN K. DAVIS, 

"WILLIAM P. FRYE, 

"GEORGE GRAY. 

"WH1TELAW REID, 

"EUGENIO MOXTERO RIOS, 

"B. DE ABARZUZA, 

"J. DE GARNICA, 

"W. R. DE VILLA URRUTIA. 

"RAFAEL CERRERO." 
THE SENATE'S ACTION. 
A long debate followed the reference of 
the treaty to the senate and its ratification 
was most strenuously opposed. The speeches 
made were rather against the retention of 
the Philippine islands than adverse to any 
of the specified conditions of the compact. 
The opposition to the ratification was led 
by Senators Gorman (dem.) of Maryland 
and Hoar (rep.) of Massachusetts. Those 
opposing the acceptance of the treaty were 
divided into two factions, one of which 
advocated its rejection on the ground that 
the United States had not acquired sover- 
eignty in the Philippines and did not desire 
it, while the other desired to commit the 
government to a declared policy of offering 
its aid toward the establishment of an in- 
dependent government for the Filipinos as 
it had already undertaken to do in the case 
of the Cubans. 

The debate was continued to the 6th of 
February, 1899, and until the day previous 
the fate of the treaty was in doubt. On 
the 5th of February, 1899, news was re- 
ceived of the attack upon the United States 
forces at Manila by Aguinaldo, and this 
inexcusable act of the Filipino chief, which 
was in direct violation of the terms of the 
truce between the two belligerents, resulted 
in securing the adoption of the treaty on 
the day following. This was accomplished 
by three senators, who did not favor the 
treaty McEnery (dem.) of Louisiana, Mc- 
Laurin (dem.) of South Carolina and Jones 
(silver) of Nevada leaving the opposition 
and joining the advocates of the measure, 
they being influenced by the ill-considered 
attack upon Gen. Otis by the insurgent 
forces. 

SENATE VOTE ON THE TREATY. 
REPUBLICANS IN FAVOR. 

Aldrich (R. I.) Gallinger Platt (Conn.) 
Allison (la.) (N. H.) Platt (N. Y.) 

Baker (Kas.) Gear (la.) Pritchard 
Burrows Hanna (O.) (N. C.) 

(Mich.) Hansbrough Quay (Pa.) 

Carter (Mont.) (N. D.) Ross (Vt.) 

Chandler Hawley(Conn.)Sewell (N. J.) 

(N. H.) Kyle (S. D.) Shoup (Idaho.) 

Clark (Wyo.) Lodge (Mass.) Simon (Ore.) 
Cullom (111.) McBride (Ore.)Spooner (Wis.) 
Davis (Minn.) McMillan Teller (Col.) 

Deboe (Ky.) (Mich.) Thurston(Neb.) 

F.lkins(W.Va.) Mantle(Mont) Warren (Wyo.) 
Fairbanks Mason (111.) Wellington 

(Ind.) Nelson (Minn.) (Md.) 

Foraker (O.) Penrose (Pa.) Wolcott (Col.) 
Frye (Me.) Perkins (Cal.) 42. 

DEMOCRATS IN FAVOR. 

Clay (Ga.) Lindsay (Ky.) Pottus (Ala.) 
Faulkner McEnery (La.) Sullivan(Miss.) 

(W. Vn.) McLaurin 10. 

Gray (Del.) (S. C.) 

Kenney (Del.) Morgan (Ala.) 



CLOSE OF THE SPANISH WAR. 



109 



PEOPLE'S PAKTY IN FAVOR. 

Allen (Neb.) Harris (Kas.) Stewart (Nev.) 
Butler (N. C.) Jones (Nev.) 5. 
Total 57. 

REPUBLICANS AGAINST. 



Hale (Me.) Pettlgrew 
Hoar (Mass.) (S. D.) 
5. 



Rawlings 
(Utah.) 
Turner(Wash.) 



DEMOCRATS AGAINST. 

Bacon (Ga.) Gorman (Md.) Murphy (N.Y.) 
Bate (Tenn.) Jones (Ark.) Pasco (Fla.) 
Berry (Ark.) Mallory (Fla.) Roach (N. D.) 
Caffery (La.) Martin (Va.) Smith (N. J.) 
Chilton (Tex.) Mills (Tex.) Tillman (S. C.) 
Cockrell (Mo.) Mitchell (Wis.)Turley (Tenn.) 
Daniel (Va.) Money (Miss.) Vest (Mo.) 21. 

PEOPLE'S PARTY AGAINST. 

Heitfeld (Idaho) 1. 

Total 27. 

Paired Cannon (rep.) of Utah and Wil- 
son (rep.) of Washington for, with White 
(dem.) of California against; Proctor 
(rep.) of Vermont and Wetmore (rep.) of 
Rhode Island for, with Turpie (dem.) of 
Indiana against. 

THK M'ENERY RESOLUTION. 

After the ratification of thp treaty Sena- 
tor McEuery (dem.) of Louisiana, who had 
voted in the affirmative on that question, 
introduced the following resolution: Re- 
solved, That by the ratification of the treaty 
of peace with Spain it is not intended to 
incorporate the inhabitants of the Philip- 
pine islands into citizenship of the United 
States, nor is it intended to permanently 
annex said islands as an integral part of 
the territory of the United States; but it 
is the intention of the United States to 
establish on said islands a government 
suitable to the wants and conditions of 
the inhabitants of said islands, to prepare 
them for local self-government and in due 
time to make such disposition of said 
islands as will best promote the Interests 
of the citizens of the United States and the 
inhabitants of said islands. 

Mr. Hoar (rep.) of Massachusetts made 
an effort to secure an amendment to this 
resolution providing that the consent of the 
Filipinos should be secured for any form of 
government proposed by the United States, 
which failed to pass. Senator Bacon 
(dem.) of Georgia then offered the follow- 
ing resolution: 

Resolved, That the United States hereby 
disclaim any disposition or intention to 
exercise permanent sovereignty, jurisdic- 
tion or control over said islands, and assert 
their determination when a stable and in- 
dependent government shall have been 
erected there, entitled in the judgment of 
the United States to recognition as such, 
to transfer to said government, upon terms 
which shall be reasonable and just, all 
rights secured under the cession by Spain, 
and to thereupon leave the government and 
control of the Islands to their people. 

A yea and nay vote was demanded, re- 
sulting 29 to 29. In announcing the vote 
the vice-president said: "The vote is a 
tie. The chair votes In the negative. The 
amendment is lost." The detailed vote 
follows : 



YEAS. 

Bacon. Hale. Murphy. 

Bate. Harris. Perkins. 

Berry. Heitfeld. Pettigrew. 

Caffery. Hoar. Pettus. 

Chilton. Jones (Ark.) Quay. 

Clay. Jones (Nev.) Kawlins. 

Cockrell. Lindsay. Smith. 

Faulkner. McLaurin. Tillman. 

Gorman. Martin. Turner 29. 

Gray. Money. 

NAYS. 

Allison. Kyle. Platt (N. Y. 

Burrows. Lodge. Pritchard. 

Carter. McBrlde. Ross. 

Chandler. McEnery. Shoup. 

Deboe. McMillan. Simon. 

Fairbanks. Mantle. Stewart. 

Frye. Morgan. Teller. 

Gear. Nelson. Warren. 

Hanna. Penrose. Wolcott 29. 

Hawley. Platt (Conn.) 

The vice-president voted in the negative 
The vote was then taken on the McEnery 

resolution Feb. 14, 1899, which was adopted 

yeas, 26; nays, 22 several democrats who 

were present and not paired withholding 

their votes. The detailed vote follows: 
YEAS. 

Allison. Hale. Mason. 

Burrows. Hanua. Nelson 

Chandler. Harris. Perkins. 

Deboe. Kyle. Pettus. 

Fairbanks. Lodge. Platt (N. Y.) 

Faulkner. McEnery. Quay. 

Frye. McLaurin. Sullivan. 

Gear. McMillan. Teller 26. 

Gray. Mantle. 

NAYS. 

Bacon. Lindsay. Platt (Conn.) 

Bate. McBride. Kawlins. 

Caffery, Martin. Ross. 

Carter. Money. Simon. 

Clay. Morgan. Smith. 

Cockrell. Murphy. Stewart. 

Hawley. Pettigrew. Warren 22. 

Hoar. 

The formal interchange of ratification of 
the peace treaty took place at the execu- 
tive mansion in Washington on the llth 
day of April, 1899, Ambassador Cambon of 
France acting as the representative of the 
Spanish government. This formal recogni- 
tion that the war had ended and that the 
United States and Spain were again on 
terms of peace occurred just one year 
from the day when President McKinley 
recognized that diplomatic consideration of 
the Cuban question had failed and that war 
was inevitable. It was on April 11, 1898, 
that President McKinley sent his war mes- 
sage to congress, saying that he had ex- 
hausted diplomatic efforts and asking con- 
gress to clothe him with the war power. 
In that message he declared: "In the 
name of humanity, in the name of civiliza- 
tion, in behalf of endangered American 
interests which give us the right and duty 
to speak and to act, the war in Cuba must 
stop." 

War was not declared until April 21, 1898, 
but the end of peaceful relations between 
the United States and Spain was on the 
llth. and the return to a recognition of 
peaceful relations occurred on the first 
inniversary of that day, making the break 
hPtween the two nations just one year. 
The president's proclamation of peace bore 
date April 11, 1899. 



110 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



THE SAMOAN AFFAIR. 



There is no island called Samoa, but the 
name is applied to a group of twelve 
islands in the Pacific, with the affairs of 
which our government has become rather 
intimately involved. The islands are lo- 
cated about 2,000 miles south and 300 miles 
west of the Hawaiian islands and 14 degrees 
south of the equator. They lie in an almost 
direct line between San Francisco and 
Australia and slightly south of the direct 
steamship line connecting the Philippines 
with the proposed Panama and Nicaraguan 
interoceanic canals. Their special impor- 
tance, therefore, lies in their position 
as coaling and repair stations on these 
great highways of commerce rather than 
in their direct commercial value, their 
population being small and their imparts 
and exports of comparatively little im- 
portance. 

INHABITANTS AND PRODDCTS. 

The group consists of ten inhabited and 
two uninhabited islands, with an area of 
1,700 square miles and an aggregate popu- 
lation, according to latest estimates, of 
36 000 people, of whom something over 200 
are British subjects, 125 Germans, 25 Amer- 
icans, 25 French and 25 of other nationali- 
ties, while the remainder are natives of 
the Polynesian race. The bulk of the popu- 
lation is located in the three islands of 
Upolu, Savaii and Tutuila; the number 
in Upolu being 16,600, in Savaii 12,500 and 
in Tutuila S.700. The islands are of vol- 
canic origin, but fertile, producing cocoa- 
nuts, cotton, sugar and coffee; the most 
important, however, being cocoanuts, from 
which the "copra" of commerce is obtained 
by drying the kernel of the cocoanut, the 
"copra." which is exported to Europe and 
the United States, being used in the manu- 
facture of cocoanut oil. The exportation 
of copra from the islands in 1896 amounted 
to 12.565,909 pounds, valued at $231,372. A 
considerable proportion of this was ex- 
ported to the United States; a larger pro- 
portion, however, to Germany, whose cit- 
izens control its commerce through a trad- 
ing company which has long been estab- 
lished there. The cocoanut and copra 
production, however, varies greatly from 
year to year, owing to the fact that many 
of the cocoannt trees have been destroyed 
In recent wars between native factions, a 
single individual being able, by cutting out 
the crown of the tree, to permanently 
destroy in two minutes' time the fruit- 
bearing qualities of trees which require 
several years for their growth. 

The government of the Samoan islands 
had been from time immemorial under the 
two royal houses of Malietoa and Tupea, 
except on the island of Tutuila, which was 
governed by native chiefs. In 1873. at the 
suggestion of foreign residents, a house of 
nobles and a house of representatives were 
established, with Malietoa Laupepa and 
the chief of the royal house of Tnpea as 
joint kings. Subsequently Malietoa became 
sole king. In 1887 he was deposed by the 
German government upon the claim of un- 
just treatment of German subjects, who 
formed the bulk of the foreign population 
on the island, and was deported first to 
German New Guinea and then to the 
Cameroons. in Africa, and finally in 1888 to 



Hamburg; Tamasese, a native chief, being 
meantime proclaimed by the Germans as 
king, though against the protest of the 
British and American consuls at Samoa. 
Mataafa, a near relative of Malietoa, made 
war upon Tamasese and succeeded to the 
kingship. 

THE BERLIN TREATY. 

In 1889 a conference between the repre 
sentatives of the American, British and 
German governments was held at Berlin, 
at which a treaty was signed by the three 
powers guaranteeing the neutrality of the 
islands, in which the citizens of the three 
signatory powers would have equal rights 
of residence, trade and personal protection. 
They agreed to recognize the independence 
of the Samoan government and the free 
rights of the natives to elect their chief 
or king and choose a form of government 
according to their own laws and customs. 
A Supreme court was established, consisting 
of one judge, styled the chief justice of 
Samoa, who was at that time W. L. 
Chambers, an American, formerly a resi- 
dent of the state of Alabama. To this 
court are referred: First, all civil suits 
concerning real property situated in Samoa; 
second, all civil suits between natives and 
foreigners or between foreigners of dif- 
ferent nationalities; third, all crimes com- 
mitted by natives against foreigners or 
committed by such foreigners as are not 
subject to any consular jurisdiction. The 
future alienation of lands was prohibited, 
with certain specified exemptions. The 
capital was located at Apia, the chief town 
of the group of islands, and a local admin- 
istration provided for the municipal district 
of Apia. A commission was appointed to 
investigate titles to lands alleged to have 
been purchased from the natives, and this 
in 1894 completed its labors, confirming 
about 75,000 acres of lands to Germans, 
36,000 to British and 21.000 to Americans, 
though much of this land has since changed 
hands. Malietoa, who had been deported, 
was restored as king in November, 1889, 
and continued as such until his death, 
which occurred Aug. 22, 1898, when the 
consuls of the three powers, with the 
chief justice as president, took charge of 
the administration, pending the election 
of a successor. It is out of the election 
and recognition of this successor to King 
Malietoa, deceased, that the recent dis- 
agreements between the representatives of 
the three governments maintaining the 
joint protectorate over the islands have 
occurred. 

CAUSE OF THE TROUBLE. 
The events leading up to the disagree- 
ment between the three governments hac 
their inception in the election of a king 
by the people of Samoa, which was helc 
Nov. 14, 1898, there being two candidates. 
These were Mataafa and Malietoa Tanus, 
son of the last ruler, who died in Septem- 
ber, 1898. In this contest Mataafa received 
a vote sis times as large as the total 
received by Malietoa. During the reign of 
the last king Mataafa had been an exile 
since 1893 on an island in the Marshall 
group, but in response to a nearly unani- 
mous demand of his people he was per- 



THE SAMOAN AFFAIR. 



Ill 



initted to return. The pledge was given 
by the adherents of Mataafa that if his 
return were permitted they would do noth- 
ing to disturb the existing government, and 
he was brought from Jaluit to Apia. 

There was no disputing the great popu- 
larity of Mataafa with the Samoans nor 
his capacity to govern them, but his right 
to the throne was denied. It was also 
believed by some of his opponents that he 
was too much under German influence. 
The other claimant to the succession 
brought the case to the Supreme court. 
Tamasese, who had at one time aspired 
to thp kingship, but had withdrawn in the 
interest of Malietoa, claiming that the 
election had not been conducted according 
to the established customs of the country 
and that Malietoa was the legally elected 
king. This court proceeding was brought 
under section 6, article 3, of the Berlin 
treaty, which provides: "In case any ques- 
tion shall hereafter arise in Samoa respect- 
ing the rightful election or appointment of 
king, or any other chief claiming authority 
over the islands, or respecting the validity 
of the powers which the king or any other 
chief may claim in the exercise of this 
office, such question shall not lead to war, 
but shall be presented for decision to the 
chief justice of Samoa, who shall decide 
it in writing, conformably to the provisions 
of this act, and to the laws and customs 
of Samoa not in conflict therewith; and thp 
signatory governments will accept and 
abide by such decision." 

MALIETOA DECLARED TO BE KING. 

The case was opened on the 19th of 
December, 1898. Eleven days were occu- 
pied in the trial, and Dec. 31 the court 
rendered the decision that Malietoa Tanus 
was the rightful and legal king of Samoa. 
The court declared also that Tamasese 
should be vice-king and the legal successor 
to the throne. The main basis of this 
decision was that Mataafa had invali- 
dated his claims to the throne by his re- 
nouncing such claims when he was per- 
mitted to return to Apia from his exile, 
and also because native customs precluded 
him from becoming the ruler. 

DISAGREEMENT OP THE CONSULS. 

The rendering of this decision was fol- 
lowed by a meeting of the three consuls 
of the signatory powers to the Berlin 
treaty at which the officers of the British 
and German warships in the harbor were 
present. The American and British con- 
suls upheld the finding of the court and 
proposed the immediate crowning of Malie- 
toa. To this proposal the German consul 
entered a vigorous protest and declared 
himself in favor of Mataafa, whose fol- 
lowers had collected at Mulinuu. Hostilities 
at once began, the new king having an 
army of about 1,200 men and the supporters 
of Mataafa a force of about 3,000 men. A 
battle took place on the 1st of January, 
1899, in which the king was defeated, while 
Mataafa's followers, forming a lawless 
band, began pillaging the country and 
threatened the life of the chief justice and 
others. 

ESCAPE OP THE KING. 

Both the king and the chief justice took 
refuge on a British war vessel then in the 
"harbor. On the 5th of January the consuls 
of the treaty powers met and issued a 



proclamation in which they announced that 
the Mataafa party, being in possession of 
the government, would be recognized as 
head of affairs, pending instructions from 
the treaty powers. Dr. Raffel, a German 
and president of the municipal council, was 
appointed as the head of the provisional 
government. The next day he issued an 
order which closed the Supreme court, an 
act that the American and British consuls 
declared to be a usurpation of power. 
Capt. Sturdee of the British war vessel 
Porpoise issued a declaration that the 
Supreme court having been illegally closed 
by the provisional government, it would 
hold a session upon that day at noon, and 
if resisted he would open fire on the town 
in its defense. Both the German consul 
and Dr. Raffel protested, while the latter 
declared that he alone constituted the 
Supreme court. To offset this all the Ameri- 
Ican and British consuls united in a procla- 
mation which declared that the formation 
of a provisional government did not in any 
way interfere with the Samoan Supreme 
court. A counter proclamation from Dr. 
Raffel followed, in which he maintained 
his position against the existence of the 
court. 

THE COURT OPENED. 

Capt. Sturdee, however, landed a force of 
marines with the chief justice, who forced 
the door to the courthouse, reinstated Jus- 
tice Chambers and raised the British and 
American flags over the building. This act 
enraged the German residents, and one of 
them destroyed the doors and windows of 
the courthouse. For this act of vandalism 
he was arrested, fined $100 and imprisoned, 
but was forcibly rescued by Dr. Raffel and 
sent to the German consulate for protec- 
tion. 

ARRIVAL OF ADMIRAL KAUTZ. 

On the 19th of January the United States 
warship Philadelphia, under command of 
Rpar-Admiral Kautz, was ordered to Apia 
to protect American interests. A few days 
later the American and British consuls 
nnited in a protest to the German consul 
against the high-handed proceedings of Dr. 
Raffel, and refused longer to hold official 
intercourse with either unless an apology 
and retraction was given and made for 
thpir acts toward the chief justice. The 
German government notified its consul that 
his protest against the Supreme court was 
not sustained, which greatly relieved for a 
time the tension of affairs. Comparative 
quiet reigned in the islands until March. 

On the 8th of March the United States 
vessel with Admiral Kantz arrived at Apia, 
and two days later a meeting was held on 
his ship of the consuls and the officers of 
the British and German war vessels. As a 
result of this conference Admiral Kautz, 
on the llth of March, 1899, issued the fol- 
lowing proclamation: 
ADMIRAL KAUTZ' PROCLAMATION. 

"To his highness Mataafa and the thir- 
teen chiefs associated with him in partic- 
ular, and to all the people of Samoa, both 
foreign and native, in general: 

"1. Whereas, at a meeting held this day 
on board the United States flagship Phila- 
delphia, at anchor at Apia, at which were 
present consular representatives of the 
signatory powers of tbe Berlin treaty of 
1889 and the three senior naval officers of 



112 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



the same powers, it was agreed that the 
so-called provisional government under High 
Chief Mataafa and thirteen other chiefs, 
can have no legal status under the Berlin 
treaty and can therefore not be recognized 
by the consular and naval representatives, 
it is hereby ordered that the high chief and 
the thirteen other chiefs go quietly to their 
homes and obey the laws of Samoa and re- 
spect the Berlin treaty. 

"2. It is further ordered that all the 
chiefs and their people who have been 
ejected from their homes and who have 
been sent to different points in the 
Samoan islands return quietly to their 
aforesaid homes without molestation. 

"3. The guarantee of protection as far 
as lies in the power of the naval force 
now in this harbor is given to all who 
quietly obey this order. On the other hand, 
it will be used against all who disregard 
it or the rights of quiet and peaceably 
disposed people. 

"4. The treaty of Berlin recognizes the 
chief justice of Samoa as the highest 
officer under the existing government, and 
as long as he holds his office his authority 
must be respected and the decree of the 
court must be carried out. 

"5. Trusting that all residents of Samoa 
will have the good sense to observe the 
requirements of this proclamation, which 
is issued in the interests of peace, with an 
earnest regard for the rights of all, both 
foreign and native, and so there may be 
no occasion to use power to enforce it. I am 
respectfully. ALBERT KADTZ, 

"Rear-Admiral U. S. Navy, Commander- 

in-Chief United States naval force ou 

Pacific station." 

On the next day the German consul 
issued a counter proclamation in these 
words: 

"Notice to all Samoans: By the procla- 
mation of the admiral of the United States, 
dated March 11, it was made known that 
the three consuls of the signatory powers 
of the Berlin treaty, as well as the three 
commanders of men-of-war, had been 
unanimous in deciding to recognize no more 
the provisional government composed of 
Mataafa and their thirteen chiefs. 

"I, therefore, make known to you that 
this proclamation is quite false. I, the 
German consul-general, continue to recog- 
nize the provisional government of Samoa 
until I have received contrary instructions 
from my government. 

"(Signed.) ROSE, 
"German Consul-General. 

"Apia, March 13, 1899." 

EFFECT UPON THE NATIVES. 
This notice stimulated the followers of 
Mataafa to acts of violence. Admiral 
Kautz threatened to bombard the towns 
unless they desisted, but this had no effect. 
Fire was opened upon the villages by the 
Philadelphia and the two British vessels 
an the narbor, and many of them were 
"buried and much property was destroyed. 
The American consulate was attacked by 
the natives and one sailor was killed. On 
the 13th of March Dr. W. Solf succeeded 
Dr. Raffel as president of the municipal 
council of Apia a change that greatly im- 
proved the situation, as the new official 
was highly esteemed by both factions. 



CROWNING OF THE KING. 
On the 23d of March Malietoa was 
crowned as king at Mulinuu, the Germans 
absenting themselves from the ceremonies. 
A few days later the British and American 
consuls informed Mataafa that if he would 
give up the war and disband his followers 
he would no longer be regarded as a rebel, 
but no attention was paid to the notifica- 
tion and the war was carried on. 

THE MARINES AMBUSHED. 
On the 6th of April a band of British and 
American sailors having landed were at- 
tacked by ambushed Samoans, and two 
officers and four sailors from the Philadel- 
phia and one officer and five sailors among 
the British were killed. The sailors were 
forced to retreat and fell back, leaving 
their fallen on the field. The American 
officers killed were Lieut. Philip Lansdale 
and Ensign J. R. Monagban and the Brit- 
ish officer was Lieut. A. Freeman. Mataafa 
lost in the battle nearly 100 killed and 
wounded. More skirmishes took place on 
the 22d and 23d of April between the Brit- 
ish force under Lieut. Grant and Ma- 
taafa 's followers, in which the latter were 
forced to retreat. 

A JOINT COMMISSION APPOINTED. 

On the 13th of April, 1899, a joint com- 
mission consisting of one representative 
from each of the powers was appointed for 
settling all the questions in dispute regard- 
ing Samoa. This commission was made up 
of Bartlett Tripp of South Dakota, ex- 
American minister to Austria-Hungary, to 
represent the United States; C. N. E 
Elliott of the British embassy at Wash- 
ington, D. C., to represent Great Britain, 
and Baron Speck von Sternburg of the Ger- 
man embassy at Washington, D. C., to 
represent Germany. The joint commission 
arrived at Apia on the 13th of May, 1899. 
On the 16th the commissioners assumed 
control of affairs. They declined to recog- 
nize either Malietoa or Mataafa as king, 
demanded that each should lay down his 
arms and sustained Judge Chambers as 
chief justice of the Supreme court. Malie- 
toa was then declared to be the rightful 
king, and he immediately abdicated the 
throne. After some weeks of examination 
the commissioners succeeded in forming a 
treaty which all of them signed, and which 
was transmitted to their respective govern- 
ments for ratification and adoption. 

THE PROPOSED TREATY. 

The treaty contains more than 6,000 
words, and after enunciating the chief evils 
that beset the administration under the 
Berlin treaty the compact provides for 
radical changes in the methods of admin- 
istrating the government of Samoa. 

The chief evils were grouped under four 
beads: 

1. Those which appear to inevitably at- 
tend the election of a king of Samoa and 
his subsequent efforts to exert his author- 
ity. 

2. Those which are due to the rivalry of 
foreign nationalities between themselves 
and to their disposition to take sides in 
the native politics and thus increase the 
importance and bitterness of disputes 
which arise. 

3. A third class of evils have their origin 
in the fact that for many years there has 



THE SAMOAN AFFAIR. 



113 



been no law or government in Samoa other 
than native custom outside the limits of 
the municipality. Murder and other serious 
crimes have remained unpunished when 
committed by persons of rank, and the 
Supreme court and the nominal government 
at Mulinuu have been equally powerless 
to exert any force. 

4. The insufficient enforcement of the cus- 
toms regulations has allowed unscrupulous 
traders to distribute large numbers of arms 
among a native population rent by political 
factions and ready to fight both one another 
and Europeans. 

The treaty may be summarized as fol- 
lows. It begins with a declaration of the 
neutrality of the islands of Samoa and an 
assurance to the respective citizens and 
subjects of the signatory powers of equality 
of rights. It provides for the Immediate 
restoration of peace and good order, and to 
this end permanently abolishes the office 
of king and limits the authority of chiefs, 
but creates a system of native government. 
Provision is made for the appointment of 
an administrator at Samoa, to be appointed 
by the three signatory powers, or, failing 
their agreement, by the king of Norway 
and Sweden. The administrator's salary 
will be $6,000 a year, and he is to execute 
all laws In force in the Samoan islandTs. 
He shall possess the pardoning power and 
make municipal appointments with the con- 
sent of the legislative council, the legisla- 
tive power being vested in the adminis- 
trator and the legislative council of three 
members, one being appointed by each of 
the three powers. There is also to be a 
native assembly, composed of the governors 
of different districts of the island. 

The chief justice of the Supreme court is 
to be appointed as at present, receiving a 
salary of $5,000. The Jurisdiction of the 
court is increased by the modified treaty, 
while the present system of consular juris- 
diction is to be abolished. The treaty con- 
tains municipal and customs regulations, 
all of which are more strict than at pres- 
ent. The general provisions of the act are 
to remain in force for three years, although 
in the meantime special amendments may 
be adopted by the consent of the three 
powers, with the adherence of Samoa. 

DISTURBANCES CONTINUE. 

The visit of the commission at Apia did 
not restore peace to the country, and the 
strife between the followers of Mataafa 
and Malietoa continued. Early in October 
trouble broke out anew between the natives 
in the Atua district. The report says that 
the thirteen chiefs who were associated 
with the rebel (or Mataafa) government 
declare that they constitute the legal gov- 
ernment of the country. They issued a 
proclamation to the three consuls regarding 
the poll tax. The document informs all 
Samoa that a poll tax of $1 a head must 
be paid by all the able-bodied natives and 
colored men outside of the town of Apia 
by Nov. 1, and is signed by adherents of 
Mataafa. To offset this President Solf. 
without the consent of the consuls, issued 
in bis own name a proclamation that a 
poll tas will be levied and collected at the 
end of the year. This action of the presi- 
dent aroused the people, who seem to think 
that Solf believes himself in supreme 
power. Some of the consuls took exception 



to his proceedings, but steps were taken 
to set aside the action of the Mataafa 
faction. 

The Mataafa people, ever since the com- 
mission left Samoa, have been accusing 
the adherents of Malietoa of causing strife 
and not obeying the commission's orders, 
but nearly all the trouble since that time 
has been caused by Mataafa people, and 
they seemed to be bent on having a fight 
before the year closed. At a funeral of 
one of the chiefs fifty-two rifles were 
counted in the procession, and Mataafa had 
informed the commission that his party had 
no arms left. They have hundreds of rifles, 
it Is said, and if not restrained by the men 
of-war would have been fighting the Malie- 
toans long ago. 

Worried by the Mataafa complaints, the 
Malietoa people were compelled to leave 
Apia and live In their villages. The gov- 
ernment issued a notice that all might 
come and go as they pleased on legitimate 
business, but has allowed natives to keep 
possession openly of fowling pieces, which 
were prohibited by the commission's orders. 
Hundreds of revolvers are owned by 
natives, but they have never been collected, 
and rifles are also plentiful with them. 

PROPOSED PARTITION. 

The failure of the tripartite rule In Samoa 
seems to be acknowledged by the three 
powers. This fact gave force to a semi- 
official report, published the last of Octo 
her, 1899, to the effect that negotiation? 
were going on for a division of the islands 
between the United States, Germany and 
Great Britain. 

On the 8th of November, 1899, it was 
officially announced from Berlin that an 
agreement, subject to the approval of the 
United States, had been arrived at between 
Great Britain and Germany, by virtue of 
which the Samoa treaty Is repealed and 
the islands of Upolu, Savaii and the small 
adjacent islands fall to Germany as free 
property, and the island of Tutulla and 
the subsidiary islands go to the United 
States. Great Britain, it is added, re- 
nounces any claim to the Samoan islands, 
and Germany in turn surrenders any claim 
to the Tonga islands and to Savage island 
in favor of Great Britain, and also cedes 
Choisul and San Isabel, the two easterly 
islands of the Solomon group, with their 
insular surroundings, to Great Britain. 

The consular representatives of the two 
powers in Samoa and the Tonga islands 
are to be withdrawn for the present and 
German subjects are to have the same 
rights as the British In regard to the free 
and unimpeded employment of native la- 
borers in the whole of .the Solomon group 
in the possession of Great Britain, Includ- 
ing Choisul and SanJsabel. Regarding this 
agreement it Is observed that the assent of 
the United States is regarded as assured. 

A further agreement concluded between 
Germany, Great Britain and the United 
States is to the effect that the question of 
compensation for damages during the late 
trouble will be submitted to an imperial 
court of arbitration for adjudication. 

Especial interest attaches to the division 
of these Islands from the standpoint of the 
United States by reason of the fact that 
the harbor of Pago-Pago, in the island of 



114 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



Tutuila, the southernmost of the group, was 
ceded to the United States for a naval and 
coaling station, first in 1872, and afterward 
confirmed by a treaty signed at Washing- 
ton Jan. 17, 1878, and ratifications exchanged 
on Feb. 13 of the same year, by which 
the United States was given the right to 
establish at that harbor a station for coal- 
ing, naval supplies, freedom of trade, com- 
mercial treatment as a favorad nation, and 



extraterritorial consular jurisdiction. This 
harbor was occupied by the United States 
in 1898, presumably with the purpose of 
utilizing its advantages as a coaling and 
supply station. Tutuila has a population of 
3,700, and an area of fifty-four square miles. 
The United States declined to accept the 
agreement as to the disposition of the 
Samoan islands reached by Great Britain 
and Germany, but proposed a new one. 



NATURALIZATION LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES. 



The conditions under and the manner in 
which an alien may be admitted to become 
a citizen of the United States are pre- 
scribed by sections 2165-74 of the revised 
statutes of the United States. 

DECLARATION OF INTENTIONS. 

The alien must declare upon oath before 
a Circuit or District court of the United 
States or a District or Supreme court of 
the territories, or a court of record of any 
of the states having common-law jurisdic- 
tion and a seal and clerk, two years at 
least prior to bis admission, that it is his 
bona fide intention to become a citizen of 
the United States, and to renounce forever 
all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign 
prince or state, and particularly to the one 
of which he may be at the time a citizen 
or subject. 

OATH ON APPLICATION FOB ADMISSION. 

He must at the time of his application to 
be admitted declare on oath, before some 
one of the courts above specified, "that he 
will support the constitution of the United 
States, and that he absolutely and entirely 
renounces and abjures all allegiance and 
fidelity to every foreign prince, potentate, 
state or sovereignty, ana particularly, by 
name, to the prince, potentate, state or 
sovereignty of which he was before a cit- 
izen or subject," which proceedings must 
be recorded by the clerk of the court. 

CONDITIONS FOB CITIZENSHIP. 

If it shall appear to the satisfaction of 
the court to which the alien has applied 
that he has made a declaration to become a 
citizen two years before applying for final 
papers, and has resided continuously within 
the United States for at least five years, and 
within the state or territory where such 
court is at the time held one year at least; 
and that during that time "he has behaved 
as a man of good moral character, attached 
to the principles of the constitution of the 
United States, and well disposed to the 
good order and happiness of the same," he 
will be admitted to citizenship. 

TITLES OF NOBILITY. 

If the applicant has borne any hereditary 
title or order of nobility he must make an 
express renunciation of the same at the 
time of his application. 

SOLDIEBS. 

Any alien of the age of 21 years and up- 
ward who has been in the armies of the 
United States, and has been honorably dis- 
charged therefrom, may become a citizen on 
his petition, without any previous declara- 
tion of intention, provided that he has re- 
sided in the United States at least one 
year previous to his application, and is of 
good moral character. (It is judicially de- 



cided that residence of one year in a par- 
ticular state is not requisite.) 

MINORS. 

Any alien under the age of 21 years who 
has resided in the United States three years 
next preceding his arriving at that age, and 
who has continued to reside therein to the 
time he may make application to be ad- 
mitted a citizen thereof, may, after he 
arrives at the age of 21 years, and after he 
has resided five years within the United 
States, including the three years of his 
minority, be admitted a citizen; but he 
must make a declaration on oath and prove 
to the satisfaction of the court that for two 
years next preceding it has been his bona 
fide intention to become a citizen. 

CHILDBEN OF NATURALIZED CITIZENS. 

The children of persons who have been 
duly naturalized, being under the age of 21 
years at the time of the naturalization of 
their parents, shall, if dwelling in the 
United States, be considered as citizens 
thereof. 

CITIZENS' CHILDREN WHO ABE BORN ABBOAD 

The children of persons who now are or 
have been citizens of the United States are, 
though born out of the limits and jurisdic- 
tion of the United States, considered as 
citizens thereof. 

CHINESE. 

The naturalization of Chinamen IB ex- 

Eressly prohibited by section 14, chapter 126, 
iws of 1882. 

PROTECTION ABROAD TO NATURALIZED 
CITIZENS. 

Section 2000 of the revised statutes of the 
United States declares that "all naturalized 
citizens of the United States while in for- 
eign countries are entitled to and shall re- 
ceive from this government the same pro- 
tection of persons and property which is 
accorded to native-born citizens." 

THE BIGHT OF 8UFFBAGE. 

The right to vote comes from the state, 
and is a state gift. Naturalization Is a 
federal right and is a gift of the union, not 
of any one state. In some of the states 
aliens (who have declared intentions) vote 
and have the right to vote equally with 
naturalized or native-born citizens, but in 
most of them only actual citizens may vote. 
The federal naturalization laws apply to 
the whole union alike, and provide that no 
alien may be naturalized until after five 
years' residence. Even after five years' 
residence and due naturalization, he is not 
entitled to vote unless the laws of the state 
confer the privilege upon him, and in sev- 
eral states he may vote six months afrer 
landing if he has declared his intention, 
under United States law, to become a 
citizen. 



THE NICARAGUA CANAL. 



115 



THE NICARAGUA CANAL. 



A waterway across the isthmus between 
the continents of North and South America, 
connecting the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, 
has been the dream of commerce for three 
centuries. The revival of Spanish trade 
that followed the conquest of Peru and 
Chile led the king of Spain, Ferdinand, to 
consider a nearer route to his new pos- 
sessions than the long and dangerous one 
arouiid Cape Horn. His proposal was that 
a canal be cut across the isthmus at what 
is now Panama. No steps were taken to 
begin the work, and his successor, Philip, 
abandoned the idea of a canal at" Panama 
and favored a location farther north, the 
one that is now being considered across 
Nicaragua. With the increase of Spanish 
commerce the demand for this waterway 
became more urgent, but Philip's ambitions 
in Europe and the losses he sustained by 
reason of them made the building of the 



oceanic canal through Nicaragua, and 
called for proposals, a concession being 
given to Mr. Beniski. In 1826 Mr. Clay, who 
was then secretary of state, ordered an ex- 
amination of the route. In 1829 Gen. Wer- 
meer of Belgium obtained a franchise in 
the name of King William of Holland, but 
the revolution of 1830, which separated Bel- 

ium from Holland, put an end to the un- 
ertaking. In 1837 Morazan, president of the 
Central American federation, attempted to 
carry out the scheme, but the survey wa? 
brought to a close by the dissolution of 
the government. In 1843 J. L. Stephens 
carried out a confidential mission to Cen- 
tral America on behalf of the United States 
government. In 1844 Don Francisco Castel- 
lon of Nicaragua endeavored to induce 
Louis Philippe to take up the question of 
the interoceanic canal, but he was inter- 
ested in the Panama project. 




canal an impossibility. For the two suc- 
ceeding centuries the canal, while seriously 
considered, was not actively projected. In 
1655 Great Britain endeavored to control 
the transit trade through Nicaragua and 
sacked and burned Leon. The expedition 
demonstrated to England the value of Lake 
Nicaragua for iuteroceanic communication 
and was the beginning of an attempt to 
control it, which lasted until 1690. 

Attention was called to the canal project 
and interest again awakened in it by the 
report of Von Humboldt, who explored 
Central America between 1799 and 1804. 
Regarding a canal across Nicaragua he 
said: "I should wonder if the United 
States were to let an opportunity escape 
of getting such a work into their own 
hands. * * * I therefore repeat that it 
is absolutely indispensable for the United 
States to effect a passage from the Mexican 
gulf to the Pacific ocean, and I am certain 
they will do it." In 1825 the United States 
congress decreed the cutting of an inter- 



In 1847 the British government advanced 
claims to the control of the proposed inter- 
oceanic waterway, but the Nicaraguan gov- 
ernment, acting with the approval and sup- 
port of the United States, signed a contract 
for building the canal. This concession 
lapsed, and in 1849 Cornelius Vanderbilt and 
his associates contracted with the govern- 
ment for a regular transportation service 
across Nicaragua from ocean to ocean. 
Complications with Great Britain Inter- 
vened, and it was not until the conclusion 
of the Clayton-Bulwer treaty, April 19, 1850. 
that the neutrality of all and any present 
or prospective interoceanic waterways 
across Nicaragua was absolutely guaran- 
teed. . 

This treaty was signed on April 19, 1850, 
before the development of steam navigation 
had rendered the Suez canal commercially 
possible, before a transcontinental railway 
was practicable and at a time when the 
discovery of gold in California seemed to 
render an interoceanic canal an early 



116 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



necessity. It was in form intended to effect 
five principal objects: 

1. The United States and Great Britain 
were to unite in jointly protecting persons 
engaged in building any canal or railroad 
across the American isthmus from "unjust 
detention, confiscation, seizure or any vio- 
lence whatever." 

2. They were to protect the canal when 
completed from interruption, seizure or un- 
just confiscation, and "to guarantee the 
neutrality thereof, so that the canal may 
forever be open and free and the capital 
invested therein secure." 

3. "Vessels of the United States or Great 
Britain, traversing the said canal," in case 
of war between the contracting parties, 
were to be exempted from blockade, deten- 
tion or capture by either of the belligerents. 

4. Neither party, it was agreed, would 
ever obtain for itself or maintain any ex- 
clusive control over the canal, or erect any 
fortifications commanding the same, or as- 
sume any dominion over any part of Cen- 
tral America. 

5. All other nations were to be Invited to 
enjter into similar stipulations, to the end 
that they might "share in the honor and 
advantage of having contributed to a work 
of such general interest and importance as 
the canal herein contemplated." 

This treaty was ratified by the United 
States senate under the impression that 
Great Britain had abandoned her terri- 
torial encroachments in Central America. 
As a result of some correspondence between 
the two governments it became known that 
Great Britain had given up practically noth- 
ing. In pursuance of the pledge given In 
the treaty there was a storm of disappro- 
bation in this country, united with a popu- 
lar demand for the abrogation of the treaty 
on the part of the United States. This 
might easily have been accomplished at 
that time, but no direct steps were taken 
to that end until the administration of Mr. 
Buchanan. This movement was met by a 
few concessions by England, which caused 
Mr. Buchanan to accept the treaty as sat- 
isfactory to the United States. It has been 
the chief effort of American statesmen ever 
since that time to show that this treaty 
has little or no validity, in which they 
have failed to satisfy the American con- 
gress or the British government. The fact, 
however, remains that, in the opinion of 
this nation, the canal should be, if con- 
structed, under American control. This pol- 
icy of "American control," as enunciated 
by President Hayes, is directly opposed to 
the Clayton-Bulwer treaty, which is still 
in force. Two plans have been proposed 
to remove this obstacle. One is to delib- 
erately annul our agreement with Great 
Britain, while the second is to ask that 
government to abrogate the treaty upon the 
best terms we can make with her. 

During Mr. Arthur's administration a 
treaty was made with Nicaragua, providing 
for the building of the canal, and also 
declaring that "the United States shall 
have exclusive control of the construction 
of the canal and railway and telegraph 
lines, if the same shall be built, and shall 
be invested with all the rights and powers 
necessary thereto." 

Mr Cleveland, immediately after his in- 
auguration, finding this treaty unratified. 



withdrew it on the ground that controlling 
foreign territory in this way would lead to 
entangling alliances. The Cleveland policj 
was that the canal should be built by pri- 
vate individuals rather than by the gov- 
ernment, and as a result of this the Mari- 
time Canal company was organized, hav- 
ing obtained valuable concessions from 
Nicaragua, with a large capital. This com- 
pany expended about $6,000,000 in prepara- 
tions, and then asked the government to 
become responsible for the work by guaran- 
teeing the bonds and securities of the com- 
pany. This congress declined to do and the 
Maritime company ceased to be an impor- 
tant factor in the work in 1893. 

For two years or more the Nicaragua 
canal scheme has been, in one form or an- 
other, before congress, and several commis- 
sions have been appointed to make esti- 
mates as to the cost of the work. 

Three routes have been surveyed. The 
first was made in 1850-52 by Col. O. M. 
Childs. This survey was for a waterway 
with a depth throughout of seventeen feet. 
In the canal portion the bottom width was 
to be fifty feet, while in the excavated 
channels in the river and lake the bottom 
width was to be 150 feet. Locks were to be 
250 by 80 by 17 feet. Ships were to pass 
from the sea level on each side to the 
summit lake level of 108 feet by fourteen 
locks, each with an eight-foot lift. The 
lake was to be held at 108 feet elevation by 
a dam in the Rio Grande valley, nine and 
three-quarter miles west of the lake, and 
another at Castillo rapids, thirty-seven 
and one-quarter miles east of the lake, in 
the San Juan river. The lowest lock on the 
east side was to be at a point ninety miles 
from the lake, where the canal was to 
leave the river and extend across the flat 
alluvial land to Greytown, where at that 
time there was a well protected harbor. 
The total length of the 'Childs canal was to 
have been 194.4 miles, and its cost, includ- 
ing 15 per cent for contingencies, was esti- 
mated at $31,538,319. 

The next survey was made in 1872 by an 
expedition under Commander Lull of the 
United States navy, and associated with him 
was A. G. Menocal. later the engineer of 
the Maritime Canal company. The depth 
of the canal was to be twenty-six feet and 
its bottom width fifty, sixty and seventy- 
two feet, according to locality. In the ex- 
cavated river channel the bottom width was 
to be eighty feet and something over eighty 
feet in the lake channel. Commander Lull 
proposed several changes. The Pacific ter- 
minus was to be Brito, the same as that 
proposed by Childs. The ascent from the Pa- 
cific coast to the lake was 1 to be via the 
Rio Grande valley, and by means of eleven 
locks of ten and one-half feet lift, and the 
canal was to be cut directly through the 
western divide to the lake. This portion was 
to be sixteen and one-quarter miles long. 
The route across the lake was to be fifty- 
six and one-half miles long. The San Juan 
was to be navigated by placing dams in 
the river at four places, the uppermost at 
Castillo, the lowest a mile below the moutb 
of the San Carlos. This river portion was 
to be sixty-six and one-half miles long. 
At the lowest dam the canal was to leave 
the river, follow its left bank to the San 
Juanillo, and then proceed by a straight 
course to Greytown. The total length of the 
canal from ocean to ocean was to be 181V4 1 



THE NICARAGUA CANAL. 



117 



miles. The total cost was estimated at 
$65,722,147. 

The third survey was made by Mr. Meno- 
oal, under direction of the government, in 
1885. He was to make an estimate for a 
twenty-eight-foot canal. He made some 
changes in the Lull route, especially in that 
portion of it that provided for the canal- 
ization of the San Juan river. His estimate 
was $60,036,197. In 1895 congress provided 
for a commission consisting of Col. Ludlow, 
U. S. A.; M. T. Endicott, U. S. N., and 
Alfred Noble, a private citizen, which was 
to report upon the feasibility and cost of 
completing the canal company's work. The 
commission estimated the cost of the work 
at $133,472,893, but its report was not favor- 
able to the company and It recommended 
the appointment of a new commission, with 
enlarged powers, to make a more exhaust- 
ive examination of the proposed routes. 
Such a new commission was appointed, con- 
sisting of Admiral Walker, U. S. N. ; Prof. 
Lewis M. Haupt and Gen. Hains. This 
commission, with a force of 250 men. includ- 
ing eighty engineers, with complete ap- 
paratus for boring, testing rainfall, evap- 
oration and flow of streams, with other 
appliances, landed In December, 1897, and 
spent three months in the work. The esti- 
mated cost of construction was: Admiral 
Walker, $125,000,000: Prof. Haupt, $90,000,- 
000, and Gen. Hains, $140,000,000. As to 
the routes the commission recommended, 
that of the Maritime and the Lull route 
were the best two to be followed. 

In March, 1899, congress authorized the 
president to appoint a new commission to 
examine all possible routes across the Isth- 
mus, especially the two known as the Nica- 
ragua and Panama routes, and to determine 
which is the most feasible and practicable 
one of the two. In accordance with this 
act the president selected the following 
gentlemen to serve on such commission: 

Rear- Admiral John G. Walker. U. S. N.; 
Samuel Pasco of Florida, Alfred Noble, 
C. E., of Illinois; George S. Morrison. C. E., 
of New York; Col. Peter C. Hains. U. S. 
A.; Prof. William H. Burr of Connecticut, 
Lieut.-Col. Oswald H. Ernst, D. S. A.; 
Prof. Lewis M. Haupt, C. E., of Pennsyl- 
vania; Prof. Emory R. Johnson of Pennsyl- 
vania. 

The report of this commission had not 
been issued at the time of going to press. 
The secretary of state, however, gave out. 
on the 31st of May, the following synopsis 
of its report: 

"The commission understood that It was 
required to consider all routes heretofore 
proposed having any merit; that new routes 
appearing to have merit should be devel- 
oped, and the entire region of canal possi- 
bilities should be examined with sufficient 
thoroughness to enable a Just and compre- 
hensive comparison of the various routes to 
be made and the most desirable one se- 
lected. With this view the commission 
made a carefnl study of all data bearing 
upon the Nicaraguan canal question. 

"Mnch delay to the work and great an- 
noyance to working parties were caused by 
attempts at revolution and by the strained 
relations between the governments of Nic- 
aragua and Costa Rica. The outbreak of 
the war between the United States and 
Spain was also a serious matter. 

"The report poes Into minute details with 



respect to all matters connected with the 
construction of the canal, and says after 
mature deliberation the commission has 
adopted and estimated for the route from 
Brito to Lake Nicaragua, called the Childs 
route, and from the lake to Qreytown, 
called Lull route. 

"This line leaving Brito follows the left 
bank of the Rio Grande to near Bueno Re- 
tiro, crosses the western divide to the val- 
ley of the Lajas, which it follows to Lake 
Nicaragua. Crossing the lake to the head 
of the San Juan river it follows the upper 
river to near Boca San Carlos, thence in 
excavation by the left bank of the river to 
the San Juanillo and across the low country 
to Greytown, passing to the northward of 
Lake Silico. 

"It requires but a single dam with regu- 
lating works at both ends of the summit 
level. The surveys have in general revealed 
better physical conditions than were hith- 
erto supposed to exist, especially as to the 
amount of rock in the upper river, whereby 
It is possible to greatly reduce the esti- 
mated cost of construction. 

"To determine the proper unit of prices 
for excavation, the average of prices actu- 
ally paid to contractors on the Chicago 
drainage canal, which represent cost of 
plant, prices paid for work done, and con- 
tractors' profits, was taken. To these 
prices certain percentages were added for 
the difference In location, climate, etc. 

"In obtaining the estimates for the cost 
of locks, the prices actually paid for build- 
ing the government locks at Sault Ste. 
Marie were taken and 33 per cent was 
added for the difference of location. 

"After giving due weight to all the ele- 
ments of this important question, and with 
an earnest desire to reach logical conclu- 
sions based upon substantial facts, the 
commission believes that a canal can be 
built across the Isthmus on this route for 
not exceeding $118,113,790. 

"Col. Hains concurs generally with the 
views of the other members of the com- 
mission, but his estimate of the cost is 
$134,818,308." 

The full report will be submitted by the 
president to the LVIth congress. 

TECHNICAL DETAILS. 

Total distance from ocean to ocean, 169.4 
miles. 

Canal in excavation, 28 miles. 

Lengths of basins, 21.6 miles. 

River San Juan. 64.5 miles. 

Lake Nicaragua, 56.5 miles. 

Free navigation In lake, river and basins, 
142.6 miles. 

Elevation of summit level of canal above 
sea level, 110 feet. 

Length of summit level, 153.2 miles. 

Number of locks, 6. 

Greatest lift of lock, 45 feet. 

Dimensions of locks, 800 feet long, 100 
feet wide. 

Depth of canal, 30 feet. 

Least width at bottom, 100 feet. 

Time transit from ocean to ocean, 28 
hours. 

Length of Lake Nicaragua, 110 miles. 

Average width. 40 miles. 

Surface area, about 2,600 square miles. 

Area of watershed of lake, about 8,000 
square miles. 



118 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


DISTANCES IN NAUTICAL MILES BETWEEN COMMERCIAL PORTS OF THE WORLD 
AND DISTANCES SAVED BY THE NICARAGUA CANAL. 
[Compiled from data furnished by the United States Hydrographic office. Length of sailing 
routes approximate only.J 


BETWEEN 


Around 
Cape Horn 
for sailing 
vessels. 


Via Magel- 
lan for 
full-pow- 
ered steam 
vessels. 


Via Cape 
of Good 
Hnpe. 


Via 
Nicaragua 
canal. 


Advantage 
over sail- 
ing route. 


Advan- 
tage oiier 
steam 
route. 


New York and San Francisco. 
Puget Sound 


15,660 


13.174 
13,935 
14,439 




4,907 
6.6K5 
6,117 
7.402 


10,753 


8.267 
8.270 ! 
8.262 
8,303 
8.510 
8,362 




Sitka 








Bering Strait 




15,705 






Acapulco 




11,555 
12037 




3.045 
3,675 
10.692 
9,227 
9,862 
8,462 
6,417 
3,744 
3.227 




M R7.at 1 a n 














13750 


3.058 

3,8. 
4,138 
7,063 


Yokohama 






15.217 
12.8SO 
14,069 




Melbourne 


13,7(50 
12.600 
15,480 


12.860 
11,599 
13.290 
9640 


3,'l37 
6.873 
5.896 
7,073 
3.426 
9,392 
9.635 
9.487 
7.021 
4,551 
6.867 
6.110 
5.962 
737 
4.673 
3.490 
1.026 
4.473 
2,558 


Auckland 


Honolulu 


Callao 




Guayaquil 




10,300 






Valparaiso 


9,420 
16,000 


8,440 
13.539 
11920 




5,014 
4.147 

2.285 


4.40(5 
11,853 


New Orleans & San Francisco 






M azatlan 




12,402 
10,005 
8,805 




2.915 




Callao 






2,984 




V alparaiso 






4,254 




Liverpool and San Francisco. 
Acapulco 


15.620 


13.494 
11,875 




7.627 
5.765 


7,993 




Mazatlan 




12,357 
11,919 
10,620 




6.395 
11,182 
5,947 




Auckland 


12,130 


13,357 


948 


Guayaquil 


Callao 




9,960 




6.464 

7,734 
9,137 






9,380 


8,760 
13,610 




1,646 


Honolulu 




Yokohama 




14,505 


11,947 




Length of canal in nautical m 
New York to eastern port of cs 
Liverpool to eastern port of ci 
Hamburg to eastern port of cs 
Havre to eastern port of cana 
New Orleans to eastern port ol 

GR 

The great canals of the 
growth of the business p 
them were recently discussec 
ury bureau of statistics. T 
the Suez canal, the Kaiser 
St. Mary's falls, the Well 
York state canals, and, in 
commerce passing through th 
are given in detail for a tern 
thus is presented statistical i 
for those desiring to study 1 
ship canals connecting gr< 
water. 
The Suez canal shows a i 
6,576 tons In 1869, its first y 
1870, over a million in 1872, 
millions 1n 1875, and a steadj 
1891, when the figures rea 
since whjch time there has 
tlvely little change, the fi 
being slightly below those < 
per cent in excess of those of 
than three times those of 1 
The Kaiser Wilhelm can 
been in operation but three y 
increase of 50 per cent in 
the tonnage passing through 
first year after its opening 
and that for the fiscal year 
31. 1898, 2,469.795. 
The St. Mary's falls can 
Lake Superior with the lowe 


les ,..147 


Wes 

Wes 
Wea 
Wes 
Wes 
Wes 


tern port of canal to S 
tern port of canal to 1 
tern port of canal to I 
tern port of canal to 1 
tern port of canal to C 
tern port of canal to I 


an Francisco. . .2,700 
'ortland 3,345 




2,OtiO 
4.780 
5,127 
4,H91 
1.300 




'uget Sound 3,458 
Valparaiso 2.807 
'allao 1,537 


nal 



canal 


okohama 7,020 




EAT CANALS OF THE WORLD. 


world and the 
ssing through 
by the treas- 
le business of 
Wilhelm, the 
and and New 
jidentally, the 
; Detroit river, 
i of years, anil 
ata convenient 
he question of 
at bodies of 

et tonnage of 
ear; 436,609 In 
more than two 
Increase until 
ched 8,698,777, 
been compara- 
gures for 1897 
f 1896, but 33 
1887, and more 
877. 
il, which has 
ears, shows an 
that period In 
it. that of the 
being 1,505,983, 
ending March 

al. connecting 
r lakes, shows 


a more rapid gain than the Suez. The 
freight tonnage passing through the St. 
Mary's falls canal in 1881 Is given at 1,567,- 
741, reaching more than three million tons 
In 1885, more than five millions in 1887, more 
than seven millions in 1889, more than 
nine millions in 1890, more than eleven mil- 
lions In 1892, more than thirteen millions in 
1894 and more than eighteen millions In 1897. 
Incidentally the freight tonnage passing 
through the Detroit river, which connects 
Lakes Superior, Michigan and Huron with 
Erie and Ontario, is shown to have in- 
creased from 9,000,000 tons In 1873 to 23,900,- 
520 in 1896, an Increase in that time of 200 
per cent, while the increase In the regis- 
tered tonnage through St. Mary's falls 
canal alone in that time is from 1,204,446 to 
17.619.933. 
The Welland canal statistics show that 
the quantity of freight passed through that 
canal In 1880 was 819.934 tons, and in 1896 
1.279.987, though, comparing 1896 with 1872, 
1873 and 1874, no Increase is found, the fig- 
ures of 1872 being 1.333,104 and those of 
1873 1.506.484, while the tons passed from 
United States ports to United States ports 
through that waterwav fell from 748.557 
In 1874 to 653.213 in 1896. 
The New York canal tables show a steady 
decrease since 1880 In the tons of merchan- 
dise carried to tide water. The number of 



FOREIGN CARRYING TRADE. 



119 



tons of freight carried to tide water on the 
New York canals in 1880 was 4,067,402; in 
1890, 3,024,765, and in 1897, 1,878,218, while all 
other canals mentioned, as above indicated, 
show large gains in business meantime. 

The average of freight rates, especially 
on the great Jakes and by rail, in competi- 
tion with the lakes and their canals, shows 
a material decrease between Chicago and 
New York, whether freight is carried by 
lake and rail, lake and canals, or by all 
rail, though the reduction where carried 
by the all-water route of lake and canals 
is greater than in cases where a part or all 



of the transportation is by rail. The aver- 
age rate per bushel for wheat from Chi- 
cago to New York by lake and canal was 
in 1877, 11.24 cents per bushel; in 1887, 8.5 
cents, and in 1897, 4.25 cents. In the combi- 
nation of lake and rail freights the rate 
fell from 15.8 cents per bushel in 1877 to 12 
cents in 1887 and 7.37 cents in 1897, while 
the all-rail freight fell from 20.3 cents per 
bushel In 1877 to 15.74 cents in 1887 and 12 32 
cents in 1897. 

The following table presents the statistics 
of freight tonnage on the great canals of 
the world from 1880 to 1897: 



TRAFFIC THROUGH THE GREAT CANALS OF THE WORLD-1880-1897. 



YEAR. 



St. Mary's 

falls freight 

tonnage. 



Detroit river 

freight 

tonnage. 



Welland 

canal, 

freight 

transported. 



New York 
canal, freight 

tons to 
tide water. 



Suez canal, 
net vessel 
tonnage. 



1880. 
1881. 



1885. 

ISSti. 

1887. 



1890. 
1891. 

IS'.):.', 
is;.:; 
is-.tr 
1895. 



1897 



*1,734,890 
1,567,741 

2,029,521 

2,207,105 

2,874,557 

3,256,628 

4,527,759 

6,494,649 

0.411.423 

7.510.022 

9,041,21s 

8,888,759 

11,214,333 

10,796.572 

13,195,860 

15,062,580 

16,239.061 

18,982,765 



*20,235.249 
*17.672.240 
*17,8T2.182 
*17,695.174 
*18,045.949 
17,777,828 
"18.96S.005 
*18.864,250 
*19,099.060 
19,717,860 
21,750,913 
23,209,619 
28,553,819 
23,091,899 
24,203,868 
25,845,079 
27,900,520 



819.934 
681,500 



1,005,150 

837.S11 

784,928 

980,135 

777,918 

878,S<>0 

1,085.273 

1,010,005 

975,013 

955,554 

1,294,823 

1,008,221 

869.595 

1,279,987 



4,007,402 

3.005.839 
;s.oo8,if>:} 

2,892,170 
2,911,788 
2,715,219 
3,215,177 
3,158,923 
2,584,061 
2,623.836 
8,024.765 
2,280.a55 



3,057,421 
4,136,779 

6,074.8(18 
5,775,801 
6,871.500 
6,335,752 
6,767,055 
6.903,031 
ti.040.834 
0,783,187 
tW.XI.OiU 



2.505.845 

2,2;.0.8',I5 
1,003,745 
2,073,37S 
1,878,218 



7,712,028 
7.>;59,OU8 
8:039.175 
8,t4S.38:i 
8.5li0.2H3 
7,899,373 



* Gross tonnage. 

FOREIGN CARRYING TRADE. 

Values of Imports and exports of the United States carried in American and foreign ves 
sels each fiscal year for the last thirty years, with the percentage carried in American vessels- 



YEAH ENDED JUNE 30. 



IMPORTS. 



In American In foreign 
vessels. vessels. 



EXPORTS. 



In American In foreign 

vexwh. 



1869.. 
1870.. 
1871.. 
1872.. 
1873.. 
1874.. 
1875.. 
1876.. 
1877.. 
1878.. 
1879.. 
1880.. 
1881.. 
1882.. 
1883.. 
1884.. 
1885.. 
1686.. 
1887.. 
1888.. 
1S89.. 



. 

1892.. 
1893.. 
1894.. 
1895.. 
1890.. 
1897.. 
1898.. 



1186^02,024 

153,237,077 
163,285,710 
177,280,302 
174,739,834 
170.1127.778 
157.872.72t; 
143,380,704 
151,834,007 
146.4'.I9,2S2 
143,599,353 
149.317,368 
133,031,140 
130,266,826 
136,002,290 
135,04ii,207 
112.864.0S2 
11H.!I42,S17 
121,365,493 
123.525,298 
120.782,910 
124,926,977 
127,471,088 
139.139,891 
127.095,434 
121,561.193 
108.229,615 
117.2yj.074 
100,188,464 
93,535,867 



$300,512,231 
309,140,510 
363,020,644 
445.416,783 
4? 1,800,705 
405,320,135 

:;s2,949.5t;s 

321,139,5(10 
829,565,833 
307,407,565 
310,499,5'.*!) 
503,494,913 
491.840,269 
571,517,802 
564,175,576 
612,511,192 
443.513,801 
491,937.036 
543.392.2N; 
568.222.357 
586,120,881 
623.676,134 
676,511,763 
648.535,976 
695,184,394 
503,810,334 
590.538,362 
626,890.521 
619.784,338 
492,086,003 



199,732,:cn 
190,378,462 
168,044,7!i9 
171.566.75S 
174,421,210 
150,:5.000 
167.1W.,407 
164,826,214 
166,551,624 
128,425,339 
109,029,209 
116,955.324 
96,902,919 
104,418.210 
98.fo2.s28 
82,001,091 
78,406,686 
72,991,253 
67,332,175 
83,022,198 



*285,979,781 
329,786,978 
392.S01,!);?.' 
3!,!9.579 
494,915.886 



501.838,949 
492.215,487 
630,354,703 



78,908.047 



70,070,073 
71,258,893 
(ti.277,ri81 
70,:i92,H13 
79.4tl.823 
C)7 ,792,1;^ 



. 

720,770,521 
777,162,714 
041,460.907 
694,331,348 
015,287.007 
636,004,765 
5S1,973,477 
621,802,292 
f.06.474.9fl 
630.942.tH 
7:ffl,594,424 
773.589,324 
916,022,832 
7;,132,174 
825.798.918 
695,357.R3U 
751.0S3.000 
1)5,%9,428 
1,090,400,476 



33.2 
85.6 
31.9 
29.2 
26.4 
27.2 
26.2 
27.7 
26.9 
26.3 
23.0 
17.4 
16.5 
15.8 
16.0 
17.2 
15.3 
15.5 
14.3 
14.0 
14.3 
12.9 
12.5 
12.3 
12.2 
13.3 
11.7 
12.0 
11.0 
9.8 



120 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



POLITICAL MOVEMENTS OF THE YEAH 1899. 



[Arranged in the order 
THE UNION REFORM PARTY. 

The union reform party, which had Its 
inception in Ohio as a state organization in 
1898, was launched as a national alliance at 
Cincinnati, O., on the 1st of March, 1899. 

There were about 300 delegates present 
and persons from the following states: 
New York, Pennsylvania. Maryland, West 
Virginia, Georgia, Kentucky, Arkansas, 
Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, Washington, 
Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio and Min- 
nesota. 

The committee on permanent organiza- 
tion submitted the names of R. S. Thomp- 
son of Ohio for chairman. Asa Taylor of 
Nebraska for secretary and T. J. Donnelly 
of Cincinnati for assistant secretary. 

The following was adopted as the nation- 
al platform of the party: 

"Our present system of government vests 
the entire law-making power in representa- 
tives. The people elect these representa- 
tives but have no control over their actions. 

"An experience of over 100 years in the 
practical operation of this system has 
proved that it does not provide a govern- 
ment of, by and for the people. 

"Representatives cannot always know 
certainly the will of their constituents, and 
even where that will has been clearly 
manifested it has been continually disre- 
garded. 

"Legislative bodies, from municipal coun- 
cils to the national congress, have been 
controlled by corrupt influences. Legisla- 
tion has consequently been in the interest 
of the corrupt few and against the interest 
of the voiceless masses. 

"Under this system the people are dis- 
franchised on all matters of legislation. 
They are allowed to vote for men, but are 
denied the right to vote for measures. The 
people are governed by laws which they did 
not enact and cannot repeal. 

"As the result of this system great abuses 
have arisen and politics has become a 
synonym for corruption. 

"The people have seen these abuses, but 
being disfranchised on all legislative ques- 
tions have been nnable to provide a remedy. 
They have become divided into parties and 
factions contending with each other in re- 
gard to the legislation needed. They have 
overlooked the fact that under our system 
of government they have power neither to 
enact legislation which they desire nor to 
prevent legislation to which they are 
opposed. 

"In search for relief the people have 
turned from one party to another and have 
organized new parties without number. 

"But all such efforts have been fruitless 
and must continue so to be as long as the 
people are disfranchised. They must be 
invested with the power to make their own 
laws before they can have laws made in 
their own interest. 

"So long as the people have no voice in 
legislation it is useless for them to con- 
tend among themselves regarding the legis- 
lation which they need but cannot enact. 

"That we may have a government con- 
ducted in the interests of the people, and 
which will provide for the peace, prosper- 
ity, morality and happiness of the entire 
nation, we must have a government which 



Of their occurrence.] 

is in fact of the people, by the people and 
for the people, and in which the people 
shall rule. 

"We, therefore, reserving to ourselves the 
right to our individual opinions on all 
questions of legislation, unite lor the 
accomplishment of this end the enfran- 
chisement of the American people and the 
establishment of a government in which 
the will of the people shall be supreme. 
And to this do pledge our united labors. 

"And we invite all persons who believe in 
the principles of liberty and the declara- 
tion of independence to unite in support of 
the following platform: 

"Direct legislation under the system 
known as the initiative and referendum. 

"Under the 'initiative' the people can 
compel the submission to themselves of 
any desired law, when, if it receives a 
majority of the votes cast, it is thereby 
enacted. 

"Under the 'referendum* the people can, 
compel the submission to themselves of 
any law which has been adopted by any ! 
legislative body, when, if such law fails to 
receive a majority of the votes cast, it will 
be thereby rejected." 

A national executive committee was ap- 
pointed consisting of the following named 
gentlemen: R. S. Thompson, chairman. 
Springfield, O.; A. G. Eichelberger, secre- 
tary, Baltimore, Md. ; J. M. Dunlap, vice- 
president and treasurer, Franklin, Ind. : 
Edward Evans, North Tonawanda, N. Y. ; 
Asa Taylor, Omaha, Neb. ; W. J. Seelye, 
Wooster, O. ; Sheridan Webster, St. Louis, 
Mo. ; F. A. Naille, Colwyn, Pa. ; J. G. 
Waite, Sturgis, Mich. 



THE PEOPLE'S PARTY. 

The national organization committee met 
in response to call of Chairman Park in 
Kansas City, Mo., on May 15. After sev- 
eral hours of general discussion the follow- 
ing subcommittee was appointed to prepare 
an address to the populists of the United 
States embodying a plan of action for their 
general guidance, to the end that all 
straight populists might act with common 
purpose and on common lines, thereby 
making their forces effective: William L. 
Peek, Georgia, chairman; Jo A Parkpr, 
Kentucky; L. Stebbins, Nebraska; H. F. 
Jones, Texas; L. H. Weller, Iowa, secre- 
tary. 

The full report of the subcommittee as 
adopted by the organization committee is 
as follows: 
"To the Populists of the United States: 

"1. We congratulate the official members 
of the national organization committee of 
the national people's party on their success- 
ful efforts to curtail and minimize the dis- 
integrating and destroying forces set in 
motion by the advocates of the 'fusion' 
policy of and during 1896. as also upon 
their success in so reorganizing the earnest 
and true membership of the national peo- 
ple's party into such active, effective work 
as to awaken large hopes that in the elec- 
tion of 1900 only clean-handed and straight- 
forward work in support of the principles 
set forth in the Omaha platform and candi- 



POLITICAL MOVEMENTS OF THE YEAR 1899. 



121 



dates nominated thereon shall be consid- 
ered in our ranks. 

"2. We congratulate the membership of 
the people's party throughout the nation on 
the success attending upon their educa- 
tional and propaganda efforts among the 
people to the extent that the principles of 
the party are to-day accepted by thousands, 
including many prominent politicians and 
metropolitan newspapers who a short time 
ago ridiculed and reviled them. 

"3. We congratulate the membership of all 
political organizations which have indorsed 
any of the paramount propositions con- 
tained in the Omaha platform and respect- 
fully suggest to all such that a generous 
appreciation of the efforts of the people's 
party during years of educational work in 
the interests and behalf of all such can 
best be attested by uniting their political 
fortunes under the banner of the people's 
party. 

"Plan of action: 

"That the voters of the nation may feel 
assured that the people's party shall not 
again be betrayed in national convention 
or its working forces passed into the hands 
of the enemy, and to inspire confidence 
among the masses in the integrity of our 
acts and sincerity of our demands for in- 
dependent action as a party, we respect- 
fully submit to the populists of the nation 
the following plan of action: 

"1. That the national organization com- 
mittee hereby instructs its chairman to pro- 
ceed with the formation of people's party 
precinct clubs in all the states on the plau 
recommended by the Cincinnati convention 
of September, 1898, or some relative plan, 
deemed by the members in the different 
states most efficient, and to appoint in 
each state not having members already 
selected three members of the national 
organization committee, and with the 
assistance and advice of these committee- 
men to select a state organization com- 
mittee of the same number of members as 
the then existing state committee, and 
through these committeemen to organize 
as far as possible organization committees 
in congressional districts, counties and 
voting precincts. Wherever It is positively 
known that those members of national, 
state and other committees now existing 
are unqualifiedly opposed to fusion with 
either of the old parties and for indepen- 
dent, straightforward action by the peo- 
ple's party they are to be selected as 
members of the several organization com- 
mittees. 

"2. It shall be the duty of these several 
committees to use all honorable means to 
secure the selection of delegtrtes to the 
various conventions leading up to the 
nominating presidential convention of 1900 
who are opposed to fusion; and, failing in 
this, to provide for and send contesting 
delegates to the several conventions. That 
is to say, if those who are opposed to 
fusion are unfairly or dishonorably treate'i 
in the county convention they shall send a 
delegation to contest the seats of the 
fusion delegation in the state convention. 
If the state convention is controlled in the 
interest of 'fusion' and against an honor- 
able and straightforward people's party 
policy, as soon as this is determined the 
middle-of-the-road delegations shall leave 
the convention and uniting with the con- 



testing delegations shall hold another state 
convention and send a contesting delega- 
tion from that state to the national con- 
vention. Should the national convention be 
controlled by straight populists all dele- 
gates sent under this plan shall feel them- 
selves in honor bound to vote to nominate 
those candidates for president and vice- 
president recommended by the referendum 
vote; provided, that in the judgment of the 
national organization committee a suf- 
ficient number of said clubs shall have 
been organized to make such a vote both 
practicable and representative of the will 
of the party. 

"Should the national convention of 1900 
be controlled in the interest of 'fusion' the 
straight delegations shall leave said con 
vention and join the contesting delegations 
sent under this plan in a straight conven- 
tion, and there carry out the will of the 
populists of the nation without regard to 
the 'fusion' convention. 

"In this case the national organization 
committee and the several state, district, 
county and precinct committees organized 
under this plan shall be recognized as the 
only committees having any authority in 
the affairs of the people's party. 

"If it should so occur that the national 
committee fail to issue a call for a national 
people's party convention within due time, 
in the discretion of the national organiza- 
tion committee, said organization commit- 
tee shall then proceed to Issue a call for 
a national convention. 

"We offer this plan of action knowing 
that it will (first) show to every populist 
that we are willing to remain in good fel- 
lowship with our 'fusion' brethren with 
whom we have differed in the past in 
accepting distasteful allegiance with the 
enemies of the people's party; provided 
they will, with us, stand squarely on the 
original principles of the party and the 
line of action intended by its founders, who 
declared at Omaha in 1892 that the two old 
parties were jointly responsible for the 
miseries of the people and the unjust 
legislation which oppressed them; second, 
if they refuse to do so that we wish them 
to know that we can go with them no 
farther, preferring to adhere to the grand 
principles of untainted populism rather 
than to traffic In those sacred principles for 
personal or political advancement and gain. 

"We share the humiliation of the populist 
voters who have found themselves in the 
past forced to vote for candidates not in 
sympathy with each demand of the peo- 
ple's party platform and urge them to 
diligently work In the future to avert any 
repetition of such complications. 

"We recommend that an earnest effort to 
carry out the request for the referendum 
vote asked for by the Cincinnati conven- 
tion be made so that the fullest expression 
on the question may be obtained. 

"In order that states using the national 
precinct referendum club systems of party 
government may be made most effective 
we recommend that these clubs be pre- 
pared to vote on national candidates and 
other questions between Oct. 1, 1899, and 
Jan. 1. 1900. and send tabulated vote of 
same by states to Hon. Milton Park, chair- 
man national organization committee, 
Pallas, Tex., who, as soon as practicable. 



122 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



shall certify national results of same to 
the public." 

BIMETALLIC LEAGUE. 

The Ohio Valley League of Bimetallic 
clubs met at Louisville, Ky. , on the 30th 
day of May, 1899. Judge James P. Tarvln 
of Covington, Ky., was elected president, 
and Allen Clark of Indiana was chosen 
secretary. 

Speeches were made by the democratic 
candidate for governor, Mr. Goebel; Gen. 
Watt Hardin, J. J. Lentz, Matt O'Doherty, 
William J. Bryan, L. A. Russell, John S. 
Rhea, George Fred Williams. A. G. Caruth 
and several others. The following resolu- 
tions were adopted: 

"Resolved 1. Our faith in bimetallism is 
vindicated by events. The necessity for 
the restoration of the double standard was 
acknowledged by the president and con- 
gress in 1897, when a commission wts sent 
to Europe to entreat other nations to aid 
in establishing bimetallism, and the failure 
of the commission to secure European co- 
operation confirms the friends of free coin- 
age in their belief that relief can come 
only by the independent action of the 
United States. The present logical ratio 
of 16 to 1 is the only ratio at which bimet- 
allism can be restored, and opposition to it 
is confined to those who oppose bimetallism 
at any ratio, and to those who misappre- 
hend or ignore the reasons which led three 
national conventions to adopt it. That 
whatever paper money needs to be Issued 
in this country to supplement a gold and 
silver currency should be issued by the 
government of the United States directly 
without the intervention of any bank or 
corporation whatever. 

"2. We favor and recommend the enact- 
ment by the democratic national conven- 
tion in 1900 of the Chicago platform of 1896 
without change. 

"3. We especially favor and recommend 
the adoption by the democratic national 
convention of 1900 of the financial plank in 
the Chicago platform of 1896 without any 
change. 

"4. We believe that the trust is the result 
in large measure of the methods that have 
been used, among which is the demonetiza- 
tion of silver, by which the volume of cur- 
rency has been kept below the demands of 
business. We favor the destruction of the 
result as well as the removal of the causes. 
The establishment of independent bimetal- 
lism at 16 to 1 would do more to cripple or 
destroy the organization and the operation 
of the trust than any other single act. We 
recommend, therefore, the. adoption by the 
democratic national convention of 1900 of 
an appropriate and specific declaration 
against the organization and existence of 
the trust and a specific promise of legis- 
lative and executive action tending to their 
extermination. 

"5. We hereby express our continued con- 
fidence in William Jennings Bryan and 
favor bis nomination for the presidency of 
the United States in 1900." 

THE ANTI-TRUST CONFERENCE. 
Pursuant to a call issued by Gov. Sayers 
of Texas to the governors of various states 
to meet at St. Louis, Mo., on the 20th of 
September, 1899, for the purpose of con- 
sidering what course should be pursued 



regarding the trusts, eleven states re- 
sponded upon a call of the roll. 

The states represented and their repre- 
sentatives were as follows: 

Michigan Gov. Pingree and Attorney- 
General Oren. 

Missouri Gov. Stephens and Attorney- 
General Crow. 

Texas Gov. Sayers and Attorney-General 
Smith. 

Arkansas Gov. Jones and Attorney-Gen- 
eral Davis. 

Tennessee Gov. McMillln. 

Iowa Gov. Shaw. 

Colorado Gov. Thomas and Attorney- 
General Campbell. 

Indiana Attorney-General Taylor. 

Montana Attorney-General Nolan. 

Mississippi Monroe McClurg, democratic 
candidate for attorney-general. 

Washington Insurance Commissioner C. 
G. Heifner. 

Gov. Sayers of Texas was made perma- 
nent chairman. 

While it was the design of the promoters 
of the convention that nothing of a par- 
tisan character should be injected into it, 
early in the proceedings there was a good 
deal of defection and the republican 
delegates retired from the conference, leav- 
ing delegates from the following eight 
states: Michigan, Missouri, Texas, Arkan- 
sas, Tennessee, Mississippi, Montana and 
Washington. These delegates unanimously 
adopted resolutions demanding: 

"1. The enactment and enforcement, both 
by the several states and the nation, of 
legislation that shall adequately and fully 
define as crimes any attempted monopoliza- 
tion or restraint of trade in any line of 
industrial activity, with provisions for 
adequate punishment both of the individual 
and the corporation that shall be found 
guilty thereof; punishment to the corpora- 
tion to the extent of its dissolution. 

"2. The enactment by each of the states 
of the union of legislation for the adequate 
and proper control and regulation of cor- 
porations chartered t>y that state, and we 
recommend as efficacious a system of re- 
ports to and examination by state author- 
ity of the corporations organized under its 
laws, to the end that they be brought to a 
fair observance of the laws under which 
they are created. 

"3. The enactment by each state of laws 
that will prevent the entrance of any 
foreign created corporation into its limits 
for any other purpose than interstate com- 
merce, except on terms that will put the 
foreign created corporation on a basis of 
equality with the domestic created corpora- 
tion of the state entered, and subject to 
the same laws, rules and regulations of the 
state that it enters which are applicable 
to the domestic corporations of that state, 
and to this end we recommend legislation 
that would make it mandatory upon cor- 
porations seeking to engage in business 
outside the state of their creation that 
they procure licenses from the foreig'j 
state as a condition precedent to their 
entry into such state; such license to be 
granted on such terms and subject to such 
restrictions as will place the corporation 
subject to the same control, inspection, 
supervision and regulation as the domestic 
corporation of that state, and to be revoc- 
able if the conditions thereof are violated. 



POLITICAL MOVEMENTS OF THE YEAR 1899. 



123 



"4. The enactment of state legislation 
declaring that a corporation created in one 
state to do business exclusively in .other 
states than where created shall be pro- 
hibited from admission into any state. 
(This proposition is supported by decisions 
of the Supreme courts of several states, 
but we believe it should become legislative 
enaetmen* ilform throughout the states.) 

"5. That no corporation should be formed 
in whole or in part by another corporation. 

"6. That no corporation shall own or hold 
any stock in another corporation engaged 
in a similar or competitive business and 
that no officer or director of a corporation 
shall be the officer or director or the owner 
of stock in another corporation engaged in 
a similar or competitive business the object 
or result of which is to create a trust or 
monopoly. 

"7. Recognizing that trusts are usually 
composed of corporations and that corpora- 
tions are but creatures of the law and can 
exist only in the place of their creation 
and cannot migrate to another sovereignty 
without the consent of that sovereignty, 
and that this consent may be withheld 
when desired, we recommend as the sense 
of this conference that each state pass 
laws providing that no corporation which 
is a member of any pool or trust in that 
state or elsewhere can do business in that 

"Resolved, That it is the sense of this 
conference that all the capital stock of 
private corporations should be fully paid 
either, first, in lawful money, or, second, 
in property of the actual cash value of 
the amount of the capital stock; and that 
in all private corporations with a capital 
stock issued in excess of the amount 
actually paid up as above provided the 
shareholders shall be liable to the extent 
of twice the face value of the stock held 
by each." 

THE ANTI-IMPERIALIST LEAGUE. 

The declaration of Edwin B. Smith in 
calling the league convention to order on 
the 17th day of October, 1899, in the city 
of Chicago, that "We propose next year to 
contribute to the defeat of any party that 
shall then stand pledged to the subjugation 
of any people," makes the movement a 
political one and entitles it to classifica- 
tion under this head. Upon the opening of 
the convention about 100 delegates were 
present representing some fifteen states 
and territories. 

The opening address was made by Mr. 
Morton of Nebraska. He was followed by 
Mr. Schurz of New York, Mr. Atkinson of 
Massachusetts, Prof. Tolman of Illinois, 
Gov. Boies of Iowa and several others. 

The following were elected as officers or 

Chairman J. Sterling Morton, Nebraska 

( 'if y Nft> 

Vice-chairmen Ruf us D. Smith, Ohio; 
Edwin Burritt Smith, Chicago. 

Secretaries Erving Winslow, Boston; 
William J. Mize, Chicago. 

Committee on Programme Edwin Burnt 
Smith, Chicago; J. Laurence Laughlin, 
Chicago; Erving Winslow, Boston 

Committee on Resolutions Carl Schurz. 
New York; Herbert Welsh, Philadelphia; 
Louis R. Ehrich, Denver; Prof. J. Lau- 
rence Laughlin, Chicago; Dans Estes, Bos- 



ton; E. Burritt Smith, Chicago; Sigmund 
Zeisler, Chicago; C. B. Wilby, Cincinnati; 
Horace White, New York; Edgar A. Ban- 
croft, Chicago. 

Honorary Vice-Chairmen Ex-Gov. George 
S. Boutwell, Groton, Mass. ; Gen. William 
Birney, Washington, D. C. ; Gen. A. C. 
McClurg, Chicago, 111.; Senator William 
E. Mason, Chicago, 111.; Gen. John Beatty, 
Columbus, O. ; Senator R. F. Pettigrew, 
Sioux Falls, S. D. ; Gov. John Lund, St. 
Paul, Minn.; Gov. Charles S. Thomas, 
Denver, Col. ; Ex-Gov. Horace Boies, Water- 
loo, Iowa; Edward Atkinson, Brookline, 
Mass.; Andrew Carnegie, New York, N. Y.; 
Dr. Emil Pretorious, St. Louis, Mo. ; Sena- 
tor Caffrey, Franklin, La. ; Samuel Gomp- 
ers, New York, N. Y. ; Congressman J. J. 
Lentz, Columbus, O.; Thomas A. Moran, 
Chicago, 111.; George W. Ochs, Chatta- 
nooga, Tenn. ; Prof. Hermann von Hoist, 
Chicago, 111.; Edward M. Shepard, New 
York, N. Y. ; Rev. W. R. Huntington. New 
York, N. Y.; Patrick O'Farrell, Washing- 
ton, D. C. ; Ex-Senator George F. Edmunds, 
Burlington, Vt. ; Rev. W. D. McHugh, 
Omaha, Neb. ; Rev. S. W. Sample, Minne- 
sota ; Louis R. Ehrich, Denver, Col. ; Hor- 
ace White, New York, N. Y.; Carl Schurz, 
New York, N. Y. ; Herbert Welsh, Phila- 
delphia, Pa.; Charles N. Sturges, Chicago, 
111.; Austin G. Fox, New York, N. Y. ; Rt.- 
Rev. H. C. Potter, New York, N. Y.; Rt.- 
Rev. John Lancaster Spalding, Peoria, 
111.; Rev. Theodore L. Cuyler, New York, 
N. Y. ; Dana Estes, Boston, Mass. ; Rev. 
Herbert S. Bigelow, Cincinnati, O.; J. L. 
Slayden, San Antonio, Tex.; George Foster 
Peabody, New York. N. Y.; Rev. W. H. 
Fish, Jr., Denver, Col.; Edgar A. Bancroft, 
Chicago, 111. 

At the second day's session the following 
platform was adopted: 

"We hold that the policy known as Im- 
perialism is hostile to liberty and tends 
toward militarism, an evil from which It 
has been our glory to be free. We regret 
that it has become necessary in the land of 
Washington and Lincoln to reaffirm that all 
men, of whatever race or color, are entitled 
to life, liberty and the pursuit of happi- 
ness. We maintain that governments de- 
rive their just powers from the consent of 
the governed. We insist that the subjuga- 
tion of any people is 'criminal aggression" 
and open disloyalty to the distinctive 
principles of our government. 

"We earnestly condemn the policy of the 
present national administration in the 
Philippines. It seeks to extinguish the 
spirit of 1776 in those islands. We deplore 
the sacrifice of our soldiers and sailors, 
whose bravery deserves admiration even in 
an unjust war. We denounce the slaughter 
of the Filipinos as a needless horror. We 
protest against the extension of American 
sovereignty by Spanish methods. 

"We demand the immediate cessation of 
the war against liberty begun by Spain and 
continued by us. We urge that congress 
be promptly convened to announce to the 
Filipinos our purpose to concede to them 
the independence for which they have so 
long fought and which of right is theirs. 

"The United States have always pro 
tested against the doctrine of International 
law which permits the subjugation of the 
weak by the strong. A self-governing 
state cannot accept sovereignty over an 



124 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



unwilling people. The United States can- 
not act upon the ancient heresy that might 
makes right. 

"Imperialists assume that with the de- 
struction by American hands of self-gov- 
ernment in the Philippines all opposition 
here will cease. This is a grievous error. 
Much as we abhor the war of 'criminal 
aggression' in the Philippines, greatly as 
we regret that the blood of the Filipinos 
is on American hands, we more deeply 
resent the betrayal of American institu- 
tions at home. The real firing line is not 
in the suburbs of Manila. The foe is of our 
own household. The attempt of 1861 was to 
divide the country. That of 1899 is to 
destroy its fundamental principles and 
noblest ideals. 

"Whether the ruthless slaughter of the 
Filipinos shall end next month or next 
year is but an incident in a contest that 
must go on until the declaration of inde- 
pendence and the constitution of the 
United States are rescued from the hands 
of their betrayers. Those who dispute 
about standards of value while the founda- 
tion of the republic is undermined will be 
listened to as little as those who would 
wrangle about the small economies of the 
household while the house is on fire. The 
training of a great people for a century, 
the aspiration for liberty of a vast immi- 
gration who have made their homes here, 
are forces that will hurl aside those who 
in the delirium of conquest seek to destroy 
the character of our institutions. 

"We deny that the obligation of all 
citizens to support their government in 
times of grave national peril applies to 
the present situation. If an administra- 
tion may with impunity Ignore the issues 
upon which it was chosen, deliberately 
create a condition of war anywhere on the 
face of the globe, debauch the civil service 
for spoils to promote the adventure, organ- 
ize a truth - suppressing censorship and 
demand of all citizens a suspension of 
judgment and their unanimous support 
while it chooses to continue the fighting, 
representative government itself is im- 

"We' propose to contribute to the defeat 



of any person or party that stands for the 
forcible subjugation of any people. We 
shall oppose for re-election all who in the 
white house or in congress betray American 
liberty in pursuit of un-American ends. 
We still hope that both of our great polit- 
ical parties will support and defend the 
declaration of independence in the closing 
campaign of the century. 

"We bold with Abraham Lincoln that no 
man is good enough to govern another man 
without that other's consent. When the 
white man governs himself, that is self- 
government, but when he governs himself 
and also governs another man, that is more 
than self-government that is despotism. 
Our reliance is in love of liberty, which 
God has planted in us. Our defense is in 
the spirit which prizes liberty as the herit- 
age of all men in all lands. Those who 
deny freedom to others deserve it not for 
themselves, and under a just God cannot 
long retain it. 

"We cordially invite the co-operation of 
all men and women who remain loyal to 
the declaration of independence and the 
constitution of the United States." 

The following form of petition to be 
circulated among the people was adopted 
for presentation to congress: 

"We, the undersigned citizens of the 
United States of America, respectfully 
petition your honorable body to bring about 
an immediate cessation of hostilities in 
the Philippine islands, and to announce to 
the people thereof with all convenient 
promptitude that it is the purpose of the 
United States not to interfere with their 
aspirations for independence or to subject 
them to our authority, but only to aid 
them in setting up an independent govern- 
ment of their own choice, and to protect 
them against hostile foreign interference 
and to assist them with the military and 
naval forces of the United States so far as 
may be required in the maintenance of 
order and security until such a government 
shall be established." 

The convention adjourned on the 18th of 
October. 



MEN OF THE YEAR 1899. 



ELIHU ROOT. 

Elihu Root, secretary of war, was born at 
Clinton, Oneida county, N. Y., Feb. 15, 1845. 
His father was Oren Root, for many years 
professor of mathematics in Hamilton col- 
lege. In his youth he taught school and 
paid his way through Hamilton, subse- 
quently studying law there, and he com- 
pleted his course at the University Law 
school in New York. He then entered the 
law office of Mann & Parsons. His first 
partnership was formed with John H. 
Strahn and the next with Willard Bartlett, 
who became a judge of the Supreme court. 
Mr. Root was connected with the munic- 
ipal-reform movement in New York city in 
1871. In 1879 he was the republican candi- 
date for judge of the Court of Common 
Pleas, but was defeated, though polling a 
large vote He was chairman of the re- 
publican county committee in 1886 and 1887, 
and for many years executive member of 
the 21st assembly district. He was appoint- 
ed by President Arthur United States at- 



torney for the south district of New York 
and served two years. During his long 
career as a lawyer Mr. Root has been 
leading counsel in many noted cases, nota- 
bly for Tweed and Ingersoll on the exposure 
of the frauds perpetrated upon the county 
of New York by the Tweed ring, for Judge 
Hilton in the Stewart will case, for the ex- 
ecutors in the Hoyt and Havemeyer will 
cases, and for the contestants in the Ham- 
mersley will case. He is now counsel for 
and director in several banks, is attorney 
for several steam railroads and the chief 
adviser of the syndicate controlling the 
Broadway (New York city) railroad. He is 
also counsel for many large private corpora- 
tions. Mr. Root was chairman of Gov. 
Roosevelt's campaign committee in 1898. He 
was appointed by the president to be sec- 
retary of war upon the resignation of Gen. 
Alger, and assumed the duties of that of- 
fice Aug. 1, 1899 

JOSEPH H. CHOATE. 
Joseph Hodges Choate of New York, am- 



MEN OF THE YEAR 1899. 



125 



bassador to Great Britain, was born in 
Salem, Mass., Jan. 24, 1832. He graduated 
from Harvard university in 1852 and en- 
tered Dana Law school, from which he was 
graduated in 1854. He was admitted to the 
bar, and removed to New York city, where 
he entered upon the practice of his profes- 
sionwhich he continued to the time of his 
present appointment and became one of 
the most prominent lawyers in the country. 
While always an active republican, he had 
never held political office until selected by 
the president to represent this country at 
the court of St. James. Mr. Choate has, 
however, been active in New York politics, 
and was a member of the committee of 
seventy whose work broke up the Tweed 
ring in that city. In 1894 he was president 
of the state constitutional convention. In 

1897 he was a candidate for United States 
senator, but was defeated by Thomas C. 
Platt. Mr. Choate has been president of 
a number of N*w York city clubs, and in 

1898 he was elected president of the Amer- 
ican Bar association. When John Hay was 
selected secretary of state to succeed Mr. 
Day Mr. Choate was appointed in his place 
to the embassy to London. 



HORACE A. TAYLOR. 
H. A. Taylor, assistant secretary of tbe 
treasury, is the editor and proprietor of the 
Madison (Wis.) Journal, and has been for 
many years one of the most prominent fig- 
ures in the political field in the state. He 
has been at times a candidate for governor 
and has wielded no little influence in Wis- 
consin politics. Mr. Taylor was born in 
1837 in St. Lawrence county. New York. 
He went to Wisconsin in 1855, and after 
working on a farm, driving a stage and 
dealing in real estate he drifted into the 
newspaper business and, with his brother, 
the late Lute A. Taylor, started the River 
Falls Journal. Three years later he gave 
his interest in this paper to his brother and 
went to Hudson, where he purchased the 
Hudson Chronicle and changed its name 
to the Hudson Times. A short time after- 
ward he purchased the Hudson Star and 
combined the names of the two papers, and 
published the Hudson Times and Star for 
over thirty years. Besides publishing a 
weekly paper, Mr. Taylor branched out into 
lumbering and banking, in both of which 
enterprises he did well and laid the founda- 
tion for a fortune. He was always a re- 
publican, and his papers were always 
stanchly faithful to that party. He went 
into politics and in 1876 was appointed 
state timber agent by Gov. Ludington and 
held the place through successive admin- 
istrations until 1881, when he resigned to 
take the position of United States consul to 
Marseilles. He returned to Wisconsin in 
1883, and five years later he was elected 
to the state senate. While serving as sen- 
ator he was appointed United States rail- 
road commissioner by President Harrison. 
During the World's Fair Mr. Taylor repre- 
sented the department of the interior on 
the commission. When he retired from tbe 
railroad commission in 1893 Mr. Taylor re- 
turned to Madison and took charge of the 
Journal, in which he had purchased a con- 
trolling interest. Since that time he has 
confined himself to editorial work. He was 
appointed assistant secretary of the treas- 
ury to succeed Mr. Howells of New Jersey 
in February, 1899. 



JOHN N. IRWIN. 

John N. Irwln, minister to Portugal, was 
born in Ohio in 1847, attended school in 
Keokuk, Iowa, and graduated at Mirmi 
university (O.). Upon the breaking out of 
the civil war be enlisted as a private In 
the 45th Iowa infantry and served until 
1864. Entered Dartmouth college (N. H.) 
and graduated from that institution In 167, 
and engaged in merchandising at Keokuk. 
In 1883 he was appointed governor of Idaho, 
but resigned after a service of u'.x months. 
In 1890 he was appointed governor of Ari- 
zona, but resigned before the close of his 
term. Appointed minister to Portugal in 
1899. 

WILLIAM P. LORD. 

William Paine Lord of Oregon, minister 
to Persia, was born in Dover, Del., in 1839, 
and was graduated from Fairfield college ID 
1860. He began the study of law, but on 
the outbreak of the civil war aided in rais- 
ing a battalion of Delaware cavalry, of 
which he was first captain, later major, 
finally becoming Judge-advocate on the staff 
of Gen. Lew Wallace. At the close of the 
war he resumed his legal studies, and on 
graduation from the Albany Law school 
was admitted to the bar in Oregon in 1866. 
At this time he was appointed a lieutenant 
in the 2d United States cavalry, and saw 
service in Alaska. He then resigned his 
commission, and in 1868 went to Salem, 
Ore., where he built up a successful law 
practice. In 1878 he was chosen state sen- 
ator for four years, but resigned in 1880 to 
accept the republican nomination for jus- 
tice of the Supreme court. He was elected 
by a good majority, and re-elected in 1882 
and 1888. While yet on the bench he was 
nominated in 1894 for governor. His term 
in that office expired on Jan. 1, 1899. 

ADDISON C. HARRIS. 
Addison C. Harris of Indiana, minister to 
Austria-Hungary, was born in Wayne county, 
Indiana, in 1840, and graduated at But- 
ler college in that state about 1864. He 
studied law, and was admitted to the bar. 
In 1876 he was elected to the state senate, 
of which body he was a member for four 
years, in wjiieh he devoted his energies 
to securing reform in the state statutes. 
Since 1886 he has been prominent in state 
politics, and in 1896 was candidate for the 
United States senate, but was unsuccessful 



ARTHUR S. HARDY. 
Arthur S. Hardy, minister to Greece, was 
born in Boston Aug. 13, 1847, and graduated 
at the West Point Milftary academy. He 
served as second lieutenant in the 3d artil- 
lery, but soon resigned and spent some 
time in foreign travel and study. Upon his 
return to this country he was appointed 
professor of civil engineering in Iowa col- 
lege. Later he became one of the editors 
of the Cosmopolitan Magazine in New 
York, and in 1888 became professor of 
mathematics in Dartmouth college, where 
he remained until 1893. In 1897 he was ap- 
pointed minister and consul-general to 
Teheran, Persia, which position he held 
until April, 1899, when he was transferred 
to Athens. Mr. Hardy is the author of 
several books, among which are "But Yet 



126 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMAXAC FOR 1900. 



a Woman," "The Wind of Destiny," "Ele- 
ments of Quarternions," "New Methods in 
Surveying" aud some others. 

WILLIAM R. MEREIAM. 

William Rush Merriam, director of the 
twelfth census, was born at Wadham's 
Mills, Essex county, New York, in July, 
1849. In 1861 his parents removed to St. 
Paul, Minn., and that city has been his 
home ev-er since. At 12 years of age he 
began his school life at Racine, Wis., and 
was graduated from Racine college in 1871. 
He then entered the First national bank 
of St. Paul as a clerk, and thoroughly mas- 
tered the business of banking. In 1873 he 
was elected the first cashier of the Mer- 
chant's national bank of St. Paul, which 
was organized at that time. In 1880 he was 
elected vice-president, and in 1882 president 
of that institution and occupied the latter 
place at the date of his appointment. In 
1882 he was elected to represent his ward 
in the lower house of the state legislature, 
was re-elected in 1886, and was speaker of 
that body during the following session. 
Two years later he received the republican 
nomination for governor of the state, and 
was elected by a large majority. In 1890 
he was elected for a second term. The rec- 
ord of his life is that of a successful busi- 
ness man. He bas occupied places of honor 
in almost every capacity in regard to 
schools and charitable institutions, giving 
liberally to local charities. He is a mem- 
ber of the University club of New York 
and the Metropolitan club of Washington. 



FREDERICK H. WINES. 

Dr. Wines, assistant superintendent of 
the census, was born in Philadelphia in 
1838, and is the son of the Rev. Dr. E. C. 
Wines, the well-known clergyman, teacher, 
author and philanthropist. Mr. Wines was 
graduated in 1857 from Washington (now 
Washington and Jefferson) college, in 
western Pennsylvania, in which his father 
was a professor. He was educated for the 
ministry at Princeton, N. J. During the 
war he served as chaplain in the regular 
army, and was stationed on the frontier 
in southwest Missouri, where he had the 
opportunity to participate in only one en- 
gagement, but was mentioned by name in 
the officiSl dispatches for distinguished 
courage and gallantry on the field. 

At the close of the war he was called to 
the pastorate of the First Presbyterian 
church of Springfield. 111. He sustained this 
relation for four years, at the expiration of 
which he was appointed secretary of the 
newly created board of state commissioners 
of public charities, a position which he has 
occupied, except for a single brief interval, 
during thirty years. During the period he 
has filled the positions of secretary of the 
National Prison association, president of 
the national conference of charities and 
correction and expert special agent of the 
tenth census in 1880 for the collection and 
establishment of statistics relating to de- 
fective, dependent and delinquent classes, 
and of the eleventh census in 1890 for the 
collection of statistics relating to crime, 
pauperism and benevolency. The statistical 
atlas of the United States, first published 
in 1870, was his conception, and he fur- 



nished some of the statistical diagrams 
published in that work. 



HERBERT PUTNAM. 

Mr. Putnam, the new librarian of con- 
gress, was born in New York in 1861. He 
is the youngest son of the late George P. 
Putnam, the well-known publisher and 
founder of the house of G. P. Putnam's 
Sons. He was educated in the public and 
private schools of New York, was graduated 
from Harvard in 1883, and studied at the 
Columbia Law school. In 1884 Mr. Putnam 
went to Minneapolis and was admitted to 
the Minnesota bar. Early in his residence 
in that city he became librarian of the 
Minneapolis Athenaeum, a proprietary 
library. Later through his efforts the 
Minneapolis public library was founded and 
the Athenaeum was merged with it. From 
its organization the Minneapolis public 
library has been one of the most progress- 
ive in the country. Its building is also one 
of the best equipped in the United States. 
Mr. Putnam resigned as librarian at Minne- 
apolis in December, 1891, and went to Bos- 
ton to practice law. He was about to trans- 
fer his activities in that profession to Min- 
neapolis, when he was chosen librarian of 
the Boston public library. Four years' ex- 
perience in administration of the largest 
city library and the foremost library in 
the country in the point of efficiency 
made him the most available man for 
librarian of congress. In point of breadth 
and completeness of its collections, no less 
than in its strength as an educational in- 
stitution, the Boston public library at pres- 
ent much excels the national library. Mr. 
Putnam was president of the American Li- 
brary association in 1898, and was the can- 
didate of that body for the post of librarian 
of congress. 

JAMES P. TALIAFERRO. 

Mr. Taliaferro, United States senator 
from Florida, was born at Orange, Va., 
Sept. 30, 1847, and went to Florida in 1868 
He has always been a democrat, and was 
once chairman of the state committee. He 
is president of the First national Hmk of 
Tampa, vice-president of the C. B. Rogers 
company of Jacksonville, and is a member 
of the state board of health. He was 
elected to the senate to succeed Samuel 
Pasco, and his term will expire March 4, 
1905. 



ALBERT J. BEVERIDGE. 
Albert J. Beveridge, United States sen- 
ator from Indiana, was born in 1863 on a 
farm on the borders of Highland county, 
Ohio. His father and all his "brothers were 
away at the war, and at the close of that 
struggle Beveridge's father lost all his 
property, and the family moved to Illinois 
From the age of 12 Albert's life w:is one of 
hardship. When 12 he was a plowboy, at 14 
he was working as a day laborer on rail- 
road work: at 15 he became a logger and 
teamster, and by reason of a riatu.-al com- 
mand of men was placed in charge of the 
logging camp. He went through the high 
school by working at nights and in the 
morning and borrowed $50 to go to collegp 
on. He got through his first year by 
working as steward of a club, and by 



MEN OF THE YEAR 1899. 



127 



the end of the year he had taken prizes 
in philosophy, science and oratory sufficient 
to pay two years' expenses. He was com- 
pelled to begin college late each y-.-ar and 
quit early in order to go to work. The 
strain proved too much for him, and to 
recover his health Mr. Beverldge went wtst 
and for some time lived with the cowboys. 
He then went to Indianapolis, where he 
read law in the office of Senator McDonald. 
After his admission to the bar the cases 
which came to him were of great impor- 
tance, and his first pleading before a court 
was in the Supreme court. His career as a 
political speaker commenced in the Blaine 
campaign, and he has since stumped Indi- 
ana in every campaign. In 1895 he was in- 
vited by the Union League club of Chicago 
to respond to the toast of honor at its 
Washington's birthday banquet, and this 
address was so well received that he was 
requested to close the republican national 
campaign at the Auditorium in Chicago. 
Since then Mr. Beveridge has delivered ad- 
dresses in many of the large cities of the 
country. He has never sought political of- 
fice, and, with the exception of the time 
spent in giving these addresses, x has de- 
voted himself to his law practice. He was 
elected to succeed David Turpie, and his 
term of office will expire March 4, 1905. 



WILLIAM A. CLARK. 
W. A. Clark, United States senator from 
Montana, was born Jan. ,8, 1839, near Con- 
nellsville, Payette county, Pennsylvania. 
He is the son of John and Mary (Andrews) 
Clark, both natives of that county. The 
father of John Clark, whose name was also 
John, was a native of County Tyrone, Ire- 
land, who emigrated to this country and 
settled in Pennsylvania soon after the rev- 
olutionary war. Mr. Clark's father was 
a farmer, and his boyhood days were spent 
on the homestead, where he enjoyed the 
advantages of three months' winter school 
and nine months of such farm work as the 
boy could turn his hand to. At the age of 
14 he entered Laurel Hill academy, and ac- 
quired a good English education. In 1856 
his father moved to Iowa, and there Wil- 
liam assisted the first year in improving 
and tilling the new prairie farm, teaching 
a term of school the succeeding winter. 
He then attended an academy at Mount 
Pleasant, becoming a disciple of Black- 
stone. Here he prosecuted his legal studies 
for two years, but did not afterward en- 
gage in the profession. In 1859-60 he taught 
school in Missouri and in 1862 he crossed the 
great plains, driving a team to the South 
park, Colorado, and that winter worked in 
the quartz mines in Central City, gaining 
knowledge and experience that afterward 
served him to good purpose. In 1863 the 
news of the gold discoveries at Bannack, 
Mont., reached Colorado, and Mr. Clark 
was among the first to start for this new 
El Dorado. After sixty-five days' travel 
with an ox team, he arrived at Bannack 
jnst in time to join a stampede to Horse 
Prairie. Here he secured a claim, which he 
worked during this and the following sea- 
son, cleaning up a net $1.500 the first sum- 
mer, which formed the basis of hjs future 
operations in Montana and the beginning of 
the immense fortune he has since accumu- 
lated. To the time of his election to the 
senate he was engaged in mining, bonking 



and merchandising, in which he carried on 
the most extensive and important opera- 
tions in the state, and has accumulated a 
princely fortune. He was chosen senator 
to succeed Lee Mantle, and his term of of- 
fice will expire March 4, 1905. 



MONROE L. HAYWARD. 
Mr. Hayward, United States senator from 
Nebraska, was born in Essex county, New 
York, Dec. 22, 1840. He enlisted in com- 
pany I, 22d New York infantry, at the out- 
break of the war, and was transferred to 
the 5th cavalry later and mustered out of 
the service in 1862. He graduated at Fort 
Edward Collegiate institute, New York, and 
removed to Whitewater, Wis., with his 
father in 1865, where he studied law and 
was admitted to the bar. He came to Ne- 
braska in 1866, and located at Nebraska 
City, where he has since resided. He is a 
wealthy man and has many line farms well 
stocked with finely bred cattle. He has de- 
voted his attention mostly to law and spec- 
ulations, and has given comparatively lit- 
tle attention to politics. In 1886 be was ap- 
pointed district judge to 811 an uexpired 
term, and that is the only s..-ite i ffice he 
has ever held. In 1898 Judge Hayward was 
the republican party's candidate for gov- 
ernor. He was defeated by less than 3,000 
majority. It was the sympathy be claimed 
as the defeated standard-bearer of the 
party that gained him the strength he 
early demonstrated in the contest. This is 
the first office to which Judge M. L. Hay- 
ward was ever elected in the state or else- 
where, with the exception of being a dele- 
gate to the state constitutional convention 
in 1875. He was elected to succeed Wil- 
liam V. Allen, and his term will expire 
March 4, 1905. 



JOHN KEAN. 
John Kean, United States senator from 
New Jersey, was born at Ursino, Union 
county, N. J., Dec. 4, 1852. He studied at 
Yale college, and afterward was graduated 
from the Columbia College Law school, an<3 
read law in the office of Chetwood & Magie. 
Mr. Kean was admitted to the bar, bill 
law practice was distasteful to him and 
he embarked in the banking and manufac- 
turing business, in which he has displayed 
marked ability. He is president of the Na- 
tional state bank of Elizabeth and is its 
largest stockholder. He is one of the di- 
rectors of the Elizabethport Banking com- 
pany, president and controlling spirit of the 
Elizabethtown Water company and the 
Elizabethtown Gaslight company, and holds 
the principal interest in the Elizabeth 
Street Railway company. He is also inter- 
ested in a number of other enterprises in 
Elizabeth, and is vice-president of the Man 
hattan Trust company of New York city 
He has been actively identified with pol 
itlcs for many years. In 1882 he ran for 
congress against Miles Ross, whom he de 
feated by 2,295 plurality. In 1884 he ran 
again, against Robert S. Green, who after- 
ward became governor of New Jersey, anc 
was beaten by 1.848 plurality. He ran a 
third time In 1886 against William Mo- 
Mahon and won by 637 plurality. In 1892 
Mr. Kean was the republican candidate for 
governor against George T. Werts, who de 
feated him by 7,625 votes. In January 



128 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



1899, he was elected to the United States 
senate to succeed James Smith, Jr. His 
term of office will expire March 4, 1905. 



CHAUNCEY M. DEPEW. 
Mr. Depew, United States senator from 
New York, was born in Peekskill, N. Y., 
April 23, 1834, and at the age of 32 was 
graduated at Yale. Returning to his native 
village, he studied law in the office of Wil- 
liam Nelson, and was admitted to the bar 
in 1858. During that year he served as 
delegate to the republican state convention, 
beginning the practice of law in 1859. 
In 1861 he was elected to the assembly 
from the 3d Westchester county district. 
Re-elected in 1862, he was made speaker 
pro tern.; two years later he was elected 
secretary of state by a majority of 30,000. 
The post of United States minister to 
Japan was tendered to him by President 
Johnson, but the superior attractions of 
an important business connection led him 
to the decision to retire from political life. 
In 1866 he was appointed attorney for the 
New York & Harlem Railroad company; in 
1869 he came to hold the same relation to 
the New York Central & Hudson River 
Railroad company. In 1875 he beciiaie gen- 
eral counsel for the entire Vantlerbilt sys- 
tem of railroads and a director in each of 
the lines comprised in that system. In 
1874 he was chosen regent of the state uni- 
versity and a member of the building com- 
mission connected with the state oapitol. 
In 1882, when William H. Vanderbilt re- 
tired from the presidency of the New York 
Central, Mr. Depew became second vice- 
president, and three years later the presi- 
dency was conferred upon him. This posi- 
tion he retained until, at the time of Cor- 
nelius Vanderbilt's withdrawal from the 
chairmanship of the entire Vanderbilt sys- 
tem of railroads, he succeeded to this post. 
At the national republican convention of 
1888 Mr. Depew was a candidate for the 
presidential nomination, but withdrew his 
name when the Elaine vote went to Ben- 
jamin Harrison. For seven years he was 
president of the Union League club of New 
York city, and on retiring was elected an 
honorary life member. The Yale Alumni 
association chose him as its president for 
ten successive years. At the time of his 
election to the senate he was president of 
the Republican club, regent of the univer- 
sity of the state of New York and member 
of the St. Nicholas, Holland and Huguenot 
societies and the New York chamber of 
commerce. His term of office will expire 
March 4, 1905. 

PORTER J. M'CUMBER. 

P. J. McCumber, United States senator 
from North Dakota, was born in Chicago, 
111., In 1856. His parents moved in that 
year to Rochester, Minn., where he resided 
nntll he went to North Dakota, when a 
young man of 23 years. He is a lawyer, and 
was educated in the public schools of Minne- 
sota and the law department of Ann Arbor, 
from which he was graduated in 1880. He 
commenced practicing his profession in 1881 
at Wabpeton, where he "Is still located. 
He has been a member of the legislature, 
either In the house or senate, for two 
terms, and has always been a leader on the 



floor, standing generally with the reform 
element and for better laws. 

CHARLES A. CULBERSON. 
Charles A. Culberson, United States sen- 
ator from Texas, was born at Dadeville, 
Ala., June 10, 1855. He is a son of the 
Hon. David B. Culberson, former mem- 
ber of congress from the 4th Texas district. 
He has been remarkably successful in polit- 
ical life, having served the state for four 
years as attorney-general and four as gov- 
ernor, just prior to his election as senator. 
His parents moved from Alabama to Gil- 
more, Tex., in 1856, where young Culberson 
attended the public schools and a high 
school conducted by Prof. Looncy. After 
studying a few years in his father's law 
office, he graduated at the law school of 
the University of Virginia. In his pro- 
fessional career he was distinguished on ac- 
count of his defense of the prisoner in the 
LeGrand murder case, in which he con- 
vinced Judge Woods of the federal court 
that the kuklux law was unconstitu- 
tional and the court without jurisdiction. 
He was elected county attorney of Marion 
county, declined a nomination for the leg- 
islature, and, moving to Dallas, formed a 
law partnership with Judge Bookhout, 
which connection was continued till 1890, 
when he was nominated without opposition 
for attorney-general by the democratic state 
convention. His duties as attorney-general 
were discharged with marked success, and 
as governor he gained national distinction 
on account of his vigorous action !:i prompt- 
ly assembling the legislature and prevent- 
ing the Corbett-Fitzsimmons prize fight 
taking place in Texas. His term of office 
as governor of Texas expired in January, 
1899, and he was elected to the United 
States senate to succeed Roger Q. Mills. 
His term of service will expire March 4, 
1905. 

JONATHAN ROSS. 

Jonathan Ross, appointed to succeed Mr. 
Morrill as senator from Vermont, was born 
in Waterford April 30, 1826. He rtad law 
in the office of William Hebard, ar.d lo- 
cated in St. Johnsbury in 1856, where be 
still resides; is a graduate of Dartmouth 
college; was a member of the Vermont 
house in 1865, 1866 and 1867 and a senator 
from the county of Caledonia in 1870; was 
a member of the state board of education 
from 1866 to 1870; was one of the council 
of censors in 1869; was elected an assistant 
judge of the Supreme court in 1870, re- 
ceiving successive elections since; was ap- 
pointed second assistant judge by Gov. 
Farnham in 1882, vice Timothy P. Redfleld, 
promoted, and was elected chief judge in 
1890. 



ADDISON G. FOSTER. 
Addison G. Foster, United States senator 
from Washington, was born Jan. 28, 1837, nt 
Belehertown, Mass., and is a descendant of 
Reginald Foster, who landed at Ipswich, 
Mass., in 1638. His father. Samuel Foster, 
was a thrifty village merchant. When 13 
years of age Mr. Foster accompanied his 
parents to Sheboygan Falls. Wis., where 
his father in 1850 secured land and began 
to clear it for a farm. That was where 
Mr. Foster got his first experience in log- 



MEN OF THE YEAR 1899. 



129 



glng. Afterward he and his brother started 
for Pike's peak, but they turned back and 
he taught school in Missouri and afterward 
returned home and went to Wabasha, Minn. 
He held the offices of county surveyor and 
county auditor. Afterward he was engaged 
in forwarding and commission business In 
Lake City and Red Wing, Minn. In 1877 he 
formed a partnership with Col. C. W. 
Griggs in the fuel and contracting business, 
which partnership has continued to this 
day. In 1879 they formed the Beaver Dam 
Lumber company and in 1884 incorporated 
the Lehigh Coal and Iron company. He is 
still a leading officer in those companies 
and vice-president of the St. Paul and 
Tacoma Lumber company, organized in 1888, 
since which time he has made his home in 
Tacoma, Wash. He was elected to succeed 
John L. Wilson, and his term will expire 
March 4, 1905. 

NATHAN B. SCOTT. 

Nathan Bay Scott, United States senator 
from West Virginia, was born in Guernsey 
county, Ohio, In 1842. He enlisted in the 
union army and was mustered out in 1865, 
and settled in Wheeling shortly afterward 
and went to work as an employe of the 
Central Glass company. In a short time he 
was employed as manager and soon after- 
ward was selected president of the com- 
pany, which position he filled for years. He 
served two years as president of the second 
branch of the city council of Wheeling. He 
was elected in 1882 as a member of the 
state senate, and again in 1886, serving eight 
years. In the last race he defeated John O. 
Pendleton in a strongly democratic district, 
Mr. Pendleton being afterward elected to 
congress. While a member of the senate he 
had passed the mutual savings back law of 
the state. For five years he was West Vir- 
ginia's member of the republican national 
committee, and during the entire time was 
a member of the executive committee. Dur- 
ing the campaign of 1896 he was selected by 
President McKinley to serve with Gen. 
Powell Clayton and Vice-President Hobart 
in the headquarters at New York city. In 
recognition of his services President McKin- 
ley appointed him commissioner of Internal 
revenue. He organized the first savings 
bank in the state of West Virginia and is 
still president of that institution. He was 
elected to the senate to succeed Charles J. 
Faulkner and his term of office will expire 
March 4, 1906. 

JOSEPH V. QUARLES. 
Joseph V. Quarles, United States senator 
from Wisconsin, was born at Kenosha on 
Dec. 16, 1843. His father's family came 
originally from New Hampshire, and his 
father, Joseph V. Quarles, Sr., was a native 
of that state. Both his parents were among 
the earliest settlers of Kenosha, and were 
married there when it was but a mere 
hamlet. Young Quarles pursued his studies 
in the public schools and the high schools of 
Kenosha, graduating from the latter when 
he was 17 years of age. The following two 
years were spent in teaching and earning 
money in other ways for the expenses of a 
college course, which he had set his heart 
upon pursuing. In 1862 he entered the Uni- 
versity of Michigan as a freshman. He 
was conspicuous among his classmates, and 
upon the organization of the class was 



chosen its president and class orator for 
that year. The struggle of the govern- 
ment with the rebellion enlisted bis 
sympathies and aroused all his patriotic 
impulses. He left his studies and enlisted 
in the 39th regiment of Wisconsin infantry 
and was mustered into service as first 
lieutenant of company C. At the expira- 
tion of his service he returned to the 
university and graduated with the class of 
'66 with the degree of A. B. He then 
entered the law department of that Insti- 
tution, spending a year therein. Having 
exhausted his financial resources he re- 
turned to Kenosha and continued his law 
studies in the office of O. S. Head, a dis- 
tinguished lawyer of those days, with 
whom, upon his admission to the bar in 
1868, he formed a law partnership, the firm 
being Head & Quarles. His ability and 
activity soon led to his being called outside 
to duties other than his profession. In 1876 
he was elected mayor of Kenosha, and the 
two following years he was president of the 
Kenosha board of education. In 1879 he 
was a member of the legislative assembly, 
and in 1880 and 1881 he was the representa- 
tive of Kenosha and Wai worth counties ID 
the state senate. 

DAVID B. HENDERSON. 
David Bremner Henderson of Dubuque, 
speaker of the house of representatives, 
was born at Old Deer, Scotland, March 14, 
1840; was brought to Illinois in 1846 and to 
Iowa in 1849; was educated in common 
schools and at the Upper Iowa university; 
studied law with Bissel & Shiras of Du- 
buque, and was admitted to the bar in the 
fall of 1865; was reared on a farm until 21 
years of age; enlisted in the union army In 
September, 1861, as private in company C, 
12th regiment Iowa Infantry volunteers, 
and was elected and commissioned first 
lieutenant of that company, serving with 
it until discharged, owing to the loss of his 
leg, Feb. 26, 1863; in May, 1863, was ap- 
pointed commissioner of the board of 
enrollment of the 3d district of Iowa, serv- 
ing as such until June, 1864, when he re- 
entered the army as colonel of the 46tb 
regiment Iowa Infantry volunteers, and 
served therein until the close of his term 
of service; was collector of Internal rev- 
enue for the 3d district of Iowa from 
November, 1865, until June, 1869, when he 
resigned and became a member of the law 
firm of Shiras, Van Duzee & Henderson; 
was assistant United States district attor- 
ney for the northern division of the district 
of Iowa about two years, resigning in 1871; 
is now a member of the law firm of Hen- 
derson, Hurd, Lenehan & Kiesel; was 
elected to the XLVIIIth, XLIXth, Lth, 
List, Llld, LUId, LIVth, LVth and LVIth 
congresses as a republican. 

FRED FUNSTON. 

Gen. Funston, United States volunteers 
was born in New Carlisle, O., Nov. 9, 1865. 
His family moved to Kansas in 1867, where 
he attended school at lola and at the state 
university at Lawrence. In 1890 he became 
a newspaper reporter in Kansas City, an<3 
the next year was attached to the United 
States Death Valley expedition as botanist 
In 1893 he was sent to Alaska by the gov- 
ernment to explore and report upon the 
flora of the territory, and camped in the 



130 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOB 1900. 



Klondike in the winter of 1893-4. Later he 
became a lecturer and railroad employe. 
In 1896 he joined the insurgent army in 
Cuba; was twice wounded, and after 
eighteen months' service he returned to the 
United States and was made colonel of the 
20th regiment of Kansas volunteers. The 
command was sent to the Philippines and 
he took part In several battles. He was 
promoted to be brigadier-general for swim- 
ming across the Rio Grande river at Ca- 
lumpit under a heavy fire from the enemy 
and establishing a rope ferry by means of 
which the troops were enabled to cross the 
river and win an engagement. 

COL. ALBERT D. SHAW. 
Col. Albert D. Shaw of Watertown, 
N. Y. ( commander-in-chlef of the Grand 
Army of the Republic, was United States 
consul at Manchester from 1878 to 1886. He 
was rated during that time as one of the 
most efficient members of the government's 
consular staff, and his reports on com- 



mercial and industrial conditions in Eng- 
land became authorities. He distinguished 
himself at the outbreak of the Spanish- 
American war by tendering President 
McKinley the services of 10,000 veterans of 
the civil war. Col. Shaw is a New Yorker 
by birth and was born in 1841. He was 20 
years old when he enlisted in the 35th New 
York volunteers for the war against the 
confederacy. He fought at Rappahannock, 
the second Bull Run, Chantilly, South 
Mountain, Antietam and in many of the 
lesser engagements of the war. Gov. Fen- 
ton appointed him colonel of the 35th New 
York national guard. He resigned this 
office to become consul at Toronto, where 
he remained until his promotion to the 
Manchester post. In 1897 he was elected 
commander of the New York department, 
Grand Army of the Republic, and It was 
that department's support of him that 
elevated him to his present office. Col. 
Shaw is the author of the text-book used 
in the public schools of New York entitled 
"The Teaching of Patriotism and Civics." 



LEGAL HOLIDAYS, 



Jan. 1 New Year's day. In all the states 
except Arkansas, Kentucky, Massachusetts, 
Mississippi, New Hampshire and Rhode 
Island. 

Jan. 8 Anniversary of the battle of New Or- 
leans: In Louisiana. 

Jan. 19 Lee's birthday: In Florida. Alabama, 
Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina 
and Virginia. 

Feb. 6 Mardi-Gras, Shrove Tuesday (the day 
before Ash Wednesday, the first day of 
Lent): In Alabama and city of New 
Orleans, Louisiana. 

Feb. 12 Lincoln's birthday: In Illinois, Minne- 
sota, New Jersey. New York, Washington. 

Feb. 22 Washington's birthday: In all the 
states except Arkansas. Iowa and Mississippi. 

March 2 Anniversary of Texan independ- 
ence: In Texas. 

March 4 Firemen's anniversary: In New 
Orleans, La. 

March Good Friday (the Friday before 
Easter): In Alabama, Louisiana, Maryland, 
Pennsylvania and Tennessee. 

April (first Wednesday) State election day: 
In Rhode Island. 

April 6 Confederate Memorial day: In Lou- 
isiana. 

April 19 Patriots' day : In Massachusetts. 

April 21 Anniversary of the battle of San 
Jacinto: In Texas. 

April 26 Memorial day : In Alabama, Florida 
and Georgia. 

May 10 Memorial day: In North Carolina and 
South Carolina. 

May 20 Anniversary of the signing of the 
Mecklenburg declaration of independence: 
In North Carolina. 

May 30 Decoration day: In Arizona, Cali- 
fornia, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, 
Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, 
Maine, Maryland. Massachusetts, Michigan, 
Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, 
Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New 
York, North Dakota. Ohio. Oklahoma, 
Oregon, Pennsylvania. Rhode Island, South 
Dakota Tennessee, Utah, Vermont, Wis- 
consin, Washington and Wyoming. 

June 3 Jefferson Davis' birthday: In Florida. 

July 4 Independence day: In all the states. 

July 24 Pioneers' dav: In Utah. 

Aug. 16 Benninpton Battle day : In Vermont. 



September (first Monday) Labor day: In 
Alabama, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, 
Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, 
Iowa. Kansas. Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, 
Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mis- 
souri. Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, 
New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Penn- 
sylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, 
South Dakota. Tennessee, Texas, Utah. Vir- 
ginia,Washington, Wisconsin and Wyoming. 

Sept. 9 Admission day: In California. 

Oct. 4 Labor day : In California. 

Oct. 15 Lincoln day: In Connecticut. 

Oct. 31 Admission in the Union day : Nevada. 

Nov. 1 All Saints' day: In Louisiana. 

November (generally the Tuesday after the 
first Monday) General election day: In 
Arizona, California, Florida, Idaho, Indiana, 
Kansas, Maryland, Minnesota, Missouri. 
Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire. New 
Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, 
Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Dakota. South 
Carolina, Tennessee. Texas. West Virginia, 
Washington, Wisconsin and Wyoming. 

November, the last Thursday In Thanksgiv- 
ing day: It is observed in all the states, 
although In some it is not a statutory holiday. 

Nov. 25 Labor day: InLoulsiana. 

Dec. 25 Christmas day: In all states, and 
in South Carolina the two succeeding days 
in addition. 

Sundays and fast days (whenever appointed) 
are legal holidays in nearly all the states. 

Arbor day is a legal holiday in Kansas. Minne- 
sota, North Dakota, Wisconsin and Wyo- 
ming, the day being set by the governor 
In Nebraska, April 22; California, Sept. 9: 
Colorado, on the third Friday in April; 
Florida, Feb. 7; Rhode Island, first Friday 
in April; Texas. Feb. 22; Georgia, first 
Friday in December: Montana, third Tues- 
day in April; Utah, first Saturday in April; 
and Idaho, on Fridav after May 1. 

Every Saturday after i3 o'clock noon is a legal 
holiday in New York, New Jersey, Pennsyl- 
vania, Maryland and Virginia, and the city 
of New Orleans. 



*Labor day was made a national holiday by 
congress. It is the only strictly national 
holiday we have, not excepting the Fourth 
of July. 



UTTERANCES OF STATE CONVENTIONS. 



131 



Utterances of State Contentions. 



RESOLUTIONS ADOPTED AT VAKIOUS STATE CONVENTIONS IN 1899 ON 
NATIONAL QUESTIONS. 

THE FINANCES. 



[Where parties are omitted 
IOWA. 

REPUBLICAN. 

Wereadopt the following declaration from 
the Iowa republican platform of 1898: 

The monetary standard of this country 
and the commercial world is gold. The 
permanence of this standard must be as- 
sured by congressional legislation, giving to 
it the validity and vitality of public law. 
All other money must be k*pt at a parity 
with gold. And we urgently call upon our 
senators and representatives in congress to 
lend their best endeavors to enact these 
propositions .into law. 

We denounce the Chicago platform and 
itB declaration in favor of free trade and 
free silver coinage at the ratio of 16 to 1, 
and its attack upon the courts, as threaten- 
ing the American people with a departure 
from the policies of good government that 
would prove fraught with evil to the Ameri- 
can people. The enormities of that plat- 
form call for the resistance of all good 
citizens. 

As republicans, we make recognition of 
the loyalty and exalted patriotism of the 
sound money democrats and men of all 
parties who put aside partisanship in order 
to maintain the good faith of the nation 
and in resistance to the Chicago platform 
and its candidate. 

DEMOCRATIC. 

We, the democrats of Iowa, In convention 
assembled, unqualifiedly and unreservedly 
indorse the Chicago platform of 1896 in 
whole and in detail and declare our un- 
wavering fidelity and adherence to the 
same, and we proclaim our admiration for 
and loyalty to that peerless exponent of 
democratic principles, William J. Bryan, 
and favor bis nomination in 1900. 

PEOPLE'S PARTY. 

The people's party of the state of Iowa 
hereby reaffirm the national platform of 
the party as adopted at Omaha, A. D. 1892, 
and reaffirmed at St. Louis in 1896. 

For the purpose of meeting the obliga- 
tions of our contracts the free and un- 
limited coinage of gold and silver at the 
ratio of 16 to 1 meets our approval, but for 
internal commerce the truly scientific money 
of the United States is a money not de- 
pendent upon intrinsic value or coin redemp- 
tion, but a money issued solely by the 
government, without the intervention of 
corporations, thus nationalizing the money 
trust. Such a money should be a full legal 
tender for all debts, public and private, 
without any exception or limitation In pay- 
ment of all dues. It should be Issued In 
volume commensurate with the business 
demands of the country and increase of 
population. 

KENTUCKY. 

REPUBLICAN. 

We regard it as settled beyond dispute 
that the maintenance of a sound currency 



no declaration was made.] 
through republican administration and legis- 
lation is the foundation upon which rests 
the most remarkable period of industrial 
progress, commercial activity and general 
prosperity within the experience of the 
people of the United States. 

DEMOCRATIC (REGULAR). 

The democrats of Kentucky, in conven- 
tion assembled, reaffirm, without the slight- 
est qualification, the principles and policies 
declared in the democratic national plat- 
form adopted at Chicago in 1896. Their 
faith in bimetallism is vindicated by 
events. The necessity for the restoration 
of the double standard was acknowledged 
by the president and the congress in 1897 
when a commission was sent to Europe to 
entreat other nations to aid us in establish- 
ing bimetallism. The failure of this com- 
mission to secure European co-operation 
confirms the friends of free coinage in their 
belief that relief can come only by the 
independent action of the United States. 
The present legal ratio of 16 to 1 is the only 
ratio at which bimetallism can be restored, 
and opposition to it is confined to those 
who oppose bimetallism at any ratio and 
to those who ignore the reasons which led 
three national conventions to adopt it. 

DEMOCRATIC (ANTI-OOEBEL). 
We Indorse and reaffirm the principles of 
the democratic platform and policy as 
enunciated by it at its convention in Chi- 
cago in 1896. We recognize William Jen- 
nings Bryan as the most thoroughly 
equipped leader of the people of the United 
States in their contest against wrong and 
oppression; we regard him as a fearless 
advocate of principles which, If enacted 
as laws, will secure honest government, 
civil liberty and promote the welfare and 
happiness of the people of the United 
States. We declare that he is our choice 
for the democratic nomination for presi- 
dent in 1900. We apprehend disastrous 
consequences from the unnatural alliance 
between the nominees of the Louisville 
convention and the Louisville Courier- 
Journal and Times. These papers are 
avowed enemies of bimetallism and Bryan, 
and we regard such alliance as a serious 
menace to every principle embodied In the 
democratic platform of 1896 and the out- 
cropping of a deliberate conspiracy to 
fasten the shackles of the gold standard 
upon the people of the United States for- 
ever. 

PEOPLE'S PARTY. 

(See declaration on trusts.) 



MARYLAND. 

REPUBLICAN. 

We believe in the gold standard and that 
all our currency should be made by law 
redeemable in gold coin at the option of 
the holder. To this faith we confidently 
pledge the Influence and votes of the Mary 
Innd members In each house of congress. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

BEPUBLICAN. 

Defects exist in our currency system 
which must be remedied. Bonds and notes 
payable in coin must be established by law 
to be payable in gold and provisions made 
for supply of gold when required. The re- 
publican party stands unreservedly pledged 
to maintain the existing gold standard, and 
we look with confidence to the LVIth con- 
gress for the enactment of measures to so 
perfect our monetary system that there 
shall be ample money for the expanding 
business of the country and to so arm and 
guard the treasury that it can at all times 
protect the national credit. 

DEMOCRATIC. 

To-day, as on every proper occasion since 
the democratic national convention of 1896, 
the democrats of Massachusetts reaffirm 
and indorse in general and in particular 
the principles of the platform adopted by 
that convention. \Ve pronounce that polit- 
ical code one written not for a year or for 
a -single campaign, but for all time, being 
made up as it is of the fundamental prin- 
ciples of democracy, upon the acceptance 
and enforcement of which alone a free gov- 
ernment of, by and for the people can be 
maintained. New conditions may and do 
compel additions to that platform, for con- 
ditions change, but the Chicago platform, 
like the declaration of independence, stands 
as a part of the fundamental code of demo- 
cratic government. 

Particularly do we reiterate our belief in 
the financial plank of the Chicago platform 
and renew our demand for the free and 
unlimited coinage of both gold and silver 
at the ratio of 16 to 1. Heavy and unex- 
pected discoveries of gold and of new 
processes for extracting that metal, to- 
gether with the other supplies, have re- 
sulted since 1896 in an increase in the 
volume of money estimated at $441,000,000 
for the United States alone. The imme- 
diate revival of prices and trade accom- 
panying this increase demonstrated the 
democratic contention that the evils from 
which the nation suffered so gravely in the 
five years prior to 1897 proceeded from a 
contracted currency for which republican 
financial legislation bad provided no form 
of relief. 

But the benefits of a rise In the price 
level under the gold standard are of neces- 
sity unequally and unjustly distributed. 
The farmers of the west and south, before 
compelled to sell their products in the 
world's markets in competition with silver- 
using countries, are condemned to low 
prices for what they sell, while the rising 
scale of prices at home, due partly to the 
Increased volume of money and more to 
the intervention of the trusts, results in the 
exaction from them of higher prices for all 
they have to buy. The prosperity of New 
England rests upon the prosperity of her 
customers, and Massachusetts in pleading 
the cause of the farmers of the west and 
south advances her own industrial interests, 
and no system which decreases the income 
and Increases the outgo of the farming 
community can afford a safe foundation for 
a sound commercial fabric. 

The agricultural interests of the nation 
cannot be left to the chance of failing 
crops and famine in other lands, nor can 



national prosperity be founded upon expec- 
tation of disaster to foreign peoples. 

If there should now be a sudden check in 
the production of gold such as is indeed 
threatened by the prospect of war in the 
Transvaal, or if there should be a new and 
heavy demand for that metal such as any 
European crisis would at once create, all 
the evils of a currency famine would at 
once reappear and again the nation would 
be left without a remedy. Only by the 
establishment of bimetallism can a stable 
and just equilibrium of prices be effected. 

We denounce unqualifiedly the purpose of 
the republican party to surrender to the 
banks the governmental function of issuing 
paper money and controlling its volume. 
Such action would create a trust in com- 
parison with which all other monopolies 
would be trivial. Already there exists 
among the banking corporations a complete 
unity of interests and a practical unity of 
action, and by a perversion or an evasion 
of the law many national banks in the 
money centers are consolidating, creating 
branches under other names and manifest- 
ing a purpose to adopt that system of 
centralization and monopoly which has 
seized upon the commercial interests of the 
country. 

The power over mercantile credits which 
the great banking trust, already in sight, 
possesses is in itself a menace to com- 
mercial interests, and to add the power 
arbitrarily to expand or contract the 
volume of money would be to deliver over 
to the banking interests the fortunes of all 
the people. 

To-day our trust magnates are our bank- 
ers. They hold the bank stock, they sit 6n 
the boards of directors, they select th*- 
officials and they will apply to their com- 
mand over the supply of the nation's money 
the same merciless and extortionate meth- 
ods which they use in turning to their own 
profit their present monopolies. 

MISSISSIPPI. 

DEMOCRATIC. 

We heartily and earnestly Indorse and 
reaffirm the declaration of principles pro- 
mulgated by the party in convention 
assembled at Chicago In 1896 and recognize 
in the Hon. W. J. Bryan of Nebraska the 
ablest exponent of those principles, the 
statesman and the patriot, the great 
tribune of the people. 

PEOPLE'S PARTY. 
(See plank on trusts.) 

NEBRASKA. 

BEPTJBLICAN. 

We adhere unequivocally to the gold 
standard and are unalterably opposed to tne 
free coinage of silver. Gold has been our 
standard since 1834 and is now the standard 
of every civilized and important country in 
the world. After more than twenty years 
of harmful agitation and a campaign of 
extraordinary earnestness and full discus- 
sion, the people of the United States by a 
majority of more than half a million decided 
in favor of that standard. Our experience 
and present prosperity in the amplest and 
fullest measure demonstrate the wisdom of 
that decision. 

DEMOCRATIC. 

We, the democrats of the state of Ne- 



UTTERANCES OF STATE CONVENTIONS. 



133 



braska, In convention assembled, Indorse 
and emphasize each and every plank of the 
national platform adopted at Chicago in 
1896. 

Our confidence in the principles set forth 
in that platform has been increased as 
those principles have been vindicated by 
events. The gold standard is less defen- 
sible now than it was in 1896, since the 
president has confessed its failure by send- 
ing a commission to Europe to secure 
international bimetallism, while the In- 
ability of the commission to secure foreign 
aid is added proof that the people of the 
United States must act alone if they expect 
relief. The present legal ratio of 16 to 1 
is the natural and necessary ratio and the 
opponents of that ratio have nothing to 
offer in Its place but the evasive and 
ambiguous phraseology which for years 
furnished to the gold-standard advocates 
a mask behind which to hide while they 
secretly labored to make gold monometal- 
lism permanent. Any improvement In busi- 
ness conditions due to the Increased pro- 
duction of gold or to a favorable balance 
of trade Instead of supporting the gold- 
standard doctrine shows that more money 
makes better times and points the way to 
bimetallism as the means of securing a 
permanent increase In the volume of stand- 
ard money throughout the world. 

The republican scheme to lessen the vol- 
ume of standard money by making gold the 
only legal-tender money has at last become 
apparent to all and must be resisted by the 
debt-paying and wealth-producing classes of 
the country. The plan to retire the green- 
backs in the Interest of national bank 
notes, denounced by* the democrats In 1896, 
but then defended by the republicans, has 
boldly stalked forth from Its hiding place 
and threatens the formation of a gigantic 
paper-money trust. 

PEOPLE'S PARTY. 

We affirm our devotion to the national 
platform of 1896 and to every plank therein 
contained. (This platform advocated the 
free coinage of silver at the ratio of 16 
to 1.) 



OHIO. 

REPUBLICAN. 

The republican party of Ohio reaffirms 
the principles declared by the St. Louis 
platform. 

We earnestly Indorse the great adminis- 
tration of William McKinley. It is dis- 
tinguished to a remarkable degree In the 
history of national administrations. Under 
the last democratic administration a'nd as a 
result of the democratic principles and 
policy our Industries were destroyed, capital 
and labof were unemployed, the poor suf- 
fered as never before In our history, agricul- 
tural products could not be sold because 
consumers could not earn money with which 
to buy, and every branch of trade felt the 
blighting Influence of the democratic tariff- 
reform hard times; the treasury of the 
United States was depleted and the gold 
reserve disappeared. The government bor- 
rowed money to pay current expenses, in- 
creasing the public debt In time of peace 
by hundreds of millions of dollars. The 
democratic party proposed to the people as 
a remedy for all these democratic Ills a 



depreciated and dishonest currency which 
Intensified every evil. 

During all that period of depression and 
distress the republican party stood fast for 
the principles and policies under which 
American industries had been built up and 
had flourished beyond example the prin- 
ciples and policies under which the people 
had prospered and the nation had grown 
great for a generation stood fast foi 
sound and honest currency, and in 1896 
elected to the presidency William McKin- 
ley, the best exponent of republicanism and 
true American ideas and policies, the friend 
of every American Industry and the wise 
and patriotic defender and advocate of 
honest money. Under his splendid repub- 
lican administration public credit has been 
restored, the prosperity of the people has 
developed, our commerce has grown great, 
our trade, domestic and foreign, has in- 
creased to a degree never before known and 
the people are looking with confidence for 
greater things to come. 

DEMOCRATIC. 

We heartily reaffirm the entire Chicago 
platform of 1896 and we especially empha- 
size the financial plank therein, and we 
continue to demand the free and unlimited 
coinage of silver and gold as equal In 
primary money at the ratio of 16 to 1, 
independent of all other nations in the 
world. 



PENNSYLVANIA. 

REPUBLICAN. 

We reaffirm the principles of our party 
declared In the national platform by the 
St. Louis convention. The republican party 
of Pennsylvania stands unequivocally and 
unreservedly for sound money, and favors 
a currency with which to pay the wages 
of labor and the earnings of capital, the 
soldier and pensioner, as good as gold the 
world over. To further these ends we be- 
lieve In maintaining the existing gold 
standard, and -are unalterably opposed to 
the free coinage of silver at the ratio of 
16 to 1. 

DEMOCRATIC. 

The democracy of Pennsylvania In con- 
vention assembled, again renewing our 
pledges of fidelity and devotion to .the 
sacred rights of the people; true to the 
faith and principles of our party as de- 
clared In the platforms of our several 
national conventions, and proud of our 
matchless leader, William Jennings Bryan, 
realize that the issues involved In the 
coming campaign in Pennsylvania are 
honest government, clean politics and the 
redemption of our state from republican 
misrule and corruption. 

PEOPLE'S PARTY. 

We, populists of Pennsylvania, assembled 
In state convention this 7th day of Septem- 
ber, 1899, affirming our unshaken belief in 
the basic tenets of the people's party as 
expounded In the Omaha, St. Louis and 
Cincinnati platforms, and pledging our- 
selves anew to continued advocacy of those 
prand principles of human liberty until 
right shall triumph over might, love over 
greed, do proclaim: 

That there are two great domestic ques- 
tions before the American people, first, the 



134 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



money question, and, second, the railroad 
question, which involves the trust question. 
And these questions we would solve by 
the issue of paper money irredeemable in 
coin and by the nationalization of the rail- 
roads. * * * We know that the demo- 
cratic and republican parties do not advo- 
cate these measures. We know that they 
stand in the way of solving these questions 
and we cannot prostitute our principles by 
supporting the candidates of either of such 
parties. The populist does not want a gold 
dollar nor a silver dollar, but a paper dollar 
that will be an honest dollar, something 
that gold and silver dollars, the volume of 
which cannot be regulated at will by the 
government and in response to the demands 
of trade, cannot be; and he does not want 
the railroads to continue to be operated by 
corporations as preferential carriers but by 
the government as common carriers; and 
seeking to secure these things, and unable 
to secure them by voting for democrats or 
republicans who are opposed to these 
things, who are obedient to those who profit 
unfairly from things as they are, he must 
support his own candidates. 

RHODE ISLAND. 

REPUBLICAN. 

The unexampled abundance of money In 
all parts of the country is a complete 
refutation of the contention that an easy 
financial condition can be secured only by 



debasing the monetary standard, and 
demonstrates that the wealth of a nation 
is not increased by diminishing the value 
of the unit of its expression. The right- 
eousness and the wisdom of the mainte- 
nance of the gold standard have been again 
conclusively shown in the result of the last 
congressional election and to that standard 
we reaffirm our adherence. 



SOUTH DAKOTA. 

BEPUBLICAN. 

We, the republicans of South Dakota, In 
convention assembled, unhesitatingly re- 
affirm our allegiance to and accept the 
principles of the republican party as 
declared by the republican platform adopted 
at St. Louis. 

FUSION. 

The union reform forces of South Dakota 
in convention assembled reaffirm in detail 
the platform of the allied reform forces 
adopted at Chicago and St. Louis in 1896 
and we view with pride the steadfast 
adherence to principle which has constantly 
marked the career of our matchless leader, 
William J. Bryan, whose nomination we 
favor as the presidential candidate of the 
people in 1900. 

We demand of our national lawmakers 
the enactment of a law compelling the 
redemption and destruction of all national 
bank notes, and that their place be supplied 
by government legal tender notes. 



TRUSTS. 



IOWA. 

BEPUBLICAIT. 

To maintain the welfare of the people Is 
the object and end of all government. In- 
dustry and commerce should be left free to 
pursue their method according to the 
natural laws of the world, but when the 
business aggregations known as trusts prove 
hurtful to the people they must be re- 
strained by adequate law and if need be 
abolished. 

DEMOCEATIC. 

We view with alarm the multiplication 
of those combinations of capital commonly 
known as trusts that are concentrating 
and monopolizing industry, crushing out 
independent producers of limited means, 
destroying competition, restricting oppor- 
tunities for labor, artificially limiting pro- 
duction and raising prices and creating an 
industrial condition different from a state 
of socialism only in the respect that under 
socialism benefits of production would be 
for all, while under the trust system they 
go to increase the fortune of these trusts 
and combinations that are the direct out- 
growth of the policy of the republican 
Sarty, which has not only favored these 
istitutions, but has accepted their support 
and solicited their contributions to aid that 
party in retaining power, which has placed 
the burden of taxation upon those who 
labor and produce in time of peace and who 
fight our battles in time of war, while the 
wealth of the country is exempted from 
these burdens. We condemn this policy and 
it is our solemn conviction that the trusts 
must be destroyed or they will destroy free 
government, and we demand that they be 
suppressed by the repeal of the protective 



tariff and other privileges conferred by 
legislation responsible for them by the 
enactment of such legislation, state and 
national, as will aid in their destruction. 

PEOPLE'S PABTT. 

The rapid concentration of private Indus- 
tries into consolidated organizations, com- 
monly called trusts, which is now awaken- 
ing and alarming the American people, is 
the result of economic law and the develop- 
ment of the age and cannot be remedied 
by restriction or penal anti-trust legislation 
or outlawed in the courts, but such evils 
can be remedied only by the ownership of 
natural and economic monopolies by the 
whole people in their collective capacity as 
nation, state and municipality, in order 
that there may be equality of all men in 
the gifts of God to the common life, equal- 
ity of economic opportunity and political 
power, equality in access to all the national 
and social resources needful for the living 
of free, righteous, happy and complete 
lives. We charge the republican and demo- 
cratic parties that while recognizing the 
disease they have utterly faled to discover 
or prescribe the true remedy. 

KENTUCKY. 

EEPUBLICAN. 

We pledge the republican party of Ken- 
tucky to the enactment of all such laws as 
may be necessary to prevent trusts, pools, 
combinations or other organizations from 
combining to depreciate below its real value 
any article, or to enhance the cost of any 
article, or to reduce the proper emoluments 
of labor. 

We congratulate the republican party 
that existing federal legislation for the 



UTTERANCES OF STATE CONVENTIONS. 



135 



suppression of harmful trusts, pools and 
combinations Is the work of a republican 
congress, performed during the administra- 
tion of a republican president and we 
congratulate the couutry that in the sup- 
pression of injurious combinations repub- 
lican legislation has had in the past, as it 
will have in the future, dne regard for 
the interests of legitimate business, the 
purposes of such legislation being the 
remedy for wrong, and not embarrassment 
to industry, enterprise or thrift. 

DEMOCRATIC (REGULAR). 

We believe the trust is the result of the 
policies pursued by the republican party, 
chief among which are the demonetization 
of silver and the passage and enforcement 
of protective tariff laws, such as the Mc- 
Kinley and Dingley bills, by all which 
there is made a distinct discrimination in 
favor of corporate wealth. The re-estab- 
lishment of independent bimetallism at the 
ratio of 16 to 1 and the repeal of all pro- 
tective tariff laws would, In the opinion 
of the democracy of Kentucky, seriously 
cripple if not wholly destroy the organiza- 
tion and operation of all trusts. 

DEMOCRATIC (ANTI-GOEBEL). 

We condemn the president of the United 
States for using the power of his great 
office to advance the interest of trusts 
the recognized enemies and oppressors of 
the American people and we demand the 
enactment of a law that will protect the 
rights of all from their aggressions. 
PEOPLE'S PARTY. 

We are opposed to trusts and combina- 
tions of capital whereby the fruits of 
labor are boldly stolen to build up colossal 
fortunes for the few; but we do not con- 
sider it possible to regulate or abolish 
them by state restrictive legislation. 
Trusts are founded upon the monopolies of 
public utilities and the only solution of 
the trust problem is through the public 
ownership and operation of such public 
utilities. As long as private corporations 
own and operate the means of transporta- 
tion and control the money of the country, 
trusts will continue to multiply and thrive 
until they destroy liberty and fasten upon 
the people an industrial despotism. There- 
fore we urge as a means of destroying 
trusts- and preventing monopoly: 

1. The issuance and the control of all the 
money of the country, gold, silver and 
paper, by thp government, and that the 
volume of money shall at all times be 
kept sufficient to maintain the stability of 
prices, the restoration of silver coinage at 
the ratio of 16 to 1 with gold, and the 
issuance of a full legal tender paper 
money. 

2. The public ownership and operation of 
railroads, street railways, telephones, elec- 
tric lights, water works and other public 
utilities. 

MARYLAND. 

REPUBLICAN. 

Legitimate business interests, fairly cap- 
italized and honestly managed, have built 
up our industries at home, giving employ- 
ment to labor as never before, and have 
enabled us to successfully compete with 
foreign countries in the markets of the 
world. Such Industries must not be struck 



down by legislation aimed at the dishon- 
estly organized trust, which stifles com- 
petition and oppresses labor. We are 
opposed to legislation merely for popular 
effect and in reckless disregard of business 
revival after prolonged depression. We 
strongly favor laws to successfully suppress 
trusts and all combinations which create 
monopoly. 

DEMOCRATIC. 

We view with alarm the multiplication 
over the land of such gigantic Industrial 
and commercial trusts, the outgrowth of 
republican legislation, as stifle competition, 
threaten popular government, increase the 
cost of living and curtail the Individual 
rights of the people, and we favor vigorous 
measures by the states and by congress to 
repress this great and growing evil. 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

REPUBLICAN. 

The republican party of Massachusetts Is 
unqualifiedly opposed to trusts and monop- 
oly and the capitalization of fictitious and 
speculative valuations, and reiterates its 
declaration In the platform of 1894 against 
stock-watering in all forms, and points to 
the existing legislation and especially to 
the anti-stock watering laws of that year, 
passed by a republican legislature and 
signed by a republican governor, as proof 
of its progress, sincerity, wisdom and 
courage upon this issue. 

It believes that similar laws enacted by 
all the states In connection with the federaj 
trust law already passed by a republican 
congress would put an end to the danger 
from the growth of great combinations and 
trusts. 

DEMOCRATIC. 

The monopolistic corporations or con- 
solidations of corporations known com- 
monly as trusts are wholly evil, pernicious 
and contrary to public policy. They despoil 
with one hand the producer and with the 
other the consumer. They have closed the 
avenues of employment to hundreds of 
thousands of men, including all classes, 
from the day laborer to the successful 
salesman. By their methods of coercion 
and intimidation, re-enforced as they are 
by the corrupt favor of railroad corpora- 
tions, they drive out of business and Into 
penury or a position of dependence indi- 
viduals engaged in productive or distribut- 
ing business. The plea of these defenders 
of trusts that by the volume of their busi- 
ness and by their very control of their field 
they are able to Introduce economies which 
cheapen the price of the product to the 
consumer Is disingenuous, deceptive and 
unworthy of consideration. 

The purpose of monopoly is extortion, and 
neither an individual nor a corporation can 
be trusted with the power which monopoly 
confers. We hold that the mere success of 
the democratic party in state and nation, 
coupled with its known and vigorously 
expressed hostility to trusts in all their 
forms, will begin the disintegration of these 
oppressive corporations. 

But we pledge ourselves, furthermore, to 
give due trial to such remedies as may 
hasten this process for example, the com- 
pulsory system of publicity for all trust 
records and accounts; a federal law pro- 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



bibltlng a monopoly from making more 
divergent prices for its products in differ- 
ent parts of the country than are warranted 
by differing freight rates, thus preventing 
underselling in one state to drive out com- 
petition at the expense of the consumer 
in other states where the monopoly is com- 
plete; and a more rigid enforcement of the 
law against railroad discriminations pend- 
ing the actual government ownership and 
operation of all railroads, which this con- 
vention demands and which will, when 
accomplished, be the most effective barrier 
to the formation of 'any new trusts. 

And, finally, we demand that all special 
privileges conferred by law, whether of 
taxation, incorporation or operation, that 
shall be determined to contribute to 
monopoly, be abrogated and annulled. 

MISSISSIPPI. 

DEMOCRATIC. 

We enter our solemn protest against the 
encroachment upon governmental affairs by 
aggregated capital in the form of trusts 
and combines as being inimical to the best 
interests of the people and the cause of 
free and untrammeled government; and ex- 
press ourselves as unalterably determined 
to aid by all possible and proper means in 
the control or destruction if necessary of 
those enemies of good government. 
PEOPLE'S PARTY. 

We are opposed to trusts and combina- 
tions of capital whereby the fruits of labor 
are boldly stolen to build up colossal for- 
tunes for the few; but we do not consider 
it possible to regulate or abolish them by 
state restrictive legislation. Trusts are 
founded upon the monopoly of public 
utilities and the only solution of the trust 
problem is through the public ownership 
and operation of such public utilities. As 
long as private corporations own and 
operate the means of transportation and 
control the money of the country, trusts 
will continue to multiply and thrive until 
they destroy liberty and fasten upon the 
people an industrial despotism; therefore 
we urge as the means of destroying trusts 
and preventing monopoly the issuance and 
control of all the money of the country, 
gold, silver and paper, by the government, 
and that the volume of money shall at all 
times be kept sufficient to maintain the 
stability of prices; the restoration of silver 
coinage at the ratio of 16 to 1 with gold 
and the issuance of a full legal tender 
paper money; the public ownership and 
operation of railroads, street railways, 
telegraph, telephones, electric lights, water 
works and other public utilities. 



NEBRASKA. 

BEPTJBLICAN. 

The republican party now, as always, 
opposes trusts and combinations having for 
their purpose the stifling of competition 
and arbitrarily controlling production or 
fixing prices; but we also recognize that 
legitimate business interests, fairly capital- 
ized and honestly managed, have built up 
our Industries at home, given the largest 
employment to labor, at the highest wages, 
and have enabled us to successfully com- 
pete with foreign countries in the markets 
of the world. Such industries must not be 



struck down by legislation aimed at dis- 
honestly organized institutions which de- 
stroy legitimate enterprise and the oppor- 
tunities of labor and plunder the public. 

We favor the creation by act of congress 
of a bureau of supervision and control of 
corporations engaged in interstate business 
with power similar to those exercised over 
national banks by the comptroller of the 
currency, enforcing such publicity and reg- 
ulation as shall effectually prevent dis- 
honest methods and practices; and generally 
such legislation, state and national, as 
from time to time may be required for the 
correction of abuses. 

DEMOCRATIC. 

The industrial trusts springing up on every 
hand testify to the administration's indif- 
ference to monopoly or to its inability to 
cope with it. 

We denounce the failure of the adminis- 
tration to enforce the present law against 
trusts or to recommend new laws if the 
present law is deemed insufficient. 

We are opposed to the principle of 
monopoly wherever it manifests itself. We 
demand the enforcement of the present 
federal law, the enactment of such new 
legislation as may be necessary and a con- 
stitutional amendment, if the present con- 
stitution is construed to protect trusts, to 
the end that the monopolization of industry 
by private corporations may be absolutely 
prevented. Every trust rests upon a cor- 
poration and every corporation is a creature 
of laws, and the laws, state and national, 
must place upon the corporations such 
limitations and restrictions as will protect 
the public from Injury. 

PEOPLE'S PARTY. 

We condemn the republican national 
administration for Its complicity with un- 
lawful combinations, which have increased 
nearly 100 per cent within the last three 
years as a result of Its failure to enact 
and enforce laws In the interests of the 
people. 

In dealing with trusts and corporations 
having a monopoly of public necessaries we 
claim that the law of the land requires 
that they shall serve the public for reason- 
able compensation and in the absence of 
any legislation upon the question of what 
is reasonable the Judiciary may determine 
the question. The trust danger of this 
country is so appalling that the evils 
thereof must be combated by every branch 
of the government. We demand judges who 
will obey the law that vests the judiciary 
with Jurisdiction to protect the people 
from unreasonable and oppressive prices for 
the necessities of life. 

OHIO. 

REPUBLICAN. 

We commend the action of the LXXIIIcJ 
general assembly of Ohio in passing the 
stringent law now on our statute books 
prohibiting the organization of "trusts," 
and we denounce such unlawful combina- 
tions as inimical to the interests of the 
people. We congratulate the people of the 
state upon the fact that a republican 
legislature enacted this law and we demand 
its rigid enforcement. We pledge our 
party to such further legislation as experi- 
ence may determine necessary to prevent 



UTTERANCES OF STATE CONVENTIONS. 



187 



the formation and operation of such iniq- 
uitous and dangerous combinations. 

DEMOCRATIC. 

We declare that all unlawful combina- 
tions of capital are the legitimate fruits of 
a gold standard and other corrupt repub- 
lican legislation on questions of the tariff, 
and we demand that all articles the prices 
of which are controlled by the trusts be 
placed on the free list. We denounce the 
attorney-general of the United States, 
appointed from the state of New Jersey, 
the hotbed of trusts, for his refusal to 
enforce the statutes of the United States 
against them, and we commend the present 
attorney-general of Ohio for his earnest 
efforts to enforce the statutes of Ohio 
against such illegal combinations, and 
pledge the nominee of this convention for 
attorney-general to the enforcement of the 
statutes of the state against them. 



PENNSYLVANIA. 

DEMOCRATIC. 

We are opposed to all combinations ot 
capital calculated to produce monopoly or 
restrain trade as being inconsistent with 
the spirit of free institutions; and if their 
establishment cannot be constitutionally 
prevented we hold that they should be so 
regulated and limited by proper legislation 
that individual effort and opportunity shall 
not be impaired. 

PEOPLE'S PARTY. 

We declare that where trusts and monop- 
olies are not the artificial creation of trans- 
portation and other discriminations, and 
can, therefore, be destroyed by the re- 
moval of such discriminations but are 
the growth of natural conditions they 
must continue to be monopolies because of 
the very nature of their being, as railroads, 
steam and street; telegraph and telephone 



lines, water and gas and electric lighting 
plants, necessarily enjoying special rights; 
that the government, the state, the munic- 
ipality, must be the monopolist in order 
that the people may be protected in their 
rights. Where monopoly cannot be de- 
stroyed, or where, being of natural growth, 
it is not to the interest of the people to 
destroy it, the government must be the 
monopolist. Private monopoly must be a 
bane; government monopolization of natural 
monopolies must be a blessing. 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 

REPUBLICAN. 

We favor the enactment of such laws as 
will carry out the provisions of the state 
constitution relating to trusts and unlaw- 
ful combinations, and we pledge our party 
to such legislation as will fully control 
trusts, monopolies and combinations organ- 
ized and created in restraint of trade, for 
the purpose of limiting the output of prod- 
ucts or increasing the price thereof, and 
such legislation as may be necessary to 
prevent the formation and operation of 
such dangerous combinations. 
FUSION. 

We denounce as a menace to the well- 
being of our country the formation of the 
vast aggregation of industrial trusts for 
the control of the price and the limit of the 
production of almost every article of 
necessity; that these trusts are being con- 
summated under the present national 
administration and under the very shelter 
and protection of our laws and aided by 
the secret encouragement of high repub- 
lican officials, and are an evidence of the 
domination of aggregated wealth over the 
republican party and of the utter indiffer- 
ence of the present administration to this 
great menace, and testify to that party's 
sympathy or inability to cope with 
monopoly. 



FOREIGN POLICY. 



IOWA. 



REPUBLICAN. 

We approve the administration of William 
MeKinley. He came to the presidency 
with every American industry prostrated 
in city and on farm throughout the land 
and with the American people pervaded 
with discontent; while the evil shadow of 
the despotism of Spain rested upon neigh- 
boring lands. To-day the borders of the 
republic have enlarged the area of freedom 
in two oceans and the prosperity of the 
American people is beyond that of any 
time in our history. William McKlnley 
takes rank with the greatest of presidents. 

DEMOCRATIC. 

We rejoice in the exalted sentiment and 
motive that prompted the government of 
the United States to take up arms in 
defense of the bitterly oppressed people 
of Cuba, in the successful termination of 
the war with Spain and in the patriotism 
and unsurpassed bravery displayed by our 
soldiers and sailors on land and sea. The 
war for the liberation of the tyranny- 
cnrsod island was worthy the greatest re- 
public and the best civilization that has 
flourished in the tides of time, but for 
the same reason that we glory In the suc- 
cessful war against Spain we deprecate and 



condemn the war against the Filipinos. 
One war was for the emancipation of the 
people, the other for the subjugation of the 
people; and if the war against Spain waa 
right and it was that against the natives 
of the Philippines, who have committed no 
offense save to love liberty and to be will- 
ing to fight and to die for it, Is wrong. 
The attempt, unauthorized by congress, to 
conquer the natives of the oriental Islands 
Is a repudiation of the American doctrine 
of consent affirmed in the declaration of 
Independence and In conflict with the prin- 
ciples which George Washington and his 
fellow patriots of the revolution made 
sacrifices to establish. We also condemn 
the war against the Filipinos, believing It 
to have been inspired by Great Britain for 
the purpose of producing conditions that 
will force an Anglo-American alliance; and 
we not only protest against the war and 
demand its termination, by extension to 
the Filipinos of the same assurance given 
to the Cubans, but we record our deep- 
seated antagonism to an alliance with 
Great Britain or any other European power, 
and express our detestation of the attempts 
made in British Interests to disrupt the 
friendly relations which have uniformly 
obtained between the United States and 
Germany. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOE 1900. 



We oppose the conquest of the Philip- 
pines because Imperialism means militar- 
ism, because militarism means government 
by force and because government by force 
means the death of government by con- 
sent, the destruction of political and indus- 
trial freedom and the obliteration of equal- 
ity of rights and assassination of demo- 
cratic Institutions. 

PEOPLE'S PARTY. 

We chargp the republican and democratic 
parties that while recognizing the disease, 
they have utterly failed to discover or pre- 
scribe the true remedy. The declaration of 
congress, "that the people of Cuba are and 
of right ought to be free and independent," 
should apply with equal force and effect 
to the Filipino and his native land, and 
the same rights and liberties so guar- 
anteed to one by the United States should 
also Immediately be guaranteed the other 
and tendered to both. 



KENTUCKY. 

REPUBLICAN. 

We declare our confidence in the policies 
adopted and the measures taken by the 
president to restore order and to establish 
progressive governments in Cuba, Puerto 
Rico and the Philippines, and we pledge 
him our continuous support until these 
objects are fully attained. 

DEMOCRATIC (REGULAR). 

We Indorse the war carried to success 
for the freedom of the enslaved Cubans. 
We honor and applaud the courage and 
heroism of our soldiers and sailors therein 
engaged. But we declare the conduct of 
the present administration regarding the 
Philippines to be repugnant to the bill of 
rights, the constitution and declaration of 

independence. 

MARYLAND. 

REPUBLICAN. 

While we deplore the insurrection in the 
Philippine islands, wherein by cession from 
Spain we acquired the right of sovereignty, 
duty demands that we retain and pacify 
them and safeguard the interests of com- 
merce until the problem of their final dis- 
position be solved in such manner that the 
glory of our flag be not sullied nor the 
liberty it stands for restrained. We repose 
our trust for such a solution of the problem 
in our wise and patriotic president and the 
republican majority in congress. 

DEMOCRATIC. 

We declare our unalterable opposition to 
the creation and maintenance of a large 
standing army In time of peace and we 
insist upon the supremacy of the civil over 
the military authority and we demand the 
strictest economy in the collection and dis- 
bursement of the public revenues. 

We believe In the time-honored doctrine 
so earnestly impressed upon us by the 
"fathers of the republic" of peace, com- 
merce and honest friendship with all 
nations, entangling alliances with none. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

REPUBLICAN. 

The recent war with Spain, which was 
necessitated by humanity, has been over- 
whelmingly vindicated by the results so 
speedily and splendidly attained. We com- 
mend the tact, the patience, the skill and 
the statesmanlike spirit with which the 
president has approached the perplexing 
problems arising from the war. 



Under the treaty with Spain the law of 
nations put upon the United States the 
responsibility for the peace and security 
of life and property, the well-being and 
the future government of the Philippine 
islands. Accepting this responsibility it Is 
our profound trust that the present hos- 
tilities can be brought to an early termina- 
tion, and that congress, guided by a wise 
and patriotic administration, will establish 
and maintain in those islands, hitherto the 
home of tyrants, a government as free, as 
liberal and as progressive as our own, in 
accordance with the sacred principles of 
liberty and self-government upon which the 
American republic so securely rests. 

DEMOCRATIC. 

To the war with Spain a war rightly 
waged in the cause of humanity and which 
was forced upon an unwilling republican 
administration by the insistence of demo- 
crats in house and senate there has suc- 
ceeded a war of criminal aggression in the 
Philippines. 

We hold that this war is wanton and 
needless, for had the same promise of 
freedom been made to the people of those 
islands that the democrats secured for the 
people of Cuba no revolt against the 
American authorities would have occurred. 
It is In violation of the principles of 
American constitutional liberty, not only 
because It is prosecuted by the adminis- 
tration without the congressional action 
which the constitution prescribes, but 
because it is a denial of that right of 
self which, from the day our fore- 
fathers faced the British at Concord bridge, 
has been a cardinal precept of American 
political philosophy, until now William 
McKinley, with the applause and overt 
sympathy of the British government, has 
discarded It; it Is a wasteful war in all its 
material aspects, since by the incompetence 
and confusion which have attended its 
prosecution It has cost the nation heavily 
in blood and treasure, the very flower of 
our youth being sent to death under an 
incompetent general, while the notorious 
and scandalous misappropriation of moneys 
has resulted in an enormous deficit in the 
federal treasury, despite the collection of 
burdensome and ill-adjusted war taxes. 

We demand that to the Filipinos, as to 
the Cubans, shall be said to-day that they 
are and of right ought to be free and 
independent, and we hold that such a 
declaration, coupled with the expression of 
the purpose of the United States to pro- 
tect the islands from the assaults of any 
foreign power, would speedily restore order, 
purge our national honor of the stain put 
upon It by injustice and bad faith and 
advance American trade in. the far east by 
giving our merchants a market among peo- 
ple grateful for the gift of independence. 

The extension of American trade in all 
directions is an end to be sought by all 
patriotic Americans, and we demand that 
the settlement of the Filipino problem 
shall be attended by every possible ex- 
pedient for fostering and extending the 
commerce of the United States with the 
Islands and for preventing their acquisition 
by any foreign nation. 

The evils wh'ch result from the prosecu- 
tion of this Philippine war are not confined 
to nor are they greatest In the island of 
Luzon. They react upon our own people 



UTTERANCES OF STATE CONVENTIONS. 



139 



and particularly upon the working classes. 
Back of the gaudy trappings of imperialism 
lurks the less spectacular but more terrify- 
ing form of militarism. Against a great 
standing army the democracy, both of 
state and nation, has resolutely set Its 
face, but In the reiterated demands for 
more and more troops to subdue the 
Tagalos may be detected the purpose to 
have ultimately more soldiers to employ 
at home. Already all free peoples of the 
world gaze In amazement at the facility 
with which monopolistic corporations In 
the United States are able to secure the aid 
of armed forces, both state and federal, to 
overawe their workingmen in time of labor 
dissensions. 

NEBRASKA. 

REPUBLICAN. 

While we deplore the Insurrection in the 
Philippine Islands yet we recognize the 
duties and obligations Imposed upon our 
nation by the victory of our navy and 
the matchless valor of our arms, resulting 
in the treaty of Paris, which Imposed 
upon the president the duty of maintaining 
the authority of the United States over 
the territory acquired thereby; and so long 
as there is one gun pointed at an American 
soldier, so long as there Is an armed enemy 
assaulting our flag, so long must patriotic 
and loyal Americans uphold our president 
In affording protection, tranquillity and 
peace to all who recognize our lawful 
occupation. 

DEMOCRATIC. 

We believe that the Filipinos should have 
received the same treatment as the Cubans 
and that as the Cubans were assured of 
ultimate independence and protection so the 
Filipinos should have been assured in the 
beginning of our nation's intention to give 
them independence as soon as stable gov- 
ernment could be established and protec- 
tion from outside Interference. Such assur- 
ance should be given now. If the Cubans, 
as stated in the resolution of Intervention, 
are and of right ought to be free, the same 
can be said of the Filipinos and this nation 
would suffer no humiliation in acknowledg- 
ing adherence to the doctrine that govern- 
ments derive their just powers from the 
consent of the governed. 

We are opposed to militarism and con- 
gratulate the democrats, populists and sil- 
ver republicans in the United States senate 
upon their successful resistance of the at- 
tempt of the administration to raise the 
standing army to 100,000. 

We are opposed to entangling alliance 
with England or any other European nation, 
and contend for an American civilization 
which will recognize the rights of man 
and by a noble example teach the world 
the blessings of self-government. 
PEOPLE'S PARTY. 

We condemn the administrative policy 
which has converted a war for humanity 
into a war of conquest. We believe that 
the Filipinos should have received the 
same treatment as the Cubans and that as 
the Cubans were assured of ultimate inde- 
pendence and protection so the Filipinos 
should have been assured In the beginning 
of our nation's intention to give them Inde- 
pendence as soon as a stable government 
could be established and protection from 
outside interference. Such assurance should 
be given now. 



PENNSYLVANIA. 

REPUBLICAN. 

The magnificent achievements of our army 
and navy In the war with Spain for the 
liberation of the downtrodden and oppressed 
people of Cuba from the domination of 
Castilian despotism, accomplished under 
the master guidance of a republican admin- 
istration, are necessarily subjects for high- 
est encomium by a convention of repub- 
licans. To the same master guidance, 
controlled by the great principles that have 
shaped the high destiny of the republican 
party, from Lincoln to McKinley, the peo- 
ple can safely commit the solution of the 
momentous problems of the future of Cuba, 
Puerto Rico and the Philippine islands. 
Their wise solution will vastly increase our 
foreign trade, spread American civilization 
abroad and add to the honor and power 
and glory of this great nation. To give 
continued employment to the industry, In- 
genuity and skill of the American mechanic 
and laborer, we must find new markets 
abroad for our surplus products. The com- 
mercial control of additional territory will 
afford new markets, which will necessarily 
increase our commerce and develop our 
manufacturing interests. We have ceased 
to be content with supplying products for 
home consumption alone. We must keep 
pace with other nations In seeking new 
fields for our commerce, and to this end 
we support the policy of Industrial, com- 
mercial and national expansion. 

DEMOCRATIC. 

We are radically and unalterably opposed 
to Imperialism in the United States of 
America. When we have solved some of 
the race problems that confront us at home 
then by example we can proclaim the 
blessings that flow from free institutions 
and thus procure "benevolent assimilation 
without criminal aggression." 

We are opposed to entangling alliances 
with foreign kingdoms and empires. 

We commend the action of congress In 
declaring that our war with Spain was for 
humanity and not for conquest. 

We proudly recognize the valor and glo- 
rious achievements of our gallant soldiers 
and sailors from Bunker Hill to this very 
hour as being among the most thrilling and 
glorious In the history of the world, but we 
profoundly regret that American soldiers 
are being unlawfully used in the name of 
liberty to crush and destroy dawning repub- 
licanism in the orient, and we denounce 
the secret and vicious alliance now in evi- 
dence between England and the republican 
administration, whereby this nation may 
become involved In war with foreign 
nations. 

We demand that the Cubans and Fili- 
pinos not only be permitted but encouraged 
to establish Independent republics, deriving 
all of their governmental powers from the 
consent of the governed. 

PEOPLE'S PARTY. 

As American citizens honoring the 
memories of our forefathers who dared 
fight for liberty, and cherishing the rules of 
eternal rectitude they handed down to us, 
we are shamed and humiliated by the war 
of "criminal aggression" being carried on 
In the Philippines, where wp are doing 
under the folds of our flag, that stands for 
so much, much the same thing that we 
righteously chastised Spain for doing In 



140 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



Cuba putting forth our efforts to crush a 
people whose only crime is proclaiming the 
truth that governments are constituted tot 
the benefit of the governed, that all just 
government must rest on the consent of 
the governed, and who have the courage to 
defend these truths, against overwhelming 
odds, with their lives. We protest against 
this staining of our flag, consecrated to 
the cause of liberty, not of oppression; the 
cause of self-government, not of subjuga- 
tion; emblem that we would have stand 
for right, not might ; love, not greed ; and to 
the president we say: Cease to make war 
upon the Filipinos, accord to them the 
right of all men born in the image of their 
Creator, the right to be free and govern 
themselves, extend to them henceforth the 
hand of protection, withdraw the hand of 
chastisement, bring home the troops that 
are engaged in the un-American work of 
crushing a people struggling to be free. 

To an alliance with Great Britain, whose 
ideals, though unfortunately shared by our 
president, are not ours, we are strenuously 
opposed, as we are to entangling alliances 
with any foreign nation. The Monroe doc- 
trine we would emphasize and extend so 
as to embrace the Philippines, saying to 
monarchical Europe: Hands off the repub- 
lics of America and the Philippines; they 
are under our protection. We cannot look 
unconcernedly upon any attack on their 
institutions, any interference with their 
working out their destiny as republics, 
and we in our turn will in the future as 
in the past scrupulously avoid interference 
in European affairs. 

RHODE ISLAND. 

REPUBLICAN. 

Never in history were more splendid 
achievements won and grander opportuni- 
ties opened at so little cost of life and 
treasure as' in the war with Spain. Amer- 
ica has suddenly become one of the 
dominant powers of the earth. Henceforth 
her voice must be heard in the council of 
the nations. The new situation imposes 
upon us new and greater responsibilities. 
Although these have come unsought, they 
will be met squarely by the republican 
party, which has never evaded responsibil- 
ity. We have confidence in the loyalty of 
the people, confidence in the great party 
that has so long shaped the destinies of 
the republic, confidence that this same 
party will solve successfully the new prob- 
lems presented, confidence that the prin- 
ciples of American liberty and humanity 
will ever follow the flag. 



SODTH DAKOTA. 

BEPTJBI/ICAN. 

We indorse the present republican admin- 



istration and earnestly commend the wise, 
able and patriotic statesmanship of Presi- 
dent McKinley, displayed in the conduct of 
the war with Spain and the insurrection In 
the Philippines, and pledge our hearty 
support of the administration in all meas- 
ures looking to the honorable and speedy 
termination of hostilities by the complete 
subjugation of the enemies of our country 
and the vindication of our flag. 

We heartily commend our soldiers in the 
Philippines for their bravery, and point 
with pride to their patriotic valor in de- 
fense of our country and flag, and depre- 
cate the attempts of certain disloyal, un- 
American enemies of our country to cast 
odium upon our brave boys by attempting 
to stir up dissension in their ranks and to 
embarrass the administration in its efforts 
to suppress the insurrection now existing in 
the Philippines. 

FUSION. 

We denounce the war being waged 
against the Filipinos as a repudiation of 
the declaration of independence, an aban- 
donment of the Monroe doctrine, an assault 
upon liberty everywhere, which ties the 
hands of the great republic and estops us 
from justly protesting against monarchical 
aggression in South Africa or elsewhere. 
It is a revolution backward from the his- 
tory and traditions of our government and 
will establish in this country an imperial 
despotism, masquerading under the forms 
of democracy. The censorship of the press 
in Manila and its suppression in Havana 
are but forerunners of an abuse which will 
be attempted here by the same power. 
Such a policy, subordinating the civil to 
the military, may inflict upon us the hor- 
rors of Russian militarism, a perpetual 
debt and increasing taxes, while it can 
compensate no one but syndicates of capital 
which will exploit the islands under the 
protection of American arms. We uphold 
the flag of our country in its purity, a flag 
consecrated to the cause of human freedom 
and baptized in the blood of freedom's 
martyrs, and we exhort the people to rescue 
the emblem of our liberties from those who 
have erected it over political despotism, 
militarism, chattel slavery and polygamy. 
We oppose an alliance with England or any 
other foreign power, and we demand of the 
national administration that it give polit- 
ical independence to Cuba and that the 
Filipinos be assured that they will be 
assisted to erect a republic of their own 
to be governed by themselves. 

We extend an earnest invitation to 
organized labor to join with us in an 
organized effort to defeat this republican 
policy of expansion or imperialism that 
means simply a large standing army to 
intimidate organized labor and higher 
taxes that labor always pays. 



RIVERS AND CANALS. 



Lengths of the navigable rivers and canals of the most important countries of the world. 

Rivers. Canals. Total. Rivers. Canals. Total. 



Countries. Miles. Miles. Miles 

United States 15,502 3,064 18,566 



Germany 



14,499 1,214 15,713 



France ..................... 4,968 2,897 

Great Britain and Ireland. 1,642 2,875 



7,866 
4.517 



Russia .................... 19,274 805 20,079 

Austria-Hungary ........ 2,691 382 3,073 

Italy ...................... 1,752 294 2,046 

Spain ..................... 760 248 998 



Countries. 

Belgium 

Portugal 

Sweden and Norway 
The Netherlands 



Miles. Miles. Miles 
653 492 1,145 



432 
423 
313 



92 
855 
492 



432 
515 
1,168 
3,087 



Canada 2,59i 

Brazil 20,433 20.433 

China 3,404 4,832 8.236 

India 2.392 2.061 4.453 



AMERICAN COLONIES AND PROTECTORATES. 



141 



American Colonies anto Protectorates. 



HAWAII. 



The commission appointed by the presi- 
dent to recommend to congress such legis- 
lation as might be regarded necessary for 
the government of Hawaii (see Daily News 
Almanac for 1899, page 148) presented their 
report to congress Dec. 6, 1898. This report 
was accompanied by three bills for the gov- 
ernment of the islands, which embodied the 
conclusions reached by the commission. 
The result was that several bills were pre- 
sented to both houses, all of which fol- 
lowed mainly the suggestions given by the 
commission in its report. Both the senate 
and house bills provided for a delegate to 
represent Hawaii in the congress of the 
United States, a provision which raised 
strenuous opposition to the measures which 
was confined to neither party. The oppo- 
sition to the bills demanded that any en- 
actment for the government of Hawaii 
should contain a clause declaring that noth- 
ing in the measure should imply the future 
admission of Hawaii as a state of the 
union. The granting to the colony of repre- 
sentation like that accorded to the terri- 
tories was held to be the initial step In 
the direction of statehood. The bills were 
further opposed because they placed 
Hawaii in the same relation to the states 
of the union as the states themselves held 
to each other, which would provide for 
the admission of the products of Hawaii 
Into ports of the United States free or 
duty. While this in itself was not regarded 
as of great Importance, it was held that 
such a provision In the law would establish 
a precedent Puerto Rico, the Philippines 
and other dependencies might demand 
should be accorded them. 

Still another bill was introduced in Feb- 
ruary providing that the contract-labor 
laws in force in the United States should 
apply to Hawaii and that the Chinese ex- 
clusion act should be enforced. It was ob- 
jected to this bill that Its provisions were 
already In force In Hawaii, because the 
Supreme court of the country had decided 
Jan. 7, 1899, that "there shall be no further 
immigration of Chinese into the Hawaiian 
islands except upon such conditions as are 
now or may hereafter be allowed by the 



laws of the Dnited States." Congress ad- 
journed on the 4th of March, 1899, without 
having passed any of the bills providing a 
government for Hawaii, and administration 
affairs have been continued there as they 
existed at the date of the annexation of the 
islands. That the union has proved advan- 
tageous to Hawaii is shown by an article 
from Gov. Dole, which appeared in Harp- 
er's Weekly. In It he says: 

"The Immediate effect of annexation Is a 
rise in the values of real estate and sugar 
stock, and a general upward tendency in 
all kinds of business. There is exitement 
among speculators. Although these circum- 
stances tend to support the theory of the 
existence of a boom, it is probable that, 
with the limited amount of land in the 
group, the new land values will rather 
increase than fall as time goes on, while 
values of sugar stocks will be affected fav- 
orably or otherwise mainly by the price 
of sugar and the state of the labor market, 
although It Is evident that there is now a 
slight inflation of values. Local politicians 
are considerably excited over the consum- 
mation of annexation, even to the extent of 
taking measures to influence the selection 
of local officials by the government at 
Washington. There is some discontent 
among this class with the civil-service 
status of the government of the republic 
of Hawaii, as it is and has been, on ac- 
count of the absence of the political spoils 
system. Although annexation has inspired 
these with hopes in this direction, there 
is Impatience at the slow and uncertain 
progress of events toward a permanent form 
of government on American lines. 

"Speculators are discontented with the 
Hawaiian land system, which intentionally 
excludes them from all participation in Its 
benettts, and are looking hopefully to Wash- 
ington for legislation that shall open the 
public lands to their manipulation, and are 
discussing means to promote such legisla- 
tion." 

On the 1st of October, 1899, the military 
force stationed in Hawaii consisted of 466 
men. 



CUBA, 



The authority of the United States was 
gradually extended over the island of Cuba. 
Santiago and the province of which it was 
the capital were occupied by the Americans 
from the date of the capitulation of the 
city (July 17); Manzanillo was occupied 
Oct. 11; the evacuation of Puerto Principe 
was concluded on the 5th of December, and 
Pinar del Rio was given up at about the 
same time. During the month of October 
the American commissioners (Maj.-Gen. 
James F. Wade, Rear-Admiral W. T. 
Sampson and Maj.-Gen. M. C. Butler) 
notified the Spanish commissioners that 
Spanish authority in Cuba must cease on 
the 1st of December, 1898. The time was 
afterward extended to Jan. 1, 1899. At the 
hour of 12 on that day the formal transfer 
of authority was made, the Spanish flag 
wag lowered on the forts and public build- 



ings of Havana and the United States 
ensign was raised. It was saluted from 
both the Spanish and American batteries, 
a brief speech was made by Gen. Castel- 
lanos, surrendering Spanish authority, 
which was responded to by Gen. Brooke on 
behalf of the United States government. 
Gen. Brooke was appointed military gov- 
ernor. 

PURPOSES OF THE UNITED STATES. 
In assuming the office of governor-general 
Gen. Brooke issued a proclamation in 
which he outlined the purposes of the gov- 
ernment In these words: "The object of 
the present government is to give protec- 
tion to the people and security to person 
and property, to restore confidence, to en- 
courage the people to resume the pursuits 
of peace, to build up waste plantations, to 



142 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



resume commercial traffic and to afford full 
protection in the exercise of all civil and 
religious rights." 

PAYMENT OF CUBAN TROOPS. 
A very perplexing question confronted the 
government even before the transfer of 
Cuba to our sovereignty, and that was, 
What disposition should be made of the 
insurgent army? To complicate this ques- 
tion the Cubans themselves were not agreed 
as to the proper course to be followed. 
Early in November, 1898, a convention, 
composed of delegates from each division 
of the Cuban army, had been held at Santa 
Cruz, of which Campato was the president. 
It soon developed that there were two 
factions the extremists, under the lead of 
Gen. Gomez, who were opposed to the 
island being governed by the United {States 
troops, and the conservatives, of whom 
Gen. Garcia was the leader, who favored 
disbandment of Cuban troops upon some 
terms that would be acceptable to both 
the United States government and the 
Cubans. As a result of this convention 
Gen. Garcia was appointed chairman of a 
commission which should visit Washington 
and arrange some basis with the presi- 
dent upon which the army could be dis- 
banded. The commission reached Wash- 
ington, but the death of Gen Garcia, Dec. 
11, 1898, was a serious impediment to the 
negotiations which had already been begun. 
A portion only of the Cuban army had been 
disbanded, owing to the impossibility of 
obtaining money for paying the soldiers 
the arrears due them, and they had re- 
mained as garrisons in towns evacuated by 
the Spanish troops. Both the government 
and the Cuban officers recognized the wis- 
dom of paying these soldiers, whose homes 
had been destroyed, and in this way fur- 
nishing them the means that would enable 
them to return to the peaceful pursuits of 
life. 

THE $3,000,000 AGREEMENT. 

An agreement was concluded in Washing- 
ton between the president and the Cuban 
commission under which the government 
advanced the sum of $3,000,000 to be dis- 
tributed among the Cuban troops upon the 
surrender by them of their arms. This 
sum was regarded by the Cuban radicals 
as far too small, they demanding some- 
thing like $57,000,000, upon the claim that, 
the instargent army consisted of 40,000 men, 
most of whom were entitled to three years' 
pay. The date set for beginning the service 
pay of the Cuban troops was Feb. 24, 1895. 
Gen. Gomez' demand was for compensation 
at the rate of $11,000 a year for himself; 
for the major-generals, some twenty in 
number, $7,500 a year each; for the briga- 
dier-generals, about 200 in number, $5,500 
a year each, and so on down to the privates, 
who were to receive pay at the rate of $648 
annually each. Gen. Gomez was finally in- 
duced to sign an acceptance of the sum of 
$3,000,000 in lieu of his demands. This 
agreement was substantially as follows: 

"1. The Cuban officers in each province 
shall assist the American officers in dis- 
tributing the funds. 

"2. That these officers shall at once meet 
at some convenient point and decide how, 
when and where the payments are to be 
made, and arrange any other details. 

"3. That the sum paid to each man shall 
not be regarded as part payment of salary 



or wages due for service rendered, but to 
facilitate the disbandment of the army, as 
a relief of suffering and as an aid in get- 
ting the people to work. 

"4. The Cubans shall surrender their arms 
to the Cuban assembly or to its representa- 
tives. 

"5. The committee on distribution shall 
use its best endeavors to distribute it among 
the population so that all may secure work. 

"6. That the $3,000,000 shall be placed sub- 
ject to the order of Gen. Brooke, and that 
action in the matter shall be immediate." 

CRITICISM OF GEN. GOMEZ. 

This act of Gen. Gomez did not please the 
radicals of the Cuban army, and at a meet- 
ing held early in March he was deposed 
from the chief command by a vote of 26 to 
4. Gen. Gomez at once issued an address 
to the Cuban people in which he said, 
among other things: 

"Foreigner as I am, I did not come to 
serve this country by helping it to defend 
its just cause as a mercenary soldier; and. 
consequently, since the oppressive power of 
Spain had withdrawn from this land and 
left Cuba in freedom, I had sheathed mv 
sword, thinking I had finished the mission 
which I had voluntarily imposed upon my- 
self. I am owed nothing. I retired con- 
tented and satisfied at having done all I 
could for the benefit of my brothers. Wher- 
ever destiny rules that I make my home, 
there can the Cubans depend upon a 
friend." 

This address produced a profound impres- 
sion upon the Cuban people. On the 4th of 
April the Cuban assembly again met, and 
upon the question, Shall this assembly 
dissolve? the vote stood 21 to 1 in favor of 
dissolution. A few days later, on the 7th, 
the generals of the Cuban army voted to 
reinstate Gomez as commander-in-chief of 
the army, and chose a board of three of 
their number to assist him in distributing 
the $3,000,000 and in disbanding the insur- 
gent forces. 

PAYING THE SOLDIERS. 

Defective and fraudulent pay rolls, added 
to the temper of some of the Cuban officers, 
made the disbursement of the funds a dif- 
ficult matter, and Gen. Brooke appointed a 
commission, consisting of one American and 
one Cuban for each corps of the army, to 
distribute the money, and designated the 
places in the provinces at which the pay- 
ments should be made. The payments in 
Cuba began about May 27 and were com- 
pleted Sept. 21, 1899, the total number of 
soldiers paid being 33,930. Each received 
$75. 

REFORMS INSTITUTED. 

The efforts of the government in Cuba 
have been exerted chiefly in three direc- 
tions. The first was toward the reforma- 
tion of the courts, which were so corrupt, 
venal and disgraceful under Spanish rule 
as to have utterly destroyed their useful- 
ness or value as mediums for the dispensing 
of justice among the people. During the 
year they have been remodeled and have 
gained the respect and confidence of the 
citizens of the island. 

The second reform included a change in 
the educational system of the island. The 
absence of competent teachers who under- 
stood Spanish, the paucity of text-books 
and the inability of the people to compre- 



AMERICAN COLONIES AND PROTECTORATES. 



143 



bend the advantages to be derived from a 
system of common schools like that of the 
United States have made progress com- 
paratively slow, notwithstanding the fact 
that a good deal has been done. A large 
number of native Cubans have been placed 
in schools and colleges of this country who 
will, upon their return, take up the educa- 
tional work as it has been begun. The fact 
that the people are poor, as the result of 
their long rebellion, has been a serious 
obstacle in the path of public education. 

The third reform has been the improve- 
ment of the sanitary conditions of the 
cities. This work was inaugurated by Gen. 
Wood immediately upon the surrender of 
Santiago, which had the reputation of being 
the filthiest and most unhealthful city in 



PUERTO 

The American commissioners to adjust 
the evacuation of Puerto Rico (MaJ.-Gen. 
J. K. Brooke, Rear-Admiral W. S. Schley 
and Brig.-Gen. W. W. Gordon) gave notice 
to the commission appointed by Spain for 
a similar purpose that the Island must be 
evacuated by the Spanish forces on or 
before Oct. 18, 1898. The work was com- 
pleted at the appointed time, and at the 
noon hour of that date the United States 
flag was raised over all the public build- 
ings and forts at San Juan, the bands 
playing American airs and the people cheer- 
ing the proceedings with the greatest 
enthusiasm. Maj.-Gen. Brooke was made 
military-governor of the island, Gen. Grant 
was placed in command of the district of 
San Juan, and Gen. Henry in that of 
Ponce. By the 23d of October the last of 
the Spanish troops had embarked for Spain. 
An insular government was at once com- 
pleted, Munoz. Blanco, Lapez and Carbon- 
nel of the Spanish Insular cabinet taking 
the oath of allegiance to the United States. 
They were retained in their respective 
official positions by Gen. Brooke. 

The people of the island did not take 
kindly to a military rule, and demanded 
the establishment of a territorial form of 
government similar to that of Arizona and 
New Mexico. Until, however, congress 
should provide for such a change in the 
administration of affairs in the island it 
was not possible to comply with the wishes 
of the people as expressed in a public 
meeting held at San Juan Oct. 30, 1898. 
Dr. H. K. Carroll was sent by the presi- 
dent as a special commissioner to the 
island to examine its condition, the needs 
of the people and the form of government 
best suited to all the existing conditions. 
In January, 1899, Maj.-Gen. Brooke was 
transferred to Cuba and Brig. -Gen. Guy 
V. .Henry was appointed governor-general 
of Puerto Rico. On the 5th of February, 
1899, the heads of the several departments 
resigned because Gen. Henry removed from 
office Senor Carbonnel and placed two 
Americans at the head of divisions of pub- 
lic works, which act was declared to be 
in violation of the policy already an- 
nounced by the governor-general. On the 
day following the entire cabinet was dis- 
charged and the administration was car- 
ried on by four departments state, finance. 
Interior and justice. In Instituting this 
change in the administration of the gov- 
ernment Gen. Henry gave the people an 
outline of his policy. He said: "The beads 



the West Indies. He at once inaugurated 
a system of street cleaning, enforced the 
most rigid rules for the maintenance of 
public cleanliness and entirely changed the 
conditions of the municipality. Under him 
the city became both clean and healthful, 
and in these respects it will compare 
favorably with average American towns. 
What was done in Santiago was, in a 
greater or less degree, accomplished In 
Havana and other towns in which American 
troops were placed as a garrison. The 
revenues of the island have more than 
paid for all that has been accomplished 
and Cuba has learned already many lessons 
from these reformatory measures which 
will be of inestimable value when the 
people assume self-government. 

RICO. 

of the new departments will confine their 
duties to their departments and the gov- 
ernor-general will preside and give instruc- 
tions directly to the heads of these depart- 
ments. Heads of the new departments 
who object to the introduction of Amer- 
ican methods and to the investigation of 
their departments will be relieved and the 
vacancies will be filled by the appoint- 
ment of the most competent persons, 
irrespective of party affiliations." 

One of the first objects of the govern- 
ment was the Improvement of the public- 
school system of the island. Fortunately 
one of the heads of the departments was 
Gen. John Eaton, who had been for sev- 
eral years at the head of the bureau of 
education at Washington, and Gen. Henry 
delegated him to organize a general sys- 
tem of public schools. Gen. Eaton says of 
the schools of Puerto Rico as he found 
them that, "Under Spanish rule there ex- 
isted a system of public schools in the 
island elementary schools supported by 
the municipalities, and a higher grade of 
schools by the insular government. Only 
three schoolhouses in the whole island 
belong to the public. In one school of 
seventy pupils there were only six books. 
There is a strong demand at present for 
instruction in the English language. Gen. 
Henry offers to pay out of the public funds 
$50 a month to teachers of English. As 
there are very few such teachers In the 
Island the plan was adopted of supplying 
for all pupils English readers and requir- 
ing regular daily lessons. The teacher has 
to see that the task Is duly performed, and 
a special teacher of English, assigned to a 
group of schools, visits each school twice 
a week, and sees that the English is cor- 
rectly pronounced and written. For adults 
evening schools, served by volunteer teach- 
ers gratis, have been established for the 
special teaching of English." 



Early in the year the "Republican Party 
of Puerto Rico" was formed, its founders 
being the radicals under the lead pf Rossy 
and a colored man named Barbosa, who is 
a graduate of Michigan university. The 
platform says the party looks to the time 
when the island "shall have a place among 
the states of the union," but expresses 
willingness to await congressional action. 
It favors free, public, nonsectarian schools, 
free trade with the United States, reduc- 
tion of oppressive taxation, and closes with 
this declaration: 

"We congratulate ourselves and onr 



144 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOE 1900. 



country on being under the protection of 
the American flag, the recognized emblem 
of liberty, and will lend every effort to 
advance civilization, to teach loyalty, to 
love American institutions and honor 
Washington, Lincoln and McKinley, whose 
names are household words in the land." 

Besides the changes made in the public- 
school system of Puerto Rico, Gen. Henry 
instituted several legal reforms, the laws 
relating to marriages being radically 
changed to prevent concubinage and to 
legitimize children born of such cohabita- 
tion. 

Gen. Henry was recalled from Puerto 
Rico in April, 1899, and Brig. -Gen. G. W. 
Davis succeeded him as governor-general. 
A fraction of the inhabitants strenuously 
object to military rule in the island, and 
in June, 1899, two representatives of 
popular government J. J. Henna and M. 
Z. Gaudia came to Washington to present 
their reasons for demanding an immediate 
change. The document is a long one, but 
the following extracts embody its essential 
features: 

"Puerto Rico finds itself at this moment 
in an extraordinary situation. The island 
is de facto by virtue of actual occupation 
and de jure by virtue of the treaty of 
peace between the United States and 
Spain, concluded at Paris on Dec. 10, 1898, 
an Integral part of the territory of the 
Dnited States of America. And, neverthe- 
less, neither its soil nor its ports, its 
commerce, its inhabitants, are for any 
practical purpose considered American. 
The flag of the United States of America 
floats over the soil of Puerto Rico, but it 
does not make American even the children 
who are born under its shield. * * * 

"Puerto Ricans are treated as an in- 
ferior people, needing to be educated, and 
Christianized, and civilized; and in the 
procession of the peace jubilee, celebrated 
with great pomp at Washington, which 
the president reviewed, surrounded by his 
cabinet and the diplomatic body and the 
elite of Washington society, no other 



symbol was made to appear to represent 
Puerto Rico and Puerto Rican civilization 
than a dilapidated little negro boy riding 
on the back of a not less dilapidated little 
pony, with the announcement, which ex- 
cited the joyous shouts of the multitude, 
of 'Puerto Rican Express." This is the 
recognition which Puerto Rico has secured 
for having opened its arms and offered no 
resistance to the American invaders! 
* * * 

"Puerto Rico was not by any means a 
proper subject for American intervention. 
The voice of Puerto Rico was not heard. 
The idea that the Puerto Rican people 
might have something to say on the sub- 
ject, or that a bargain of this kind, no 
matter how generous on the part of one 
belligerent, might need at least pro forma 
the consent of the Puerto Rican people, 
was not even thought of. 

"This pamphlet is intended not to make 
opposition to the government, but to aid 
it in doing justice to Puerto Rico. It ha? 
been prepared to show to the people of the 
United States of America and of the whole 
world that the Puerto Rican people do not 
submit in silence to treatment as slaves or 
as dependent beings little less than sav- 
ages, needing protection from the outside 
and entitled to nothing else than guardian- 
ship by the sword. 

"The Puerto Rican people, in asking 
from the people to whom they have been 
added that the principles of the first en- 
actment to be found in their statute books 
be applied to them, are not asking for 
favors. They are demanding justice." 

Nothing of importance has occurred since 
the arrival of these representatives. The 
people of the island understand that the 
only power in this country to change or 
modify the present administration of 
affairs is held by the congress of the 
United States and they are awaiting its 
action with patience and confidence. 

On the 1st of October, 1899, the military 
force stationed in Puerto Rico amounted 
to 3,362 men. 



GUAM. 



An account of the capture of the island 
of Guam in June, 1898, may be found in 
The Daily News Almanac for 1899, page 
140. In February, 1899, the Bennington, 
Commander Taussig, visited the harbor of 
San Luis d'Apra, the chief port on the 
island, and took possession by raising the 
United States flag over Fort Santa Cruz 
and the government buildings at the 
capital, Agana, about five miles from the 
harbor. Commander Taussig acted as gov- 
ernor-general until relieved by Capt. R. P. 
Leary in August, 1899, who is still in 
office. 

The last of October, 1899, Capt. Leary 
reported that he bad been obliged to expel 
from the island seven of the eight friars 
who resided there. In explaining his posi- 
tion Capt. Leary says that he exhausted 
all efforts to overcome their influence, but 
was forced to adopt heroic measures to 
establish American authority. Capt. Leary 
states that every one of the reforms which 
he proposed was defeated through the 



hostile -influence of the friars. He de- 
clares they resisted every decree, no mat- 
ter of what character, from a spirit of 
intense conservatism. 

Capt. Leary also found many ex-convicts 
at Guam, who had been sent by the Span- 
ish authorities from Manila. These he 
considered to have a contaminating influ- 
ence, and he ordered them to board ves- 
sels bound for Spain. 

Changes have been made in land tenure 
at Agana. Land which sold as low as 
?10 or $15 an acre when the island was 
under Spanish rule suddenly advanced to 
over $100. Before Gov. Leary came foreign- 
ers were grabbing everything in sight, 
knowing that American rule would mean 
a boom for Agana. The governor issued a 
proclamation in which it was decreed that 
none but American citizens should hold 
land in the islands. Many of the natives 
have sworn allegiance to the government 
and are respectful to the flag. 



NATIONAL SOUND-MONEY LEAGUE. 



TRADE WITH COLONIES AND PROTECTORATES. 



Commerce between the United States and 
Cuba, Puerto Rico, Hawaii and the Philip- 
pine islands continues to grow with amaz- 
ing rapidity. The September Summary of 
Commerce and Finance shows that the im- 
ports from these islands are 61 per cent 
greater than in the corresponding months 
of 1898 or 1897, and the exports to them 161 
per cent greater than in the same months 
of 1898 or 1897. The total of our imports 
from these four Islands or groups of islands 
was, in the nine months of 1899, $53,273,224, 
against $34,471,276 in the corresponding 
months of 1898, and $33,059,105 in the same 
months of 1897, while our exports to them 
in nine months of 1899 were $29,921,783, 
against $11,933,833 In the corresponding 
months of 1898, and $11,480,153 in the same 
months of 1897. 

An examination of the details shows that 
in the matter of exports our sales to each 
of these islands or groups of islands have 
been greater in the nine months just ended 
than in any corresponding period in the 
history of our commercial relations with 
them, except those to Cuba In the year in 



which reciprocity brought our sales to that 
island to a much higher figure than they 
ever attained in any preceding or sub- 
sequent year. From Puerto Rico, Hawaii 
and the Philippines the imports of the nine 
months just ended are larger than in any 
corresponding months in the history of our 
commerce with those islands, though from 
Cuba they are necessarily less than in the 
years prior to the destruction of her sugar 
plantations and works during her war with 
Spain, our chief sugar supply at that time 
being brought from Cuba. 

The following tables show the exports to 
and imports from Cuba, Puerto Rico, Hawaii 
and the Philippines in the nine months of 
each year since 1894. It will be seen that 
the total exports for the nine months of 
1899 are greater than those of the corre- 
sponding months of any preceding year 
shown, while the imports are also greater 
than those of any preceding year, except 
in the case of Cuba, from which our chief 
sugar supplies were drawn prior to the 
destruction of her plantations during her 
war with Spain. 



NINE M'THS END- 
ED SEPT. 30. 



EXPORTS FROM THE UNITED 
STATES TO 



Cuba. 



Putrto 
Rico. 



Hawaii. 



Philip- 
pines. 



IMPORTS INTO THE UNITED 
STATES FROM 



Cuba. 



Puerto 
Rico. 



1894. 

- 



1897. 

1898. 
1899. 



$13,726,688 
7.124.801 

5.044.566 

ti.154.2ol 

6,438,002 
18.8ftl.84fl 



$1,836,274 
1.364.273 
1,458,444 
1,501.974 



$67,473 $73^80,683 



2,562,589 



8.230.016 



121,948 
112.448 
54.600 
84.856 
777,329 



43.352.215 
22,726,268 
14.8S5.78fi 
14,399,176 
2ft.922.806 



$2,058,802 
1.620,949 
2,051.936 
1.767.028 
2,296.811 
3.360,785 



$8,154.192 
6,990.149 

13,602.961 
13,044.231 
14.611,285 
19,496,831 



$2,307,006 
3,254.445 

4,693,826 



. 

3,164,004 
4,493,302 



NATIONAL SOUND-MONEY LEAGUE. 
[Nonpartisan.J 

Headquarters, 117 Monadnock building, Chicago. Eastern office, Bowling Green offices 
Broadway, New York. 



OFFICERS OF THE LEAGUE. 

J Sterling Morton, president... Nebraska City 

A. B. HepDurn, treasurer New York 

C. L. Hutchinson, associate treasurer. Chicago 
E.V. Smalley, general secretary Chicago 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

M. E. Ingalls, chairman Cincinnati 

J. Kennedy Tod New York 

H. P. Robinson Chicago 

Edwin Burritt Smith Chicago 

John B. Jackson Pittsburg 

J. K. Co wen Baltimore 

James L. Blair St. Louis 

Louis R. Ehrich Colorado Springs 

George Foster Peabody New York 

ALTERNATES. 

J. C. Schmidlapp Cincinnati 

A. E. Willson Louisville 

A. B. Kittredge Sioux Falls 

E. P. Wells Jamestown, N. D. 

W. H. Dunwoody Minneapolis 

F. C. Winkler Milwaukee 

J. W. Norwood Wilmington, N. C. 

William F. Ladd Galveston 

Henry Hentz New York 

VICE-PRESIDENTS. 

Alabama R. H. Clarke Mobile 

Arkansas Morris M. Cohn Little Rock 

California Lovell White San Francisco 

Connecticut N. G. Osborn New Haven 



Delaware H. A. DuPont Wlnterthur 

Florida Dr. J. L. Gaskins Starke 

Georgia Henry G. Turner Quit-man 

Indiana Lucius B.Swift Indianapolis 

Kansas E. N. Morrill Hiawatha 

Kentucky Geo. M. Davie Louisville 

Louisl ana J. C. Morris New Orleans 

Maine Chas. F. Libby Portland 

Maryland Henry A. Parr Baltimore 

Massachusetts Ed w. Atkinson Boston 

Michigan Edwin F. Conely Detroit 

Minnesota Thomas Wilson St. Paul 

Mississippi Addison Croft Holly Springs 

Missouri James L. Blair 8t. Louis 

Montana Wilbur F. Sanders Helena 

Nebraska J. S. Morton Nebraska City 

New Hampshire F. C. Faulkner Keene 

New Jersey John Keene Elizabeth 

New York Wm. C. Cornwell Buffalo 

North Carolina Wm. A. Blair Winston 

North Dakota J. M. Devine La Moure 

Ohio Virgil P. Kline Cleveland 

Oregon M. C. George Portland 

Pennsylvania J. B. Jackson Pittsburg 

Rhode Island Wm. B. Weeden ... .Providence 

South Carolina G. B. Edwards Charleston 

Texas J. F. Campbell Galveston 

Vermont C. W. Woodhouse Burlington 

Virginia W. L. Royall Richmond 

Washington L. 8. Hewlett North Yakima 

West Virginia Alfred Caldwell Wheeling 

Wisconsin F. G. BUrelow Milwaukee 

Wyoming Joseph M. Carey Cheyenne 



146 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



THE COLONIAL SYSTEMS OF THE WOULD. 

[From United States Bureau of Statistics.] 



The colonies, protectorates and depend- 
encies of the world number 126. They 
occupy two-fifths of the land surface of 
the globe, and their population is one-third 
of the entire people of the earth. Of the 
500,000,000 people thus governed, over three- 
fourths live between the tropics of cancer 
and Capricorn, or within what is known as 
the torrid zone, and all of the governing 
countries lie in the north temperate zone. 
Throughout the globe-encircling area known 
as the torrid zone no important republic 
or independent form of government exists 
save upon the continent of America. 

The total imports of the colonies and 
protectorates average more than $1,500,000,- 
000 worth of goods annually, and of this 
vast sum more than 40 per cent is pur- 
chased from the mother countries. Of their 
exports, which considerably exceed their 
imports, 40 per cent goes to the mother coun- 
tries. Large sums are annually expended 
in the construction of roads, canals, rail- 
ways, telegraphs, postal service, schools, 
etc., but in most cases the present annual 
expenditures are derived from local reve- 
nues or are represented by local obligations. 
The revenues of the British colonies in 
1897 were 151,000,000 and their expendi- 
tures 149,000,000. While the public debt in 
the more important and active of these 
communities aggregates a large sum, it is 
represented by canals, railways, public 
highways, harbors, irrigation and other 
public improvements intended to stimulate 
commerce and production, the railroads in 
operation in the British colonies alone ag- 
gregating 55,000 miles. 

The most acceptable and therefore most 
successful of the colonial systems are those 
in which the largest liberty of self-govern- 
ment is given to the people. The British 
colonial system, which has by far outgrown 
that of any other nation, gives, wherever 
practicable, a large degree of self-govern- 
ment to the colonies; the governors are in 
all cases appointed by the crown, but the 
law making and enforcing power is left 
to the legislative bodies, which are elected 
by the people wherever practicable, in 
minor cases a portion being elected and a 
portion appointed, and in still others the 
appointments divided between the British 
government and local municipal or trade 
organizations, the veto power being In all 
cases, however, retained by the home gov- 



ernment. The enforcement of the laws Is 
intrusted to courts and subordinate organi- 
zations, whose members are in many cases 
residents or natives of the communities 
under their jurisdiction. In the French 
colonies less attention is given to law 
making and administration by local legisla- 
tive bodies, the more important of the 
colonies being given members in the legisla- 
tive bodies of the home government. In 
the Netherlands colonies and in the less 
advanced communities under British con- 
trol the laws and regulations are adminis- 
tered in conjunction with native function- 
aries. 

Of the 125 colonies, protectorates, de- 
pendencies and "spheres of influence" which 
make up the total list, two-fifths belong to 
Great Britain, their area being one-half of 
the grand total and their population con- 
siderably more than one-half of the grand 
total. France is next in order in number, 
area and population of colonies, etc., though 
the area controlled by France is hut about 
one-third that belonging to Great Britain 
and the population of her colonies less 
than one-sixth of those of Great Britain. 

Commerce between the successful colonies 
and their mother countries is in nearly all 
cases placed upon practically the same 
basis as that^ with other countries, goods 
from the home countries receiving in the 
vast majority of cases no advantages over 
those from other countries in import duties 
or other exactions of this character affect- 
ing commerce. In the more prosperous and 
progressive colonies, the percentage of im- 
portations from the mother countries grows 
somewhat less as the business and pros- 
perity increase. The chief British colonies 
in North America (Canada and Newfound- 
land), which in 1871 took 50 per cent of 
their importations from the home country, 
took in 1896 less -than 30 per cent from the 
United Kingdom; those of South Africa 
(Cape Colony and Natal), which in 1871 took 
83 per cent from the home country, took 
but 71 per cent in 1896; those of Australia 
and the adjacent islands, which in 1876 
took 48 per cent from the home country, in 
1896 took but 40 per cent. The French 
colonies now take from the home country 
about 42 per cent of their total imports, 
while the British colonies obtain about 40 
per cent of their total imports from the 
home country. 



COLONIES, DEPENDENCIES AND PROTECTORATES OF NATIONS OF THE WORLD. 
[Compiled from Statesman's Year-Book, 1898.] 



COUNTRIES. 



Number 

of 
colonies. 



AREA (SQUARE MILES). 



Mother coun- 
try. 



Colonies. 



POPULATION. 



Mother coun- 
try. 



Colonies. 



United Kingdom* . 

France 

Germany 

Netherlands 

Portugal 

Spain 

Italy 

Austria-Hungary- . 

Denmark 

Russia 

Turkey 

China 

United States 

Total 



120,979 

204.092 

208.830 

12,648 



197.6TO 

110.646 

240.922 

15,289 

8.516,139 

1,115.067 

1,336.841 

3.557.000 



11,250,412 
3.617.327 
1,021.676 
802.S4S 
801,060 
243,271 
104,000 
23,262 
86.614 
255.550 
564.500 



. 
16S.287 



39.824.563 
38.517.975 
52.279.915 
4.928.658 
5,049.729 
17.5rt5.632 
31,290.490 
41.231.342 
2.185.235 
126,683,312 
24,128,690 

aso.ooo.ooo 

75,194.000 



344.059.12-2 

52.642.930 

10.64T.OOii 

33.911,744 

9,216,707 

209.1 ii)0 

650.000 

1.568.092 

114.229 

5,684.000 

17.489.000 

16.680.0CO 

10,177,000 



126 



16,672,161 



21,821.382 



844.879,541 



503.04S.S24 



* Includes feudatory native states of India. 731.914 square miles; population in 1891. 66.OGO.47i). 



THE COLONIAL SYSTEMS OF THE WORLD. 



147 



COLONIES. PROTECTORATES, DEPENDENCIES, ETC., GROUPED BY GRAND DIVI- 
SIONS OF THE WORLD. 

C. C. indicates crown colonies, in which the crown has the entire control of legislation, ths 
administration being carried on by public officers under the control of the home government. 

R. I. indicates colonies possessing representative institutions, in which the crown has no 
more than a veto on legislation, but the homegovernmentretains thecontrolof public officers. 

R. G. indicates colonies possessing responsible governments, in which the crown has only 
a veto on legislation and the home government no control over any public officer ezcept its 
own representatives. 

NORTH AMERICA. Possession and form Area. Povula- 

Colontes. of government. Sq. miles^ twn. 

Bahamas, W. I British R. 1 6,794 50,599 

Barbados British R. 1 166 188,000 

Bermudas British R, 1 19 15,794 

Canada British R. G 3,315,647 5,250,000 

Cuba O. S., temporarily 43,220 1,631,687 

Curacao, W. I Dutch colony 436 44,153 

Greenland Danish possession 34,000 10,516 

Guadaloupe, etc.. W. I French colony 722 190,704 

Honduras, British British C. C 7,562 31,471 

Jamaica, etc., W. I British C. C 4,416 644,270 

Leeward Islands, W. I British R. 1 701 127,723 

Martinique, etc., W. I French colony 381 175,863 

Newfoundland British R. G 42,200 202,059 

Puerto Rico, W. I Dnited States 3,550 806,708 

St. Croix, W. I Danish colony 74 19,783 

St. John, W. I Danish colony 21 944 

St. Pierre and Miquelon French colony 90 6,927 

St. Thomas, W. I Danish colony 23 14,390 

Trinidad, W. I British C. C ,. 1,868 224,445 

Windward Islands, W. I British R. I 648 231,899 

Total North America _ 3,461,538 9,886,935 

SOUTH AMERICA. 

Falkland Islands British C. C 6,500 1,890 

Guianas: British British R. 1 96,550 280,000 

French French colony 46,880 26,9iO 

Dutch Dutch 46,060 71,200 

Total South America 195,990 380,040 

EUROPE. 

Bosnia Austria-Hung, protect.. 16,205 1,348,581 

Bulgaria Turkish tributary 38,562 2,317,430 

Faeroe Islands Danish colony 510 12,955 

Gibraltar British C. C 2 26,080 

Herzegovina Austria-Hung, protect . . 3,528 219,511 

Iceland Danish province 39,756 70,937 

Malta and Gozzo British R. 1 125 174,621 

Roumelia Turkish tributary 13,862 992.386 

Total Europe 112,550 5,162,491 

ASIA. 

Aden and Pprim British C. C 85 41,910 

Annam French protectorate 105,000 6,000,000 

Bahreim Islands British protectorate 273 68,000 

Baluchistan British protectorate 106,000 500,000 

Bokhara Russian dependency 92.300 2,130,000 

Cambodia French protectorate 38,600 815,000 

Ceylon British R. 1 25,365 3,008,466 

China dependencies Dependencies 2,923,800 14,500,000 

Cochin China ? French possession 22,958 1,917,000 

Cyprus British administration.. 3,584 209,291 

Hongkong British C. C 31 248,498 

India: British British C. C 988,993 221,292,952 

French French possession 196 282.923 

Portuguese Portuguese possession... 1,295 561,384 

Khiva Russian dependency 22,320 700,000 

Macao Portuguese possession... 6 68,100 

Malay federated native states British protectorate 28,220 460,000 

Samos Turkish tributary 180 44,661 

Sikkim British protectorate 3,090 50,000 

Straits Settlements British C. C 1,472 512,342 

Tonquln French possession 121,246 14,000,000 

Total Asia 4,485,013 267,410,527 

AFRICA. 

Algeria French colony 307,940 4,174,700 

Angola Portuguese possession... 515,670 19,400,000 



148 CHICAGO DAILY 


NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900 






AFRICA . CONTIN USD. 










Possession and form 


Area. 


Popula- 


Colonies. 


of government. 


Sq. miles. 


tion. 


Ascension 


British C. C 


35 


240 


Azores, and Madeira Islands 


Portuguese province 


1,510 


401,624 


Basutoland .\ . . . 


British C. C 


10,293 


250,000 


Bechuanaland 


British protectorate 


400,000 


4,000,000 


British East Africa 


British protectorate 


667,680 


6,358,000 


British Central Africa 


British protectorate 


60,000 


845,000 


British South Africa 


British protectorate 


750,000 


6,000,000 


Canary Islands 


Spanish province 


2,808 


291,700 


Cape Colony 


British R. G 


276,900 


1,800,000 


Cape Verde Islands 


Portuguese possession . . . 


1,650 


111,000 


Ceuta 


Spanish province 


13 


5,090 


Comoro Islands 


French protectorate 


620 


64,000 


Congo Free State 


Belgian protectorate 


869,570 


14,000,000 


Dahomey 


French possession 


15.000 


600,000 


Egypt 


Turkish tributary 


383,800 


7,739,000 


Eritrea 


Italian colony 


50,000 


200,000 


Fernando Po 


Spanish possession 


1,500 


50,000 


French Sudan 


French possession 


50,800 


285,000 


Gaboon-Congo 


French possession 


220,000 


6,000,000 


Gambia 


British C. C 


2,700 


15,000 


German East Africa 


German protectorate 


363,265 


3,000,000 


German S. W. Africa 


German protectorate 


320,750 


200,000 


Gold coast : British 


British C. C 


90,000 


1,500,000 


French 


French protectorate 


50.000 


650.000 


Kamerun 


German protectorate 


190,530 


3,500,000 


Lagos 


British C. C 


15,000 


2,000.000 


Madagascar 


French possession 


228,500 


3,500,000 


Mauritius and dependencies 


British C. C 


877 


395,700 


Mayotte and Nossl Be 


French possession 


257 


18,800 


Mozambique 


Portuguese possession... 


310,000 


1,500.000 


Natal 


British R. I 


20,850 


550,000 


Niger Territories 


British protectorate 


500,000 


25,000,000 


Obock and Tajura 


French possession 


3,860 


23,000 


Providence Island 


German possession 


20 


100 


Reunion 


French possession 


764 


176,000 


St. Helena 


British C. C 


47 


4,116 


St. Marie 


French possession 


64 


7,667 


Senegambia 


French possession 


234,000 


6,000,000 


Sierra Leone : 


British C. O 


4,000 


136,000 


Somali 


British protection 


142,000 


700,000 


Togoland 


German protectorate 


19,000 


800,000 


Tripoli 


Turkish tributary 


398,873 


1,015,000 


Tristan d'Acunha 


British C. C 


45 


102 


Tunis 


French protectorate 


44,920 


1,600,000 


Uganda 


British protectorate 


70,000 


5,000,000 


Zanzibar 


British protectorate 


985 


260,000 


Zululand 


British C. C 


14,220 


180,000 


Total Africa 




7,611,916 


129,306,839 


OCEAXICA. 








Bismarck Archipelago 


German protectorate 


18,180 


190,000 


Borneo, British North 


British protectorate 


79,100 


495,000 


Borneo, Dutch 


Dutch possession 


343,060 


1,290,000 


Caroline Islands and Palaos 


German possession 


1,606 


47,000 


Emperor Williamsland 


German protectorate 


81,000 


190,000 


Fiji and Rotuma Isles 


British C. C 


7.740 


125,000 


Guam 


United States 


200 


2,000 


Hawaii 


United States v .. 


6,582 


107,000 


Java and Madura 


Dutch possession 


50,560 


35,070,000 


Marquesas Island 


French possession 


492 


5,100 


Marshall Islands .- 


German possession 


135 


10,000 


New Guinea: British 


British C. C 


88,460 


350,000 


Dutch 


Dutch possession 


243,000 


240,000 


New South Wales 


British R. G 


310,700 


1,277,870 


New Zealand 


British R. G 


104,471 


743,212 


Philippine Islands 


U. S., temporarily 


114,320 


6.990,000 


Queensland 


British R. G 


668,497 


460,550 


South Australia 


British R. G 


903,690 


357,405 


Society Islands and dependencies 


French possession 


932 


27,000 


Spanish colonies 


Spanish possession 


1,170 


81,000 


Sumatra 


Dutch possession 


76,640 


1,590,000 


Tasmania 


British R. G 


26,215 


160,834 


Timor and Archipelago 
Victoria 


Dutch possession 
British R. G 


28,554 
87,884 


2,110.000 
1,181,769 


West Australia 


British R. I 


975.920 


101,235 


: Total Oceanlca 




4,219,114 


43,201,975 



THE ALASKAN BOUNDARY. 



149 



THE ALASKAN BOUNDARY. 



The controversy regarding the boundary 
line between Alaska and British Columbia 
was discussed In full In The Dally News 
Almanac for 1896, page 79. The subject of 
this dispute was referred with eleven 
other questions to the Anglo-American Com- 
mission (see Daily News Almanac for 1S99, 
page 159), which met in Quebec, Canada, 
Aug. 23, 1898, and adjourned Feb. 20, 1899, 
to meet again Aug. 2, ' 1899, unless some 
other date should be agreed upon. The 
Alaska boundary question proved to be the 
rock upon which the commission split, and 



different that some modification of the 
Venezuela boundary reference should be in- 
troduced. They thought the reference 
should be made to six eminent jurists, 
three chosen by each of the high contract- 
ing parties, without providing for an um- 
pire, they believing that finality would be 
secured by a majority vote of the jurists 
so chosen. 

"They did not see any present prospect 
of agreeing to a European umpire, to be 
selected in the manner proposed by the 
British commissioners, while the British 




THE PROVISIONAL ALASKA BOUNDARY. 
(The boundary commonly claimed by the United States is indicated by the broken line 
sweeping across the upper part of the map in a bold curve. The line claimed by Canada is 
not snown, but would be near the bottom of the map. The boundary established temporarily 
by the modus vivendl is shown by the solid line A B, and this will probably be continued to 
the American boundary, as shown by the dotted line. This provisional line retains for the 
United States full possession and control of the coast, of all harbors, towns and villages and 
of the Porcupine river region, lying south of Klukwan and west of Pyramid harbor, which is 
supposed to be rich in gold.] 



it has not been called together since its 
adjournment in February. At the time of 
adjournment the commissioners made a 
public statement as to the reasons for their 
failure to come to a settlement, from 
which the following is an extract: 

"The difficulties, apart from the imme- 
diate delimitation of this boundary by the 
commission itself, arose from the conditions 
under which it might be referred to arbi- 
tration. The British commissioners desired 
that the whole question should be referred 
on terms similar to those provided in the 
reference of the Venezuelan boundary line, 
and which, by providing an umpire, would 
insure certainty and finality. The United 
States commissioners, on the other hand, 
thought the local conditions in Alaska so 



commissioners were unwilling to agree to 
the selection of an American umpire in 
the manner suggested by the United States 
commissioners. The United States commis- 
sioners further contended that special stipu- 
lations should be made in any reference to 
arbitration, that the existing settlements 
on the tidewaters of the coast should in 
any event continue to belong to the United 
States. To this contention the British 
commissioners refused to agree." 

The settlements referred to are Dyea and 
Skaguay, which are situated at the head 
of Lynn canal, and these two ports prac- 
tically control the most frequented routes 
to the gold fields in the Klondike region. 
Canada, therefore, contended most strenu- 
ously for a seaport on the canal, together 
with an unobstructed waterway to the 



150 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



Pacific. The Americans' refusal to yield 
either of the ports named was based upon 
the fact that they were clearly some miles 
within American territory, and they had 
been so long held and occupied by the 
Cnlted States that any adjustment of the 
boundary line IBUSI concede these ports to 
this country. 

After the adjourement of the commission 
the foreign offices of the United States and 
Great Britain undertook to settle the con- 
troversy between themselves. 

After a good deal of negotiation a 
modus vivendi was agreed upon in Octo- 
ber, 1899, which effects a temporary settle- 
ment of the main point in the dispute, 
namely, the demand of Canada for a port 
on Lynn canal. The provisional line estab- 
lished temporarily retains for the United 
States full possession of the coast, of 
all harbors, towns and villages and of the 
Porcupine river region, lying south of 
Klukwan and west of Pyramid harbor, 
which is supposed to be rich in gold. 

The following is the text of the agree- 
ment: "It is hereby agreed between the 
governments of the United States and 
Great Britain that the boundary line 
between Canada and the territory of 
Alaska in the region about the head of 
Lynn canal shall be provisionally fixed, 
without prejudice to the claims of either 
party in the permanent adjustment of the 
International boundary, as follows: 

"In the region of the Dalton trail, a line 
beginning at the peak west of Porcupine 
creek, marked on map No. 10 of the United 
States commission, Dec. 31, 1895, and on 
sheet No. 18 of the British commission, 
Dec. 31, 1895, with the number 6500; thence 
running to the Klehini (or Klaheela) river 
In the direction of the peak north of that 
river, marked 5020 on the aforesaid United 
States map, and 5025 on the aforesaid 
British map; thence following the high, or 
right, bank of the said Klehini river to the 
junction thereof with the Chilkat river, a 
mile and a half, more or less, north of 
Klukwan provided that persons proceeding 
to or from Porcupine creek shall be freely 
permitted to follow the trail between the 
said creek and the said junction of the 
rivers, into and across the territory on the 
Canadian side of the temporary line wher- 
ever the trail crosses to such side, and 
subject to such reasonable regulations for 
the protection of the revenue as the Cana- 



dian government may prescribe, to carry 
with them over such part or parts of the 
trail between the said points as may lie 
on the Canadian side of the temporary 
line such goods and articles as they desire 
without being required to pay any customs 
duties on such goods and articles; and 
from said junction to the summit of the 
peak east of the Chilkat river, marked on 
the aforesaid map No. 10 of the United 
States commission with the number 5410, 
and on the map No. 17 of the aforesaid 
British commission with the number 5490. 

"On the Dyea and Skaguay trails, the 
summits of the Chilkoot and White passes. 

"It Is understood, as formerly set forth 
in communications of the department of 
state of the United States, that the citizens 
or subjects of either power found by this 
arrangement within the temporary juris- 
diction of the other shall suffer no diminu- 
tion of the rights and privileges which they 
now enjoy. 

"The government of the United States 
will at once appoint an officer or officers, 
in conjunction with an officer or officers to 
be named by the government of her Britan- 
nic majesty, to mark the temporary line 
agreed upon by the erection of posts, 
stakes or other appropriate temporary 
marks." 

While the establishment of the provis- 
ional boundary cannot be regarded as a 
victory for either side, it is unquestionably 
true that the United States government 
secured everything it demanded in the way 
of concessions. 

Great Britain has not secured a port on 
tidewater, and the nearest point in British 
territory to a stream leading to tidewater 
that Is navigable by canoes is a mile and 
a half distant. The head of navigation 
proper is twenty-two and one-fourth statute 
miles on the American side of the pro- 
visional boundary. A slight concession of 
territory to Great Britain was necessary 
In order to more clearly define the line, 
but this does not benefit British interests 
in any way, as the line Is so drawn as to 
give to the United States control of all 
the passes leading to the Klondike and the 
Porcupine country from tidewater. 

It Is understood that the modus vivendi 
will continue in force at the pleasure of 
both parties to it, no date being fixed for 
its expiration. 



VALUE IN GOLD OF $100 CURRENCY IN THE NEW YORK MARKET--1862-78. 



PERIODS. 



January. 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



97.668.9 
96.662.3 

98.2i64.7 
98.566.0 
96.867.2 
93.969.2 
86.6 76.6 

87.3 79.5 

84.4 74.5 
77.867. 

'6.367.6 
75.666.2 



64.346.371.4 



1 iTf'TS.'s'^SjTu!? 74.'4 83;7i89!7:96!7 S7!ti : 89!l 87^3 8Si2 94l8 98.'o 
76.2 88.8 90.1 ; 90.8 86.6 89.2 ,86.6 87.5 95.4 98.8 



47.5 
t38.7 
39.4 



48.368.7 



4 57.5 76.6 74.ll71.7 
.378.673.772.175.2 

75.973.071.671.887.289 



. 

1.4 



70.4 66.0 71.7 70.1 73.5 85.6 89.0 87.5 86.4 91.0 87.1 89.3 94.9 99.5 



67.271.068.7 



74.372.278.782.490.391 



74.5 84.8 89.0 87.4 86.7 91.2 88.1 89.9 



44.9 69.5 68.7 69.7 69.6 73.1 87.1 87.3 88.1 88.7 91.2 86.4 90.9 96.8 99.6 



42.8 68.0 69.5171.6 74.4 



88.4 90.4 90.0 84.9 88.2 87.1 88.5 94.2 99.4 
88.0 85.0 ML!) s;.H -8.8 93.5 99.3 



1.4172.4 88.6 89.0 87.8 85.8 90.0 ,85.5 88.9 94.9 99.2 



44.0 68.4 73.2 74.2 74.0 82.3 90.3 91.5 89.1 90.9 89.6 87.8 92.6 97.3 99.9 



67.4 69.7 72.9 76.8 88.7 88.3 88.3 91.8 91.0 85.9 91.2 97.3 99 



__. ... 19.5 

73.2 89.8 89.9 88.6 92.1 90.2 87.2 91.7 97.3 99.8 



(On July 11. 1861, $100 in greenbacks was worth only $35 in gold. 



SUBMARINE CABLES OP THE WORLD. 



151 



SUBMARINE CABLE LIKES OF THE WORLD. 

Showing length, points between which operated, company operating, etc. also the lines 
owned and controlled by various governments. 

[From Report of International Bureau of Telegraph Administration.] 

No. Length 
of of 
cables, cables. 
cent (Cape Verde Island), to 

Pernambuco (Brazil) 6 7,375 

Central and South American Tel- 
egraph Co 15 



No. Length 

of of 

cables, cables. 

Anglo- American Telegraph Co.: * 
Transatlantic system Valen- 
tia (Ireland) to Hearts Con- 
tent (Newfoundland) 

Minon. near Brest (France) to 

St. Pierre-Miquelon 1 

Communication on American 

coasts 9 

European communication 1 

Total 



4 7,510 

2,718 



1,964 
101 



15 12,293 



6,893 
826 



Ml 



Commercial Cable Co.: 
Transatlantic system Water- 
vine (Ireland) to Canso (Nova 

Scotia) 3 

Canso (Nova Scotia) to New York 1 
Canso (Nova Scotia) to Rockport, 

Mass 1 

Communication in Europe 2 

Total 7 9.069 

Direct United States Cable Co. : 
Ballinskelligs Bay (Ireland) to 

Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1 2,504 

Halifax (Nova Scotia) to Rye 

each,N.H 1 535 



Bea 
Total . 



2 3,099 



Western Union Telegraph Co.: 
Transatlantic system Sennen 
Cove, near Penzance (Eng- 
land), to Dover Bay, near 

Canso (Nova Scotia) 

Dover Bay (Nova Scotia) to New 

York 

Gulf of Mexico system 

Total "_ 

Compagnie Francaise du Tele-" 

graphe de Paris a New York: 
Brest (France) to St. I'ierre- 

Miquelon 

St. Pierre to Cape Cod, Mass 

Other branch lines _ 

Total 



5,107 
1,776 



7,342 



2,282 



Compagnie Francaise des Cables 

Telegraphique: 
Brest (France) to Cape Cod, 

Mass 

African Direct Telegraph Co i 

Black Sea Telegraph Co 

Brazilian Submarine Tel. Co.: 
Carcavellos, near Lisbon (Por- 
tugal), to Madeira, to St. Vin- 

CABLES 



3,532 



3,250 

2,938 

337 



Compagne Allemande des Cables 
Telegraphique 

Compania Telegraflco-Telefonlca 
del Plata 

Compania Telegraflco del Rio de 
la Plata 

Cuba Submarine Telegraph Co 

Direct Spanish Telegraph Co 

Direct West India Cable Co.: 
Bermuda-Turks Islands, and 
Turks Islands-Tamarique 

Eastern and South African Tele- 
graph Co 

Eastern Extension Australasia 
and China Telegraph Co 



7,500 
1 1,114 



28 

28 

1.048 
710 



2 (t) 
13 8,832 



27 17,359 



Eastern Telegraph Co. : 
Anglo-Spanlsh-Portuguese sys- 
tem 12 4,186 

System west of Malta 17 4,603 

Italo-Greek system 2 2K 

Austro-Greek system 1 60! 

Greeksystem 12 69! 

Turko-Greek system 4 678 

Turkish system 15 845 

Egypto-European system 4 2,53( 

Egyptian system 1 15; 

Egypto-Indian system 13 ll,80i 

Total 81 26,153 



Europe and Azores Telegra'h Co. 2 1,053 

Great Northern Telegraph Co.: 

Cables in Europe and Asia 24 6,982 

Halifax and Bermuda Cable Co. . 1 850 

Indo- European Telegraph Co 2 14 

India Rubber, Gutta Percha and 

Telegraph Works Co 3 145 

Mexican Telegraph Co 3 1,527 

River Plate Telegraph Co 1 32 

Societe Francaise des Telegraphes 

Sous-Marins 19 4,720 

South American Cable Co 2 2,048 

United States aud Haiti Telegraph 

andCableCo 1 1,389 

West African Telegraph Co 11 2,977 

West Coast of America Telegraph 

Co 8 1.964 

Western and Brazilian Telegraph 

Co 16 6,154 

West India and Panama Tele- 
graph Co.. 22 4,557 



Total, all lines 318 146,419 

OWNED BY NATIONS. 



Austria 41 

Belgium 2 

Denmark 73 

France 64 

Germany 68 

Great Britain and Ireland 135 

Greece 47 

Holland 24 

Italy 39 

Norway 325 

Portugal 4 

Russia 9 

Spain 15 

Sweden 14 

Switzerland 2 

Turkey 23 

*Nautical miles. 



214 

65 

235 

6,035 

2.'->25 

1.9S9 

55 

62 

l.Otil 
324 
115 
231 
1,744 
9(3 
10 
344 



Argentine Republic and Brazil.. . . 49 

Australia and New Zealand 3l 

Bahama Islands 1 

British America 1 

British India (Indo-European 

Telegraph Department; Ill 



China 

Cochin China and Touquin 

Japan 

M acas 

No veil e Caledonie 

Netherlands Indies 

Senegal, Africa-Dakar to Goree 
Island 



119 
315 
213 
200 

1.919 
113 

774 

1,508 

2 

1 



Total 1,142 19,880 

(Official figures not announced when this list was revised. 



152 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



INFORMATION PERTAINING TO SUBMARINE TELEGRAPH LINES. 

Length of first successful cable miles 25 

Length of first successful Atlantic cable miles 2,134 

Length of direct United States cable (Ballinskelligs Bay to Halifax, Nova 

Scotia) miles.... 2.564 

Length of French cable (Brest. France, to Cape Cod, Massachusetts) miles 8.250 

Distance from San Francisco to Hawaii (proposed line) miles 2.0H9 

Distance from Hawaii to Wake Island (proposed line) miles 2.040 

Distance from Wake Island to Guam (proposed line) miles 1,290 

Distance from Guam to Manila (proposed line) miles.... 1,520 

Distance from Manila to Asiatic coast miles 680 

Depth of water in which first successful cable was laid feet 120 

Depth of Atlantic cable lines feet 14.000 

Greatest depth at which cable has been laid, Haiti to Windward Islands. ..feet 18.000 

Greatest depth between San Francisco and Hawaii feet 18.300 

Greatest depth between Hawaii and Manila (estimated) feet I9.ri0 

Capital of first Atlantic cable company $1,750.000 

Contract price of cable for first Atlantic line $1,125.000 

Contract price of cable for first successful Atlantic cable line $3,000.000 

Present cost per mile of cable (estimate by Bright) $750 

Costof laying per mile, average $375 

Number of words per minute sent on first line 3 

Number of words per minute on first successful Atlantic cable line at beginning 8 

Number of words per minute on first successful Atlantic cable line, after expert- 
mental stage 15 

Present rate of speed (without duplex ) 26 

Present rate by automatic system (without duplex) 60 

Increased use of wire by duplexing percent.... 90 

Number of cables laid across the North Atlantic 16 

Number now working 13 

Average life of cable years 25 

Original rates for messages, first Atlantic Hues (minimum, 20 words or lass) $100 

On first reduction (minimum, 20 words or less) $50 

Original word rate, without minimum $1 

Present word rate, without minimum $0.25 

Length of telegraph cables of the world (1808) miles 170,000 

Length of land lines of the world (1898 estimate by Bright) miles. . . . 6(52.000 

Costof cable lines of the world i estimate by Bright) $250,000,000 

Cost of land lines of the world (estimate by Bright) $310,000 000 

Total length of telegraph wires, land and cable (estimate by Bright) miles. . . . 2,300.000 

Number of cable messages sent annually (estimate by Bright) 6.000,000 

Per cent of world's lines built by governments 10 

Per cent built by private enterprise 90 

Time of message and answer. Washington to Santiago battlefield and return, .min. . 12 

Timeof message. Washington to London and reply, in chess natch of 1898 sec... 13W 

Number of cables owned by nations 1,142 

Length of cables owned by nations miles 20,000 

Number of cables owned by private companies 320 

Length of cables owned by private companies miles 150,000 

Longest single line without intermediate landing miles 3,260 

Present route of telegrams from Washington to Manila: To New York by land; to 
Valentia, Ireland, by cable; to Brighton, England, cable and land; to Havre, 
France, cable; to Marseilles, land; to Alexandria, Egypt, cable; to Suez, Egypt, 
land; to Aden, Arabia, cable; to Bombay, India, cable; to Madras, land; to 
Singapore, Malayan Peninsula, cable; to Saigon, Cochin China, cable; to Hong- 
kong, cable; to Bolinao, Philippine Islands (Luzon), cable; to Manila, land. 

Distance miles 14,000 



Every body of water lying between the 
inhabited portions of the earth, with the 
single exception of the Pacific ocean, has 
been crossed and recrossed by submarine 
telegraph lines. Even that vast expanse of 
water has been invaded along its margin, 
submarine wires stretching along its west- 
ern border from Siberia to Australia, while 
its eastern borders are skirted with lines 
which stretch along the western coast of 
the two Americas. Several adventurous 
pioneers in Pacific telegraphy have ven- 
tured to considerable distances and depths 
in that great ocean, one cable line running 
from Australia to New Zealand, a distance 
of over 1,000 miles, and another extending 
from Australia to the French colony of New 
Caledonia, 800 miles seaward. 

The chief obstacle in the past to the con- 
struction of a grand trans-Pacific cable was 



places could not be satisfactorily obtained 
or arranged for, no single government con- 
trolling a sufficient number of suitable 
landing places to make this seem practic- 
able, In view of the belief that the dis- 



tances from which messages could be sent 
and cables controlled were limited. With 
lauding places at Hawaii, Wake island, 
Guam and the Philippines, however, no sec- 
tion of a cable stretching from the United 
States to Asia and touching at these points 
would have a length equal to that now in 
daily operation between France and the 
United States. The length of the French 
cable from Brest, France, to Cape Cod, 
Massachusetts, is 3,250 miles, while the 
greatest distance from land to land on the 
proposed Pacific route would be that from 
San Francisco to Hawaii, 2.089 miles, that 
from Hawaii to Wake island being 2,040 
miles, from Wake island to Guam 1,290 
miles, from Guam to Manila 1,520 miles and 
from Manila to the Asiatic coast 630 miles. 
While the depth of the Pacific is somewhat 
greater than that at which any cable has 
been laid, the difference between its depth 
and the greatest reached by cables in the 
Atlantic would be very slight, the cable 
recently laid from Haiti to the Windward 
islands being In 18,000 feet of water, while 



NATIONAL DEBTS. 



153 



the greatest depth between San Francisco 
and Hawaii is 18,300 feet and the greatest 
depth between Hawaii and Manila is esti- 
mated at 19,600 feet, though this estimate 
is yet to be verified by detailed soundings. 
Otto Krummel, who was the first to dis- 
cuss the bathymetric data and calculate 
the area and volume of the various 
oceanic basins, puts the mean depth of 
the Pacific at 2,160 fathoms, against 2,040 
for the Atlantic, in which cables have 
already been so successfully laid, and 
later researches and actual soundings, 
while they have developed extreme depths 
at certain points in the Pacific, have not, 
in the opinion of experts, been such as 
to warrant the belief that the depths along 
the proposed line would be considerably 
greater than those in which cables have 
been already successfully laid and oper- 
ated. 

The developments in construction, lay- 
Ing and operating of submarine cables and 
in their availability for general public use 
have kept pace with their extension 
throughout the civilized world. From a 
mere gutta-percha-coated wire the sub- 
marine conductor of electricity has de- 
veloped in half a century into a great 
cable having a central copper core sur- 
rounded by numerous layers of noncon- 
ducting material and protected by steel 
wire wound spirally about it, and in turn 
further protected by waterproof and in- 
sect-proof wrappings. From a steamer- 
towed open barge, the facilities for laying 
have developed to a fleet of nearly fifty 
steam vessels, with every facility for 
laying, picking up, splicing and repairing 
the cable lines. From a speed rate of 
three words per minute, which was made 
on the first transatlantic cables, the speed 
of transmission has been accelerated to 
fifty words per minute, and even more 
than that with the automatic transmit- 
ters now coming into use with cable lines, 
while by the duplexing of the cables their 
carrying capacity is doubled. From a cost 
to the sender of $100 per message, which 
was originally charged on the first trans- 
atlantic cables, the rate from New York 
to London and the great cities on the con- 
tinent of Europe has fallen to 25 cents per 
word. From several hours required for the 
transmission of a message and receipt of a 
response, the time has been so reduced 
that messages from the executive mansion 
to the battlefield at Santiago were sent 
and a response received within twelve 



age sent from the 
house of representatives in Washington to 
the bouse of parliament in London in the 
chess match of 1898 was transmitted and 
the reply received in thirteen and one-half 
seconds. 

The effect of this ready and inexpensive 
method of transmitting thoughts and words 
from continent to continent throughout the 
civilized world is shown in the rapid 
development of international commerce 
since it began. The first successful cable 
lines between the United States and 
Europe were put into operation in 1866. 
In that year our commerce with Europe 
amounted to $652,232,289; in 1876, to $728,- 
959,053; in 1886, to $896,911,504; in 1896, to 
$1,091,682,874, and in 1898, to $1,279,739,936, 
while our commerce with ttoe whole world, 
which in 1866 amounted to $783,671,588, had 
by 1898 reached the enormous sum of 
$1,847,531,984. 

With this evidence of the advantage of 
prompt communication between commercial 
centers desiring an interchange of their 
products, it may not be improper to call 
attention to the fact that the United 
States now obtains but a small proportion 
of the commerce of Asia, which it is at 
present able to reach only through the long 
and devious submarine and land telegraph 
lines across the Atlantic, the continent of 
Europe, the Mediterranean, the Bed sea or 
the Persian gulf, the Indian ocean, land 
lines across India, cable lines again by 
way of the Straits Settlements and thence 
along the Asiatic coast and among the 
islands of Oceanica. The commerce of the 
countries of Asia and Oceanica lying com- 
mercially adjacent to the Philippine 
islands amounts to more than $2,000,000,000 
annually, their imports alone averaging 
$100,000,000 a month, or $1,200,000,000 per 
annum. Of this enormous market the 
United States at present obtains less than 
6 per cent, despite the fact that the im- 
ports into the countries in question are 
largely composed of the classes of articles 
produced in the United States and offered 
for sale by her manufacturers and mer- 
chants. With a direct cable communica- 
tion across the Pacific, direct water com- 
munication through a Nicaraguan canal, 
and an increase in the number and capac- 
ity of American steamships, it seems not 
improper to suppose that a material addi- 
tion might be made to the share obtained 
by the United States in the trade of that 
part of the world. 



NATIONAL DEBTS. 
[From United States Consular Reports.] 



COUNTRY. 


Debt. 


COUNTRY. 


Debt. 


England 


683.000.000 

1 2S4.(XX),(XX> 


J3.323.819.500 
6,248.580 (XXI 


Austria-Hungary : 
Austria 


119,000.000 
181.000,000 

229,000,000 
529,000.000 

510,184,900 
5159,645 700 


$579,113,500 

S80,85,51A) 
1,114,428,500 
2,574,378,500 

2,482.814.812 

1 798 881 ) 7'ft 


Germany 
Prussia 
Bavaria 
Total 


*107.717,015 
32t.2Kl.10S 
70,919,20f> 
.T02,W,323 


584,201.853 

1,578.U1';.W. 
345,128.311 
2.447349,850 


Common debt 
Total 

Italy 
Spain 


Russia 


1978,000,000 


4,769,437,000 


Grand total 


4.856.727,923 


23,635,266,441 



Interest, 3 per cent, tlnterest, 29.000,000 ($141,128,500). ^Interest, 19,627,946 ($95.519,403). 



154 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



LAND TELEGRAPH SYSTEMS OF THE WORLD. 



COU.XRXES. 


Number of 
offices. 


Length of 
lines, mites 


Miles of 
wire. 


Messaies 
delivered. 


Popula- 
tion. 


Messages 
per capita. 


Area. 


United Kingdom . . 
United States 
France 


10.183 
24,811 
11 653 


41.393 
214.394 

58267 


279,935 
1,017,710 
197307 


79,423,556 

77,580.767 
44 793 860 


38,104,975 
75,194.000 
38 517 975 


2.09 
1.03 
1 16 


120,979 
3,557,000 
204 092 


Germany 
Austria-Hungary. . 


21,455 
7,320 
4623 


84,370 
46,010 
78396 


320,8% 
131,239 
157 397 


auscufa 

14 546 753 


52,279.915 
41,231.342 


.73 
.50 
11 


208,830 

240.922 
8 516 139 


Japan 


1,114 


11720 


37661 


10 978 153 


42 270 620 


26 


'l47 655 




3063 


48783 


104273 


8002957 


3 352 913 


2 46 


2 946 091 


Italy 


3500 


24716 


95675 


7 322703 


31 290490 


23 


110640 




1002 


3955 


39000 


8668 117 


6 06*) 321 


1 43 


11373 


Spain 


1,421 


23636 


69247 


5 963 839 


17565632 


34 


197,670 




1,237 


25345 


69060 


4953887 


3 954 911 


1 25 


1 778195 


India 


1 461 


46375 


142 946 


4 736 734 


1^22000000 


02 


1 008314 


Netherlands 


533 


{3539 


12571 


4583,798 


4,928 658 


.93 


' 12.648 




800 


40990 


78000 


4300000 


12 578 801 


34 


767,005 




2556 


31 735 


68923 


3945794 


5250000 


75 


3 316000 




1866 


5493 


19978 


3 182564 


2 P86848 


1 06 


15976 




168 


8*164 


6500 


2 677 702 


24 128690 


11 


1 115 067 




148 


2269 


8*450 


2399934 


9 734 405 


.25 


400000 




603 


4250 


10150 


2 373 391 


6800000 


.41 


48307 




385 


6405 


11000 


2229663 


1 527 224 


1 46 


221 311 




1,385 


8282 


25150 


2,177,477 


4 919 260 


.44 


172.876 




172 


3349 


9375 


1 911,7541 


2185335 


83 


15289 




464 


6313 


14966 


1902 281 


2000917 


95 


124445 




366 


3985 


8839 


1 o54 827 


5049729 


27 


36038 


Brazil 


289 


I0'l43 


21*936 


1 283,695 


14332,530 


.09 


3209S78 


Chile 


205 


6,965 


8,330 


1,159,553 


2,712,145 


.43 


293,970 




230 


6,065 


6,000 


941.785 


2,433,806 


.39 


25,014 




134 


1,990 


4,170 


803,430 


2,314,163 


.35 


19,050 




155 


2,980 


4500 


755,687 


1,364,678 


.55 


63,400 


Cuba 


153 


2,300 


4,000 


357,914 


1,631.687 


.22 


41,655 




97 


4,380 


*6.000 


322,477 


818,843 


.39 


72,110 




319 


6835 


9.000 


320.071 


8,878,600 


.08 


513,938 




95 


4490 


6670 


142.646 


9,000,000 


015 


628000 




41 


1,491 


2.500 


88,326 


2,621,844 


.03 


463.747 


Paracuav . . . 


35 


360 


520 


46.075 


660.000 


.07 


98.000 



Estimated. tExclusive of feudatory states. JState lines only. {Populated area. 

LIQUOR STATISTICS. 

Fermented liquors produced in each state and territory from 1893 to 1898. 
[From Reports of the Commissioner of Internal Revenue.] 



STATES AND TERRITORIES. 



1893. 1894. 1895. 1896. 1897. 



1898. 



Alabama 

California and Nevada 

Colorado and Wyoming 

Connecticut and Rhode Island 

Florida 

Georgia 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas and Indian Territory 

Kentucky ' 

Louisiana and Mississippi 

Maryland, Dist. Columbia & Delaware 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Mi nnesota 

Missouri 

Montana, Idaho and Utah 

Nebraska and Dakotas 

New Hampshire, Maine and Vermont 

New Jersey 

New Mexico and Arizona 

New York. 

North Carol! na 

Ohio 

Oregon and Washington 

Penn sylvania 

South Carolina 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Total 



Barrels. 
44.661 

787,825 
234,735 
408,939 



Ban-els. 
36,465 
727.397 
188,164 
433,659 



Barrels. 
28,766 
759,772 
193,159 
492,231 



Barrels. 



210.227 

558.91)0 



Barrels. 
36.370 
763.741 



69.267 

3,417,295 

638.204 

130,565 

2,680 

361,653 

292,285 

852.621 

1,241.780 

725,215 

416,570 

2,281,149 

85,847 

170.772 

403.155 

1,915.780 

7,114 

9,978,449 



78,407 
8,310,134 



135,048 

5,867 
353.858 
270.150 



1,248,34 
655.580 
390,303 

2,188,449 
73,137 
178,272 
364.292 



4,593 
9,772,235 



84,405 

3.29:.'.:;:; I 
592,282 
127,101 
6,013 
367,997 
252,082 
837,368 

1,337,747 
659,470 
420,378 

2,139.224 
87,044 
179,617 
368.525 

1,894.541 
4,978 

9,758,801 



2,834.807 

220.7-.ii 

3,584.333 

5,265 

97,425 

131.218 

79,480 

152,343 

3.019.022 

"S4.591.179 



2,621,012 

174,192 

3,447.940 

9,541 

82,108 

187.942 

76,060 

111,300 

2.908,461 



2,633.067 
175.915 



9.395 
82,090 
221.2S1 
76,617 
109,222 
2.807,001 



104,744 

3.580.724 

627,176 

130,686 

6.039 

401,380 

248,393 

892.042 

1.5*0.:0 

722,244 

463,293 

2,262,048 

110,462 

176,132 

384.144 

2,02;;,'.f,'6 

4 706 

UMBUM7 

5 

2,879,668 

180,494 

4,047.081 

11,101 

93,760 

249.6-30 

87.525 

116,177 

2,854,334 



671,306 

2,480 

109,300 

3,244.8% 
634.208 
142.153 
6,255 
378,290 
251.943 
916.130 

1,670.556 
675,184 
492,814 

2,254.962 
132,610 
173,498 
285,554 

2,001,496 
3,891 

9,493,620 



2,631.669 
193.469 

3,902.301 
8.400 
111,590 
205.987 
102.254 
123.125 

2.673.948 



Barrels. 

46,649 

802,267 

227,239 

631,163 

10,908 

123,378 

3,601,163 

752,441 

175,894 

7,189 

436,747 

247.617 

981,978 

1.8115.508 

792,647 

658.672 

2,435,700 

159,295 

213,152 

313.939 

2,110,310 

4.218 

10,093.450 



289,361 

4,245,972 

7,190 

130,226 

322,761 

138,144 

142.222 

2,880.502 



33.362.373 



33.589.784 



35.859.250 



37.529.339 



RELIGIOUS. 155 


i&eltgtous. 

STATISTICS OF THE CHURCHES. 
[From the New York Independent.] 
Wherever practicable, official year books have been relied upon. Where they are lacking, 
the best possible estimates by authorities in the different denominations have been given. In 
some cases even those have failed through unwillingness to gather statistics, as with the Ply- 
mouth Brethren, or through lack of organization. In some cases the figures of the census of 
18!H) are continued. As the Roman Catholic church includes children, a deduction is made, the 
result being approximate rather than absolute. 
Some of the losses are more apparent than real, being due to the substitution of official 
figures for estimates in the tables of last year. 
MINISTERS, CHURCHES AND COMMUNICANTS IN 1897 AND 1898 IN UNITED STATES- 


DENOMINATIONS. 


MINISTERS. 


CHURCHES. 


COMMUNICANTS. 


1897. 


1898. 


1897. 


1898. 


1897. 


1898. 


ADVENT1STS- 
1. Evangelical , 


84 
912 
282 
19 
60 
94 


34 
912 
364 
19 
60 
94 


30 
610 
1,348 
29 
28 
95 


30 

610 
1,403 
2s 
28 
95 


1,147 
26,500 
47,779 
647 
3,000 
2,872 


1.147 

26,500 
60,288 

3,000 
2,872 


2. Advent Christians 


8. Seventh Day 


4. Church of God 


5. Life and Advent Union 


6. Churches of God in Jesus Christ 


Total Ad ventists 
ARMENIANS 
1. Orthodox 


1,401 

7 


1,483 

5 
10 


2,140 
6 


2,195 
17 


81,945 
835 


84,454 

5,624 
300 


2. Evangelical 


Total Armenians 


7 

| 14, 700 

12,672 
14 
123 
1,379 
120 
650 
19 
25 
80 
2,130 
300 


15 

17,165 
10,190 
14 
130 
1,350 
120 
650 
91 
25 
80 
2,130 
300 


6 

26,250 

14,471 
18 
109 
1,624 
167 
680 
24 
204 
152 
3,630 
473 


21 

28,935 
14,462 
18 
111 
1,671 
167 
675 
91 
204 
162 
3,530 
473 


335 

2,125,000 
1,728,334 
937 
9,205 
91.911 
12,000 
28.000 
1,599 
13,209 
8,254 
126,000 
12,851 


5,924 

2,324,170 
1,731.636 
937 
9,154 
91.981 
13,000 
28,000 
6.235 
13,209 
8,254 
12ti.OOO 
12,851 


BAPTISTS 
1. Regular (north) 


2. Repular (south) 


3. Regular (colored) 
4. Six Principle 


5. Seventh Day 


6. Freewill 


7. Original Freewill 


8. General 


9. Separate 


10. United 


11. Baptist Church of Christ 


12. Primitive 


13. Old Two-Seed-in-the-Spirit Predestinarian 
Total Baptists 


32,112 

152 

7 
20 


32,143 

152 
7 
20 


47,602 

78 
8 
25 


50,289 

78 
8 
25 


4,157,300 

4,000 
214 
525 


4,364,427 

4,000 
214 
625 


BRETHREN (RIVER) 
1. Brethren in Christ 


2. Old Order or Yorker 


8. United Zion's Children 


Total River Brethren 
BRETHREN (PLYMOUTH) 
1. Brethren (I.) 


179 


179 


111 

109 

88 
86 
81 


111 

114 

88 
86 
31 


4,739 

2,289 
2,419 
1,235 
718 


4.7S9 

2,350 

2,419 ! 
1,235 
718 


2. Brethren (II.) 






3. Brethren (III.) 






4. Brethren (IV.) 






Total Plymouth Brethren 






314 
14,859 


319 

14,675 


6,661 
8,156,962 


6,722 
8,378,128 


CATHOLICS 


10,840 


11,001 




Polish Branch 


20 
3 
8 


34 
12 
4 


8 
6 
8 


12 
8 
4 


17,000 
425 
1,000 


15,000 
1,050 
1,000 


Old Catholic 


3. Reformed Catholic 


Total Catholics 


10,8', 1 
95 


11,051 
96 


14.880 
10 

47 
63 

1,325 
170 


14,699 
10 
47 
63 

1,424 
174 


8,333,179 
1,491 


8,395,178 
1,491 


CATHOLIC APOSTOLIC.... 


'CHINESK TEMl'LKS 


CHRIST ADELPHIANS 






1,277 

105,500 
16,000 


1,277 

107.868 
16.500 


CHRISTIANS 


1,400 
100 


1,391 
102 


2. Christian Church South 


Total Christians 


1,500 

10 

3,500 

183 
460 


1,493 
20 
10 
10,000 
183 
460 


1,495 
13 
13 
343 
294 
680 
12 


1,598 
40 
13 
415 
294 
680 
12 


121,500 
6.000 
754 
40,000 
18.214 
38,000 
384 


124.308 
14,000 
754 
70.000 
18.214 
38,0110 
384 


CHRISTIAN CATHOLIC (Dowie) . , 


CHRISTIAN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION.. 
CHRISTIAN SCIENTISTS 
CHRISTIAN UNION 


CHURCH OF GOD (Winebrennerian) 


CHURCH TRIUMPH ANT (Schweinfurth).... 



156 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


STATISTICS OF CHURCHES.-CONTINUED. 


DENOMINATIONS. 


MINISTERS. 


CHURCHES. 


COMMUNICANTS. 


1897. 


1898. 


1897. 


1898. 


1897. 


1898. 


CHURCH OF THE NEW JERUSALEM 
COMMUNISTIC SOC1ETIES- 


139 


117 


. 150 

15 

7. 

1 
1 

5 


100 

16 
7 
1 
1 
1 
5 


7,674 

1,650 
1,600 
250 
200 
25 
205 


6,702 

1,650 
1,600 
250 
200 
25 
205 


























6. Church Triumphant (Koreshan Ecclesia). 










30 
5,546 
10,029 

775 
100 
145 
6 


31 
5,K14 
10,088 

850 
100 
100 
6 


3,930 
616.195 
1,051,079 

85,000 
4.000 
12,000 
194 


3.930 
625.864 
1,085,615 

90,000 
4,000 
15.000 
194 


CONGREGATION ALISTS 


5,405 

5,780 

2,315 
150 
250 
5 


5.475 
5,922 

2,405 
150 
231 
5 


DISCIPLES OF CHRIST 


DUNKARPS 






4! Seventh-Day Baptists (German) 




2.T20 

4,658 

87 


2,791 

4,754 
103 


1,026 

6.093 
93 


1,116 

6,295 
104 


101,194 

658,640 
8.863 


109,194 

679,fi04 
9,743 


EPISCOPALIANS- 


2. Reformed Episcopal 




4,745 

996 
425 


4,857 

1,053 
426 


6,186 

1,614 
605 


6,399 

1,787 
684 


607,503 

94,742 

57,028 


639,347 

116.714 
59.190 


EVANGELICAL BODIES 


2. United Evangelical Church 




1,421 

1,298 
115 
38 
11 


1,479 

1,272 
115 
38 
11 


2,219 

830 
201 
53 
9 


2,471 

830 
201 
63 
9 


151,770 

90,921 
21,992 
4,329 
232 


175,904 

92.073 
21.992 
4,329 
232 


FRIENDS- 


2 Friends (Hlcksite) 


8 Friends (Wilburite) 


4! Friends (Primitive) 




1,462 
4 

45 

878 

3 
13 


1,436 
4 
45 
872 

4 
39 


1,093 
4 
55 

1,130 

3 
12 


1,093 
4 
55 
1,130 

3 

29 


117,474 
310 

36,500 
194.618 

200 
13.504 


118.626 
340 
36.500 
199,234 

5.030 
43.000 


FRIENDS OF THE TEMPLE 


GERMAN EVANGELICAL, PROTESTANT. . 
GERMAN EVANGELICAL SYNOD 


GREEK CHURCH- 


2. Russian Orthodox 




16 
301 

600 
2,000 


43 
301 

1,700 
2,200 


15 

670 

600 
600 


32 
670 

796 
610 


13,704 
143,000 

259,000 
38,370 


480,030 
1.200,000 

300,000 
40,639 


JEWS 


LATTER-DAY SAINTS- 
1 Church of Jesus Christ Latter-Day Saints. 
2 Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter-Day Saints 


Total Latter-Day Saints 


2,600 

1,185 
204 
1,128 
2,222 

359 
434 
25 
91 
7 
10 
392 
215 
83 
42 
7 
22 
9 
50 
7 
70 
63 


3,900 

1,196 
207 
1.214 
1.879 

358 
449 
26 
89 


1,200 

1,505 
425 
1,840 
3,225 

1,026 
590 
40 
215 
50 
18 
593 
651 
128 
40 
24 
27 
11 
60 
9 
140 
121 


1,306 

1,496 
427 
2,056 
2,451 

1.059 
608 
39 
217 

."ii 

794 
676 
88 
66 
25 
51 
44 
60 


297,370 

190,594 
40,690 
323,054 
520,095 

125.110 
85,273 
4.400 
16,158 
2,100 
1.319 
67,807 
64.164 
13.843 
5,900 
3.009 
5.100 
4,700 
5,500 
650 
7,000 
21,000 


840,039 

190.839 
38.642 
347.2ti8 
519,524 

123,575 
86,097 
4,300 
17,483 

"T.289 
71.074 
65900 
7,860 
1.000 
3.000 i 
6.118 1 
6.000 
5,5UOl 


LUTHERANS- 
GENERAL BODIES. 








INDEPENDENT SYNODS. 


6 Joint Synod of Ohio 


7* Buffalo i 








11 
417 
251 
65 
47 

45 
11 
50 




















20 Danish United 


77 
83 


145 

200 


7,983 
25.000 


Independent congregations 


Total Lutherans 
Waldenstromians 


6,625 
140 


6,482 
140 


10,738 
150 


10,513 
150 


1,507,466 
20.000 


1.526,552 
20,000 



RELIGIOUS. 157 


STATISTICS OF CHURCHES. CONTINUED. 


DENOMINATIONS. 


MINISTERS. 


CHURCHES. 


COMMUNICANTS. 


1897. 


1898. 


1897. 


1898. 


1897. 


1898. 


MENNON1TES- 
1. Mennonite 


375 
1 

241 

7i 

101 
18 

41 
2( 
80 


ss: 

24( 

4J 
104 
18 
17 
41 
20 
45 


281 

Hi 

2j 

& 
50 
18 
15 
16 
11 
57 


280 
6 
118 

2i 

ft 

50 
18 
15 
Ib 
11 
82 


21,OOC 
352 
12.151 
2,438 
209 
1,656 
8 773 


21,600 
352 
12,751 
2,438 
209 
1,655 
9,173 
471 
610 
2,950 
1.156 
2.953 


2. Bruederhoef 


3. Aniish 


4. Old Aniish 


5. Apostolic 


6. Reformed 


7. General Conference 


8. Church of God in Christ 


471 


9. Old (Wisler) 


610 
2,951 

Km 

2,779 


10. Bundes Conference 


11. Defenseless 


12. Brethren in Christ 


Total Mennonites 


1,021 

16,411 
(53 
4,825 
80 
,641 
1,600 
(5(iO 
5,9% 
2 

M 

30 
1,687 
77 
938 

87 


1,001 

16,693 
63 

5 ' 7 i 
2,786 
1,588 
600 
5.901 
21( 

2C 
30 
2,187 
180 
1,025 
8 
87 


631 

25,25'. 
61 
4,950 
70 
1,663 
2,314 
565 
13.800 
275 
5 
35 
32 
1,100 
90 
708 
15 
13 


65b 

25,371 
61 
5,851 
70 
1.749 
2,263 
470 
13,995 
24C 



32 
1,300 
90 
1,220 

li 


54,544 

2,689.419 
2,675 
630,550 
7,000 
503.075 
182,260 
18,600 
1,482,605 
13,000 
315 
1,200 
2,34* 
161,958 
5,527 
28.135 
2,569 
4,600 


66,318 

2,705,601 
2,675 
750.354 
7,000 
519,681 
18U,9t>4 
16,500 
1,453,345 
12.500 
319 
1,200 
2,346 
199,206 
6,100 
28,134 
2.569 
4,600 


METHODISTS- 
1. Methodist Episcopal 


2. Onion American Methodist Episcopal 
3. African Methodist Episcopal 


4. African Union Methodist Episcopal 




6. Methodist Protestant 


7. Wesley an Methodist 


8. Methodist Episcopal, South 


9 Congregational Methodist 




11. New Congregational Methodist 




13. Colored Methodist Episcopal . .. 


14. Primitive Methodist 


15. Free Methodist . 


1(5. Independent Methodist 


17. Evangelist Missionary 


Total Methodists 


35,232 
120 

6,769 
1,571 
400 
105 
826 

1,393 
12 
96 

115 

35 
1 

1 


37,188 
125 

7,062 
1,599 
359 
106 
873 

1,448 
12 
95 

116 

41 
1 

1 


50,948 
112 

7,317 
2,915 
2*0 
185 

888 

2,816 
130 
116 

48 
4 

1 


52,779 
120 

7.369 
3,021 
224 
185 
899 

2,873 
31 
125 

109 

50 
4 

1 


5,735,898 
14,220 

939.299 
175.642 
13,250 
12,000 
110,933 

211,694 
1,053 
10,824 

9,830 

5,000 
37 

600 


5,898,094 
14,553 

954,942 

180,635 
35,000 
12,000 
114,287 

217,075 
1.053 
10,868 

9,634 

6,288 
87 

582 


MORAVIANS 


PRESBYTERIANS 
1. Presbyterian in the United States of 






4. Welsh Calvinistic 


6. United Presbyterian 


6. Presbyterian in the United States (south- 


7. Associate Church of North America 
8. Associate Reformed Synod of the South. 
9. Reformed Presbyterian in the United 
States (Synod) 


10. Reformed Presbyterian in North Amer- 


11. Reformed Presbyterian (Covenanted).... 
12. Reformed Presbyterian in the United 
States and Canada .' 


Total Presbyterians 


11,324 

634 
1,039 
81 


11.703 

633 
1,029 
91 


14,701 

610 
1,653 
123 


14,891 

683 
1,660 
138 


1,490,162 

105.689 
2*4,612 
16,740 


1,542,401 

110,713 

242,299 
17,265 


REFORMED 


2 Reformed in United States 


3. Christian Reformed 


Total Reformed 


1,754 
2,444 
3 
17 


1,753 
2,653 
3 
17 


2,386 
716 
4 
20 
4 
334 
122 

4,172 
855 


2,481 
740 

20 
5 
334 
122 

3,206 
1,150 


357,221 
40,000 
30(5 
913 
1,064 
45,030 
3,000 

235,117 
45,000 


370,277 
40,000 
306 
913 
1,300 
45,030 
3,000 

242,602 

43,338 


SALVATION ARMY .. 


SOHWKNKFELD1ANS 


SOCIAL BRETHREN . 


SOCIETY FOH ETHICAL CULTURE 


SPIRITUALISTS 






THEOSOPHICAL SOCIETY 






UNITED BRETHREN 
1. United Brethren in Christ 


1,724 
700 


1,724 
700 


2. United Brethren (Old Constitution) 


Total United Brethren 


2,424 
535 
773 
650 
54 


2,424 
551 

758 
590 
54 


5,027 
455 
849 
200 
156 


4,356 
454 

7sr 

205 
156 


280,117 
70,000 
51.025 
7,000 
14,126 


285,940 
75,000 
48,856 
2,000 
14,126 


UNITARIANS 


UN1VKRSALISTS...-. 


VOLUNTEERS 


INDEPENDENT CONGREGATIONS 


Grand total 


188.955 


149.868 


181,189 


189,488 


25.708,430 


27.714.523 



158 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH OF THE UNITED STATES. 

Apostolic Delegate Most Rev. Mgr. Martlnelli, Washington, D. C. 

Cardinal James .Gibbons, Baltimore, Md. 

ARCHBISHOPS. 
Archdioceses. Names. 

St. Louis, Mo John Joseph Kain. 

Cincinnati, O William H. Elder. 

Chicago, 111 Patrick A. Feehan. 



^invs*$tvj, in. .L tiLi ii_ii A, r ct. nan. 

Boston, Mass John Joseph Williams. 

Philadelphia, Pa Patrick John Ryan. 

Portland, Ore Alex. Christe. 

New York, N. Y M. A. Corrigan. 



Dioceses. Names 

Mobile, Ala Edward P. Allen. 

Springfield, Mass T. D. Beaven. 

Savannah, Ga Thomas A. Becker. 

Lincol n, Neb Thomas Bonacum . 

Manchester, N. H D. M. Bradley. 

Boston, Mass John Brady. 

Helena, Mont John B . Brondel. 

St. Joseph, Mo M. F. Burke. 

Albany, N. Y T. A. M. Burke. 

Nashville, Tenn T. 8. Byrne. 

Indianapolis. Ind F. 8. Chatard. 

Davenport, Iowa Henry Cosgrove. 

Winona, Minn Jos. B. Cutter 

Concordia, Kas J. F. Cunningham. 

Baltimore. Md A. A. Curtis. 

Wheeling. W. Va P. J. Donahue. 

Dallas, Tex E. J. Dunne. 

Natchitoches. La Anthony Durier. 

Marquette, Mich E. Frederick. 

New York, N. Y J. M. Farley. 

Kansas City, Kas L. M. Fink. 

Little Rock, Ark E. Fitzgerald. 

Erie, Pa J. E. Fitzmaurice. 

Detroit, Mich J. S. Foley. 

San Antonio, Tex J. A. Forest. 

Ogdensburg. N. Y Henry Gabriels. 

Galveston, Tex N. A. Gallagher. 

Kansas City, Mo J. J. Glennon. 

Boise City. Idaho A. J. Glorieux. 

Sacramento, Cal Thos. Grace. 

Belmont, N. C Leo Haid. 

Providence, R. I M. J. Harkins. 

Portland-Me J. A. Healy. 

Wichita, Kas John J. Hennessy. 

Natchez, Miss Thomas Heslin. 

Ashley Pa M. J. Hoban. 

Kansas City, Mo John J. Hogan. 

Cleveland, O I. F. Horstmann. 

Belleville, 111 John Janssen. 

Cheyenne, Wyo T. M. Lenihan. 



Archdioceses. Names. 

New Orleans, La P. L. Chape lie. 

San Francisco, Cal Patrick W. Riordan. 

St. Paul, Minn John Ireland. 



Milwaukee, Wis Frederick X. Katzer. 

Santa Fe, N. M P. Bourgade. 

Dubuque, Iowa John Hennessy. 



BISHOPS. 

Dioceses. Names. 

Syracuse, N. Y P. A. Ludden. 

Louisville, Ky W. G. McCloskey. 

Brooklyn, N. Y C. E. McDonnell. 

Trenton, N. J J. A. McFaul. 

Chicago, 111 8. J. McGavick. 

Duluth. Minn James McGolrick. 

Rochester, N. Y B. J. McQuaid. 

Covington, Ky P.C.Maes. 

Denver. Col N. C. Matz. 

Guthrie. Oklahoma T..T. Meerschaert. 

Green Bay, Wis 8. G. Messmer. 

Burlington, Vt J. 8. Michaud. 

Wilmington, Del John J. Monaghan. 

St. Augustine, Fla John Moore. 

Los Angeles, Cal George Montgomery. 

Erie, Pa Tobias Mullen. 

Charleston, 8. C H. P. Northrop. 

Vancouver, Wash Edward O'Dea. 

Sioux Falls. 8. D Thos. O'Gorman. 

Scranton, Pa W.O'Hara. 

Pittsburg. Pa R. Phelan. 

Philadelphia. Pa E. F. Prendergast. 

Buffalo, N. Y J. E. Quiglev. 

Fort Wayne, Inrt J. Rademaeher. 

Grand Rapids, Mich...H. J. Richter. 

New Orleans, La G. A. Rouxel. 

Alton, III. James Ryan. 

Salt Lake City, Utah..L. Scanlan. 

Omaha, Neb R. Scanneil. 

La Crosse, Wis J. Schwebach. 

Harrisourg, Pa J. W. Shanahan. 

Fargo, N. D John Shanley. 

Peoria, 111 J. L. Spalding. 

Hartford, Conn M. Tierney. 

St. Cloud. Minn James Trobec. 

Richmond, Va A. Van de Vyver. 

Laredo, Tex P. Verdaguer. 

Columbus, O Vacant. 

South Orange, N. J....W. M. Wigger. 



PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL CHURCH. 



Dioceses. Bishops. Residence. 

Alabama. . . .R. H. Wilmer Mobile. 

H. M.Jackson, co- 
adjutor Euf aula. 

Ari. & N. M..J. M. Kendrick Santa Fe. 

Arkansas.. . .Wm. M. Brown Little Rock. 

Boise James B. Funsten. .Boise City. 

California. . . W. F. Nichols San Francisco 

Sncram'to.Wm. H. Moreland.. Sacramento. 
Los Ang's. J. H. Johnson Los Angeles. 

Colorado J. F. Spalding. Denver. 

Connecticut.Channcey B. Brews- 

ter New Haven. 

Delaware.. . .L. Coleman Wilmington. 

Florida- 
Northern.. E. G. Weed Jacksonville. 

Southern . . W. C. Gray Orlando. 

Georgia C. K. Nelson Atlanta. 

Illinois- 
Chicago... .W. E. McLaren Chicago. 

Spr'gaeld. .G. F. Seymour Springfield. 

C. R. Hale, coadju- 
tor Cairo. 

Quincy . . . .Alex. Burgess Peoria. 

Indiana 

Southern. .Joseph M. Francis.-Indianapolis. 
Northern. .John H. White Michig'n City. 

Iowa T. N. Morrison Davenport. 



Dioceses. Bishops. Residence. 

Kansas F. R. Millspaugh....Topeka. 

Kentucky ...T. U. Dudley Louisville. 

Lexington. L. W. Burton Lexington. 

Louisiana ...Da vis Sessums New Orleans. 

Maine Vacant 

Maryland . . . W. Paret Baltimore. 

Easton W. F. Adams Easton. 

Wash'ton..H. Y. Satterlee Washington. 

Mass W. Lawrence Boston. 

Michigan- 
Eastern . . .T. F. Davies Detroit. 

Western.. .G. DeN. Gillespie. .Grand Rapids 
Marquette.G. M. Williams Marquette. 

Minnesota... H. B. Whipple Faribault. 

M. N. Gilbert, co- 
adjutor St. Paul. 

Duluth J. D. Morrison Duluth. 

Mississippi. .H. M. Thompson. . .Jackson. 

Missouri D. S. Tuttle St. Louis. 

W.Missouri. E. R. Atwill Kansas City. 

Montana ... .L. R. Brewer Helena. 

Nebraska... .G. Worthington Omaha. 

A. L. Williams, co- 
adjutor Omaha. 

Laramie. ..A. N. Graves Kearney. 

N. Hump ...W. W. Niles Concord. 



RELIGIOUS. 



159 



PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL CHURCH. -CONTINUED. 



Dioceses. Bishops. Residence. 

New Jersey. J. Scarborough Trenton. 

Newark.... T. A. Starkey Newark. 

New York. . .H. C. Potter New York city 

Central F. D. Huntington.. Syracuse. 

Albany.... W. C. Doane Albany. 

Long Id. . .A. N. Littlejohn. . . . Brooklyn. 

Western.. .W. D. Walker Buffalo. 

N. Carolina.. J. B. Cheshire Raleigh. 

E.CarolinaA. A. Watson Wilmington. 

Asheville..Julius M. Homer. . . Asheville. 
N. Dakota.. .Samuel C. Edsall. ..Fargo. 

Ohio- 
Ohio W. A. Leonard Cleveland. 

Southern. .T. A. Jaggar Cambridge. 

B. Vincent, coadj.. Cincinnati. 

Oklahoma- 
Indian T. .F. K. Brooke GuthrJe. 

Oregon B. W. Morris Portland. 

Penn O. W. Whltaker . . . . Philadelphia. 

Pittsburg. . C. W hitehead Pittsburg. 

Central. . . .E. Talbot S. Bethlehem. 

Rhode Isl'd.T.M. Clark, presid- 
ing bishop Providence. 

Wm. N. Me Vickar, co- 
adjutor Providence. 

S. Carolina. .Ellison Capers Columbia. 

S. Dakota... W.H Hare Sioux Falls. 

Tennessee . .T. F. Gailor Memphis. 



Dioceses. Bishops. Residence. 

Texas G. H. Kinsolving. . .Austin. 

Western.. .J. S. Johnson San Antonio. 

Dallas A. C. Garrett Dallas. 

Salt Lake ... A. Leonard Salt Lake City 

Vermont Arthur C. A. Hall. .Burlington. 

Virginia F. McN. Whittle. . . .Richmond. 

R. A. Gibson, coad- 
jutor. Richmond. 

Southern.. A.M.Randolph Norfolk. 

W. Virginia. G. W. Peterkin Parkersburg. 

W. L. Gravatt, co- 
adjutor Charlestown. 

Wisconsin 

Milw'kee.. Isaac L. Nicholson. Milwaukee. 

F. du Lac. Charles C. Graf ton. Fond du Lac. 
Washington 

Olympia.. . W. M. Barker. 

Spokane. ..L. H. Wells. 

Africa S. D. Ferguson Cape Palmas. 

China- 
Shanghai. .F. R. Graves Shanghai. 

Japan John McKim Tokyo. 

Kyoto Sidney C.Partridge.Kyoto. 

Brazil Lucien L. Kinsolo- 

Ing Rio Grande. 

Haiti J. T. H. Holly P't-au-Prince- 

Honolulu . .A. Willis Honolulu. 



METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH. 



Bishops. Residence. 

Thomas Bowman.. St. Louis, Mo. 

Randolph S. Foster Roxbury, Mass. 

Stephen M. Merrill Chicago, 111. 

Edward G. Andrews New York, N. Y. 

Henry W. Warren Univ'ty Park, Col. 

Cyrus D. Foss Hhiladelphia, Pa. 

John F. Hurst Washington, D. C. 

William X. Ninde Detroit. Mich. 

John M. Walden Cincinnati. O. 

Missionary Bishops William Taylor, Vlvi, Congo, Africa. 
James M. Thoburn, Calcutta. India. 



Bislwps. Residence. 

Willard F. Mallalieu Buffalo, N. T. 

Charles H. Fowler Minneapolis, Minn. 

John H. Vincent Topeka. Kas. 

James W. Fitzgerald New Orleans, La. 

Isaac W. Joyce Chattanooga.Tenn. 

John P. Newman Omaha, Neb. 

Daniel A. Goodsell San Francisco. Cal. 

Charles C. McCabe Fort Worth, Tex. 

Earl Cranston Portland, Ore. 



METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH, SOUTH. 



Bishops. Residence. 

JohnC. Keener New Orleans, La. 

Alpheus W. Wilson Baltimore. Md. 

J.C. Granbery Ashland, Va. 

R. K. Hargrove W.Nashville, Tenn. 

W.W.Duncan Spartanburg, S. C. 

E. R. Hendrir Kansas City, Mo. 



Bishops. Residence. 

C. B. Galloway Jackson, Miss. 

J.S. Key Sherman, Tex. 

O. P. Fitzgerald Nashville. Tenn. 

H. C. Morrison Louisville, Ky. 

W. A. Chandler Atlanta, Ga. 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH. 



A. B. C. F. M. 

President S. B. Capen. 

Treasurer Frank H. Wiggin. 

Secretaries Rev. Judson Smith, D. D., Rev. 
Charles H. Daniels, D. D., Rev. James L. 
Barton, D. D. 

Editorial Secretary Rev. E. E. Strong, D. D. 

District Secretaries Rev. C. C. Creegan, D. D., 
121 Bible House, N. Y. City; Rev. A. N. Hitch- 
cock. Ph. D., IdSLaSalle street. Chicago, 111.; 
Rev. Walter Frear, San Francisco. Cal. 

Headquarters Congregational House, Boston. 

AMERICAN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION. 

President F. A. Noble. D. D.. Chicago, 111. 

Treasurer H. W. Hubbard. 

Secretaries-Rev. A. F. Beard. D. D., Rev. F. P. 

Woodbury. D. D., Rev. J. C. Ryder, D. D., Rev. 

M. E. Strieby, D. D. 
Headquarters 4th avenue and 22d street, 

N. Y. city. 

SUNDAY SCHOOL AND PUB. SOCIETY. 

Presiderct-Willard S. Scott, D. D., Worcester, 

Mass. 

Secretary George M. Boynton. D. D. 
Treasurer E. Lawrence Barnard. 



Field Secretary W. A. Duncan, Ph. D. 
District Secretary Rev. W. F. McMlllen, room 

1003 Association building, 153 LaSalle street, 

Chicago. 
Manager Western Agency E. Herrick Brown, 

175 Wabash avenue, Chicago. 
Headquarters Congregational House, Boston. 

HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

President-Gen. O. O. Howard, Burlington, Vt. 
Treasurer William B. Rowland. 
Secretaries Joseph B. Clark, D. D., Washington 

Choate, D. D. 
Secretary Woman's Department Mrs. Harriet 

8. Caswell. 

Editor Home Missionary, etc. A. H. Clapp, D.D. 
Headquarters 4th avenue and 22d street, 

N. Y. city. 

CHURCH BUILDING SOCIETY. 
President Dr. Lucien C. Warner, N. Y. city. 
Secretary Rev. L. H. Cobb. D. D., N. Y. city. 
Field Secretaries-Rev. C. H. Taintor, Chicago; 

Rev. George A. Hood, Boston; Rev. H. H. 

Wikoff, Berkeley, Cal. 
Headquarters 4th avenue and 22d street, 

N. Y. city. 



160 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOE 1900. 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH. CONTINUED. 



EDUCATION SOCIETY. 

President W. H.Wilcox, D. D., Maiden, Mass. 
Secretary Charles O. Day, D. D. 
Treasurer-S. F. Wilkins. 
Headquarters Congregational House, Boston. 

MINISTERIAL BELIEF. 

Chairman. Rev. H. A. Stimson, D. D..N.Y. city. 



Secretary W. H. Whittlesey, D. D., New Haven, 

Conn. 
Treasurer Rev. S. B. Forbes, 200 Wethersfleld 

avenue, Hartford, Conn. 
Headquarters 135 Wall street, Hartford, Conn. 

NATIONAL TKIENNIAL COUNCIL. 

Rev. Henry A. Hazen, D. D., Auburnrtale, 
Mass., Statistical Secretary and Editor of 
"Congregational Year-Book." 



BAPTIST DENOMINATION. 



Missionary Union Hon. Robert O. Fuller, 

president, Boston, Mass. 
Publication Society S. A. Crozer, president, 



Upland, Pa. 



Home Mission Society Stephen H. Greene, 
president, Boston. Mass. 

Historical Society Lemuel Moss, B. D., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 



Education Society A.. H. Strong, D. D., president, Rochester, N. Y. 
SOUTHERN BAPTIST CONVENTION. 



Hon. W. J. Northen, president, Atlanta, Ga. 

Foreign Mission Board Prof. C. H. Winston, 
president, Richmond, Va.; R. J. Wlllingham, 
corresponding secretary, Richmond, Va. 



SundaySchool Board E. E. Folk, pres., Nash 
ville.Tenn.; J.M.Frost, sec., Nashville,Tenn. 

Home Mission Board Rev. Henry McDonald, 
president, Atlanta, Ga ; I. T. Tichenor, D. D.. 
corresponding secretary, Atlanta, Ga. 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 



Stated Clerk and Treasurer Rev. William H. 
Roberts, D. D., 1319 Walnut street, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

Permanent Clerk Vacant. 
TRUSTEES. 

President George Junkin, Esq. 

Treasurer Frank K. Hippie, 1340 Chestnut 
street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Recording Secretary Jacob Wilson. 

Office 1319 Walnut street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS SUSTENTATION. 

Secretary Rev. Charles L. Thompson, D. D. 
Treasurer Henry C. Olin. - 
Superintendent of Schools Rev. G. F. McAfee. 
Office Presbyterian House, 15(5 6th avenue. 
"New York city. 

BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

Secretary Emeritus Rev. John C. Lowrie, D. D. 
Corresponding Secretaries Rev. Frank F. El- 

linwood, D. D.; Rev. A. W. Halsey, D. D.; 

Mr. Robert E. Speer and Rev. Arthur J. 

Brown, D. D. 

Treasurer Charles W. Hand. 
Field Secretary Rev. Thomas Marshall, D. D., 

48 McCormick block, Chicago, 111. 
Office Presbyterian House, 156 5th avenue, 

New York city. 

BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

Corresponding Secretary Rev. Edward B. 

Hodge, D. D. 

Treasurer Jacob Wilson. 
Office 1319 Walnut street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

BOARD OF PUBLICATION AND SABBATH 
SCHOOL WORK. 

Secretary Rev. Elijah R. Craven, D. D. 
Superintendent of Sabbath School and Mission- 
ary Work Rev. James A. Worden, D. D. 
Editorial Superintendent Rev.J.R.MillerJXD. 
Business Superintendent John H. Scribner. 
Manufacturer Henry F. Sheetz. 
Treasurer Rev. C. T. McMnllin. 
Office 1319 Walnut street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

BOARD OF CHURCH ERECTION. 

Corresponding Secretary Rev. Erskine N. 

White, D. D. 

Treasurer Adam Campbell. 
Office Presbyterian House, 150 5th avenue, 

New York city. 

BOARD OF MINISTERIAL RELIEF. 
Corresponding Secretary Rev.B.L.Agnew.D.D. 



Recording Secretary and Treasurer Rev. Wil- 
liam W. Heberton. 

Office Publication House, 1319 Walnut street. 
Thlladelphia, Pa. 

BOARD OF FREEDMEN'. 

Corresponding Secretary Rev. Edward 

Cowan, D. D. 
Recording Secretary Rev.Samuel J.Flsher.D.D. 
Treasure? -Rev. John J. Beacom, D. D. 
Office 516 Market street, Pittsburg, Pa. 

BOARD OF AID FOR COLLEGES AND 
ACADEMIES. 

Corresponding Secretary Rev. Edward C. Ray, 

Office Room 30 Montauk block, 115 Monroe 
street, Chicago, 111. 

COMMITTEE ON SYSTEMATIC BENEFICENCE 

C/iairman-Rev. W. H. Hubbard, D. D., Au- 
burn, N. Y. 

Secretary Kiliaen Van Rensselaer, 56 Wall 
street, New York city. 

COMMITTEE ON TEMPERANCE. 

Chairman Rev. John J. Beacom, D. D., 516 
Market street, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Corresponding Secretary Rev. John F. Hill, 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

Recording Secretary George Irwln, P. O. box 
14, Allegheny, Pa. 

Treasurer Rev. James Allison, D. D., Pitts- 
burg. Pa. 

PRESBYTERIAN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

President Rev. W. C. Cattell, D. D., LL. D. 
Wbrarian Rev. W. L. Ledwlth, D. D.. 1531 

Tioga street, Philadelphia. 
Corresponding Secretary Rev. Samuel T. 

Lowrie, D. D., 1827 Pine street, Philadelphia. 
Recording Secretary Rev. James Price, 107 

East Leblgh avenue, Philadelphia. 
Treasurer Deb. K. Ludwig, Ph. D.,3739 Walnut 

street, Philadelphia. 

TREASURERS OF SYNODICAL HOME MISSIONS 
AND SUSTENTATION. 

New Jersey W. M. Lanning, Trenton, N. J. 
ffew York A. P. Stevens, National Savings 

Bank Building, Albany, N. Y. 
Pennsylvania Frank K. Hippie, 1340 Chestnut 

street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Maryland D. C. Ammidon, 31 South Frederick 

street, Baltimore, Md. 



THE NATIONAL GOVERNMENT. 



161 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 

President, William McKinley (O.) $50,000 

Sec. to the President, John Addison Porter 

(Conn.) 5,000 

Vice-President 8,000 

U.S.&ist.Marshal, A. A. Wilson (D.C.)... 6,000 

DEPARTMENT OF STATE. 

Secretary, John Hay (D.C.) 8,000 

Asst. Sec., David J. Hill (N.Y.) 4,500 

Second Asst. Sec., Alvey A. Adee (D. C.).. 4,000 
Third Asst. Sec., Thos. w. Cridler (W. Va.) 4,000 

Solicitor, Wm. L. Penfleld (Ind.) 3,500 

Chief Clerk, Wm. H. Michael (Neb.) 2,500 

Chief of Diplomatic Bureau, Sydney Smith 

(D.C.) 2,100 

Chief Consular Bureau, Robert 8. Chil- 

ton, Jr. (D. C.) 2,100 

Chief of Bureau of Indexes and Archives, 

Pendleton King (N. C.) 2,100 

Chief of Bureau of Accounts, Frank A. 

Branagan (O.) 2,100 

Chief of Bureau of foreign Commerce, 

Frederic Emory (Md.) 2,100 

Chief of Bureau of Molls and Library, A. 

H. Allen (N. C.) 2,100 

Chief of Bureau of Appointments, Robert 

Brent Mosher(Ky.) 2,100 

Translator, Henry L.Thomas (N. Y.) 2,100 

Private Sec. to Sec. of State, E. J. Bab- 
cock (N. Y.) 2,400 

[Bureau of Accounts now has charge of 
passports.] 

TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 

Secretary, Lyman J. Gage (111.) 8,000 

Priv. Sec.,M.E.Alles(0.) 2,400 

.Asst. Sec., Frank A. Vanderlip (111.) 4,500 

.Asst. Sec., Horace A. Taylor (Wis.) 4,500 

Asst. Sec., O. L. Spaulding (Mich.) 4,500 

Chief Clerk, Theo. F. Swayze (N. J.) 3,000 

Chief of Appt. Div.. Chas. Lyman (Conn.). 2,750 
Chief of Warrants Div., W. F.Maclennan. 8,500 
Chief Pub. Moneys Div., Eugene B.Daskam 2,500 
Chief of Cus. Div., Andrew Johnson 

(W. Va.) 2,750 

Acting Chief of Rev., Marine Div., Charles 

F.Shoemaker (N.Y.) 2,500 

Chief of Stationery, Printing and Blanks 

Div., Geo. Simmons (D. C.) 2,500 

C hiefof Loans and Currency Div. , Andrew 

T.Huntlngton (Mass.) 2.500 

Chief of Misc. Div., Lewis Jordan (Ind.).. . 2,500 
Government Actuary, Jos. S. McCoy (N.J.) 1,800 

Supervising Architect's Office. 

Supervising Architect, Jas. K. Taylor (Pa.) 4,500 

Bureau of Engraving and Printing. 

Director, C. Johnson (Ky.) 4,500 

Asst. Director, Thomas J. Sullivan (D. C.). 2,250 
Supt. Engraving Div., John R. Hill (N.Y.) 3,600 

Office Steamboat Inspector. 

Supervising Inspector, James A. Dumont.. 3,500 

Bureau of Statistics. 

Chief, Oscar P. Austin (D.C.) 3,000 

Life-Saving Service. 

Gen'ISupt., S. I. Kimball (Me.) 4,000 

Asst., Horace L. Piper (Me.) 2.500 

Comptrollers. 
First Comptroller, Robt. J. Tracewell (Ind.) 5,000 

Asst.. Leander P. Mitchell (Ind.) 5.000 

Chief CUrk, C. M. Force (Ky.) 2,750 

Chief Law Clerk, J. D. Terrell (Mich.) 2,750 

Register of the Treasury. 

Register, Judson W. Lyons (Ga.) 4.000 

Asst., Nolen L. Chew (Ind.) 2.250 



Cfje National (Sotaermtunt. 

[Corrected to Nov. 15, 1899.] 



Auditors. 
Auditor for the Treasury Dept., William E. 

Andrews (Neb.) $3,600 

Deputy, Edward McKetterick (Iowa) 2,250 

Auditor forthe War Dept., F. H.Morris(O.) 3,600 

Deputy, D. A. Grosvenor (Md.) 2,250 

Auditor for the Interior Dept., William 

Youngblood(Ala.) 3,600 

Deputy, R. 8. Person (S. D.) 2,250 

Auditor for the Navy Dept,, W. W. Brown 

(Pa.) 3,600 

Deputy, John M. Ewing (Wls.) 2,250 

Auditor for the State and Other Depts.,E. 

G.Timme(Wis.) 8.600 

Deputy, Geo. W. Esterly (Minn.) 2,250 

Auditor for the PostofficeDept., Henry A. 

Castle (Minn.) 7. .....3,600 

Deputi/.A.L.Lawshe(Ind.) 2,250 

Treasurer of the United States. 

Treasurer, Ellis H.Roberts (N.Y.) 6,000 

Asst. Treas., J. F. Meline (D. C.) 3.KOO 

Supt. Nat.BankRed. Div., Thos. E. Rogers 3,500 

Comptroller of the Currency. 

Comptroller, Charles G. Dawes (111.) 5.000 

Deputy, Thomas P. Kane (D. C.) 2,800 

Commissioner of Internal Revenue. 

Commissioner, G. W. Wilson (O.) 6,000 

Deputy, Robt. Williams, Jr. (N. Y.) 3,200 

Director of the Mint. 

Director, Geo.E. Roberts (Iowa) 4,500 

Bureau of Navigation. 
Commissioner, E. F. Chamberlain (N. Y.). 3,600 

United States Coast and Geodetic Survey. 
Superintendent, Henry S. Pritchett (Mo.). 6,000 

Marine Hospital Service. 
Supervising Surg.-Qen., Walter Wyman.. . 4,000 

NAVY DEPARTMENT. 

Secretary, John D. Long (Mass.) 8,000 

Asst. Sec., Charles H. Allen (Mass.) 4,500 

Chief Clerk, Ben] . F. Peters (Pa.) ; 2,500 

Priv. Sec., L. H. Finney, Jr 2,250 

Bureau Yards and Docks. 
Chief, Rear Admiral Mordecai T. Endlcott. 
Civil Engineers, Prof. H. M. Paul.F. T. Cham- 
bers, A. C. Cunningham and 11. H. Rousseau. 

Bureau of Navigation. 

Chief, Rear Admiral A. S. Crownlnshleld. 

Asst. to Bureau, Commander W. 8. Cowles. 

Lieutenant-Commanders, Chas. E. Colahan and 
J. J. Hunker. 

Lieuts., H. H. Ward, W. W. Phelps and Chas. 
Webster. 

Nautical Almanac. 

Superintendent, Prof. S. J. Brown. 

Professor, Prof. H. D. Todd. 

Assistants, E. J.Loomis, C. Keith, W. S. Harsh- 
man. 

Office Naval Intelligence, 

Chief Intelligence Officer. Comdr. R. Clover. 

Lieut.-Comdrs., G. H. Peters and R. T. Mulli- 
gan. 

Lieuts., H. W. Harrison, C. C. Marsh, W. L. 
Howard, 8. E. W. Kittelle. 

Hydrographic Office. / 

Hj/dro0rap7ier,Capt. J. E. Craig. 
Commander, J. D. Adams. 
Lieutenant-Commander, R. G.Davenport. 
Lieut., F. W. Kellogg. 



162 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



Library and Naval War Records. 
Superintendent, Prof. E. K. Rawson. 
.Lieut-Commander, George P. Colvocoresses. 

Naval Observatory. 
Superintendent, Capt. C. H. Davis. 
Assistant, Lieut. B. W. Hodges. 
Astronomical Director, Prof, of Mathematics 

B. J. Brown. 
Professors of Mathematics, A. N. Skinner, F. J. 

J. See and M. Updegraff. 
.Assistant Astronomers, Geo. A. Hill, Theo. I. 

King and F. B. Llttell. 
Professor of Mathematics, H. D. Todd. 
Assistants, E. J. Loomis, W. 8. Harshman and 

H. B. Hedrick. 

Bureau of Ordnance. 
Chief, Bear Admiral Chas. O'Neil. 
Lieutenants, T. C. Fenton, W. McLean, Joseph 

Strauss, L. H. Chandler, F. B. Bassett. 
Professor, P. R. Alger. 

Bureau of Equipment. 
Rear Admiral, R. B. Bradford. 
Lieut-Commanders, S. W. B. Diehl, T. E. D. W. 

Veeder, W. H. Allen. 
Lieutenants, G. W. Denfeld, J. B. Blish, F. L. 

Chapin, H. E. Parmentor. 

Bureau of Construction and Repairs. 
Rear Admiral, Philip Hichborn. 
Naval Constructor, D. W. Taylor. 
Asst. Constructors, L. Spear, F. B. Zahm. 

Office of Judge-Advocate General. 
Judge-Advocate General, Capt. S. C. Lemly. 
Ensign, Geo. Mallison. 
Captain, Wm. C. Dawson, U. S. M. C. 

Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. 
Rear Admiral, W. K. Van Reypen. 
.Asst. to Bureau, Medical Inspector J. C. Boyd. 
Special Duty, P. A. Surgeon F. L. Plead well. 

Bureau of Supplies and Accounts. 
Rear Admiral, Albert S. Kenny. 
.4sst. to C7iie/Poi/ma8ter,Geo.W.Simpson,U.S.N. 
Paymaster, T. H. Hicks, U. S. N. 
P. A. Paymaster, J. J. Cheatham. 
Asst. Paymaster, David M. Addison. 
Naval Examining Board. 
President, Rear Admiral John A. Howell. 
Members, Rear Admiral Benjamin F. Day and 

Capt. F. A. Cook. 

Board of Medical Examiners. 
President, Med. Director J. B. Parker. 
Members, Med. Inspector J. C. Wise and D. N. 

Bertolette. 

Naval Retiring Board. 
President, Rear Admiral B. J. Cromwell. 
Members, Rear Admiral B. F. Day, Capt. F. A. 

Cook, Grove S. Beardsley and W. S. Dixon. 

Bureau of Steam Engineering. 
Rear Admiral, Engineer-in-Chief George W. 

Melville. 

Chief Clerk, Wm. H. H. Smith. 
Commander, H. Webster. 
Lieut. -Conimanders, J. H. Perry. A. B. Willlts, 

F. H. Bailey, W. F. Worthington. 
Lieuts., R. S. Griffin. B. C. Bryan, C. A. E. King, 

W. W. White, C. E. Rommel. 
.4sst. Engineer, John A. Henderson. 
State, War and Navy Department Building. 
Supt., Chief Engineer G. W. Baird. 

Board of Inspection and Survey. 
President, Rear Admiral Frederick Rodgers. 
Members, Capt. Robley D. Evans. Comdrs. W. 

H.vEmory, C. R. Roelker, Lieut.-Comdr. R. 

Henderson, Nav. Constr. W. Capps. 

Naval Dispensary. 
Surgeon, P. M. Rixey. 



Museum of Hygiene. 
Medical Director, Chas. H. White. 
Surgeon, C. G. Herndon and J.D. Gatewood. 

Navy Pay Office . 
Pay Director, Stephen Rand. 
Headquarters of United States Marine Corps. 
Col. Commandant, Charles Hey wood. 



t. Quartermaster, Capt. Chas. L. McCawley. 
Surgeon, E. H. Green. 

Marine Barracks, Washington, D, C. 
Colonel, F. H. Harrington. 
Major, R. Dlckins. 

Capts., C. 8. Radford. L. Kannany, J. S. Bates. 
Surgeon, E. H. Green. 

WAR DEPARTMENT. 

Secretary, Ellhu Root (N. Y.). ... ... .$8,000 

Sec. to Sec. of War, V. L. Mason (D. C.). . . . 2,250 

Confidential Cleric, Fred C. Squires (Mich.) 1.800 

^sst. Sec., Geo. D. Meiklejohn (Neb.) 4,500 

Chief Clerk, John C. Scofleld 2.500 

Headquarters of the Army. 
Major-Gen., Nelson A. Miles. 
Adjt.-Gen., Lt.-Col. J. C. Gilmore. 
Ai&de-Camp, Capt. F. Michler,5th Cav. 
Inspector-Gen., Aid-de-Camp 1st Lieut. H. H. 

Whitney. 
.Asst. -4.djt.-Gen., Capt. J. B. Morton. 

Adjutant-General's Department. 
Adjt.-Gen., Brlg.-Gen. H. C. Corbin. 
Assistants, Col. Thos. Ward, Col. James M. 

Moore, Lieut.-Col. J. C. Gilmore, Lieut.-Col. 

W. H. Carter, Mai. J. A. Johnston, Maj. 

W. A. Simpson. Maj. Charles Bird, Maj. Wm. 

S. Patten, Maj. M. C. Martin. Maj. F. G. 

Hodgson, Maj. F. M. Schreiner, Capt. J. Z. 

Chief Clerk, R. P. Thian $2,000 

Inspector-General's Department. 
Inspector-Gen., Brlg.-Gen. J. C. Breckinridge. 
^Issts., Maj. Tlios. T. Knox, Maj. S. C. Mills. 
Chief Clerk, W. H. Orcutt. 

Quartermaster's Department. 
Quarterm.-Gen., Brlg.-Gen. M. I. Ludington. 
Chief Clerk, Henry D. Saxton. 
Depot Quartermaster, Maj. Theodore E. True. 

Subsistence Department. 
Actg. Commissary-Gen., Col. Jno. F. Weston. 
^Issist'int, Lieut.-Col. Henry G. Sharpe. 
Chief Clerk, Wm. A. DeCaindry. 

Medical Department. 

Surgeon-Gen.. Brig.-Gen. Geo. M. Sternberg. 

Assts., Col. C. H. Alden, Col. Dallas Bache, 
Lieut.-Col. Chas. Smart, Maj. Walter Reed, 
Maj. J. C. Merrill, Maj. G. E. Bushnell. 

Chief Clerk, George A. Jones. 

Fay Department 

Paymaster-Gen., Brig.-Gen. A. E. Bates. 
Assistant, Lieut.-Col. C. C. Sniflen. 
Chief Clerk, G.D. Hanson. 

Corps of Engineers. 

Chief of Engineers, Brig.-Gen. John M. Wilson. 
Assistants, Lieut.-Col. A. MacKenzie, Capt. 

Joseph E. Kuhn, Capt. James L. Lusk. 
Chief Clerk, Wm. J. Warren. 

Public Buildings and Grounds. 
Officer in Charge, Col. T. A. Bingham. 



THE NATIONAL GOVERNMENT. 



163 



Ordnance Department. 

Chief of Ordnance, Brig.-Gen. A. R. Buffington. 
Assistants, Maj. V. McNally, Capt. C. B. 
Wheeler, Maj. C. E. Dutton, Maj. Chas. 8. 
Smith, Capt. Wm. Crozier. 
Chief Clerk, John J. Cook. 

Judge-Advocate General's Office. 
Judge-Advocate Oen., Brlg.-Gen. G. N. Lieber. 
Chief Clerk, Lewis W. Call. 

Signal Office. 

Chief Signal Officer, Brig.-Gen. A. W. Greely. 
Disburs'g Officer, Capt. Eugene O.Fechet.U.S.V. 
Acting Chief Clerk, Geo. A. Warren. 

Record and Pension Office. 
Chief of Office, Brlg.-Gen. F. C. Alnsworth. 
Assistant, Maj. John Truesdale. 
Chiefs of Division, Jacob Freeh, O. B. Brown. 



POSTOFFICE DEPARTMENT. 
Postmaster-Gen., Charles E. Smith (Pa.). .$8,000 

Chief Clerk, Blain W. Taylor (W. Va.) 2,500 

Asst. Atty.-Gen., James N. Tyner (Ind.). . . 4,000 
Law Clerk, Harrison J. Barrett (N. C.). . . . 2,500 
Appirintment Clerk, John H. Robinson 

(Miss.) 1,800 

Suvt. and Disbursing Clerk, Ruf us B. Mer- 
chant (Va.) 2,100 

Topographer, A. Von Haake (N. Y.) 2,501) 

OFFICE FIEST ASSISTANT POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

First Asst. P. M. O., Perry 8. Heath (Ind.) 4,000 

Chief Clerk, Geo. M. Allen (Ind.) 2,000 

Supt. Div. P. O. Sup., Michael W. Louis 
(O.) 2,000 

Supt. Div. Free Delivery, August W. Ma- 
chen(0.) 3,000 

Chief Div. of Salaries and Allowances, 
Geo. W. Beavers (N. Y.) 2,500 

Supt. Money-Order System, James T. Met- 
calf (Iowa) 3,500 

Chief Clerk Money-Order System, Edward 
M. Gadsden (Ga.J 2,000 

Supt. Dead-Letter Office, David P. Leib- 
hardt (Ind.) 2,500 

Chief Clerk Dead-Letter Office, Ward Bur- 
lingame (Kas.) , 1,800 

Chief Div. of Correspondence, J.R.Ash(Pa.) 1,800 

Anst, Supts. Div. Free Delivery, E. C. Fowler 
(Md.), hdqrs. Wash.; Wm. G. Edens 
(111.), hdqrs. Chicago; and Charles Hed- 
ges (Tex.), bdqrs. New York 2,000 

OFFICE SECOND ASSISTANT POSTMASTEIW3ENERAL. 

Second Asst. P. M. O., W. 8. Shallenberger 
(Pa.) 4.000 

Chief Clerk, George F. Stone (N. Y.) 2,01)0 

Supt. Railway Adjustments, J.H.Crew(O-) 2,000 

Chief Div. of Inspection, James B. Cook 
(Md.). 2,000 

Chief Div. Mail Equipment. Thomas P. 
Graham (N.Y ) 1,800 

Ge. Supt. Railway Matt Service, James 
E. White (111.) 3,500 

Chief Clerk Railway Mail Service, John 
W. Hollyday (O.) 2,000 

Supt. Foreign Mails, N. M. Brooks (Va.).. 3,000 

Chief Clerk Foreign Mails. R. L. Maddox 
(Ky.) 2,000 

Asst.Ge n. Supt. Railway Mail Service, Alex- 
ander Graut( Mich.) 2,000 

OFFICE THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTEB-GENERAL. 

Third Asst. P. M. G., Edwin C. Madden 

(Mich.) 4,000 

Chief Clerk, Edward B. Kellogg (Conn.).... 2,000 
Chief Div. Finance, A.W.Bingham (Mich.) 2,000 
Chief Div.Postage Stamps.Ja.iaes H.Reeve 

(N.Y.) 2.250 

Principal Clerk Classification Division, D. 

C. Fountain (N. Y.) 1,600 

Principal Clerk Registration Diwiston.Jobn 

B. Quay (Mo.) 1,800 



Principal Clerk Division of Files, Mail, 

etc., E. S. Hall (Vt.) J1.800 

Postage Stamp Agent, John P. Green (O.). . 2,500 
Postal Card Agent. Edgar H. Shook (W. 

va.) : :;:.... .....2,500 

Stamped Envelope Agent, Chas. H. Field 
(Conn.) 2,500 

OFFICE FOURTH ASSISTANT POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

Fourth Asst. P. M. G., J. L. Brlstow (Kas.) . 4,000 

Chief Clerk, M. O. Chance (111.) 2,000 

Chief Div. of Appointments, Carter B. 

Keene(Me.; 2,000 

Chief Dto. of Bonds and Commissions, 

Christian B. Dickey (O.) 2,000 

Chief P. O. Inspector, W. E. Cochran (Col.). 3,000 
Chief Clerk Div. of P. O. Inspectors and 

JfaiJ Depredations.John P. ClumjCal.). 2,000 
Eastern Div. Rural Free Delivery, H. Con- 
quest Clark (D. C.), hdqrs. Wash 

Western Div.. Frank M. Dice (Ind.), hdqrs. 

Indianapolis 

Military Postal Service, Cuba Director-. 

Gen. of Posts, E. G. Rathbone (O.) 4,500 

Postmaster, Havana, E. P. Thompson 

(Ind.) 4,200 

Chief Finance Div., Chas. F. W. Neely 

(Ind.) 2,500 

Puerto Rico- Director-Gen, of Poste.W. H. 

Elliott (Ind.) 3,600 

Philippines Director-Gen, of Posts, Frank 

W. Vaille (Col.) 3,600 

OFFICE OF THE AUDITOR FOR THE POSTOFFICE DE- 
PARTMENT. 

Auditor, Henry A. Castle (Minn.) 4,000 

Deputy Auditor, Abraham L.Lawshednd.) 2,500 

Chief Clerk, JohnM. Bishop (Tenn.) 2,000 

Law Clerk, D. H. Fenton (Ind.) 2,000 

Disbursing Clerk, B. W. Holman(Wis.j... 2,000 
Chief Collecting Div., Arthur Ciements(Md) 2,000 
Chief Bookkeeping Div., David W. Duncan 

(Pa.) 2,000 

Chief Pay Div., John B. Sleman (111.) 2,000 

Chief Inspecting Div., M. M. Holland (D.C.) 2,000 
Chief Checking and Assorting Div., R. M. 

Johnson (Ind.) 2,000 

Chief Foreign Div., EmanuelSpeich(Neb.) 2.000 
Chief Recording Div., B. A. Allen (Kas.). . 2,000 



INTERIOR DEPARTMENT. 

Secretary. E. A. Hitchcock (Mo.) 8,000 

First Asst. Sec., Thomas Ryan (Kas.) 4,500 

Asst. Sec., Webster Davis (Mo.) 4,000 

CMef Clerk, Edward M. Dawson (Md.) 2,750 

General Land Office. 

Commissioner. BInger Hermann (Ore.) 5,000 
Asst. Comr., W. A. Richards 3,000 

Office of Indian Affairs. 

Commissioner, Wm. A. Jones (Wis.) 4,OOC 

Asst. Comr., A. Clarke Tonner (O.) 3,000 

Supt. Indian Schools. Miss Estelle Reel 
(Wyo.) 3,000 

Pension Office. 

Commissioner, H. Clay Evans (Tenn.) 5,000 

First Deputy Comr., Jas. L. Davenport 

(N. H.) 3,600 

Second Deputy Comr., Leverett M. Kelly 

(111.) 3,600 

Chief Clerk. Wm. H. Bayly (O. ) 2.25C 

Medical Referee, Jacob F. Raub (Pa.) 3,000 

Office of Commissioner of Railroads . 
Commissioner, James Longstreet (Ga.) 4,500 

Patent Office. 
Commissioner, Charles H. Duell (N.Y.)... 5,000 
Asst. Comr., Arthur P. Greeley (N. H.). . . . 3,000 
Chief Clerk. Edward V. Shepard (N. Y.). . . 2,250 



164 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



Office of Education. 

Commissioner, William T. Harris (Mass.). $3,000 
Chief Clerk, Lo vick Pierce (Ga.) 1,800 

Geological Survey. 

Director, Chas. D. Walcott (N. Y.) 5,000 

Chief Clerk, Henry C. Rizer (Kas.) 2,400 

DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE. 

AUy.-Gen., John W. Griggs (N. J.) 8,000 

Solicitor-Gen.. J. K. Richards (O.) 7,000 

Asst. Atty.-Gen., Jas. E. Boyd (N. C.) 5,000 

Asst. Atty.-Gen., Henry M. Hoyt (Pa.). . . . 5.000 
Asst. Atty.-Gen., Jno. G. Thompson (111.). . 5,01)0 
Asst. Atty.-Gen., Louis A. Pradt (Wis.). . . . 5,000 
Asst. Atty.-Gen. (Dept. of Int.), Willis Van 

Devanter ( Wyo.). 5,000 

Asst. Atty.-Gen. (P. O. Dept.), Jas. N. Tyner 

(Ind.) 4,000 

Solicitor of Int. Rev. {Treas. Dept.), Geo. 

M. Thomas (Ky.) 4,500 

Solicitor for Dept. of State, W. L. Penfleld 

(Ind.).. 3,500 

Law Clerk and Examiner of Titles, A. J. 

Bentley (O.) 2,700 

Chief Clerk and Supt. of Building, Cecil 

Clay (W. Va.) 2,750 

Gen. Agent. Frank Strong ( Ark.; 4,000 

Disbursing CUrk, Henry Rechtin(O.) 2,300 

Appointment Clerk, Joseph P. Rudy (Pa.). 1,800 
Atty. in Charge of Pardons, Jno. H. Camp- 
bell (111.) 2,400 

Solicitor of Treas. (Treas. Dept.), Maurice 

D. O'Connell Uowa) 4,500 

Asst. Solicitor, Felix A. Reeve (Tenn.) 3,000 

Chief Clerk Solicitor 1 * Office (Treas. Dept.), 

Charles E. Vroonian (Iowa) 2,000 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 

Secretary, James W ilson (Iowa) 8,000 

Asst. Sec., Joseph H. Brigham (O.) 4,500 

Chief Clerk, Andrew Geddes (Iowa) 2,500 

Appointment Clerk. J. B. Bennett (Wis.). . 2,000 
Private Secretary to Secretary of Agricul- 

ture, J. W. Wilson (Iowa) 2,250 

Chief of Weather Bureau, Willis L. Moore 

(111.). 4,500 

Chief of Bureau of Animal Industry, D. 

E. Salmon (N. J.) 4,000 

Statistician, John Hyde (Neb.) 3,000 

Chemist, H. W. Wiley (Ind.) 2.5UO 



Entomologist, L. O. Howard (N. Y. ) $2,500 

Botanist, F. V.Covllle (N. Y.) 2.500 

Chief of Biological Survey, C. Hart Mer- 

riam(N.Y.) 2,500 

Chief of Div. of Forestry, Gifford Pinchot 

(N. Y.) 2,500 

Pomologist, G. B. Brackett (Iowa) 2,500 

Chief of Div. of Agrostology, F 1 . Lamson 

Scribner (Tenn.) 2.500 

Chief of Div. of Soils, Milton Whitney 

(Md.). ..2,500 

Chief of Div. of VeaettMe Physiology and 

Pathology, B. T. Galloway (Mo.) 2,500 

Director Office of Experiment Stations, A. 

C.True (Conn.) 3,000 

Chief Div. of Accounts and Disbursements, 

F.L. Evans (Pa.) .... 2,500 

Editor, George Win. Hill (Minn.) 2,500 

Horticulturist, etc., Wm. Saunders (Pa.)... 2,500 
Director of the Office ofPublic Road In- 
quiry, Roy Stone (N. Y.) 2,500 

Chief of Section of Foreiyn Markets, Frank 

H. Hitchcock (Mass.) 2,500 

Chi-'/ of Seed Division, R. J. Whittleton 

(111.) 2,000 

INDEPENDENT DEPARTMENTS. 
Government Printing Office. 

Public Printer, F. W. Palmer (III.) 4,500 

Chief Clerk, W. H. Collins (D.C.) 2,400 

Foreman of Printing, H. T. Brian (Md.). . . 2,100 
Foreman of Binding, H. C. Espey (D.C.) . . 2,100 

United States Civil Service Commission. 
Commissioners, John R. Procter (Ky.), 
JohnB. Harlow(Mo.), Mark S. Brewer 

(Mich.) 3,500 

Chief Examiner, A. L. Severn 3.000 

Secretary, John T. Doyle (N. Y.) 2,000 

Department of Labor. 
Commissioner, Carroll D. Wright (Mass.). 5,000 

Chief Clerk, Oren W. Weaver (Mass.) 2,500 

Disbursing Clerk, Charles E. Morse (Pa.). 1,800 
Interstate Commerce Commission. 

Chairman, Martin A. Knapp(N.Y.) 7.500 

Judson C. Clements (Ga.) 7.500 

J ames D. Yeomans (Iowa) 7,500 

Chas. R. Prouty (Vt.) 7,500 

J. W. Fiferdll.) 7,500 

Secretary, Edward A. Moseley (Mass.) 3,500 



THE ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY. 



The Illinois Central Railroad company 
was Incorporated by a special act of the 
legislature Feb. 10, 1851. In the act of 
incorporation It was stipulated that 7 per 
centum of the gross Income of the company 
should be paid into the state treasury for 
general revenue purposes. Pursuant to 
that proviso, more than $17,000,000 has 
been paid Into the state treasury since 
1855, the year that the road was opened 
for traffic. The present state constitution, 



1855* | 29,751.59 

1856* 77,631.66 

1857 145,645.84 

1858 132,005.53 

1859 132,104.46 

1860 177,557.22 

1861 177,257.81 

1862 212,174.60 

1863 300,394.58 

1864 405,514.04 

1865 496,489.84 

1866 427,075.75 



1867 $444,007.74 1879 $325,477.38 1890 

1868 428,397.48 1880 368,348.66 1891 

1869 464,933.31 1881 384,582.52 1892. 

1870 464,584.52 1882 396,036.11 1893 

1871 463,512.91 1883 388,743.19 1894 

1872 442,856.54 1884 356,679.62 1895 

1873 428,574.00 1885 367,788.92 1896 

1874 394,366.46 1886 378,714.50 1897 

1875 375.766.02 1887 414,374.57 1898 

1876 356,005.68 1888 418,955.89 

1877 316,351.94 1889 460,244.65 

1878 320,431.71 

*Only 6 per centum of the gross receipts of the company was received 
treasury during 1855 and 1856. 



adopted in 1870, prohibits any legislation, 
agreement or covenant by which a less pro- 
portion than 7 per centum of the gross 
receipts of the road shall be paid into 
the public treasury. 

The following table shows the amounts 
received into the treasury of the state 
from the Illinois Central Railroad company 
each year since the road has been oper- 
ated: 



$486,281.13 
538,005.67 
589,486.02 
753,067.24 
553,911.49 
614,988.17 
624,550.83 
624,532.74 
657,032.81 



Total.. $17,315,193.24 
into the state 



THE ARMY. 



165 



Cfje 

[Corrected to Nov. 15. 1899.] 
General and Field Officers of the Regular and Volunteer forces of the United States. 



DIVISION AND DEPARTMENT COMMANDERS OF THE REGTHAR ARMY. 
HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY. 

Commander, Maj.-Gen. N. A. Miles. 

Aid-de-camp, Capt. Francis Michler, 5th Cav. 

Aid-de-camp, 1st Lt. H. H. Whitney, 4th Art. 

Adjutant-general, Lt.-Col. J. C. Gilmore. 
DIVISION OP CUBA. Consisting of the geo- 
graphical departments and provinces of the 

island of Cuba; headquarters, Havana. 

Cuba. 
Commander, Maj.-Gen. J. R. Brooke. 



DEPARTMENT OP CALIFORNIA. States of 
California and Nevada, the Hawaiian 
islands and their dependencies; headquar- 
ters. San Francisco, Cal. 

Commander, Maj.-Gen. W. R. Shatter (retired). 

DEPARTMENT OP THE COLORADO. States of 
Wyoming (except so much thereof as is em- 
braced in the Yellowstone national park). 
Colorado and Utah, and the territories of 
Arizona and New Mexico; headquarters, 

Commander, Brig.-Gen. H. C. Men-lam. 

DEPARTMENT OF THE COLUMBIA. States of 
Washington, Oregon, Idaho (except so much 
of the latter as is embraced in the Yellow- 
stone national park), and the territory of 
Alaska; headquarters, Vancouver Barracks, 

Commarufer, 1 Maj.-Gen.W. R. Shatter (retired). 

DEPARTMENT OP DAKOTA. States of Minne- 
sota. North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, 
and so much of Wyoming and Idaho as is 
embraced in the Yellowstone national park; 
headquarters, St. Paul, Minn. 

Commander, Brig.-Gen. J. F. Wade. 

DEPARTMENT OF THE EAST. New England 
states, New York. New Jersey, Pennsyl- 
vania, Delaware. Maryland, District of Co- 
lumbia, West Virginia, Virginia and North 
Carolina; headquarters, Governor's island, 
New York. 

Commander, Maj.-Gen. Wesley Merritt. 

DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF. States of South 
Carolina, Georgia. Florida, Alabama, Mis- 
sissippi and Louisiana; headquarters, At- 

Commander. Col. R. T. Frank, 1st artillery. 
DEPARTMENT OP HAVANA. Consisting of 
that portion Of the island of Cuba embraced 

OFFICERS OF THE 

MAJOR-GENERALS. 

Miles, Nelson A. Brooke, John R. 

Merritt, Wesley. 

BRIGADIER-GENERALS. 

Otis, Elwell S. Wade, James F. 

Merriam, Henry C. Anderson, Thomas M. 

ADJUTANT-GENERAL. 

[With rank of Brigadier-General.] 
Corbin, Henry C. 

ASSISTANT ADJUTANTS-GENERAL. 

[With rank of Colonel-1 
Barber, Merritt. Volkmar. William J. 

Sheridan, Michael V. Schwan, Theodore. 
Ward, Thomas. 

[With rank of Lieutenant-Colonel.] 
MacArthur. Arthur. Hall, William P. 
Gilmore, John C. Wagner, Arthur L 

Babcock, John B. Carter, William H. 

[With rank of Major.] 
Barry, Thomas H. Johnston, John A. 



within the following boundaries: Begin- 
ning at the mouth of the Almendares river; 
thence south and east following the Almen- 
dares to its tributary, the Rio Grande; 
thence along the Rio Grande to near its 
head; thence north via Santa Maria del 
Kosario to the headwaters of the Rio las 
Vegas; thence along the Rio las Vegas and 
the Rio Cojimar to the sea; headquarters, 
Havana, Cuba. 
Commander, Brig.-Gen. William Ludlow. 



DEPARTMENT OF THE LAKES. States of Wis- 
consin, Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, 
Kentucky and Tennessee; headquarters, 
Chicago. 111. 

Commander, Brig.-Gen. T. M. Anderson. 

DEPARTMENT OF MATANZAS AND SANTA 
CLARA. Provinces of Matanzas and Santa 
Clara; headquarters, Matanzas. Cuba. 

Commander, Brig.-Gen. J. H. Wilson. 

DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI. States of 
Iowa, Nebraska, Missouri, Kansas and Ar- 
kansas, the Indian Territory and the terri- 
tory of Oklahoma; headquarters, Omaha, 
Neb. 

Commander, Brig.-Gen. H. C. Merriam. 

DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC. Philippine 
islands; -headquarters. Manila, P. 1. 

Commander, Maj.-Gen. E. S. Otis. 

DEPARTMENT OF PUERTO Rico. Island of 
Puerto Rico and the islands and keys adja- 
cent thereto; headquarters, San Juan.Puerto 
Rico. 

Commander, Brig.-Gen. G. W. Davis. 

DEPARTMENT OP PROVINCE OF HAVANA 
AND PINAR DEL Rio. Consisting of all 
that portion of the island of Cuba within 
the limits of the province of Havana (except 
such portion as is embraced in the Depart- 
ment of Havana) and the province of Pinar 
del Rio; headquarters.Havana, Cuba. 

Commander. Brig.-Gen. FitzhugL Lee. 

DEPARTMENT OF SANTIAGO AND PUERTO 
PRINCIPE. Provinces of Santiago and Pu- 
erto Principe; headquarters, Santiago, Cuba. 

Commander, Brig.-Gen. Leonard Wood. 

DEPARTMENT OP TEXAS. State of Texas; 
headquarters, San Antonio, Tex. 

Commander, Col. Chambers McKibbin, 12th 
infantry. 

REGULAR ARMY. 

Heistand, Henry O. S. Simpson, William A. 

Andrews, George. 

INSPECTOR-GENERAL. 

[With rank of Brigadier-General.] 
Brecklnridge, Joseph C, 

INSPECTORS-GENERAL. 

[With rank of Colonel.] 
Hughes, Robert P. Lawton, Henry W. 
Burton, George H. 

[With rank of Lieutenant-Colonel.] 
Vroom. Peter D. Garlington, Ernest A. 

Sanger, Joseph P. . 

[With rank of Major.] 
Heyl, Charles H. Mills, Stephen C. 

Knox, Thomas T. 

JUDGE-ADVOCATE GENERAL. 

[With rank of Brigadier-General.] 
Lleber, G. Norman. 



166 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



ASSISTANT JUDGE-ADVOCATE GENERAL. 

[With rank of Colonel.] 
Barr, Thomas F. 

DEPUTY JUDGE-ADVOCATES GENERAL. 

[With rank of Lieutenant-Colonel.] 
Clous, John W. Davis, George B. 

Hunter, Edward. 

JUDGE ADVOCATES. 

[With rank of Major.] 
Groesheck, Stephen W. Morrison, Jasper N. 
Crowder, Enoch H. 

QU AHTE RM A STER-GENE R AL. 

[With rank of Brigadier-General.] 
Ludington. Marshall I. 

ASSISTANT QUARTERMASTERS-GENERAL. 

[With rank of Colonel.] 
Moore, James M. Scully, James W. 

Lee, James G. C. Kimball, Amos S. 

DEPUTY QUARTERMASTERS-GENERAL. 

[With rank of Lieutenant-Colonel.] 
Furey, John V. Humphreys, Chas. F. 

Atwood, Edwin B. Wheeler, Daniel D. 
Marshall, James M. Barnett, Charles R. 
Simpson, John. McCauley, Chas. A. H. 

QUARTERMASTERS. 

[With rank of Major.] 
Hathaway, Forrest H. Pullman. John W. 
Jacobs. Joshua W. Pope, James W. 
Bird, Charles. Jones, Francis B. 

Clem. John L. Miller, Crosby P. 

Booth, Charles A. Summerhayes, JohnW. 
Patten, William 8. True, Theodore E. 
Pond, George K. Hyde, John McE. 

PAYMASTER-GENERAL. 

[With rank of Brigadier-General.] 
Bates, Alfred E. 

ASSISTANT PAYMASTERS-GENERAL. 

[With rank of Colonel.] 
Coxe, Frank M. Wilson, Charles I. 

DEPUTY PAYMASTERS-GENERAL. 

[With rank of Lieutenant-Colonel.] 
Towar,- Albert S. Baird, George W. 

Sniffen, Culver C. 

PAYMASTERS. 

[With rank of Major.] 

Dodge, Francis S. Kilbourne, Charles E. 

McClure, Charles. Bullis, John L. 
Whipple, Charles H. Rogers, Harry L. 
Comegys. William H. Watrous, Jerome A. 
Tucker, William F. Gilbert, William W. 
MubJenberg, John C. Rees, Harry L. 
Smith, George K. Vinson, Webster. 

Baker, John P. Newbold, Charles. 

Halford, Elijah W. Wallace. Hamilton S. 
Hamner, William H. Wham, Joseph W. 
CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 
CHIEF OF ENGINEERS. 

[With rank of Brigadier-General.] 
Wilson, John M. 



COLONELS. 

Robert, Henry M. Suter. Charles R. 

Barlow, John W. Smith, Jared A. 

Hains, Peter C. Mansfield, Samuel M. 
Gillesple, George L. 

LIEUTENANT-COLONELS. 

Benyaurd, Wm. H. H. Jones, William A. 
Lydecker, Garrett J. Damrell, Andrew N. 
Stickney t Amos. Allen, Charles J. 

Mackenzie, Alexander.' Raymond, Charles W. 
Ernst, Oswald H. Miller, Alexander M. 

Heap, David P. Adams, Milton B. 

Ludlow, William. Livermore, William R. 

MAJORS. 

Heuer, William H. Willard, Joseph H. 
Stanton, William S. Bixby, William H. 
Handbury, Thomas H. Rossell, William T, 
Adams, Henry M. Symons, Thomas W. 
Davis, Carles E.L. B. Leach, Smith S. 
Quinn, James B. Kingman, Dan C. 

Lockwood, Daniel W. Black, William M. 
Ruffner, Ernest H. Fisk, Walter L. 
Sears, Clinton B. Roessler, Solomon W, 

Maban, Frederick A. Derby, George McC. 
Powell, Charles F. Lusk, James'L. 
Knight, John G. D. Abbot, Frederic V. 
Hoxle, Richard L. Casey, Thomas L. 
Marshall, William L. Binpham, Theodore A 

CHIEF OF ORDNANCE. 

[With rank of Brigadier-General.] 
Buffington, Adelbert R. 

COLONELS. 

Whittemore, Jas. M. Farley, Joseph P. 
Mordecal, Alfred. Babbitt, Lawrence S. 

Ll E UTENANT-COLONELS. 

Marye, William A. Phipps, Frank H. 
Arnold, Isaac, Jr. Reilly, James W. 

McGinness, John R. 

MAJORS. 

Kress, John A. Shaler, Charles. 

Dutton, Clarence E. Smith, Charles S. 

Butler, John G. Blunt, Stanhope E. 

Varney, Almon L. Heath, Frank. 

Greer. John E. Taylor, Daniel M. 

Pitman, John. Lyle, David A. 

CHIEF SIGNAL OFFICER. 

[With rank of Brigadier-General.] 
Greely, Adolphus W. 

ASSISTANT CHIEF SIGNAL OFFICER. 

[With rank of Colonel.] 
Dunwoody, Henry H. C. 

LIEUTENANT-COLONEL. 

Craig, Robert. 

MAJOR. 

Allen, James. 

RECORD AND PENSION OFFICE. 
[Chief, with rank of Brigadier-General.] 
Ainsworth, Fred C. 

[Assistant, with rank of Major.] 
Tweedale, John. 



FIRST CAVALRY Colonel, Arnold, Abra- 
ham K. ; lieutenant-colonel, Lebo, Thomas 
C. ; majors, Bell, James M. ; Smith, 
Allen; Ward, Frederick K. 

SECOND CAVALRY Colonel, Noyes. Henry 
E. ; lieutenant-colonel, Wallace, William 
M. ; majors, Hennisee, Argalus G.; Dorst, 
Joseph H.; Schuyler, Walter S. 

THIRD CAVALRY Colonel, Young, Sam- 
uel B. M. ; lieutenant-colonel, Wessells, 
Henry W., Jr.; majors. Jackson, Henry; 
Swigert, Saronel M. ; Steever, Edgar Z. 

FOURTH CAVALRY Colonel, Vlele. Chas. 
D.; lieutenant-colonel, Hayes, Edward 



REGIMENTAL OFFICERS. 



M.; majors, Rucker, Louis H. ; Augur, 
Jacob A. ; Morton, Charles. 

FIFTH CAVALRY Colonel, Rafferty, Wm. 
A. ; lieutenant-colonel, Carr, Camillo, C. 
C. ; majors, Cooper, Charles L. ; Dimmick, 
Eugene D.; Thomas, Earl D. 

SIXTH CAVALRY Colonel, Sumner, Sam- 
uel S. ; lieutenant-colonel, Wint, Theo- 
dore J.; majors, Huggins, Eli L. ; Ander- 
son, George S. ; Rodgers, Alexander. 

SEVENTH CAVALRY Colonel, Baldwin, 
Theodore A.; lieutenant-colonel. Wheelan, 
James N. ; majors, Godfrey, Edward S. ; 
Edgerly, Winfleld S. ; Godwin, Edward A. 



THE ARMY. 



167 



EIGHTH CAVALRY Colonel, Chaffee, Adna 
R. ; lieutenant-colonel, Davis, Wlrt; ma- 
jors, Hatfield, Charles A. P.; Sprole, 
Henry W.; Stanton, William. 

NINTH CAVALRY Colonel, McGregor, 
Thomas; lieutenant-colonel, Wells, Al- 
mond B. ; majors, Woodson, Albert E.; 
Forbush, William C. ; Hughes, Martin B. 

TENTH CAVALRY Colonel, Whitside, Sam- 
uel M.; lieutenant-colonel, Moore, Fran- 
cis; majors, Pratt, Richard H.; Kerr, 
John B.; Stedman, Clarence A. 

FIRST ARTILLERY Colonel, Frank, Royal 
T. ; lieutenant-colonel, Kinzie, David H.; 
majors, Calef , John H. ; Tiernan, John 
L.; Ingalls, James M. 

SECOND ARTILLERY Colonel, Penning- 
ton, Alex. C. M. ; lieutenant-colonel, Has- 
kin, William L. ; majors, Field, Edward ; 
Scantling, John C. ; Grimes, George S. 

THIRD ARTILLERY Colonel, Rawles, 
Jacob B.; lieutenant-colonel, Randolph, 
Wallace F. ; majors, Hess, Frank W. ; 
Kobbe, William A.; Merrill, Abner H. 

FOURTH ARTILLERY Colonel, Guenther, 
Francis L. ; lieutenant-colonel, Rodney, 
George B. ; majors, Lancaster, James M. ; 
Andruss, E. Van A. ; Fuger, Frederick. 

FIFTH ARTILLERY Colonel, Kodgers, 
John I.; lieutenant-colonel, McCrea, Tully; 
majors, Maybrlck, John R. ; Burbank, 
James B. ; Day, Selden A. 

SIXTH ARTILLERY Colonel, Williston, 
Edward B. ; lieutenant-colonel, Smith. 
Frank G.; majors. Mills, Samuel M.; 
Vose, William P.; Ennis, William. 

SEVENTH ARTILLERY Colonel, Has- 
brouck, Henry C. ; lieutenant-colonel, 
Woodruff, Carle A.; majors, Morris, 
Charles; Story, John P.; Greenough, 
George G. 

FIRST INFANTRY Colonel, Harbach, 
Abram A.; lieutenant-colonel, Dempsey, 
Charles A.; majors, O'Connell, John J.; 
Edmunds, Frank H. ; Smith, Frederick A. 

SECOND INFANTRY Colonel, Bates, John 
C. ; lieutenant-colonel, Corliss, Augustus 
W.; majors, Bowman, Alpheus H.; Hall, 
Charles B. ; Maus, Marion P. 

THIRD INFANTRY Colonel, Page, John 
H. ; lieutenant-colonel, Goodale, Green- 
leaf A. ; majors, Baldwin. Frank D. ; 
Rice, Edmund; Hannay, John W. 

FOURTH INFANTRY Colonel, Hall, Rob- 
ert H.; lieutenant-colonel, Sanno, James 
M. J.; majors, Price, Butler D.; Reade, 
Philip; Scott, Walter S. 

FIFTH INFANTRY Colonel, Comba, Rich- 
ard; lieutenant-colonel, Hooton, Mott; 
majors, Chance, Jesse C.; Forbes, Theo- 
dore F.; Borden, George P. 

SIXTH INFANTRY Colonel, Kellogg, Ed- 
gar R.; lieutenant-colonel. Miner, Charles 
W. : majors, Whitney, Folllot A. ; Cro- 
well, Wm. H. H.; Rockefeller, Chas. M. 

SEVENTH INFANTRY Colonel, Coates, 
Edwin M.; lieutenant-colonel, Dougherty, 
William E.; majors, Richards, Wm. V.; 
Kendrick, Frederick M. H. ; Van Orsdale, 
John T. 

EIGHTH INFANTRY Colonel, Randall, 
George M. ; lieutenant-colonel, Ellis, 
Phillip H. ; majors, Stretch, John F.; 
Ray, P. Henry; Pitcher, William L. 



NINTH INFANTRY Colonel, Liscum, Em- 
erson H.; lieutenant-colonel, Ooolrldge, 
Charles A.; majors, Lee, Jesse M.; Foote, 
Morris C.; Regan, James. 

TENTH INFANTRY-Colonel, Ewers, Ezra 
P.; lieutenant-colonel, Lincoln, Sumner 
H. ; majors, Duggan, Walter T. ; Hoyt, 
Ralph W. ; Brown, George Le R. 

ELEVENTH INFANTRY Colonel, Da 
Russy, Isaac D. ; lieutenant-colonel. 
Brinkerhoff, Henry R. ; majors, Davis, 
Charles L.; Myer, Albert L. ; Mansfield, 
Francis W. 

TWELFTH INFANTRY Colonel, McKib- 
bin, Chambers; lieutenant-colonel, Bubb, 
John W. ; majors, Haskell, Harry L. ; 
Gerlaeh, William; Allen, Leven C. 

THIRTEENTH INFANTRY Colonel, Bis- 
bee, William H. ; lieutenant-colonel, Rob- 
erts, Cyrus S. ; majors, Auman, William; 
Duncan, Joseph W. ; Gardener, Cornelius. 

FOURTEENTH INFANTRY Colonel. Dag- 
gett, Aaron S. ; lieutenant-colonel, Thomp- 
son, J. Milton; majors, Potter, Carroll 
H. ; Quinton, William ; Matile, Leon A. 

FIFTEENTH INFANTRY Colonel, Moale, 
Edward; lieutenant-colonel, Williams, 
Constant; majors, Guthrie, John B.; 
Buchanan, James A. ; Cornish, George A. 

SIXTEENTH INFANTRY Colonel, Hood. 
Charles C. ; lieutenant-colonel, Spurpin, 
William F.; majors, Ward, Henry C.; 
Kirkman, Joel T. ; Whitall, Samuel R. 

SEVENTEENTH INFANTRY Colonel, 
Smith, Jacob H.; lieutenant-colonel. Robe, 
Charles F. ; majors, O'Brien, Lyster M. ; 
Williams, Charles A.; Cowles, Calvin D. 

EIGHTEENTH INFANTRY Colonel, Car- 
penter, Gilbert S. ; lieutenant-colonel, 
Van Home, William M; majors, Paul, 
Charles R. ; Adams, Henry H. ; Wheeler, 
William B. 

NINETEENTH INFANTRY Colonel, Sny- 
der, Simon; lieutenant-colonel, Boyle, 
William H.; majors, Leefe, John G.; 
Houston, Joseph F. ; Woodbury, Thomas C. 

TWENTIETH INFANTRY Colonel, Whea- 
ton, Loyd; lieutenant-colonel, McCaskey, 
William S. ; majors, Miller, James; Rog- 
ers, William P.; Rodman, John B. 

TWENTY-FIRST INFANTRY Colonel, 
Kline, Jacob; lieutenant-colonel, Clapp, 
William H. ; majors, Cornman, Daniel; 
Lockwood, Benjamin C.; Wittlch, Willis. 

TWENTY-SECOND INFANTRY Colonel, 
French, John W. ; lieutenant-colonel, 
Hartz, Wilson T. ; majors, Penney, Chas. 
G.; Baldwin, John A.; Reynolds, Alfred. 

TWENTY-THIRD INFANTRY Colonel, 
Davis, George W. ; lieutenant-colonel, 
Eskridge, Richard I.; majors. Sweet. 
Owen J. ; James, William H. W.; Pratt, 
Edward B. 

TWENTY-FOURTH INFANTRY Colonel, 
Freeman, Henry B.; lieutenant-colonel. 
Keller, Charles; majors, Markley, Alfred 
C. ; Wygant, Henry; Macklin, James E. 

TWENTY-FIFTH INFANTRY -. Colonel, 
Burt, Andrew S. ; lieutenant-colonel, 
Jocelyn, Stephen P.; majors, Craigie. 
David J.; Noble, Charles H. ; Wilson. 
David B. 



168 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



RETIRED LIST. 



ABOVE THE RANK OF CAPTAIN. ALPHABETICALLY ARRANGED. ADDRESS 
CARE WAR DEPARTMENT. 

Annual pay Lieutenant-general, $8,350; major-general, $5,625; brigadier-general, $4,125; 
colonel, $3.375; lieutenant-colonel, $3,UOO; major, $2,825. 



Abbott, Henry L., Col. 

Adam, Emll, Maj. 

Adams, Moses A., Chaplain. 

Alexander, Chas. T., Col. 

Andrews, Geo. L., Col. 

Andrews, John N. , Col. 

Arthur, William, Maj. 

Austine, William, Maj. 

Avery, Robert, Lieut. -Col. 

Bacon, John M., Col. 

Bailey, Clarence M., Col. 

Bally, Elisha I., Col. 

Bainbridge, Augustus II., Lieut. -Col. 

Bainbridge, Edmund C., Col. 

Baird, Absalom, Brig.-Gen. 

Baker, Stephen, Maj. 

Baldridge, Ben L., Chaplain. 

Barriger, John W., Col. 

Bartholf, John H., Maj. 

Bartlett, Charles G., Col. 

Bash, Daniel N., Maj. 

Batchelder, Richard N., Brig.-Gen. 

Bates, Robert F., Maj. 

Beaumont, Eugene B., Lieut. -Col. 

Belcher, John H., Maj. 

Bell, George, Col. 

Bell, William H., Brig.-Gen. 

Benham, Daniel W., Col. 

Bennett, Clarence E., Lieut. -Col. 

Bentley, Edwin, Maj. 

Bentzoni, Charles, Maj. 

Bergland, Eric, Maj. 

Bernard, Reuben F., Lieut. -Col. 

Beddle, James, Col. 

Billings, John S., Lieut. -Col. 

Bingham, Judson I)., Col. 

Bliss, Zenas R., Maj. -Gen. 

Blunt, Matthew M., Col. 

Bradford, James H., Lieut.-Col. 

Bradley, Luther P., Col. 

Brayton, George M., Col. 

Breck, Samuel, Brig.-Gen. 

Brewerton, Henry F., Maj. 

Bridgeman, Frank, Maj. 

Brinkle, John R., Maj. 

Brooke, John. Maj. -Gen. 

Brown, Hugh G., Maj. 

Brown, Paul R., Maj. 

Bryant, Cullen, Maj. 

Bryant, Montgomery, Col. 

Bnrbank, Jacob E., Maj. 

Burke, Daniel W., Brig.-Gen. 

Burns, James M., Maj. 

Caldwell, Daniel G., Maj. 

Campbell, John, Col. 

Campbell, Lafayette E., Maj. 

Canby, James P., Col. 

Card, Benjamin C., Lieut.-Col. 

Carey, Asa B., Brig.-Gen. 

Carlin, William P., Brig.-Gen. 

Carl ton, Caleb H., Brig.-Gen. 

Carpenter, Louis H., Brig.-Gen. 

Carr, Eugene A., Brig.-Gen. 

Carrington, Henry B., Col. 

Carroll, Henry, Col. 

Casey, James S., Col. 

Catton, Isaac S., Col. 

Cavenangh, Harry G., Maj. 

Chandler, John G., Col. 

Chase, Dudley, Chaplain. 

Chester, James, Maj. 

Chipman, Henry L., Lieut.-Col. 



Clark, Joseph C., Maj. 
Closson, Henry W., Col. 
Cochran, Melville A., Col. 
Coe, John N., Lieut.-Col. 
Collier, George W., Chaplain. 
Collins, Edward, Lieut.-Col. 
Compton, Charles E., Col. 
Comstock, Cyrus B., Col. 
Cook, Henry C., Col. 
Cooney, Michael, Col. 
Coppinger, John J., Brig.-Gen. 
Corson, Joseph K., Maj. 
Crabbe, George W., Maj. 
Craighill, William P., Brig.-Gen. 
Crandal, Fred M., Maj. 
Cronkhlte, Henry M., Maj. 
Gushing, Harry C., Maj. 
Cushing, Samuel T., Brig. -Gen. 
Dandy, George B., Col. 
Darling, John A., Maj. 
DeComay, Ferd E., Maj. 
Dillenback, John W., Maj. 
Dodd, Stephen G., Chaplain. 
Drum, Richard C., Brig.-Gen. 
DuBarry, Beekman, Brig.-Gen. 
Dudley, Nathan A. M., Col. 
Dunbar, George W., Chaplain. 
Ebsteln, Fred H. E., Maj. 
Eckerson, Theo. J., Maj. 
Egan, John, Maj. 
Elbrey, Fred W., Maj. 
Elderkin, William A., Col. 
Elliot, George H., Col. 
Enos, Herbert M., Maj. 
Evans, Andrew W., Col. 
Ewen, Clarence, Maj. 
Fechet, Edmond G., Maj. 
Fessenden, Francis, Brig.-Gen. 
Floyd-Jones, Delacey, Col. 
Forsyth, George A., Lieut.-Col. 
Forsyth, James W., Maj. -Gen. 
Forsyth, Lewis C., Lieut.-Col. 
Foster, Charles W., Maj. 
Frank, Royal T., Brig.-Gen. 
Fryer, Blencowe E., Lieut.-Col. 
Gardiner, Asa B., Maj. 
Gardner, William H., Lieut.-Col. 
Gilty, George W., Col. 
Gibson, Horatio G., Col. 
Gibson, Joseph R., Lieut.-Col. 
Gilbert, Charles C., Col. 
Oilman, Jeremiah H., Lieut.-Col. 
Gordon, David S., Col 
Gould, William P., Maj. 
Graham, Lawrence P., Col. 
Graham, William M., Brig.-Gen. 
Green, John, Lieut.-Col. 
Greene, Oliver D., Col. 
Grlerson, Benjamin H., Brig.-Gen. 
Grugan, Frank C., Maj. 
Guard, Alexander McC., Maj. 
Hall, Henry H., Chaplain. 
Hall, Peter P. G., Maj. 
Hamilton, John, Col. 
Hammond, William A., Brig.-Gen. 
Hardin, Martin D., Brig.-Gen. 
Harris, Moses, Maj. 
Hatch. John P., Col. 
Hawkins, Hamilton S., Brig.-Gen. 
Hawkins, John P., Brig.-Gen. 
Hawley, William, Maj. 
Head, George E., Lieut.-Col. 



THE ARMY. 



169 



Head, John F., Col. 

Heger, Anthony, Col. 

Herrick, Osgood E., Chaplain. 

Hlnton, Charles B., Maj. 

Hobart, Charles, Lieut.-Col. 

Hodges, Heury C., Col. 

Holabird, Sam B., Brig. -Gen. 

Horton, Sam M., Lleut.-Col. 

Hough, Alfred L., Col. 

Howard, Oliver O., Maj.-Gen. 

Hubbard, William P., Chaplain. 

Humphreys, Henry H., Lleut.-Col. 

Huntlngton, David L., Lleut.-Col. 

Huntt, George G., Col. 

Ingalls, Charles H., Maj. 

Irvine, Javan B., Maj. , 

Irwln, Bernard J. D., Col. 

Jackson, Allen H., Maj. 

Jackson, James, Lleut.-Col. 

Jackson, John W., Chaplain. 

Janeway, John H., Lleut.-Col. 

Johnson, Lewis, Maj. 

Jordan, William H., Col. 

Judd, Edwin D., Maj. 

Kauffman, Albert B., Maj. 

Reefer, John B., Maj. 

Kelley, Joseph M., Maj. 

Kellogg, Sandford C., Maj. 

Kendall, Henry M., Maj. 

Kendlg, Daniel, Chaplain. 

Kennedy, William B., Maj. 

Kent, Jacob P., Brig. -Gen. 

Keyes, Alexander S. B., Maj. 

Kirk, Ezra B., Maj. 

Kirtland, Thaddeus S., Maj. 

Kramer, Adam, Maj. 

Lacey, Francis E., Lleut.-Col. 

Langdon, Loomls L. , Col. 

Lamed, Daniel R., Maj. 

Latimer, Alfred E., Maj. 

Lauderdale, John V., Maj. 

Lawson, Galnes, Maj. 

Lazelle, Henry M., Col. 

Lewis, John R., Col. 

Llndesmith. Eli W. J., Chaplain. 

Litchfield, Henry G., Maj. 

Livingston, La Rhett L., Col. 

Lloyd, Thomas J., Maj. 

Lodor, Richard, Col. 

Loring, Leonard Y., Maj. 

Loud, John S., Maj. 

Lowell, Delmer R., Chaplain. 

Lyrnan, Wyllys, Ma}. 

McArthur, Joseph H., Maj. 

McClure, Daniel, Col. 

McCook, Alex McD., Maj.-Gen. 

MacFeely, Robert, Brig.-Gen. 

McGonnlgle, Andrew J., Maj. 

McKeever, Chauncey, Col. 

McLaughlin, William H., Lieut.-Col. 

McMillan, James, Maj. 

Madden, Daniel, Maj. 

Magruder, David L., Col. 

Mallery, John C., Maj. 

Manning, William C.. Maj. 

Mathey, Edward G., Maj. 

Matthews. Washington, Maj. 

Mendell, George H., Col. 

Merrill, Sherman H., Chaplain. 

Mlddleton, Johnson V. D., Lieut.-Col. 

Miles, Evans, Col. 

Miller, Marcus P., Brig.-Gen. 

Mills, Anson, Brig.-Gen. 

Mitchell, George, Maj. 

Mizner, Henry R., Col. 

Montgomery, Robert H., Maj. 

Moore, John, Brig.-Gen. 

Morgan, James N.. Maj. 

Morgan, Michael R., Brig.-Gen. 

Morrow, Albert P., Col. 



VIosher, Theodore, Maj. 
Moylau, Myles, Maj. 
Mullins. George G., Chaplain. 
Murphy, John, Maj. 
Murray, Robert, Brig.-Gen. 
Nash, William H., Brig.-Gen. 
tforvell, Steven T., Lieut.-Col. 
S T ugent, Robert, Maj. 
hikes, James, Col. 
Dlmsted, Jerauld A., Maj. 
Ord, James C., Maj. 
Ovensbine, Samuel, Brig.-Gen. 
Page, Charles, Col. 
Palmer, George H., Maj. 
Palmer, Innus N., Col. 
Parke, John G., Col. 
Parker, Daingerfield, Col. 
Parker, John D., Chaplain. 
Parker, Leopold O., Lleut.-Col. 
Patterson, John H., Brig.-Gen. 
Patzkl, Julius H., Maj. 
Pearson, Edward P., Col. 
Pearson, William H., Chaplain. 
Pennlngton, Alex C. M., Brig.-Gen. 
Pennypacker, Galusha, Col. 
Penrose, William H., Col. 
Perry, Alex, Col. 
Perry, David, Col. 
Piper, Alex, Col. 
Pollock, Otis W., Maj. 
Poole, DeWltt C., Maj. 
Porter, Charles, Lieut.-Col. 
Porter, Fitz-John, Col. 
Potter, James B. M., Lleut.-Col. 
Powell, James W., Col. 
Powell, William H., Col. 
Prime, Fred E., Maj. 
Quimby, Ira, Maj. 
Randall, Edward L., Maj. 
Randlett, James P., Lieut.-Col. 
Reese, Henry B., Maj. 
Rexford, William H., Maj. 
Ritner, I. N., Chaplain. 
Ritzius, Henry P., Maj. 
Robinson, George P. , Maj. 
Rochester, William B., Brig.-Gen. 
Rockwell, Almon P., Lleut.-Col. 
Rodenborough, P. P., Col. 
Rogers, Benjamin H., Maj. 
Rose, Thomas E., Maj. 
Rucker, Daniel H., Brig.-Gen. 
Ruger, Thomas H., Maj.-Gen. 
Ruggles, George D., Brig.-Gen. 
Runkle, Benjamin P., Maj. 
Russell, Edmund K., Maj. 
Russell, George B., Lleut.-Col. 
Russell, Gerald, Maj. 
Sanborn, Washington I., Maj. 
Sanford, George B., Col. 
Savage, Egbert B., Lleut.-Col. 
Sawtelle, Charles G., Brig.-Gen. 
Saxton, Rufus, Col. 
Seofleld, John M., Lieut.-Gen. 
Scott, Douglas M., Maj. 
Scott, William H., Chaplain. 
Scott, Winfield, Chaplain. 
Seibold, John S., Chaplain. 
Seton, Henry. Maj. 
Shatter, William R., Brig.-Gen. 
Shannon, William C., Maj. 
Sharp, Alex, Maj. 
Sharp. Thomas, Maj. 
Shea, Thomas, Lieut.-Col. 
Sickles, Daniel E., Maj.-Gen. 
Simpson, George W., Chaplain. 
Simpson, Marcus D. L., Col. 
Sinclair, William, Brig.-Gen. 
Skinner, John O., Maj. 
Smith, Alfred T., Col. 
Smith, Andrew K., Col. 



170 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



Smith, Charles H., Col. 
Smith, Joseph R., Col. 
Smith, Le-slle, Lieut. -Col. 
Smith, Lewis, Maj. 
Smith, Rodney, Col. 
Smith, Thomas M. K., Lleut.-Col. 
Smith, William, Brig.-Gen. 
Smith, Wm. F., Maj. 
Stafford, Stephen R., Maj. 
Stanley, Daviu S., Brig.-Gen. 
Btanton, Thaddeus H., Brig. -Gen. 
Stewart, Charles S., Col. 
Stewart, Joseph, Lieut. -Col. 
Stone, Ebenezer W., Maj. 
Stouch, George W. H., Maj. 
Strong, Norton, Maj. 
Sullivan, Thomas C., Brig.-Gen. 
Summers, John E., Col. 
Sumner, Edwin V., Brig.-Gen. 
Swaine, Peter T., Col. 
Swayne, Wager, Col. 
Terrell, Charles M., Col. 
Theaker, Hugh A., Col. 
Thompson, William A., Maj. 
Throckmorton, Charles B., Maj. 
Tidball, John C., Col. 
Tllford, Joseph G., Col. 
Tompkins, Charles H., Col. 
Tower, Z. B., Col. 
Town, Francis L., Col. 
Townsend, Edwin F., Col. 
Van Valzah. David D., Col. 
Van Vliet, Stewart, Col. 
Van Voast, James, Col. 
Vernon, Charles A., Maj. 



Vickery, Richard S., Maj. 
Vincent, Thomas M., Col. 
Vullum, Edward P., Col. 
Wagner, Henry, Lieut.-Col. 
Warner, Edward R., Maj. 
Waterbury, William M., Maj. 
Waters, William E., Lieut.-Col. 
Weaver, Francis H., Chaplain. 
Wedemeyer, William G., Maj. 
Weeks, George H., Brig.-Gen. 
Wells, Daniel T., Maj. 
Wheaton, Frank, Maj. -Gen. 
Wheeler, George M., Maj. 
Wherry, William M., Brig.-Gen. 
Whipple, William D., Col. 
White, David, Chaplain. 
White, Robert H., Maj. 
Whittemore, Edward W., Lieut.-Col. 
Wilcox, John A., Lieut.-Col. 
Wilhelm, Thomas, Maj. 
Wilkins, John D., Col. 
Willard, Wells, Lieut.-Col. 
Wilcox, Orlando B., Brig.-Gen. 
Williams, Robert, Brig.-Gen. 
Wills, David, Chaplain. 
Wilson, David, Chaplain. 
Wilson, Thomas, Col. 
Witcher, John S., Maj. 
Wolverton, William D., Lieut.-Col. 
Wood, Henry C., Col. 
Wood, Thomas J., Brig.-Gen. 
Woodruff, Edward C., Lieut.-Col. 
Woodward, George A., Col. 
Worth, William S., Brig.-Gen. 



GENERAL OFFICERS AND OFFICERS OF THE GENERAL STAFF, UNITED STATES 

VOLUNTEERS. 



Lawton, Henry W. 
MacArthur, Arthur. 



Davis, George W. 
Schwan, Theodore. 
Hall, Robert H. 
Wheaton. Loyd. 
Grant, Frederick D. 
Hughes, Robert P. 
Smith, James F. 
Funston, Frederick. 



GENERAL OFFICERS. 
MAJOR-GENERALS. 

Shafter, William R. 
Otis, Elwell S. 

BRIGADIER-GENERALS. 

Wilson, James H. 

Lee, Fitzhugh. 

Wheeler, Joseph. 

Bates, John C. 

Young, Samuel B. M. 
I Chaffee, Adna R. 
1 Ludlow, William. 

Wood, Leonard. 

OFFICERS OF THE GENERAL STAFF. 
ASSISTANT ADJUTANTS-GENERAL. 

rwith rank of Lieutenant-Colonel.] 
Richards, William V. Scott, Hugh L. 
Barry, Thomas H. 

[With rank of Major.] 
Sturgis, Samuel D. Greble. Edwin St. J. 
Pershing, John J. Noble, Robert H. 
Michie, Robert E. L. Alvord, Benjamin. 
Hickey, James B. 

INSPECTORS-GENERAL. 

[With rank of LieutenanfrColonel.] 
Maus, Marion P. Heyl, Charles H. 

Reade, Philip. 

[With rank of Major.] 
Harrison, Russell B. West, Parker W. 
Rolfe, Robert H. Beach, Wm. D. 

Murray, Cunliffe H. Brown, Robert A. 
Sharpe, Alfred C. 

JUDGE ADVOCATES. 

[With rank of Major.] 
Dudley, Edgar S. Hull, John A. 

McClure. Charles. Dunn, George M. 
Carbaugh, Harvey C. 



Jones, Samuel R. 
Sawyer, J. Estcourt. 
Von Schrader, Fred. 
Long, Oscar F. 
Martin. Medad C. 
Cruse, Thomas. 



QUARTERMA STERS. 

[With rank of Major.] 



Miller, William H. 
Thompson. Charles B. 
Devol. Carroll A. 
Brooks, John C. W. 
Blngham, Gonzalez S. 
Schreiner, Francis M. 



Hodgson, Frederick G. Young, Haldimand P. 



Ladd, Eugene F. 
Carson, John M., Jr. 
Ruhlen. George. 
Robertson, Edgar B. 
Hutchins, Morris C. 
Wilson, James L. 
Bellinger. John B. 
Roudlez, Leons. 



Baker, Chauncey B. 
White, William J. 
Aleshire, James B. 
Creager, Noble H. 
Knight, John T. 
French. John T., Jr. 
Cartwnght, George S. 



COMMISSARIES OF SUBSISTENCE. 

[With rank of Major.] 
Miles, Perry L. Davis. George B. 

Gallagher. Hugh J. Bralnard, David L. 
Mercer, Carroll. Ruthers, George W. 

Wood, Oliver E. 

ASSISTANT COMMISSARIES OP SUBSISTENCE. 

[With rank of Captain.] 
Hacker, Theodore B. Read, James C. 
Bootes, Samuel B. Ryan, Thomas F. 
Fenton, Eben B. Logan, James A., Jr. 

Doming, Peter C. Street, Harlow L. 

Hutchins, Edward R. Krauthoff. Charles R. 
Milliken, Seth M. Mothers!!!, Philip. 

Pomroy, Frederick H. Landstreet, John. Jr. 

SURGEONS. 

[With rank of Major.] 
Cardwell. Herbert W. Kendall. William P. 



Hysell. James H. 
Hoyt, Henry F. 
Edie. Guy L. 
Crosby. William D. 
Raymond, Henry I. 
Ives, Francis J. 



Morris, Edward R. 
Potter, Samuel O. L. 
Harris. Henry 8. T. 
Armstrong, Samuel T. 
Penrose. George H. 
Shiels, George F. 



THE ARMY. 



171 



De Niedeman, Wm. F. Laino, DamasoT. 
Carr, Lawrence C. Ducker, Orlando. 
Brown, Ira C. Combe, Frederick J. 

Davis, John G-. Meacham, Franklin A. 

Turnbull, Wilfrid. Kean, Jefferson R. 
Balch, Lewis. Drake, Charles M. 

Wlnn, William B. Keefer. Frank R. 
Matthews, W. 8. H. Fisher, Henry C. 
Echeverria, Rafael F. Ewing, Charles B. 
Thomason, Henry D. Bannister, William B 

ADDITIONAL PAYMASTERS. 

[With rank of Major.] 
Gambrill, William G. Ray. Beecher B. 
Downey, George F. Rochester, Wm. B., Jr. 
Fishback-George W. Holloway, George T. 
Keleher, Timothy D. Smith, Robert 8. 



REGIMENTAL OFFICERS 

ELEVENTH CAVALRY Colonel, Lockett, 
James; lieutenant-colonel, Starr, Charles 
G. ; majors, Sine, Hugh T.; Carson, 
Thomas G. ; Nolan, Dennis E. 

TWENTY-SIXTH INFANTRY Colonel, 
Rice, Edmund; lieutenant-colonel, Dick- 
man, Joseph T. ; majors, Anderson, Ed- 
ward D. ; Cook, Frank A.; Henry, Guy 
V., Jr. 

TWENTY-SEVENTH INFANTRY Colonel, 
Bell, James M. ; lieutenant-colonel. Cum- 
mins, Albert S. ; majors, Byram, George 
L.; Hunt, Clyde D. V.; Cassatt, Ed- 
ward B. 

TWENTY-EIGHTH INFANTRY Colonel, 
Birkhlmer, William E.; lieutenant-colo- 
nel, Leonard, Robert W. ; majors, Morgan, 
George H.; Porter, John B. ; Taggart, 
Elmore F. 

TWENTY-NINTH INFANTRY Colonel, 
Hardln, Edward E.; lieutenant-colonel, 
Sargent, Herbert H.; majors, Hawthorne, 
Harry L. ; Case, David B. ; Johnson, 
Evan M. 

THIRTIETH INFANTRY Colonel, Gard- 
ener, Cornelius; lieutenant-colonel, Camp- 
bell, James R.; majors, Steele, Matthew 
F. ; Ilartigan, Thomas L. ; Loverlng, Leon- 
ard A. 

THIRTY-FIRST INFANTRY Colonel, Pet- 
tet, James S. ; lieutenant-colonel, Hayes, 
Webb C. ; majors. McMahon, John E. ; 
Liggett, Hunter; Brett, Lloyd M. 

THIRTY-SECOND INFANTRY Colonel, 
Craig, Louis A. ; lieutenant-colonel, Stro- 
ther, Lewis H. ; majors, Spence, Robert 
E. L.; Cabell, Charles E.; Henry, Mor- 
ton J. 

THIRTY-THIRD INFANTRY Colonel, 
Hare, Luther R. ; lieutenant-colonel, 
Brereton, John J. ; majors, Cronin, Mar- 
cus D. ; March, Peyton C.; Slrmeyer, 
Edgar A. 

THIRTY-FOURTH INFANTRY Colonel, 
Kennon, Lyman W. V.; lieutenant-colonel. 
Howze. Robert L. ; majors, Penn, Julius 
A.; Wheeler, Joseph, Jr.; Shunk, Wil- 
liam A. 

THIRTY-FIFTH INFANTRY Colonel. 
Kobbe, William A.; lieutenant-colonel. 
Plummer, Edward H.; majors, Short, 
Walter C.; Laws, Albert; Walsh, Rob- 
ert D. 

THIRTY-SIXTH INFANTRY Colonel. 
Bell, J. Franklin; lleutenant-colonpl. 
Grove, William R. ; majors. Bishop, Wil- 
liam H.; Braden, John Q. A.; Luhn, Wil- 

THIRTY-SEVENTH INFANTRY Colonel, 



Lord, Herbert M. Varney, Thaddeus P. 

Howell, Seymour. Lynch, John R. 

Schoneld, William B. Goodman. Thomas C. 

Houston. James B. Graham, William R. 

Plckett, George E. Sternberg, Theodore. 

Dawes, James W. Sanders, Junius G. 

Becker, Otto. Stanton, Charles E. 

Canby, James. Arthur, George G. 

Curry, Manly B. Stevens, Pierre C. 

Wilkins. Joseph S. Belknap, Hugh R. 

Monaghan, William. Slaughter, Bradner D. 
Coffin. Eugene. 

SIGNAL OFFICERS. 

[With rank of Major.] 

Thompson, Richard E. Glassford, William A. 
Scriven, George P. Mazneld, Joseph E. 

OF THE VOLUNTEERS. 
Wallace, Robert B. ; lieutenant-colonel, 
Hamer, Thomas R.; majors, Cheatham. 
B. Frank; Boyd, Charles T.; Orwig, 
Henry B. 

THIRTY-EIGHTH INFANTRY Colonel, 
Anderson, George S. ; lieutenant-colonel, 
Crane, Charles J. ; majors. Holbrook, 
Wlllard A.; Mulr, Charles H. ; Goodler, 
Lewis E. 

THIRTY-NINTH INFANTRY Colonel, Bui- 
lard, Robert L.; lieutenant-colonel, Crow 
der, Enoch H. ; majors, Mulford, Harry 
B. ; Parker, John H.; Langhome, Geo. T. 

FORTIETH INFANTRY Colonel, Goodwin, 
Edward A. ; lieutenant-colonel, Byrne, 
Bernard A.; majors, McNamee, Michael 
M. ; Craighill, William E. ; Case, James F. 

FORTY-FIRST INFANTRY Colonel, Rich- 
mond, Ephraiin T. C. ; lieutenant-colonel, 
Mallory, John S.; majors, Preston, Guy 
H. ; Wood, Palmer G. ; Wholley, John H. 

FORTY-SECOND INFANTRY Colonel, 
Thompson, J. Milton; lieutenant-colonel, 
Beacom, John H. ; majors, Brown, Wil- 
liam C.; Prime, John R.; Carey, Ed 
ward C. 

FORTY-THIRD INFANTRY Colonel, Mur- 
ray, Arthur; lieutenant-colonel, Wilder. 
Wllber E. ; majors, Allen, Henry T.; Gil- 
more, John C., Jr.; Andrews, Lincoln C. 

FORTY-FOURTH INFANTRY Colonel. 
McClernand, Edward J. ; lieutenant-colo- 
nel, Scott, William S.; majors. Hale. 
Harry C. ; Walcutt, Charles C., Jr.; Me 
Coy, Henry B. 

FORTY-FIFTH INFANTRY Colonel, 
Dorst, Joseph H.; lieutenant-colonel, 
Parker, James; majors, Frederick, Daniel 
A.; Cole, Edwin T. ; Birkhaeuser, Theo- 
dore K. 

FORTY-SIXTH INFANTRY Colonel, 
Schnyler. Walter S.; lieutenant-colonel, 
Pratt. Edward B. ; majors, Miller, Sam- 
uel W.; Johnson, William H.; Brooke, 
William. 

FORTY-SEVENTH INFANTRY Colonel, 
Howe, Walter; lieutenant-colonel, Ed- 
wards, Clarence R. ; majors. Wise, Hugh 
D. ; Shipton, James A.; Anderson, Keller. 

FORTY-EIGHTH INFANTRY Colonel, 
Duvall, William P.; lieutenant-colonel, 
Jones, Thaddeus W. ; majors, Rice, Sedg< 
wick; Dade, Alex L. ; Howard, John. 

FORTY-NINTH INFANTRY Colonel, 
Beck, William H.; lieutenant-colonel. 
Ducat, Arthur C. ; majors. Hinds, Ernest: 
Kirkman, George W. ; Johnson, Carter P. 



172 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOE 1900. 



GARRISONED POSTS. 



Adams, Ft.. Newport, R. I. (East). 

Hdqrs. C, H and I, 7th Art. 
Adjuntas, P. R. B, 5th Cav. 
Aguadilla, P. R. H, llth Inf. 
Aibonito, P. R. G, 5th Cav. 
Alcatraz Island, Gal. (Cal.). N, 3d Art. 
Angel Island, Cal. (Cal.). Hdqrs. A, 2d 

Inf. 
Apache, Ft., Ariz. (Colo.). E and G, 9th 

Cav. 

Areclbo, P. R. A, 5th Cav. 
Armlstead, Ft., Baltimore, Md. (East). 

Det. D, 4th Art. 
Assinnlboine, Ft., Mont. (Dak.). Det. 24th 

Inf. 

Banes, Cuba. F, 10th Cav. 
Banks, Ft., Winthrop, Mass. F, 7th Art. 
Baracoa, Cuba. B. 5th Inf. 
Barrancas, Ft., Warrington, Fla. (East). 

H and L, 1st Art. 

Bayarno, Cuba. L and M, 10th Cav. 
Bayard, Ft., N. Mex. (Colo.). K, 9th Cav. 
Benlcia Barracks, Benicia, Cal. (Cal.). 

Det. 
Bliss, Ft., El Paso, Tex. (East). A, 25th 

Inf. 
Boise Barracks, Boise, Idaho (Col.). H, 6th 

Cav. 
Brady, Ft., Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. (Lakes). 

M, 7th Inf. 
Brown, Ft., Brownsville, Tex. (Texas). 

L, 9th Cav. 

Caibarien, Cuba. L, 2d Inf. 
Canby, Ft., Wash. (Col.). Det. 
Cardenas, Cuba. C, D and E, 10th Inf. 
Casey, Ft., Seattle, Wash. Det. 3d Art. 
Caswell, Ft., Southport, N. C. (East). C, 

4th Art. 

Canto, Cuba. Det. 10th Cav. 
Cayey, P. R. M, 5th Cav. 
Ciego de Avila, Cuba. B, I and L, 15th Inf. 
Clenfuegos, Cuba. M, 2d Inf. 
Circle City, Alaska. Det. L, 7th Inf. 
Clark, Ft., Bracketville, Tex. (Texas). 

M, 9th Cav. 
Columbus Barracks, Columbus, O. (Lakes). 

G, 7th Inf. 
Columbus, Ft., N. Y. City, N. Y. (East). 

A, 5th Art. 
Constitution, Ft., New Castle, N. H. (East). 

Det. 4th Art. 
Crook, Ft., Neb. (Mo.). I, K and M, 10th 

Inf. 

D. A. Russell, Ft.,Wyo. (Col.). B, 1st Cav. 
Delaware, Ft., Delaware City, Del. (East). 

Det. 

Douglas, Ft., Utah (Col.). C, 9th Cav. 
Duchesne, Ft., Dtah (Col.).' I, 9th Cav. 
Du Pont, Ft., Delaware City, Del. (East), 

L, 4th Art. 

Dyea, Alaska (Col.). L, 24th Inf. 
Egbert, Ft., Eagle City, Alaska. L, 7th 

Inf. 

El Caney, Cuba. E and D, 5th Inf. 
El Cobre, Cuba. Det. 5th Inf. 
Ethan Allen, Ft., Essex Junction, Vt. 

(East). Det. 
Flagler, Ft., Port Townsend, Wash. B, 3d 

Art. 

Gibara, Cuba. B, 10th Cav. 
Gibbon, Ft., Tananan, Alaska. E and F, 

7th Inf. 
Grant, Ft., Ariz. (Colo.). Hdqrs. A and B, 

9th Cav. 
Greble, Ft., Jamestown, R. I. (East). A, 

7th Art. 

Guanajay, Cuba. I, K. L and M, 1st Inf. 
Guautanamo. Cuba. H, 5th Inf. 



Hamilton, Ft., N. Y. (East). Hdqrs. H, K. 

and N, 5th Art. 
Hancock, Ft., N. J. (East). C, I and L, 

5th Art. 
Harrison, Ft., Helena, Mont. (Dak.). D, 

24th Inf. 
Havana, Cuba. Hdqrs. G, H, I, K, L. M. 

N and O, 2d Art. 

Holguin, Cuba. E and I, 10th Cav. 
Honolulu, H. I. I and K, 6th Art. 
Huachuca, Ft., Ariz. (Col.). F, 9th Cav. 
Humacao, P. It. C, 5th Cav. 
Hunt, Ft., Riverside Park, Va. (East). A, 

4th Art. 
Jackson Barracks, New Orleans, La (East) 

D and O, 1st Art. 

Jefferson Barracks, Mo. (Mo.). M, 6th Cav. 
Keogh, Ft., Mont. (Dak.). F, 1st Cav 
Key West Barracks, Key West, Fla. (East). 

Det. 

Lares, Puerto Rico. L, llth Inf. 
Leavenworth, Ft., Kan. (Mo.). B and K. 

6th Cav.; B, C and D, 1st Inf. 
Logan H. Roots, Ft., Ft. Roots, Ark. (Mo.). 

A, 1st Inf. 

Logan, Ft., Col. (Colo.). C, 6th Cav. 
Mackenzie, Ft., Sheridan, Wyo. (Colo.). L, 

10th Inf. 
Madison Barracks, Sacket Harbor, N. Y. 

(East). I, 7th; E, F, G and H, 15th Inf. 
Manati, P. R. K, 5th Cav. 
Manzanillo, Cuba. Hdqrs. A, C, G and H 

10th Cav. 
Mason, Ft., San Francisco, Cal, (Cal.). E. 

3d Art. 
Matanzas, Cuba. A, C, D, F, G and M 3d 

Cav. ; Hdqrs. A, B, F, G and H, lath Inf. 
Mayaguez, P. R. Hdqrs. D, E, H and L 

5th Cav.; C, llth Inf. 
Mayari, Cuba. D, 10th Cav. 
McHenry, Ft., Baltimore, Md. (East). D, 

4th Art. 
Mclntosh, Ft., Laredo, Tex. (Texas) D 

25th Inf. 
McPherson, Ft., Ga. (East). B, C, D and 

E, 2d Art. ; B, 7th Inf. 
Meade, Ft., S. Dak. (Dak.). Hdqrs. G, H 

and I, 1st Cav. 
Michie, Ft., N. Y., New London, Conn. 

(East). B, 7th Art. 

Missoula, Ft., Mont. (Dak.). Det. 24th Inf. 
Monroe, Ft., Va. (East). Hdqrs. G, N and 

O, 4th Art. 
Morgan, Ft., Mobile, Ala. (East). I, 1st 

Art. 

Mott, Ft., Salem, N. J. (East). H, 4th Art. 
Myer, Ft., Va. (East). B, G, H and I, 3d 

Cav. 
Myer, Ft., Va. (East). Signal Post; B, 

Sig. Corps. 
Niagara. Ft., Youngstown, N. Y. (East). 

Det. 7th Inf. 

Niobrara, Ft., Neb. (Mo.). K, 1st Cav. 
North Point, Baltimore, Md. (East). E, 4th 

Art. 

Nuevitas, Cuba. K, 15th Inf. 
Ontario, Ft., Oswego, N. Y. (East). I, 7th 

Inf. 

Palma Soriano, Cuba. Det. 5th Inf. 
Paso Caballo, Cuba. Hdqrs. B, C and D, 

2d Inf. 
Philippine Islands. A and B, Eng. Batl.: 

Hdqrs. A, C, D, E, F, K, L and M, 3d 

Cav.; 4th Cav.; E, 1st, G, H, K and L. 

3d, F, 4th, F, 5th; Hdqrs. A, B, C, D. 

E, F, G, H, L, M, N and O, 6th Art. ; 

3d, 4th, 6th, 9th, 12th, 13th, 14th, 16th. 

17th, 18th, 19th, 20th, 21st, 22d and 23d; 



THE AHMY. 



173 



Hdqrs. A, C, E, F, G, H, I and K, 24th; 

Hdqrs. B, E, F, H, I, K, L and M, 

25th Inf.; llth U. S. Vol. Cav.; 26th, 27th, 

28tb, 29th, 30th, 31st, 32d, 33d, 34th, 35th, 

36th, 37th, 38th, 39th, 40th, 43d, 46th and 

47th U. S. Vol. Inf. 
Pinar del Rio, Cuba. C, E, G and I, 7th 

Cav.; Hdqrs. E, F, G and H, 1st Inf. 
Placetas, Cuba. I and L, 2d Cav. 
Plattsburg Barracks, Plattsburg, N. Y. 

(East). C, 7th Inf. 
Point, Ft., San Francisco, Cal. (Cal.). 

Det. 
Ponce, P. B. I, 5th Cav. ; A, F and G, llth 

Inf. 
Porter, Ft., Buffalo, N. Y. (East). K, 7th 

Inf. 
Preble, Ft., Portland, Me. (East). E, 7th 

Art. 
Presidio of San Francisco, Cal. (Cal.). F 

and G, 6th Cav. ; C and O, 3d Art. 
Puerto Padre, Cuba. K, 10th Cav. 
Puerto Principe, Cuba. 8th Cav.; Hdqrs. 

A, C, D and M, 15th Inf. 
Quemados, Cuba. A and F, 2d Art.; Hdqrs. 

A, B, D, F, H, K, L and M, 7th Cav.: 

Hdqrs. A, B, C, D, E, F, G and H, 8th 

Inf. 
Rampart City, Alaska. Det. E and F, 7th 

Inf. 

Reno, Ft., Okla. (Mo.). D, 6th Cav. 
Riley, Ft., Kas. (Mo.). Hdqrs. A, 6th 

Cav.; F, 3d, and B, 4th Art. 
Ringgold, Ft., Rio Grande, Tex. (Texas). 

D, 9th Cav. 
Robinson, Ft., Neb. (Mo.). A, C and L, 1st 

Cav. 

Sagua la Grande, Cuba. I, 2d Inf. 
Saint Francis Barracks, St. Augustine, Fla. 

(East). A, 1st Art. 
Sam Houston, Ft., San Antonio, Tex. 

(Texas). K, 1st Art.; G, 25th Inf. 
San Carlos (sub-post of Ft. Grant), Ariz. 

(Colo.). D, 7th Inf.; C, 25th Inf. 
Sancti Spiritus, Cuba. A, 2d Inf. 
San Diego Barracks, San Diego, Cal. (Cal.) 

D, 3d Art. 
San Francisco, Cal. (Cal.). 42d, 44th, 45th, 

48th and 49th D. S. Vol. Inf. 
San Jacinto, Ft., Galveston, Tex. (Texas). 

G, 1st Art. 
San Juan, P. R. F, 5th Cav.; E and G, 

5th Art.; Hdqrs. B, E, 1, K and M, llth 

Inf. 

San Luis, Cuba. E, 5th Inf. 
Santa Clara, Cuba. Hdqrs. B, E, H and K, 

Santiago', Cuba. Hdqrs. A, C, F and G, 5th 
Inf. 



Schuyler, Ft., Westchester, N. Y. (East). 

K, 7th Art. 
Screven, Ft., Tybee Island, Ga. (East). F, 

1st Art. 
Sheridan, Ft., 111. (Lakes). D, 5th Art., 

and I, K, L and M, 5th Inf. 
Sherman, Ft., Idaho (Colo.). Det. 24th Inf. 
Sill, Ft., Okla. (Mo.). I and L, 6th Cav. 
Slocum, Ft., New Rochelle, N. Y. (East). 

L, 7th Art. 
Snelling, Ft., Minn. (Dak.). Det. 7th; I, 

K, L and M, 8th Inf. 
Stevens, Ft., Hammond, Ore. (Col.). M, 3d 

Art. 
St. Michael, Ft., Alaska (Col.). Det. E 

and F, 7th Inf. 
Strong, Ft., Boston, Mass. (East). Det. 4th 

Art. 
Sullivans Island, Moultrieville, S. C. (East). 

Hdqrs. C and M, 1st Art. 
Terry, Ft., N. Y., New London, Conn. 

(East). B and N, 1st Art. 
Thomas, Ft., Newport, Ky. (Lakes). E, F, 

G and H, 2d Inf. 
Totten, Ft., Willets Point, N. Y. (East). 

Hdqrs. C and D, Eng. Batl., and N, 7th 

Art. 

Trinidad, Cuba. K, 2d Inf. 
Trumbull, Ft., New London, Conn. (East). 

I, 4th Art. 
Vancouver Barracks, Vancouver, Wash. 

(Col.). B, 24th Inf. 
Wadsworth, Ft., Rosebank, N. Y. (East). 

B, M and O, 5th Art.- 
Walker, Minn. A, 7th Inf. 
Walla Walla, Ft., Walla Walla, Wash. 

(Col.). E, 6th Cav. 
Warren, Ft., Boston, Mass. (East). M, 4th, 

and G, 7th Art. 

Washakie, Ft., Wyo. (Colo.). E, 1st Cav. 
Washington Barracks, Washington, D. C. 

(East). M and O, 7th Art. 
Washington, Ft., Md. (East). K, 4th Art. 
Wayne, Ft., Detroit, Mich. (Lakes). Hdqrs. 

and H, 7th Inf. 

West Point, N. Y. E, Eng. Batl. 
Williams, Ft., Willard, Me. (East). D, 7th 

Art. 
Winfleld Scott, Ft., San Francisco, Cal. 

(Cal.). I, 3d Art. 

Wingate, Ft., N. Mex. (Colo.). H, 9th Cav. 
Wood, Ft., New York city (East). Det. 
Wrangel, Ft., Alaska (Col.). Det. 24th Inf. 
Wright, Ft., Spokane, Wash. (Col.). M. 

24th Inf. 

Yates, Ft., N. Dak. (Dak.). D, 1st Cav. 
Yauco, P. R. D, llth Inf. 
Yellowstone, Ft., Mammoth Hot Springs, 

Wyo. (Dak.). M, 1st Cav. 

Department in which post is located is 
shown in brackets. 



STRENGTH OF THE ARMY. 

The military forces In the service of the United States on the 25th of October, 1899, were 
composed as follows: 

REGULAR ARMY. 

Enlisted 



General officers 7 

Adjutant-General's dept 14 

Inspector-General's dept : 
Judge-Advocate Gen.'s dept.. 7 

Quartermaster's dept 

Subsistence dept 19 

Medical dept 1JJ7 

Pay dept 21 

Corps or engineers 123 

Ordnance dept 62 

Signal corps 5 



Officers, men. TotaL 
H 



105 

163 

3,314 



628 
681 
550 



144 
182 
3,481 
26 
751 
743 
555 



Chaplains 

Record and pension office 

Military academy 

Electrician sergeants 



Enlisted 

Officers, men. Total. 
30 .... 30 



15 



15 



Total 509 5,702 6,211 

10 regiments of cavalry 12,022 

7 regiments of artillery 10.191 

25 regiments of infantry 34,583 

Indian scouts and recruits 1,579 



Total 64,586 



174 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


von 

General officers and 
1 regiment of caval 
24 regiments of infa 
Puerto Rico batta li( 


JNTEEBS 
staff corp 
ry 


). 

3 


260 
.284 
.615 
414 


On t 
tribute 

In the 
In Pue 
In Cub 
In Phi 
En rou 
In Ala 
In Hiiv 

Tot 
that "I 
shown a 
the tro 
egate of 


le 1st of Oc 

d as follow 

United Stat 
rto Rico . . . 


tober these 

Offi* 
es i,( 


forces were dis- 

xrs. Men. Total. 
88 32.M1 34,229 
08 8,265 3.363 
(91 10.796 11,187 
171 31,344 32.315 
>46 16,553 17.099 
15 484 499 
13 453 466 




itry 
in. , 


.... & 




] 


Total 

RECAPITULATION. 


,0,4 

.586 
.574 


Lipp 
tet 
ska 
rai 

I. 


ine Islands S 
3 Philippine Isld. i 


United States volnnte'er 
Grand total 


5 34 


in Islan 


ds 


ft 


,160 
ort 
3rs. 
Tith 
iggr 


s 


32 95,426 99,158 
1, next, all the 
tates. will have 
a total strength 


The adjutant-general says in his rep 
infantry regiments United States volunte 
sailed for the Philippine Islands. These, ' 
of 2,117 officers and 63,608 enlisted men (an 


, is expected by Dec. 
bove as in the United g 
Dps now there, will give 
65,725}." 


PAST POLITICAL COMPLEXION OF THE STATES. 

R., Republican; W., Whig; D., Democratic; U., Onion; A., American; A. M., Anti-Masonic; 
N. R., National Republican; P., Populist. 


STATES. 








































i 

X 


X 

1 


w 

CO 
00 


t 

X 


3 

00 


1 


j 

00 




IQ 

00 









X 


3 

X 


1 


n 
| 


CO 

t~ 

X 


I 
X 


S 

X 


1 


it 
I 




00 








































Alabama. 
Arkansas 


D. 


D. 


D. 


D. 
D. 


D. 
D. 


D. 
D. 


D. 
D. 


D. 
D. 
D. 


D. 
D. 
D. 


'D. 
D. 
R. 


'R.' 


R. 
R. 
R. 


R. 
R. 
R. 


D. 
I). 
R. 
R. 
D. 
D. 
R. 
D. 


D. 
D. 
D. 
R. 
R. 
D. 
D. 
D. 


D. 
D. 
R. 
R. 
D. 
D 
D. 
D. 


D. 
D. 
R. 
R. 
D. 
D. 
D. 
D. 


D. 
D. 
D 
P. 
D. 
D. 
D. 
D. 
P. 
D. 
D. 
R. 
P. 
D. 
D. 
R. 
D. 
R. 
R. 
R. 
D. 
D. 
R. 
R. 
P. 
R. 
D. 
I). 
D. 
P 
R. 
R. 
R. 
R. 
D. 
R. 
I). 
D. 
R. 
D. 
R. 
D. 
D. 
R. 


D. 
D. 

| 

R. 
R. 
D. 
D. 
D. 
R. 
R. 
R. 
D. 
R. 
D. 
R. 
R. 
R. 
R. 
R. 
D. 
D. 
D. 
D. 
D. 
R. 
R. 
R. 
D. 
R. 
R. 
R. 
R. 
R. 
D. 
D. 
D. 
D. 
R. 
D. 
D. 
R. 
R. 
D. 


















Connecticut 
Delaware 
Florida. 


R. 
W. 


R. 
R. 


N. R. 

N. R. 


D. 
W. 


W. 
W. 


W. 
W. 


W. 
W. 
W 


D. 
D. 
D 


R. 
I). 
D 


R. 
D. 
n 


R. 
D. 


R. 
D. 
R. 
D. 


R. 

R. 
R. 
D. 


Georgia. 


W. 


D. 


D. 


W. 


W. 


D. 


W. 


D. 


D. 


D. 




Illinois. 
Indiana 


D. 
D. 


D. 
D. 


D. 
D. 


D. 
W. 


D. 
W. 


D. 
D. 


D. 
D. 
D. 


D. 

D. 
D. 


D. 
D. 
R. 


R. 
R. 
R. 


R. 
R. 
R. 
R. 
D. 

'R.' 

R. 
R. 
R. 
R. 

'R.' 


R. 
R. 
R. 
R. 
I) 
D. 
R. 
D. 
R. 
R. 
R. 

'R. 


R. 
R. 
R. 
R. 
D. 
R. 
R. 
D. 
R. 
R. 
R. 
R. 
D. 


R. 
D. 
R. 
R. 
D. 
R. 
R. 
D. 
R. 
R. 
R. 
D. 
D. 


R. 
R. 
R. 
R. 
D. 
D. 
R. 
D. 
R. 
R. 
R. 
D. 
D. 


R. 
D. 
R. 
R. 
D. 
D. 
R. 
D. 
R. 
R. 
R. 
D. 
D. 


R. 
R. 
R. 
R. 
D. 
D. 
R. 
D. 
R. 
R. 
R. 
D. 
D. 
















Kentucky 
Louisiana 
Maine 
Maryland 
Massachusetts.. 


W 
D. 
R. 
D. 
R. 


D. 
D. 
R. 
R. 
R. 


N. R. 
D. 
D. 
N. R. 
N. R. 


W. 
D. 
D. 
W. 
W. 
D. 


W. 

W. 
W. 

w. 
w. 
w. 


W. 
D. 
D. 
W. 
W. 
D. 


W. 
W. 
D. 
W. 
W. 
D. 


W. 
D. 
D. 
D. 
W. 
D. 


D. 
D. 
R. 
A. 
R. 
R. 


U. 
D. 
R. 
D. 
R. 
R. 
R. 
D. 
D. 










Mississippi 
Missouri 


D. 
W. 


D. 

D. 


D. 
D. 


D. 
D. 


w. 

D. 


D. 
D. 


D. 
D. 


D. 
D. 


D. 
D. 


























R. 
R. 
R. 
D. 
D. 
R. 


R. 
R. 
R. 
R. 
R. 
R. 


R. 
R. 
R. 
D. 
D. 
D. 


R. 
D. 
R. 
D. 
R. 
D. 


R. 
R. 
R. 
D. 
D. 
D. 


R. 
R. 
R. 
D. 
R. 
D. 
























R. 
R. 
D. 
R. 


New Hampshire 
New Jersey 
New York 
North Carolina. 


R. 
D. 
R. 
D. 


R. 
R. 
D. 
D. 


D. 
D. 
D. 
D. 


D. 
W. 
D. 
D. 


D. 
W. 
W. 
W. 


D. 
W. 
D. 
W. 


D. 
W. 
W. 
W. 


D. 
D. 
D. 
D. 


R. 
D. 
R. 
D. 


R. 
D. 
R. 
D. 


Ohio 


W 




D. 


W. 


W. 


W. 


D. 


D. 


R. 


R. 
R. 
R. 
R. 
D. 


R. 
R. 
R. 
R. 


R. 
D. 
R. 
R. 
R. 


R. 
R. 
R. 
R. 
R. 


R. 
R. 
R. 
R. 
R. 


R. 

R. 
R. 
R. 
D. 


R. 
R. 
R. 
R. 
D. 


R. 
R. 
R. 
R. 
D. 






r> 


Pennsylvania... 
Rhode Island... 
South Carolina.. 


D. 
R. 
I). 


D. 
R. 
D. 


D. 
N. R. 
W. 


D. 
D. 
W. 


W. 
W. 
D. 


D. 
W. 
D. 


W 
W. 
D. 


D. 
D. 
D. 


D. 
R. 
D. 


Tennessee 
Texas. 
Vermont 
Virginia 


D. 

R. 
W. 


D. 

R.' 
D. 


D. 

A.'M'. 

D. 


W. 

'w. 

D. 


W. 

w'. 

D. 


W. 

'w. 

D. 


W. 
D. 
W. 
D. 


W. 
D. 
W. 
D. 


D. 
D. 
R. 
D. 


U. 
D. 
R. 
U. 


'R.' 


R. 
R.' 


D. 
D. 
R. 
R. 


D. 

D. 
R 
D. 


D. 
D. 
R. 
D. 


D. 
D. 
R. 
D. 


D. 
D. 
R. 
D. 


West Virginia.. . 






















R. 
R. 


R. 
R. 


R. 

R. 


R. 
R. 


D. 
R. 


D. 

R. 


D. 
R. 
















D. 


D. 


R. 


R. 


















































In five states in 1892 the electoral rote was divided: California gave 8 electoral votes for 
Cleveland and 1 for Harrison and Ohio gave 1 for Cleveland and 22 for Harrison; in Michigan, 
by act of the legislature, each congress onal district voted separately for an elector; in Oregon 
1 of the 4 candidates for electors on the people's party ticket was also on the democratic ticket; 
in North Dakota 1 of the 2 people's party electors cast his vote for Cleveland, this causing the 
electoral vote of the state to be equally divided between Cleve and, Harrison and Weaver. 
In 1896 California gave 8 electoral votes to McKinley and 1 to Bryan; Kentucky gave 12 to 
McKinley and 1 to Bryan. 



THE NAVY. 

SCfje Nabg. 

[Corrected to Nov. 15, 1899.] 
ACTIVE LIST. 



175 



ADMIRAL. 

George Dewey, Navy Department. 
REAR ADMIRALS. 

Frederick V. McNalr, supt Naval Academy. 

John A. Howell, prest Naval Exam. Board. 

Albert Kautz, comdg Pacific Station. 

Geo. C. Remey, comdt Navy Yard, Portsmouth. 

Norman H. Farquhar, comdg North Atl. Sta. 

John C. Watson, comdg Asiatic Station. 

VV infield S. Schley, comde South Atl. Station. 

Silas Casey, comdt Navy Yard, League Island. 

William T. Sampson, comdt Navy Yd., Boston. 

Bartlett J. Cromwell, waiting orders. 

John W. Philip, comdt Navy Yard, New York. 

Francis J. Higginson, chm Lighthouse Board. 

Frederick Rodgers, prest Board Inspection and 
Survey. 

Louis Kempff, comdt Navy Yard, Mare Island. 

George W. Sumner, comdt Naval Station, Port 
Royal. 

Benjamin F. Day, mem Examining and Re- 
tiring Boards. 

Alex H. McCormick, comdt Navy Yard, Wash. 

A. S. Barker, comdg Navy Yard, Norfolk. 

CAPTAINS. 

Charles S. Cotton, comdg recg ship Indepen- 
dence. 

Silas W. Terry, waiting orders. 

Merrill Miller, comdg recg ship Vermont. 

John J. Read, comdg recg ship Richmond. 

Mortimer L. Johnson, capt Navy Yard, Boston. 

Edwin M. Shepard, lighthouse insp.. 3d dist. 

Robley D. Evans, mem Bd. Insp. and Survey. 

Frank Wildes, capt Navy Yard, New York. 

Henry Glass, comdg Penaacola and Training 
Station, San Francisco. 

Philip H. Cooper, leave absence. 

Henry C. Taylor, War College, Newport. 

Geo. H. Wadleigh, comdg recg ship Wabash. 

A. 8. Crowninsnieid, chief Bureau Navigation. 

James H. Sands, gov Naval Home. 

Yates Stirling, mem Lighthouse Board. 

William C. Wise, comdg recg ship Franklin. 

Joseph B. Cogblan, comdt Puget Sound Naval 
Station. 

Purnell F. Harrington, capt Navy Yard, Ports- 
mouth. 

Louis J. Allen. Navy Yard, Mare Island. 

Geprge W. Melville, chief Bureau Steam En- 
gineering. 

Nehemiah M. Dyer, waiting orders. 

Francis A. Cook, mem Examining and Retir- 
ing Boards. 

Colby M. Chester, gen insp Kentucky. 

C. E. Clark, capt Navy Yard, League Island. 

Charles J. Barclay, waiting orders. 

Peter A. Rearlck, insp men. Newport News. 

Charles D. Sigsbee, comdg Texas. 

Benj. P. Lamberton. waiting orders. 

Richard P. Leary, gov Island Guam. 

William H. Whiting, San Francisco. Cal. 

Charles O'Neil, chief Bureau Ordnance. 

Caspar F. Goodrich, comdg U. 8. S. Iowa. 

French E. Chadwick, comdg New York. 

Theodore F. Jewell, comdg Brooklyn. 

William M. Folger. gen insp Kearsarge. 

Clpriano Andrade, prest Engr. Exam. Board. 

John Lowe, special duty. Hartford, Conn. 

John Schouler, Annapolis, Md. 

Francis W. Dickins, comdg Indiana. 

Lewis W. Robinson, recrtg rend, Chicago. 

George F. F. Wilde, comdg Oregon. 

Charles H. Davis, supt Naval Observatory. 

Bowman H. McCalla, comdg U. S. S. Newark. 

Charles J. Train, comdg Massachusetts. 

Edwin White, waiting orders. 

William H. Harris, Navy Yard, Portsmouth. 



Ralph Aston, Insp men, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
George W. Pigman, comdg Charleston. 
John McGowan, comdg Monadnock. 
J. G. Green, comdt Naval Sta., Havana, Cuba 
Charles H. Rockwell, comdg CJ. 8. S. Chicago ' 
James M. Forsyth, comdg Baltimore. 
George A. Converse, Bureau of Navigation 
RoyalB. Bradford, chief Bureau Equipment. 
J.E. Craig, hydrographer Bureau Equipment. 
Charles M. Thomas, comdg Lancaster. 
Albert 8. Snow, waiting orders. 
S, e ,?, rg ^ C ^ Reiter ' comd U. S. S. Philadelphia. 
Willard H. Brownson, Cramp's shipyard. 
William W. Mead, capt Navy Yard. Mare Isl. 
Edwin S. Houston, comdg U. 8. 8. Amphitrite. 
H/dwin Longnecker, comdg New Orleans. 
George E. fde, comdg Yosemite. 
George M. Book, waiting orders. 
Thomas Perry, secy Lighthouse Board. 
C. H. Stockton, prest War College, Newport. 
Asa Walker, War College. Newport. 
Oscar Farenholt, Navy Yard, Boston 
Edward T. Strong, waiting orders. 
Eugene W. Watson, Navy Yard, Norfolk. 

COMMANDERS. 

Robert B. Impey, waiting orders. 
John F. Merry, Naval Repr., Honolulu. 
William C. Gibson, Navy Yard, New York. 
Washburn Maynard, lighthouse insp, 8th dist. 
H. W. Lyon, Navy Yard, New York. 
J. H. Dayton, comdg San Juan, Puerto Rico. 
Morris R. 8. Mackenzie, comdg Prairie. 
Charles S. Sperry, comdg Yorktown. 
Frank Courtis, comdg trng ship Essex. 
W. W. Reisinger, comdt Navy Yard, Pensacola. 
William T. Burwell, comdg Wheeling. 
J. J. Hunker, comdg trng ship sta., Newport. 
Franklin Hanford, lighthouse Insp, 10th dist. 
Robert M. Berry, Naval Home. 
Samuel W. Very, comdg Castine. 
Henry N. Manney, Navy Yard, New York. 
Chapman C. Todd, Navy Yard, Washington. 
Joseph N. Hemphill, comdg Detroit. 
Abraham B. H. Lillie, Navy Yard, New York. 
William T. Swinburne, Navy Yd., Portsmouth. 
Wm. H. Ernory. mem Board Insp. and Survey. 
George A. Bicknell, comdg Monocacy. 
C. T.Hutchlns. comdt Cadets, Naval Academy. 
Seth M. Ackley. comdg Concord. 
Benjamin F. Tilley, comdg Abarend-a. 
Harry Knox. comdg U. 8.8. Princeton- 
Clifford H. West, Navy Yard. New York. 
John P. Merrell, comdg Montgomery. 
Joseph G. Eaton, Navy Yard, Boston. 
Edward P. Wood, lighthouse insp. 5th dist. 
William I. Moore, Naval Station, Port Royal. 
Charles Belknap, waiting orders. 
Fernando P. Gllmore, comdg U. 8. 8. Isle de 

Cuba. 

Eugene H. C. Leutze, waiting orders. 
Uriel Sebree, lighthouse insp, 12th dist. 
William A. Windsor, insp mch, Ellzabethport. 
Albert R. Couden, Insp ord Proving Grounds. 
Edwin C. Pendleton. supt Gun Factory. 
William Swift, ord office. Navy Yd., New York. 
Henry B. Mansfield, -lighthouse insp, loth dist. i 
Charles R. Roelker, mem Bd. Insp. and Survey. 
F. M. Sy monds, lighthouse insp, 9th dist. 
Walton Goodwin, comdg trng ship Adams. 
John D. Ford. Columbian Iron Works. 
Albert Ross, comdg Alliance. 
Richardson Clover, chief intelligence officer. 
James M. Miller, dut con U. S. S. Scindia. 
Frederick M. Wise, comdg N. S. S. Enterprise. 
J. V. B. Bleecker, comdg U. 8. S. Isle de Luzon. 
Andrew Dunlap, comdg Solace. 
John A. B. Smith, Navy Yard, New York. 
Edward H. Gheen, comdg Marietta. 



176 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



Wells L. Field, comdg U. S. S. Ranger. 
Harrison G. O. Colby, comdg Marblehead. 
Leavitt C. Logan, comdg Machias. 
Conway H. Arnold, comdg U. S. S. Bennington. 
William S. Cowles, asst Bureau Navigation. 
Charles O. Allibone, comdg Wilmington. 
Alexander G. Bates, Navy Yard, League Isld. 
Edward D. Taussig, lighthouse insp, 13th dist. 
J. K. Pillsbury, equip office, Navy Yd., Boston. 
William H. Reeder, comdg naut S.S. St. Marys. 
Robert W. Milligan. Navy Yard, Norfolk. 
George W. Baird, supt S., W. and N. bide. 
Hichard Inch, Naval Station, Cavite, P.I. 
Harrie Webster, Bureau Steam Engineering. 



Daniel Delehantv. gov Sailor's Snug Harbor. 

l, comdg Monterey. 
Holland N. Stevenson. Union Iron Works. 



Charles C. Cornwell 



Charles W. Rae, Naval Station, San Francisco. 
George H. Kearny, Naval Academy. 
William S. Moore, insp mach, Cramp's. 
Royal R. Ingersoll, Naval Academy. 
Adolph Marix, lighthouse insp, 4th dist. 
Duncan Kennedy, lighthouse insp, llth dist. 
James D. J. Kelley, comdg U. S. S. Resolute. 
Jefferson F. Moser, conidg Albatross. 
Raymond P. Rogers, comdg U. S. S. Nashrille. 
Seaton Schroder, Navy Yard, Washington. 
Franklin J. Drake, ord office Navy Yard, Mare 

Island. 
Thomas C. McLean, comdg U, S. S. Don Juan 

de Austria. 

William J. Barnette, comdg N. S. S. Saratoga. 
Francis H. Delano, Navy Yard, Boston. 
Charles T. Forse, lighthouse insp 14th dist. 
Edwin K. Moore, comdg Helena. 
A. V. Wad hams, comdg U. S. S. Monongahela. 
James D. Adams, Hydrographic Office. 
Richard Wainwright, Naval Academy. 
James R. Selfridge, lighthouse insp, 2d dist. 
William H. Everett, comdg Iris. 
John M. Hawley, comdg U. S. S. Hartford. 
John A. Rodgers, lighthouse insp, 6tn dist. 
James W. Carlln, comdg Culgoa. 
Gottfried Blocklinger, naval rend, Chicago. 
Perry Garst, Naval Academy. 
James K. Cogswell, lighthouse insp, 1st dist. 
Frederic Singer, lighthouse insp. 7th dist. 
Arthur B. Speyers, Navy Yard, New York. 
Ebenezer S. Prime, equip office. Navy Yard, 

League Island. 

N. E. Niles, equip office, Navy Yard, Norfolk. 
Thomas H. Stevens. Navy Yard, Norfolk. 
Julien S. Ogden, recg ship Richmond. 
George Cowie, Morris Heights, New York. 
Charles P. Howell, Navy Yard. New York. 
Charles P. Perkins, comdg U. S. S. Michigan. 
Charles G. Bowman, Navy^ Yard. Mare Island. 
William P. Potter, Navy Yard, League Island. 
William H. Bechler, naval attache, Rome, 

Vienna, Berlin. 

Giles B. Harber, waiting orders. 
John B. Briggs, comdg U. S. S. Glacier. 
Newton Mason. In charge Torpedo Station. 
Dennis W. Mullan, under suspension. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. 

Arthur P. Nazro, comdg Manila. 

William W. Kimball, comdg Vixen. 

William P. Day, sick leave. 

John C. Wilson, U. S. S. Indiana. 

Uriah R. Harris, U. S. S. Monongahela. 

Richard G. Davenport, Hydrographic Office. 

Edward B. Barry, Amphitrite. 

Herbert Winslow, U. S. S. Constellation. 

William H. Turner. Iowa. 

George P. Colvocoresses. Library. Navy Dept. 

Charles E. Colahan, Bureau of Navigation. 

Albert G. Berry, asst lighthouse insp. 3d dist. 

John A. Norrls, Charleston. 

N. J. K. Patch, comdg Celtic. 

Thomas S. Phelps, Jr.. recg ship Independence. 

Karl Rohrer, Newport News. Va. 

John A. H. Nickels. Navy Yard. New York. 

C. K. Curtis, Navy Yard, Norfolk. 

Theodoric Porter, recg ship Franklin. 



D. D. V. Stuart, recg ship Vermont. 

C. A. Adams, ordered Asiatic Station. 

Kossuth Niles, Massachusetts. 

Dennis H. Mahan. Brooklyn. 

William F. Low, U. S. S. Chicago. 

N. T. Houston, Lancaster. 

James H. Perry, Bureau Steam Engineering. 

Warner B. Bayley, New York. 

Albert F. Dixon, Brooklyn. 

J. P. Mickley, insp men, Philadelphia. 

Clayton S. Richman, ordered to ILS.8. Newark. 

Samuel P. Comly, recg ship Richmond. 

John Hubbard, Navy Yard. New York.' 

Alexander McCrackm, U. S. S. Oregon. 

George L. Dyer, comdg Yankton. 

Lewis C. Heilner. Navy Yard. New York. 

Martin E. Hall, U. S. S. New Orleans. 

Edward M. Hughes, Boston. 

Joseph B. Murdock. U. S. S. New York. 

Hugo Osterhaus. waiting orders. 

Charles E. Vreeland. Baltimore. 

Corwin P. Rees, Torpedo Station. 

Albert C. Dillingham. U. S. S. Texas. 

George F. W. Holman, Torpedo Station. 

Nathan Sargent, comdg U. S. S. Scorpion. 

Lazarus L. Reamey, Navy Yard, Washington. 

James H. Bull, Monterey. 

G. A. Merriam, asst to gen insp, Kearsarge. 

John B. Milton, Navy Yard. Boston. 

Wlliam Kilburn, Navy Yard, Washington. 

William H. Nauman, insp men, Bath, Me. 

Jacob J. Hunter, Bureau of Navigation. 

George W. Mentz, U. S. S. Marblehead. 

S. A. Staunton, Isthmian Canal Commission. 

Aaron Ward, ordered Asiatic Station. 

Charles W. Bartlett, Naval Academy. 

Chauncey Thomas, U. S. S. Baltimore. 

William A. Marshall, U. S. S. New York. 

William M. Irwin, U. S. S. Marietta. 

John E. Roller, Navy Yard. Boston. 

Francis E. Greene. Montgomery. 

Carlos G. Calkins, Bureau Hydrographic Office. 

San Francisco. 

William P. Elliott, Naval Station, Cavite, P. I. 
William E. Sewell, Abarenda. 
Henry McCrea, Navy Yard, Washington. 
Edward F. Qualthrough, insp duty, Bureau of 

Equipment. 

James C. Cresap, U. S. 8. Detroit. 
Asher C. Baker, special duty,Paris Exposition. 
William H. H. Southerland, comdg Dolphin. 
Lucian Young. Naval Station, Havana. 
Jesse M. Roper, U. S. 8. Dixie. 
Charles E. Fox, Helena. 
John C. Fremont, supervisor N. Y. Harbor. 
Albert Mertz, Glacier. 
Rogers H. Gait, U. S. S. Brooklyn. 
Vincendon L. Cottman. Cavite, P. I. 
Frank E. Sawyer, comdg Ccesar. 
William H. Schuetze, Philadelphia. 
Thomas B. Howard. U. S. S. Monadnock. 
Walter C. Cowles, Asiatic Station. 
Austin M. Knight, Naval Academy. 
Charles J. Badger, Cramp's Ship Yard. 
Samuel W. B. Diehl, Bureau Equipment. 
Reginald F. Nicholson, comdg Farragut. 
Samuel C. Lemly, Judge- Advocate General. 
Edmund B. Underwood. Alliance. 
William F. Halsey, Naval Academy. 
Frank A. Wilner, recg ship Wabash. 
Henry Morrell, waiting orders. 
William Winder, Michigan. 
Charles B. T. Moore, Bennington. 
Ten Eyke D. W. Vedder. Bureau Equipment 

Navy Department. 
Alfred Reynolds, U. 8. S. Nashvttte. 
John M. Robinson, D. S. S. Wilmington. 
John K. Barton, Navy Yard, Boston. 
Robert G. Denig, Chicago. 
George H. Peters, office Naval Intelligence. 
Bradley A. Flake. U. S. S. Yorkttiwn. 
Frank H. Holmes. U. S. S. Monocacy. 
John F. Parker. U. S. S. Dixie. 
Hamilton Hutchins. Machias. 
John M. Bowyer, Princeton. 



THE NAVY. 



177 



John C. Col well, Naval attache. London. 
William R. A. Rooney, New Orleans. 
Edward J. Dorn, Naval Academy. 
Bernard O. Scott. Concord. 
George B. Ransom. Baltimore. 
William C. Baton, U. 8. S. Philadelphia. 
Alfred B. Canaga, ordered Asiatic Station. 
Abraham V. Zane, duty with Alabama. 
John R. Edwards, Texas. 
Stacy Potts, Naval Academy. 
Henry T. Cleaver, Yorktown. 
Albert B. Willits, Bureau Steam Engineering. 
James P. S. Lawrence, U. S. S. Massachusetts. 
Isaac S. K. Reeves, recg ship Franklin. 
York Noel. Iowa. 

Albon C. Hodgson, Torpedo Station, Newport. 
James M. Helm, lighthouse insp, 16th District. 
William G. Cutler. Newark. 
Cameron McR. Winslow, waiting orders. 
Charles Laird, waiting orders. 
Nathan R. Usher. Newport News. 
Walter S. Hughes. Philadelphia. 
Fldelio 8. Carter, U. 8. S. Prairie. 
Frank F. Fletcher, comdg Eagle. 
Alexander Sharpe, Jr., U. S. S. Hartford. 
Harry H. Hosley, recg ship Vermont. 
Frank E. Beatty. U. S. S. Wheeling. 
Moses L. Wood. Navy Yard. Pensacola. 
John A. Shearman, U. 8. S. Castine. 
Robert M. Doyle, Bureau Ordnance. 
George M. Stoney, Naval Academy. 
Frederick W. Coffin, Solace. 
Wythe M. Parks, Iowa. 
Harry M. Hodges. Nero. 
William B. Caperton, Bureau Ordnance. 
James T. Smith, waiting orders. 
Frank H. Bailey. M. S. 8. Petrel. 
George S. Willits, Marblehead. 
Walter F. Worthington, Bureau Steam En- 
gineering. 

William N. Little, Charleston. 
Edward R. Freeman, Indiana. 
Theo. F. Burgdorff, Monadnock. 
Frank H. Eldridge, U. 8. S. Oregon. 
Kdgar T. Warburton, Naval Academy. 
Henry C. Gearing, U. 8. 8. Culgoa. 
Templin M. Potts, waiting orders. 
William H. Allen. Bureau Equipment. 
Burns T. Walling, Naval Station, Cavite, P. I. 
Clifford J. Boush. Yosemitf. 
J. H. Sears, U. S. 8. Chicago (aide to Admiral). 
Abraham E. Culver, U. S. 8. Chicago. 
Henry T. Mayo, Union Iron Works. 
Charles C. Rogers. U. S. S. New York. 
John T. Newton, Navy Yard, New York. 
Walclemar D. Rose. U. S. 8. Indiana. 
Charles F. Pond. U. S. S. Iroquois. 
Walter McLean, Bureau Ordnance. 
W. I. Chambers, U. 8. 8. Texas. 
James C. Gilmore, prisoner from Yorktown. 
Benjamin Tappan, comdg U. 8. 8. Callao. 
Charles A. Gove, U. 8. S. Massachusetts. 
DeWitt Coffman, Naval Academy. 
William Hannam, sick leave. 
Richard Henderson. Board Insp. and Survey. 
Thomas D. Griffin, U. S. S. Hartford. 
Henry Minett, U. S. S. Adams. 
Richard Mulligan, Office Naval Intelligence. 
W. Braunersreuther, U. S. S. Charleston. 
F. H. Sherman, Navy Yard, New York. 

Medical Corps. 

MEDICAL DIRECTORS. 

[Rank of Captain.] 

Walter K. Scofleld. pres Medical Examining 

Board, Philadelphia. 

Grove S. Beardsley. mem Retiring Board. 
William K. Van Reypen. chief Bureau Mod 

and Surgery. 

T. C. Walton. Naval Laboratory, New York. 
Charles H. White, Naval Museum of Hygiene. 
George W. Woods. Naval Hospital, New York. 
James M. Flint, Smithsonian Institution. 



George F. Winslow, Navy Yard, Boston. 
Hosea J. Babin, pres Board Medical Exam 

iners. New York. 
Joseph B. Parker, mem Medical Examining 

Boards. 

Joseph G. Ayers, Naval Hospital, Boston. 
Abel F. Price, waiting orders. 
James A. Hawke, Navy Yard, New York. 
Robert A. Marmion. Naval Hospital, Phila. 
Dwight Dickenson, Naval Hosp, Washington. 

MEDICAL INSPECTORS. 

[Rank of Commander.] 
Wm. G. Farwell, Navy Yard, League Island 
John C. Wise, mem Examining Board. 
G. P. Bradley, Naval Hospital, Mare Island 
Charles U. Gravatt, mem Medical Examining 

Board. New York. 

Paul Fitzsimons, New York (Fleet Surgeon). 
Wm. S. Dixon, mem Retiring Board. 
C. A. Siegfried, Naval Hospital, Newport. 
Remus C. Persons, Baltimore (Fleet). 
Nelson M. Ferebee, Naval Hospital, Norfolk 
Franklin Rogers. Marine Rendez, Phila. 
James R. Wnggener. Naval Hosp, Cavite, P I 
Thomas H. Streets, Philadelphia (Fleet Surg). 
Manly H. Simons, waiting orders. 
John C. Boyd, asst. Bureau of Med and Sure 
Geo. E. H. Harmon, Brooklyn. 

SURGEONS. 

[Rank of Lieutenant-Commander.] 
Howard Wells, Chicago. 
Daniel N.Bertolette, mem Medical Exam Bd. 
Ezra Z. Derr, Navy Yard, Portsmouth. 
Frank B. Stephenson, Oregon. 
Presley M. Rixey. Naval Dispensary. 
Walter A. McClurg, U. S. S. Indiana. 
Cumberland G. Herndon. Museum Hygiene. 
Lucien G. Heneberger. waiting orders. 
Edward H. Green, hdqrs Marine Corps. 
Samuel H. Dickson, Navy Yard, Washington. 
David O. Lewis, U. S. S. Iowa. 
Howard E. Ames, Navy Yard, Norfolk. 
Frank Anderson, Naval Hospital, Yokohama. 
Phillips A. Levering, Navy Yard. Mare Island. 
William R. Du Bose, Naval Academy. 
Charles T. Hibbett, Charleston. 
N. H. Drake, mem Medical Exam Bd, N. Y. 
Henry G. Beyer, recg ship Wabash. 
John M. Steele, Torpedo Station. Newport. 
James E. Gardner, Marine Rend. Boston. 
Millard H. Crawford, Naval Rend, New York. 
George P. Lumsden, recruiting duty, Buffalo. 
Emlyn H. Marsteller, U. S. S. Richmond. 
William H. Rush, Solace. 
James C. Byrnes, Massachusetts. 
Samuel H. Griffith, Prairie. 

[Rank of Lieutenant.] 
Averley C. H. Russell, Newark. 
Clement Biddle, Texas. 
Henry T. Percy, waiting orders. 
James D. Gatewood, Lancaster. 
Oliver Diehl, Michigan. 
John M. Edgar. Amphitrite. 
Philip Leach, U. 8. S. New York. 
Lloyd W. Curtis, recg ship Vermont. 
Henry B. Fitts. Marine Barracks. Sitka. 
Victor C. B. Means, Rec Rend, San Francisco. 
Frederick J. B. Cordeiro, New Orleans. 
Francis W. F. Wieber. Ccesar. 
Oliver D. Norton. Monadnock. 
Frederick A. Hesler, Naval Hospital, Boston. 
Isaac W. Kite, Monterey. 
Andrew R. Wentworth, recg ship Independence. 
Corbin J. Decker, Monncacy. 
Thomas A. Berryhlll, U. 8. 8. Monongahela. 
Eugene P. Stone, Naval Dispensary. 
George M. Peckeral. U. S. S. Monterey. 
Rand P. Crandell, U. 8. S. Constellation. 
H. N. T. Harris, waiting orders. 
John F. Uric. U. 8. S. Dolphin. 
A. N. D. McCormick, U. 8. S. Montgomery. 



178 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



Pay Corps. 

PAT DIRECTORS. 

[With rank of Captain.] 

Charles H. Eldredge, Navy Pay Office, Norfolk. 
Edward May, Navy Pay Office, Boston. 
Henry M. Denniston, Navy Pay Office, N. Y. 
Frank C. Cosby, gen insp Pay Corps. 
George Cochran, Navy Pay Office. Phila. 
Albert S. Kenny, chief Bureau Supplies and 

Accounts. 

George A. Lyon. waiting orders. 
Edward Bellows, gen strkpr, Portsmouth. 
Arthur Burtis, waiting orders. 
Edwin Putnam, gen strkpr. New York. 
Robert P. Lisle, ordered to League Island. 
Leonard A.Frailey, gen strkpr, Washington. 
George E. Hendee, Navy Yard, Boston. 

PAY INSPECTORS. 

[With rank of Commander.] 
Henry T. Wright. Navy Yard, New York. 
Daniel A. Smith, watting orders. 
Albert W. Bacon, gen strkpr, Mare Island. 
Joseph Foster, New York (fleet). 
Theodore S. Thompson, Navy Pay Office, San 

Francisco. 

William J. Thomson, Baltimore (fleet). 
Henry G. Colby. Navy Pay Oflice, Baltimore. 
John B. Redfleld, ord to Navy Yard, Norfolk. 
Ichabod G. Hobbs, waiting orders. 
Joel P. Loomis, cadet strkpr. Naval Academy. 
Henry T. B. Harris, recg ship Vermont. 
Stephen Rand. Navy Pay Office, Washington. 
Lawrence G. Boggs, U. S. S. Massachusetts. 

PAYMASTERS. 

[With rank of Lieutenant-Commander.] 
Samuel E. Colhoun. torpedo station. 
Josiah R. Stanura, U. S. S. Philadelphia. 
James A. Ring, U. S. S. Iowa. 
James E. Cann, Navy Pay Office, Portsmouth. 
J. N. Spiel, Naval Home. Philadelphia. 
Keah Frazer, Navy Yard, League Island. 
Hiram E. Drury, clothing factory. New York. 
Charles W. Littlefleld, recg ship Wabash. 
Arthur Peterson, Navy Yard, league Island. 
William W. Gait, Navy Yard. Norfolk. 
John Clyde Sullivan, ord to trng ship Adams. 

[With rank of Lieutenant.] 
John R. Martin, ord to recg ship Richmond. 
Charles M. Ray, Naval Academy. 
Mitchell C. MacDonald, Naval Station, Cavite. 
Eustace B. Rogers, U. S. S. Oregon. 
Leeds C. Kerr, recg ship Independence. 
Richard T. M. Ball, Chicago. 
Charles S. Williams, gen strkpr, Boston. 
Thomas J. Cowie, Training Station, Newport. 
John S. Carpenter, U. S. S. Texas. 
Livingston Hunt, Navy Yard, Washington. 
John A. Mndd, Navy Yard, New York. 
Willis B.Wilcox, asst to gen strkpr. League Isl. 
George W. Simpson, asst Bureau Supplies and 

Accounts. 

Harry R. Sullivan, ord Naval Station, Cavite. 
Samuel L. Heap, U. S. S. Brooklyn. 



John Q. Lovell, U. S. S. Amphitrlte. 

James S. Phillips, So/ace. 

Thomas S. Jewett. Glacier. 

Frank T. Arms, Indiana. 

Thomas H. Hicks. Bureau Supplies and Accts. 

Henry E. Jewett, U. S. S. Newark. 

Ziba W. Reynolds, ord Charleston. 

Samuel McGowan. gen strkpr, Cavite. 

Henry A. Dent, asst gen strkpr, Norfolk. 

Walter L. Wilson, U. S. S. Pensacola. 

William J.Littell, Navy Yard, New York. 

Philip V. Mohun, sick leave. 

Martin McM. Hamsey. Coast Survey Office. 

Joseph J. Cheatham. Bureau Supplies and Ac- 
counts. 

Richard Hattan, Navy Yard, New York. 

Marine Corps, 
BRIGADIER-GENERAL, COMMANDANT. 

Charles Heywood, hdqrs Washington. 
GENERAL STAFF. 

George C. Reid, col, adj and insp, hdqrs 
Washington. 

Charles H. Lauchhelmer, maj, asst ad] and 
insp, hdqrs Washington. 

Frank L. Denny, col and qtrmstr, hdqrs 
Washington. 

Thos. C. Prince, ma] and asst qtrmstr, asst 
qtrmstr's office, Philadelphia. 

Charles L. McCawley, maj and asst qtrmstr, 
marine bks, Washington. 

Cyrus S. Radford, capt and asst qtrmstr, 
hdqrs Washington. 

Robert P. Faunt Le Roy, capt and asst 
qtrmstr, asst qtrmstr's office, Philadelphia. 

William B. Lemly, capt and asst qtrmstr, 
Cavite. r. I. 

Green Clay Goodloe, col and paymaster, 
hdqrs Washington. 

George Richards, ma] and asst paymaster, 
hdqrs Washington. 

COLONELS. 

James Forney, marine bks, League Island. 

Percival C. Pope, marine bks, Manila, P. I. 

Robert L. Meade, marine bks, Cavite, P. I. 

Charles F. Williams, marine bks, Mare Island. 

Henry C. Cochrane, marine bks, Boston. 
LIEUTENANT-COLONELS. 

William S. Muse, marine bks. Norfolk. 

Francis H. Harrington, marine bks, Washing- 
ton. 

Mancil C. Goodrell, Seattle, Washington. 

George F. Elliott, Cavite. P.I. 

Allan C. Kelton. marine bks, Island Guam. 
MAJORS. 

Richard Wallach, Naval Academy. 

Benjamin R. Russell, U. S. S. New York. 

Otway C. Berryman, Naval Academy. 

William F. Spicer, U. S. S. Brooklyn. 

Paul St. C. Murphy, Training Station, Newport. 

William P. Biddle, supt of recruiting. 

Randolph Dickins, Navy Yard, Washington. 

Thomas N. Wood, waiting orders. 

L. W. T. Waller, Cavite, P. I. 

Harry K. White, Manila, P. I. 



REAR ADMIRALS, $4,500. 
Thomas O. Selfridge, Washington, D.C. 
Roger N. Stembel, Washington, D. C. 
George B. Balch, Baltimore, Md. 
Aaron K. Hughes, Washington. D. C. 
Thomas S. Phelps, Washington. D. C. 
Francis A. Roe. Washington, D. C. 
Samuel R. Franklin. Washington, D. C. 
John H. Upshur, Washington, D.C. 
S. B. Luce. Newport, R. I. 
James E. Jouett. Washington, D. C. 
L. A. Kimberly, West Newton. Mass. 
Geo. E. Belknap. Brookline, Mass. 
D. B. Harmony. Santa Barbara, Cal. 
A. W. Weaver, Washington, D. C. 



RETIRED LIST. 



A. E. K. Benham, Washington, D. C. 

John Irwin, Washington, D. C. 

Bancroft Gherardi, New York. 

O. F. Stanton, New London, Conn. 

Henry Erben, New York. 

J. A. Greer. Washington. D. C. 

George Brown, Indianapolis. Ind. 

John G. Walker, Washington, D. C. 

Francis M. Ramsay, Washington, D. C. 

Joseph N. Miller, New York. 

Montgomery Sicard, Washington, D. C. 

Edmund O. Matthews, Newport. 

F. M. Bunce, Hartford, Conn. 

Lester A. Beardsley, Little Falls, N. Y. 

Thomas O. Selfridge, Jr., Washington, D. C 



THE NAVY. 



179 



Henry L. Howlson, New York. 
Nichol Ludlow, Washington,!). C. 
I. K. Tryon, Coxsackie, N. Y. 
Edwin Stewart, Washington, D. C. 
J. A. Smith, Philadelphia, Pa. 
J. E. Tolfree. New York. N. Y. 
Joseph Trelly, San Francisco, Cal. 
James Entwlstle, Paterson, N. J. 

COMMODORES, $3,750. 
Albert G. Clary, leave of absence. 
Somerville Nicholson, Washington, D. C. 
William K. Mayo, Washington. D. C. 
William P. McCann. New Rochelle, N. Y. 
James H. Gillis, Washington, D. C. 

E. K. Potter, Belvidere, 111. 

R. Li. Phythian, Annapolis, Md. 
R. R. Wallace, Washington, D. C. 
CAPTAINS, $3,375. 
Thomas G. Corbin, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Francis Lowry. Burlington, Vt. 
A. T. Manan. New York. 
H. B. Seely.Philadelphia, Pa. 
H. S. Ross, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
J. 1. Hannum, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Richard Rush, Washington, D. C. 

COMMANDERS, $2.625. 
Thomas L. Swann, sick leave. 
Smith W. Nichols, Dorchester, Mass. 
C. A. Schetky, leave of absence. 
George T. Davis, Asheville. N. C. 
Thos. Nelson, Annapolis. Md. 
John K. Winn, Chelsea, Mass. 
W. B. Newman, Hackensack, N. J. 

A. J. Iverson, Boston, Mass. 

F. L. Tanner. Washington, D. C. 
J. C. Marong, San Francisco, Cal. 
J. D. Graham. New York. 
Samuel Belden. New London, Conn. 

B. 8. Richards, Washington, D. C. 
Robert 8. Jasper, Charlestown, W. Va. 
William H. Drlggs, Washington, D. C. 
John H. Moore, Washington, D. C. 

H. O. Rittenhouse. Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Robert G. Peck, Washington, D. C. 
H. F. Fichbohm. Chicago. 111. 

G. C. Hannls, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
H. H. Barroll. Danberry, Conn. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS. $2,250. 
Antolne R. McNair, Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 
Charles E. McKay, Orange. N. J. 
Henry C. Tallman, New York. 
Francis O. Davenport, Detroit, Mich. 
Frederick I. Naile, Norristown, Pa. 
Gouvemeur K. Haswell, New York city. 
Edward M. Stedman, Chicago, 111. 
Socrates Hubbard, Garden City, N. Y. 
Leonard Chenery, New York. 
E. L. Amory, Boston, Mass. 
Isaac Hazlitt. Washington, D. C. 
Frederick A. Miller, leave of absence. 
William P. Randall, New Bedford, Mass. 
Francis H. Sheppard. St. Andrews, Fla. 
George F. Morrison, Washington, D. C. 
Charles W. Tracy, Boston, Mass. 



David C. Woodrow. Cincinnati. O. 
R. M. G. Brown, Washington, D. C. 

MEDICAL DIRECTORS, $3.300. 
William Grier, Washington, D. C. 
Samuel Jackson, Washington, D. C. 
Thomas J. Turner, Coldwater, Mich. 
John Y. Taylor, Washington, D. C. 
Phineas J. Horwitz, Philadelphia, Pa. 
F. M. Gunnell, Washington, D. C. 
Samuel F. Coues, Cambridge, Mass. 
Edward Shippen, Philadelphia. Pa. 
Jacob S. Dungan, San Francisco. Cal. 
George Peck, Elizabeth, N. J. 
W. TTHurd, Washington, D. C. 
A. L. Gihon, New York. 
R. C. Dean, Washington, D. C. 
D. Bloodgood, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
D. Kindleberger, New York. 
P. S. Wales, leave of absence. 
H. M. Wells, New York. 
I. N. Penrose, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

SURGEONS, $2,100. 

C. J. Cleborne, Wernersville, Pa. 
L. Baldwin, Louisville, Ky. 

MEDICAL INSPECTORS, $3,300. 
William E. Taylor, Honolulu, H. I. 
John C. Spear, Norristown, Pa. 
Archibald C. Rhoades, New York. 
A. S.Oberly. leave of absence. 
F. Woolverton, Suspension Bridge, N. Y. 
W. H. Jones, Bethlehem, Pa. 

PAY DIRECTORS. $3,300. 
James H.WatmoughjWashlngton. D. C. 
Thomas H. Looker, Washington, D. C. 
Charles W. Abbot, Warren, R. I. 
Alexander W. Russell, Philadelphia, Pa. 
J. D. Murray, Annapolis, Md. 
Caspar Schenck, Annapolis, Md. 
Luther G. Billings, Clifton, N. Y. 
AJ. Pritchard. Baltimore, Md. 

PAY INSPECTORS, $3,300. 
Francis H. Swan, Brookline, Mass. 
W. W. Woodhull, San Juan, Puerto Rico. 

PAYMASTERS, $2,100. 
W. W. Barry, New Bedford. Mass. 

CHIEF ENGINEERS. $3,300. 
Benjamin F. Isherwood, New York city. 
William H. Shock, Washington, D. C. 
Theodore Zeller, New York city. 
James W. King, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Edwin Fithian, Bridgeton, N. J. 
William S. Stamm, Philadelphia, Pa. 
F. C. Dade, Philadelphia, Pa. 

D. B. Macomb, Boston, Mass. 
Henry Mason, Plymouth, Conn. 
Edward B. Latch, Academy. Pa. 
George W. Sensner, Washington. D. C. 
Charles H. Loring, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Edward Farmer. Boston, Mass. 

F. A. Wilson, Boston, Mass. 
A. Kirby, Washington, D. C. 



LIST OF THE VESSELS OF THE U. S. NAVY IN COMMISSION, WITH NAMES OF 

COMMANDING AND EXECUTIVE OFFICERS. 

[Corrected to Nov. 15, 1899.] 



ABARENDA Comdr. Benjamin F. Tilley, 
comdg; Lt. -Comdr. Wm. E. Sewell, exec- 
utive. 

ACCOMAC Acting Boatswain Timothy Sul- 
livan, comdg. 

ACTIVE Acting Boatswain Aaron B. Ire- 
Ian, comdg. 

ADAMS Comdr. Walton Goodwin, comdg; 
Lt. -Comdr. Henry Minett, executive. 

ALBATROSS Comdr. Jefferson F. Moser, 
comdg; Lieut. Hugh Rodman, executive. 

ALLIANCE Comdr. Albert Ross, comdg; 



Lt.-Comdr. Edmund B. Underwood, exec- 
utive. 
AMPHITRITE Capt. Edwin S. Houston. 

comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Edward B. Barry, 

executive. 
BALTIMORE Capt. James M. Forsyth. 

comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Charles E. Vreeland. 

executive. 
BENNINGTON Comdr. Conway H. Arnold. 

comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Charles B. T. Moore. 

executive. 
BROOKLYN Capt. Theodore F. Jewell, 



180 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Dennis H. Mahan, ex- 
ecutive. 

CAESAR Lt.-Comdr. F. E. Sawyer, 
comdg. 

CALLAO Lt.-Comdr. Benjamin F. Tappan, 
comdg. 

CASTINE Comdr. Samuel W. Very, comdg; 
Lt.-Comdr. John A. Shearman, executive. 

CELTIC Lt.-Comdr. Nathaniel J. K. Patch, 
coindg; Lieut. Wm. S. Hogg, executive. 

CHARLESTON Capt. George W. Pigman, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. John A. Norris, exec- 
utive. 

CHICAGO Capt. Charles H. Rockwell, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Wm. F. Low, execu- 
tive. 

CHOCTAW Acting Boatswain Christopher 
J. Cooper, comdg. 

CONCORD Comdr. Seth M. Ackley, comdg; 
Lieut. Bernard O. Scott, executive. 

CONSTELLATION Comdr. John J. Hunk- 
er, comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Herbert Winslow, 
executive. 

CULGOA Comdr. James W. Carlin. comdg; 
Lt.-Comdr. Henry C. Gearing, executive. 

DETROIT Comdr. Joseph N. Hemphill, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. James C. Cresap, ex- 
ecutive. 

DIXIE Lt.-Comdr. Jesse M. Roper, execu- 
tive. 

DOLPHIN Lt.-Comdr. Wm. H. H. South- 
erland. comdg; Lieut. Thomas Snowden, 
executive. 

EAGLE Lt. -Comdr. Frank F. Fletcher, 
comdg; Lieut. Albert M. Beecher, execu- 
tive. 

ENTERPRISE Comdr. Frederick M. Wise, 
comdg; Lieut. Levi C. Bertolette, execu- 
tive. 

ESSEX Comdr. Frank Courtis, comdg; 
Lieut. Edward E, Wright, executive. . 

FARRAGUT Lt.-Comdr. Reginald F. Nich- 
olson, comdg. 

FISHHAWK Mate Jas. A. Smith, comdg. 

FRANKLIN Capt: Wm. C. Wise, comdg; 
Lt.-Comdr. Theodoric Porter, executive. 

GLACIER Lt.-Comdr. John B. Briggs, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Albert Mertz, execu- 
tive 

HARTFORD Comdr. John M. Hawley, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Alexander Sharp, Jr., 
executive. 

HELENA Comdr. Edwin T. Moore, comdg; 
Lt.-Comdr Charles E. Fox, executive. 

HERCULES Boatswain James W. Angus, 
comdg. 

INDEPENDENCE Capt. Charles S. Cotton, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Thomas S. Phelps. 
executive. 

INDIANA Capt. Francis W. Dickins, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. John C. Wilson, ex- 
ecutive. 

IOWA Capt. Charles F. Goodrich, comdg; 
Lt.-Comdr. Wm. H. Turner, executive. 

IRIS Comdr. William H. Everett, comdg; 
Lieut. John M. Orchard, executive. 

IROQUOIS Lt.-Comdr. Charles F. Pond, 
comdg. 

LANCASTER Capt. Charles M. Thomas, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Nelson T. Houston, 
executive. 

MACHIAS Comdr. Leavltt C. Logan, 
comdg: Lt.-Comdr. Hamilton Hutchins, 
executive. 

MANILA Lt.-Comdr. Arthur P. Nazro, 
comdg; Lieut. Albert L. Norton, execu- 

" tive. 

MARBLEHEAD Comdr. Harrison G. O. 
Colby, comdg; Lt.-Comdr. George W. 
Mentz, executive. 



MARIETTA Comdr. Edward H. Gheen 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Wm. M. Irwin, execu- 
tive. 

MASSACHUSETTS-Capt. Charles J. Train, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Kossuth Niles, execu- 
tive. 

MICHIGAN Comdr. Charles P. Perkins, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. William Winder, ex- 
ecutive. 

MONADNOCK Capt. John McGowan. 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Thomas B. Howard, 
executive. 

MODOC Acting Boatswain Emil H. Eycke, 
comdg. 

MONOCACY Comdr. George A. Bicknell, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Frank H. Holmes, 
executive. 

MONONGAHELA Comdr. Albion V. Wad- 
hams, comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Uriah H. Har- 
ris, executive. 

MONTEREY Comdr. Charles C. Cornwell, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. James H. Bull, execu- 
tive. 

MONTGOMERY Comdr. John P. Merrell. 
comdg; Lieut. Francis E. Greene, execu- 
tive. 

NASHVILLE Comdr. Raymond P. Rodgers, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Alfred Reynolds, ex- 
ecutive. 

NERO Lt.-Comdr. Harry M. Hodges, 
comdg; Lieut. John Hood, executive. 

NEWARK Capt. Bowman H. McCalla, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Clayton S. Ricbman, 
executive. 

NEW ORLEANS Capt. Edwin Longnecker, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Martin E. Hall, ex- 
ecutive. 

NEW YORK Capt. French E. Chadwick, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Joseph B. Murdock. 
executive. 

NEZINSCOT Boatswain Lee R. Boland, 
comdg. 

OREGON Capt. George F. F. Wilde, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Alexander McCrackin. 
executive. 

PENSACOLA Capt. Henry Glass, comdg; 
Lieut. Richard M. Hughes, executive. 

PETREL Lt.-Comdr. James T. Smith, 
comdg; Lieut. Albert N. Wood, executive. 

PHILADELPHIA Capt. George C. Reiter. 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Wm. H. Schuetze, 
executive. 

PORTER Lieut. Irvin V. Gillis. comdg. 

PRAIRIE Comdr. Morris R. S. Mackenzie, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Fidelio S. Carter, ex- 
ecutive. , 

PRINCETON Comdr. Harry Knox, comdg: 
Lt.-Comdr. John M. Bowyer, executive. 

RANGER Comdr. Wells L. Field, comdg: 
Lieut. John H. L. Holcombe, executive. 

RESOLUTE Comdr. James D. J. Kelley, 
comdg; Lieut. Reuben O. Bitler, execu- 
tive. 

RICHMOND Capt. John J. Read, comdg; 
Lt.-Comdr. Samuel P. Comly, executive. 

ST. MARY'S Comdr. William H. Reeder. 
comdg; Lieut. George R. Evans, execu- 
tive. 

SANTEE Lt.-Comdr. Richard Wainwright, 
comdg. 

SARATOGA Lt.-Comdr. William J. Bar- 
nette, comdg; Lieut. Andrew T. Long, 
executive. 

SCINDIA Comdr. James M. Miller, comdg. 

SCORPION Lt.-Comdr. Nathan Sargent, 
comdg; Lieut. Roger Welles, Jr., execu- 
tive. 

SIOUX Boatswain Albert F. Benzon, 
comdg 1 . 



THE NAVY. 



181 



SOLACE Comdr. Andrew Dunlap, comdg; 
Lt.-Comdr. Frederick VV. Coffin, executive. 

SYLPH Lieut. William J. Maxwell, comdg. 

TACOMA Acting Boatswain Charles T. 
Chase, comdg. 

TECUMSEH Boatswain James Dowling, 
comdg. 

TEXAS Capt. Charles D. Sigsbee, comdg; 
Lt.-Comdr. Albert C. Dillingham, execu- 
tive. 

ONCAS Lieut. Thomas J. Senn, comdg. 

VERMONT Capt. Merrill Miller, comdg; 
Lt.-Coindr. Daniel D. V. Stewart, execu- 
tive. 

VIXEN Lt.-Comdr. William W. Kimball, 
comdg; Lieut. Leon S. Thompson, execu- 
tive. 



WABASH Capt. George H. Wadleigh, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Frank A. Wilner, 
executive. 

WHEELING Comdr. William T. Burwell, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Frank E. Beatty, ex- 
ecutive. 

WILMINGTON Comdr. Charles O. Alii- 
bone, comdg; Lt.-Comdr. John M. Robin- 
son, executive. 

YANKTON Lt.-Comdr. George L. Dyer, 
comdg; Lieut. Isaac K. Seymour, execu 
tive. 

YORKTOWN Comdr. Charles S. Sperry, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Bradley A. Fiske. 
executive. 

YOSEMITE Capt. George E. Ide, comdg; 
Lt.-Comdr. Clifford J. Bousn, executive. 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY. 

July 1, 1899. 

[ABBREVIATIONS. Hull: 8., steel; S.W., steel, wood sheathed; I., iron; W., wood. Propul- 
sion: S., screw; T. 8., twin screw; Tr. 8., triple screw; P., paddle.] 



FIRST BATE. 



NAME. 



Iowa 

Indiana 

Massachusetts.. 

Oregon 

Brooklyn.. 

New York 

Columbia 

Minneapolis 

Texas 

Puritan 

Olympia 



H.200 



Type. 



11,340 Istrclass battleship.. 
10,288 

10/>SS 



do 

do .... 



9.215 Armored cruiser ..... 



.do. 



7.375 Protected cruiser 



r,.:;i:> 2ti-class battleship . . 
ti.UtlO Double-tur. monitor. 
5,870 i Protected cruiser 



11.111 
18,769 
17,401 21 



18,50922.8 

20.86223.7 

8.610 17 

3,700 12.4 



12.10516 T.S. 
9,738 15.55 T.S. 
10,403 16.15 T.S. 
16.78 T.S. 



18,769 21.07 T.S 



17,313 21. 78 T.S. 



T.S. 

Tr.S. 

Tr.S. 

T.S. 

T.S. 



Station or condition. 



18 Pacific Station. 
16 North Atlantic Station. 
16 Do. 

16 Asiatic Station. 
20 Do. 

18 North Atlantic Station. 
11 In reserve, League I., Pa 
11 Do. 

8 North Atlantic Station. 
10 Navy Yard, Norfolk,Va 
14 Navy Yard, Boston. 



SECOND BATE. 



Chicago 

Baltimore 

Philadelphia.... 
Monterey 



Newark 

San Francisco 

Charleston 

Miantonomoh... 

Amphitrite 

Monadnock 

Terror 

New Orleans 

Lancaster 

Cincinnati 

Raleigh 

Reina Mercedes. 
Atlanta 

Boston... 



4.50(1 Protected cruiser 

4,413 do 

4,324 do 

4,084 Barbette turret, low 

freeboard monitor. 

4,096 Protected cruiser 

4.098 do 

3,730 do 

3.990 Double-tur. monitor. 

3,990 do 

3.990 do 

3,990 do 

3,437 Protected cruiser 

3.250 Cruiser 

3.213 Protected cruiser.. . . 

3,213 do 

3.090 do 

3,000 do 

3,000 do 



9.000 15.1 
10.064 20.9 
8,815 19.68 T.S. 



5,244 13.6 
8,86919 



'.I.'.M:; I'.). 53 T.S 
6,666 18.20 T.S 



i,426 10.5 
1,600 10.5 
3.00012 
1.600 10.5 
750021 
1,00021 
10,000 19 
10,00019 

3.700 

4,030 15.6 



4,030 15.6 S 



T.S. 
T.S. 



T.S. 

T.S. 

T.S. 

T.S. 

T.S. 

S. 

T.S. 

T.S. 

8. 

S. 



18 South Atlantic Station. 
10 Asiatic Station. 
12 Pacific Station. 
4 Asiatic Station. 

a 



Do. 

avy Yard, Norfolk, Va. 
Asiatic Station. 
4 League Island, Pa. 
6 Special service. 
' siatic Station, 
avy Yard, Norfolk, Va. 
10 Asiatic Station, 
'raining service, 
lavy Yard, New York. 
Navy Yard, Portsmouth 
Navy Yard, Norfolk. 
8 Repairing atNavy Yard, 

New York. 
8 Navy Yard,Mare Island. 



12 N: 

8 As 



12 T 



1 Na 



THIRD BATE. 



Buffalo 

Yankee 

Prairie 

Dixie 

Yosemite... 

Badger 

Solace 

Panther 
Hartford . . . 
Mayflower.. 
Katahdin... 
Canonicns.. 
Mahopac 
Manhattan. 



2,100 
2,100 



bruiser (converted). 
do 



6,872 
6,145 



6,145 do 

4,784 do 

4.700 Hospital ship 

rufser (converted) . 

2.790 Cruiser 

2,n9n Cruiser (converted). 
2,155 Harbor-defense ram 

ngle-tur. monitor. 

do 



3,600 



IJ.SIKI 

3,800 



3,200 
3,200 



2,000 
4,700 18.8 



5,0t 16.25 T.S 



8. 
8.' 

S. 
S. 
8. 
S. 
S. 
T.S. 



6 Special service. 
10 In reserve. League Isl'd. 
10 Special service. 
10 Loaned to War Dept.(to 

be returned shortly). 
10 Asiatic Station, Guam. 

6 Pacific Station. 
... Special service. 

8 League Island Yard. 
13 Special service. 

2 Navy Yard, New York. 

4 Navy Yard.League Isl'd. 

2 Do. 

2 Do. 

2 Do. 



182 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY. CONTINUED. 


NAME. 


|i 


Type. 


1 


8 


? 


II 


sx 

it 


Station or condition. 


Detroit 


2.089 
2089 


Unprotected cruiser, 
do. 


S. 
S. 

s. 
w. 
I 

8. 

S. 

s. 
s. 

8. 

S. 

w. 
w. 
w. 

w. 

s. 
I. 

8. 

s. 

k 

s. 

Co. 
Co. 
Co. 
Co. 
Co. 
Co. 


5,227 
5.580 
5,451 
1,100 
340 
340 
340 
340 
340 
340 

340 
3,436 
3,405 
3.392 
MOO 
2.253 
1,894 
1.988 
800 
800 
800 
800 

2,536 

850 
2,199 
2,046 

1,500 
2,627 
2,627 
500 
500 
1.227 
1,118 
1.081 
1.054 
1.008 
800 


18.71 
13.6 
18.44 

'e'.'so 

5.50 
5.50 
5.50 
6.50 
5.50 

5.50 
17.5 
16.8 
16.14 
16 
15.5 
16 
16 

16 

K.3 
15.5 

is!?' 

12.71 

12.88 
13.3 
12.29 
12 


T.S. 
T.S. 
T.S. 
8. 
8. 
S. 
S. 
S. 
S. 
8. 

S. 
T.S. 
T.S. 
T.S. 

S. 
S. 
T.S. 
T.S. 
S. 
S. 

s. 

8. 

T.S. 
P. 
T.S. 
T.S. 

8. 
T.S. 
T.S. 

S. 

S. 

s. 

8. 
T.S. 
T.S. 
8. 

S. 


10 

10 
10 

ti 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 

2 
ti 
t 

8 
3 
8 
8 
t; 
t; 
ti 
l 

8 
6 
8 
8 

4 

6 

\ 

e 
r, 
t; 

6 
C 
6 
6 


North Atlantic Station. 
South Atlantic Station. 
Pacific Station. 
Training service. 
Navy Yard.Leaguelsl'd. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Naval Station. Port 
Royal, 8. C. 
Navy Yard, Pensacola. 
Asiatic Station. 
Do. 
Do. 
Navy Yard, Boston. 
Special service. 
South Atlantic. 
Asiatic Station. 
Training service. 
Do. 
Do. 
Public Marine; School, 
Boston. 
Asiatic Station. 
Do. 
Do. 
North Atlantic Station. 

Asiatic Station. 
Do. 
Do. 
Navy Yard.Mare Island. 
Do. 
Naval Academy. 
Navy Yard, Boston. 
Asiatic Station. 
Do. 
Navy Yard, Norfolk, Va. 
Asiatic Station. 


Montgomery 


Marblehead 
Mohican 
Catskill 


2,089 
1,900 
1,875 
1,875 
1,875 
1.875 
1,875 
1,875 

1,875 
1,710 
1.71C 
1.710 
1,700 
1.486 
1,392 
1,392 
1.375 
1.375 
1,375 
1.375 

1,371 
1,370 
1,177 
1,177 

1.159 


do 
Cruiser 
Single-tur. monitor. 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 

do 
Gunboat 
do 
do 
do 


Jason 
Lehigh 
Montauk 
Nahant 
Nantucket 

Passalc 
Bennington 
Concord 
Yorktown 
Topeka 
Dolphin 


Wilmington 
Helena 
Adams 


Light-draft gunboat. 
do 
Cruiser 
do 
do 
do 

Light-draft gunboat. 
do 
Gunboat 


Alliance 
Essex 
Enterprise 

Nashville 


Monocacy 
Castine 


Machias 
Don Juan deAus- 
tria 


do 
....do..., 


Isla de Luzon 
Isla deCuba 
Alert 


1,030 
1,030 
1,020 
1020 
1,000 
1.000 


do 
do 
Cruiser. 


Ranger 


do 
Composite gunboat.. 
do 


Vicksburg 


Wheeling 
Marietta 
Newport 
Princeton 


1.000 
1.000 
1,000 
1.000 


do 
do 
do 
do 


FOURTH BATE. 


Scindia 


*7,500 
6,428 
*6,220 
6,206 
6,181 
6,100 
5,663 
5,016 
4.925 
*4,827 
4,670 
4,460 
4,291 
4.242 
4,175 
3,375 
3,300 
*3, 100 
*3,085 


Collier 
Supply ship 
Collier 


S. 
8. 


3,000 
1,890 
1,500 




S. 

s. 
s. 
s. 
s. 
s. 
s. 
s. 

8. 

S."" 

S. 

s. 
s. 
s. 
s. 

8. 

S. 

s. 
s. 
s. 




"t2 
"t2 

"ti 
t4 

"ti 

t2 
f2 



fi 

" 

12 

"is 

f~> 

12 


Navy Yard, Mare Island 
Asiatic Station. 
Navy Yard, Norfolk. 
Navy Yard, New York. 
Navy Yard, Norfolk. 
Asiatic Station. 
Navy Yard. Boston. 
San Juan, P. R. 
Special service. 
Asiatic Station. 
Pacific Station. 
Navy Yard, New York. 
Navy Yard. Norfolk. 
Navy Yd., League Isld. 
Navy Yard, Portsmouth. 
Navy Yard, Norfolk. 
Mare Island Navy Yard. 
Navy Yard, Norfolk. 
Navy Yd., League Isld. 
League Island. 
Pacific Station. 
Navy Yard. Norfolk. 
Asiatic Station. 
Do. 
Navy Yard. Boston. 
Navy Yard, Norfolk. 
Asiatic Station. 
DO. 
Special service. 
Navy Yard, Boston. 
Asiatic Station. 
Navy Yard. New York. 
Naval Militia, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 


Celtic 




Rainbow 


Distilling ship 
Collier 
Distilling ship 
Collier 


S. 
8. 
S. 

S. 
8. 

S. 
S. 

T. 


1,800 
1,026 
1.300 
*926 
1,500 
1.000 

'i,'6so 

1.069 






Iris 




Caesar 
Nero 
Nanshan 
Abarenda 


do 
do 
......do 
do 




Collier 


A 


1,100 




' Leonidas 


do 
Transport 


s. 


1,000 






Collier 


T 






Justin 
Southery 
Pompey 
Arethusa 


......do 
do 
do 
Tank steamei 
Collier 


S. 

8. 

S. 
S 










do 


s 






Culgoa 
Glacier 




Supplv ship 
Refrigerator ship ... 
Collier 


S. 

s. 






s."" 






do. 


T 


1,200 




s. 








s 








1,900 
975 
929 
892 
850 
840 






750 




3! 

T.S. 

S. 
T.S. 
8. 


t2 
tS 
g 

W 

t3 


Yankton 
Vesuvius 


Yacht 
Dynamite-gun vessel 
Gunboat 
Yacht 
Training ship 


8. 
3. 

3. 

W. 


750 
3.795 
1 09i 
2,800 
300 




Petrel 
Scorpion 


Fern 





THE NAVY. 183 


NAME. 


Ij] 


Type. 


1 


Indicated 
horse 
power. 


Speed 
(knots). 


fl 


Guns (m'n 

jM.ttf.nfi. 


Station or condition. 


Bancroft 


831 

sot 

78fc 




s 


1 213 




T.S. 
S. 
S. 

p. 

s. 

s. 
s. 

T.S. 

S. 
3. 

3. 

3! 

3. 

s! . 

T.S. 
T.S. 
T.S. 
T.S. 
3. 

3. 

T.S. 

T.S. 
T.S. 

r'.s. 

T.S. 
T.S. 

T.S. 

8. 
S. 

S. 
S. 
S. 
S. 

s. 
s. 
s. 


j 


ti 
t4 

tic 

t- 

tf 
t7 

H 
H 

t-i 

t4 
i 

t4 
*2 

i 
i 

4 
5 
'1 
j 

8 

tj 

g 
M 

t4 



if 
H 
H 

ft 


Navy Yard. Boston. 
North Atlantic. 
Naval Academy. Annap- 
olis, Md. 
Special service, North- 
western Lakes. 
Naval Sta., Port Royal. 
Navy Yard, Norfolk. 
Do. 
Under repairs; ready for 
armament in July. 
Naval Militia,San Diego, 
Cal. 
Loaned to Louisiana. 
Under repairs at Boston 
for Nava'l Training 
Station, Newport. 
Pensacola Station. 
Special service. 
Loaned to N. Carolina. 
Navy Yard, Norfolk. 
Naval Militia. Virginia. 
Loaned to Maryland. 
Navy Yard. Norfolk. 
Asiatic Station. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Loaned to New York. 
Loaned to Rhodelsland. 
Loaned to New Jersey. 
Special service. 
Repairing; ready for ar- 
mament in July. 
Asiatic Station. 
Do. 
Navy Yard. Norfolk. 
Asiatic Station. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Navy Yard, New York. 
North -Atlantic Station, 
Navy Yd., Portsmouth 
^Javy Yard. Portsmouth 
Loaned to New Jersey. 
Asiatic Station. 
Do. 
Do. 
Loaned toMassachus'ts. 
Loaned to Pennsylvania 
Underrep's; Asiatic Sta. 
Do. 


Vixen 


Yacht 


8 


1 250 




Gloucester 


do 


S 


2,000 




Michigan 


685 

630 
B07 
594 

560 

650 

*54fc 

488 

472 
434 
425 
875 
*315 


Cruiser 


I. 

L 

f .' v 


365 

1,800 
56f 

1,588 
600 

310 




Wasp 


Yacht 


Frolic 
Dorothea 
El Cano 


do 
do 


Pinta 
Stranger 


do 
Yacht 


Peoria 


Gunboat (converted 

Yacht 
do 
do 
do 
....do.... 


S. 

S. 

L 

S. 






Hist. 
Eagle 
Hornet 
Hawk 
Siren... 


600 
850 
801 
1,000 




Sylvia 


*302 


do 


T 






Viking 
Callao 


218 
208 
201 
201 


do 
Gunboat 


s'. 

t. 
I. 
I. 
S. 
Co. 
L 

jr. 
i 

L 

Co. 


420 
250 
25C 
250 
250 
500 

'"266 
650 
125 

126 
125 
350 
125 
125 
125 
125 
500 
137 

137 




Pampango 
Paragua 


do 
do 


Samar 
Aileen 


201 
192 
*175 
*173 


do 
Yacht 


Kanawah 
Elfrida. 


do 
do. . 


Sylph 
Ca lamia DOS 

Leyte 
Albay 
Oneida 


152 
151 

151 
151 
150 
142 
142 


do 
Gunboat 

do 
do 
Yacht 


Panav 
Manileno 


Gunboat 
do 


Mariveles 
Mindoro 


142 
142 
137 
100 

100 
82 
42 
42 


do 
do 
Yacht 


Alvarado 

Sandoval 
Huntress 


Gunboat 

do 
Yacht 


Vasco 
Guardoqui 


Gunboat 
do 


V. 
R 


44 
44 
44 
400 




Urdaneta 


42 


do 


Inca 
Shearwater 




Yacht 
do 














Mindanao 




do 












TOBPEDO BOATS. 


Cushing(No.l).. 
Ericsson (No. 2).. 
Foote (No. 3) 
Rodtters (No. 4).. 
i Winslow(No.S).. 
Porter i No. 6).... 
Dupont (No. 7).. 
Rowan (No. 8)... 
Farragut (No. 11) 
Davis (No. 12).... 
Fox (No. 13 
Morris (No. 14)... 


105 
120 
142 
142 
142 
165 
165 
182 
273 
132 
132 
105 


Torpedo boat 


B. 

s. 
s. 
s. 
s. 
s. 


9. 

S. 
v 
S. 
S. 
3. 
3. 

L 
j 


1,720 
1.800 
2.000 
2,000 
2,000 

'3.200 
5.600 
1.750 
1.75(1 
1,750 
860 
850 
850 
850 


22.5 
24 
24.6 
24.5 
24.5 
28.6 
28.5 
26 
SO 
Z2.5 
22.5 
24.5 
20 
20 
20 
20 
17 


T.S. 
T.S. 
T.S. 
T.S. 
T.S. 
T.S. 
T.S. 
T.S. 
TS. 
T.S. 
T.S. 
T.S. 
S. 
3. 
3. 

3. 
3. 
3. 




Navy Yard, New York. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Naval Sta.,Newport,R.I. 
Do. 
Do. 
Naval Sta..Puget Sound. 
Navy Yard, Mare Island. 
Do. 
Do. 
Naval Sta.,Newport.R.I. 
Navy Yard, Norfolk. 
Newport. 
League Island. 
Navy Yard, New York. 
Naval Academy. 
Navy Yard, New York. 
Asiatic Station. 
Torpedo Station, New- 
port, R. I. 


do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 


do 
do 
do 


Talbot (No. 15) .. 




do 


Gwin (No 16) . 


4P 


. do 


M'ckenzle (No.17) 
McKee (No. 18)... 


65 
65 


do 


do 


Manly (No 22) 




do. 


Somers (No. 23).. 


145 

66 


do 
do 


3. 


1.900 
600 


Stiletto 


31 


do 


W. 


359 




'Estimated. tSecondary battery. {Main battery. {Torpedo tubes. 



184 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY.-CONTINUED. 
TUGS. 


NAME. 


Displace- 
ment 
(tons). 


Type. 


1 


Indicated 
horse 
power. 


if 


II 


Guns (in'n 
battery). 


Station or condition. 




187 
296 


Tug 


I. 

S. 
W. 

w 


250 
600 
250 
550 




S. 

S. 

s. 

8. 


*2 
*."> 
*2 


Havana Station, Cuba. 
Puget Sound Naval Sta. 
Navy Yard, Norfolk. 
Do. 
Port Royal, 8. C. 
Do. 
Navy Yard, Pensacola. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Honolulu. 
Key West. 
League Island, Pa. 
Navy Yard, Norfolk. 
Key West. 
Navy Yard, Boston. 
New York. 
Portsmouth, N. H. 
Boston. 
Special service. 
Navy Yard, Pensacola. 
NavyYard, Boston. 
Navy Yard, Norfolk. 
Navy Yard. Pensacola. 
Navy Yard, Washington. 
Under orders to San 
Juan, P. R. 
Mare Island. 
Port Royal, S. C. 
Navy Yard, New York. 
Asiatic Station. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Repairing at Navy Yard. 
Norfolk. 
Yard tug, Boston. 
Nav. Sta., Newport. R. I. 
Yard tug. New York. 
Navy Yard, New York. 
Navy Yard, Boston. 
Naval Academy, An- 
napolis. Md. 
Navy Yard, New York. 
Yard tug, Washington. 
Yard tug. Norfolk. 
Yard tug, Mare Island. 
Yard tug.League Island. ! 
Naval Sta., Port Royal. ; 
Nav. Sta., Puget Sound 




do 


Alice 


356 

650 


do 
do 






do.... 


w 










do 








8. 
S. 

S. 
S. 

s. 

s 


*1 
*3 
*3 
*3 
*1 






do.. . 


L 


188 




Hercules 


t!98 


do 




702 


do 


S. 


1,000 






202 


do. .. 


Modoc 


241 


do 


T 








420 


do.... 


s'. 
s 


400 
400 




s. 
s. 
s. 
s 


"*2 
*2 




156 


do. , 


Osceola 


571 


do 


Pawnee 


275 


do.. . 


\v 


250 




Piscataqua 
Pontiac 
Potomac 
Powhatan 
Seminole 


K531 
t*01 
677 
t!94 


do 
do 
do 
do 
do 


s. 
s." 

T' 


1,600 
425 
2,000 
397 




8. 
S. 

S. 

s. 
s. 
s. 
s. 
s. 
s. 

s. 


*4 

*3 
*4 
*2 
< 

a 
*i 

2 
*2 

*5 
*1 
*2 
1 

M 
*1 
*1 


Sioux 


155 


do 




290 




Tacoma 




do 


s 






Teeumseh 
Uncas 

Vigilant 


214 
441 

300 


do 
do 

do 
do 


3'. 

.... 


500 
750 

450 




Wompatuck 
Rapido 


462 


do 
do 


I. 

T 


650 




s. 






do 


T 








Petrelita 




do 


1 








Barcelo 




do 










lona 




Steam launch 










Ondina 




Steam barge 














450 

192 
450 
192 


Tug 


I. 

S. 

I. 

s. 
1. 
w. 

w 


340 

300 
310 
300 
388 
147 
340 




8. 

S. 

H. 

s! 

8. 

s. 
s. 


"ii 


Iwana 
Leyden 
Narkeeta 


do 
do 
do 


Nina 


357 


do 


Rocket 
Standish 


187 
450 

280 


do 
do 

. . do 


Triton 


212 


do 


3! 

3. 
3.' 


300 
300 
500 
450 
450 
450 




8. 
S. 
8. 
S. 
S. 
8. 




Wahneta 
Unadilla 
Samoset 


192 
315 
225 


do 
do 
do 


Penacook 


225 


do 


Pawtucket 


225 


do 


SAILING SHIPS. 


Monongahela 
Constellation 


2,100 
1,136 


Sailing ship 


VV 






Sails 
Sails 

Sails 

Sails 
Sails 

Sails 


4 
8 

12 


Training Service. 
Stationary train'g ship. 
Newport. 
Transferred to Marine 
Hospital Service. 
Naval Militia, N. J. 
Public Marine School, 
Philadelphia. 
Public Marine School, 
New York. 


do 


W 






Jamestown 

Portsmouth 
Saratoga 

St. Mary's 


1,150 

1,125 
1,025 

1,025 


do 

do 
......do 

do 


w. 

w. 
w. 

w. 






BECEIVING SHIPS. 


Franklin 


5,170 
4,650 
4.150 
3.270 


Receiving ship 
do 
do 
. . . .do 


\v. 
w. 
w. 
w 


1,050 
950 




S. 
S. 
Sails 
Sails 
S. 
8. 


4 

'"6 
2 


Recg ship, Norfolk. 
Recg ship, Boston. 
Recg ship, New York. 
Recg ship, Mare Island. 
Recg ship, League Isld. 
Yerba Buena Island. 


Wabash 
Vermont 
Independence . . . 


Richmond 


2,700 


do 


w 


692 




Pensacola 


3,000 


do 


w. 


680 





THE NAVY. 1S5 


SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY. CONTINUED. 
tTNSERVICE ABLE. 


NAME. 


iii 


Type. 


=s 
1 


Indicated 
horse 
power. 


ll 


Proput- 
sion. 


&un (m'n 
batter u). 


Station or condition. 


New Hampshire. 
Omaha 

Constitution 


4,150 
2,400 

2,200 
1,575 

1,375 

830 
675 
4,700 
1,900 
900 


Sailing ship 


w 






Sails 
S. 

Sails 
S. 

S. 

Sails 
Sails 
8. 
S. 
S. 


2 
4 
4 

'"9 
8 
4 


Naval Militia, N. Y. 
Transferred to Marine 
Hospital Service. 
Navy Yard. Boston. 
Transferred to Marine 
Hospital Service. 
Puget Sound Naval Sta- 
tion. 
Naval Militia, Penn. 
Naval Militia, Md. 
Naval Militia, Mass. 
Naval Militia, Cal. 
Naval Militia. Mich. 


Cruiser....". 
Sailing ship 


w. 
w 


953 




Cruiser 
do 
Sailing ship 

Cruiser 
do 
do 


w. 
w. 

w. 
w. 
w. 
w. 
w. 


1,202 

839 

' i',666 

1,100 
310 




Nipsic 


Dale 
Minnesota 
Marion 
Yantic 


Secondary battery guns. tin ordinary. 


VESSELS UNDER CONSTRUCTION. 




11,525 
11,525 
11,525 

11,525 
11,525 
13,500 
12,500 

12,500 

13.500 

13,500 
13,500 

12,000 
ll.'JKK) 
12,000 
3,437 
3,100 

3,100 
3.100 
3,100 
3,100 
3,100 
168 

1,175 
'3.2i4 

3,214 
3,214 
3,214 

420 
420 


Ist-class battleship. . 
do 
do 

do 
do 
do 
do 

do 

do 
do 
do 
Armored cruiser 
do 
do 
Protected cruiser 
Cruiser 

do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
Submarine torpedo 
boat. 

Sailing ship 

Gunboat 
Monitor 

do 
do 
do... 

Torpedo boat desty r. 
do 


8. 

s. 
8. 
8. 

8. 
8. 
8. 

8. 

SW 

sw 
sw 
sw 
sw 
sw 
sw 
sw 

sw 
sw 
sw 
sw 
sw 

8. 

Co. 

8. 

s. 

8. 
3. 

s. 

s. 

s 


10,000 

10,000 
10,000 

10,000 
10,000 
16,000 
16,000 

16,000 

18,000 

KIMKI 
18,000 
23,000 
28,000 
23.000 
7,500 
4,700 

4,700 

4,700 
4,700 
4.700 
4,700 
1,200 

'2,466 

2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
8,000 




T.S. 
T.S. 
T.S. 

T.8. 
T.S. 
T.S. 
T.S. 

T.8. 

T.S. 
T.S. 
T.S. 

T.S." 
T.S. 

T.S. 
T.S. 
T.S. 
T.S. 
T.S. 
T.S. 

Sails 
T.8." 

T.S. 
T.S. 
T.S. 

T.S. 
T.S. 
T.S. 
T.S. 

T.S. 
T.S. 

T.S. 
T.S. 


22 

22 

3 
n 

18 

20 

* 90 

20 

"16 

10 

10 
10 
10 
10 

1(1 
1 

a 

' ' '6 

6 
6 

6 

*2 
J 

*2 
*2 

*2 

*2 

2 
*2 


"1 Newport News Ship 
i Building andDry 
j Dock Co., Newport 
J News, Va. 
Cramp & Sons, Phila- 
delphia. 
Union Iron Works, San 
Francisco. 
Wm. Cramp & Sons, 
Philadelphia. 
Newport News Ship 
Building and Dry Dock 
Co. .Newport Ne ws, Va. 
Union Iron Works, San 
Francisco. 
Contract not awarded. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Being completed. 
Contract not yet award- 
ed. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Columbian Iron Works 
and Dry Dock Co., 
Baltimore, Md., under 
contract with J. P. 
Holland Torpedo 
Boat Co. 
Bath Iron Works, Bath, 
Me. 
Contract not awarded. 
Newport News Ship 
Building and Dry Dock 
Co., Newport News, Va. 
Bath Iron Works, Bath, 
Me. 
Lewis Nixon, Elizabeth- 
port, N. J. 
Union Iron Works, San 
Francisco. 
Neafle & Levy, Phila. 
Do. 
Do. 
Wm. R. Trigg Co., Rich- 
mond, Va. 
Do. 
Harlan & Hollingsworth 
Co., Wilmington, Del. 
Do. 
Fall River Engine Co., 
Weymouth. M;iss. 


Kentucky 
Illinois 

Alabama 
Wisconsin 
Maine 
Missouri 

Ohio 

Georgia 
New Jersey 
Pennsylvania.... 


Nebraska 
West Virginia.... 


Chattanooga 

Cleveland 
Denver 
Des Moines 
Galveston 
Tacoma 


Chesapeake 
Gunboat No. 16 . . 


Connecticut 
Florida 
Wyoming 
Bainbridge 




Chauncey 
Dale 


420 
420 

420 


do 
do 

....do.... 


s. 

8. 

s 


8,000 
8,000 

8.000 




Hopkins 

Hull 
Lawrence 


408 

408 
400 


do 

do 
do 


8. 

s. 
s. 


7,200 

7,200 
8,400 





186 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


VESSELS UNDER CONSTRUCTION. CONTINUED. 


NAME. 


Displace- 
ment 
(tons,) 


Type. 


a 


Indicated 
horse 
power. 


|j 


Propul- 
sion. 


Guns (m'n 
battery). 


Station or condition. 


Macdonough 
Paul Jones 

Perry 
Preble 


400 
420 

420 
420 


Torpedo boat dstyr.. 
do 

do 
do ... 


s. 
s. 
s. 

8 


8,400 
7,000 

7,000 
7,000 




T.S. 
T.S. 

T.S. 
T.S. 

T.S. 

T.S. 

T.S. 
T.S. 
T.S. 
T.S. 

T.S. 

T.S. 
T.S. 

T.S. 
T.S. 
T.S. 
T.S. 

T.S. 
T.S. 

T.S. 

T.S. 

T.S. 
T.S. 
T.S. 

T.S. 


*2 
2 

*2 
*2 
*2 

*2 
*2 

*2 
'2 

*2 

'2 
*2 

*3 
8 

*3 

i 

*3 
3 

*3 

n 

'3 
*3 
*3 

*3 


Fall River Engine Co., 
Weymouth, Mass. 
Union l>-on Works, San 
Francisco. 
Do. 
Do. 
Gas Engine and Power 
Co. and Chas. L. Sea- 
bury & Co., Consoli- 
dated, Morris Heights, 
N. Y. 
Maryland Steel Works, 
Sparrow Point, Md. 
Do. 
Do. 
Bath Iron Works, Me. 
Do. 

Harlan & Hollings- 
worth Co.'s Works, 
Wilmington, Del. 
Wolff & Zwicker's 
Works, Portland, Ore. 
Gas Engine and Power 
Co. and Chas. L. Sea- 
bury & Co., Consoli- 
dated, Morris Heights, 
N. Y. 
Bath Ironworks, Maine. 
Do. 
Do. 
Lawley & Sons, South 
Boston, Mass. 
Do. 
Lewis Nixon, Elizabeth- 
port,N.Y. 

Wm. R. Trigg Co., Rich- 
mond, Va. 
Do. 
Do. 
Columbian Iron Works, 
Baltimore, Md. 
Gas Engine and Power 
Co. and Chas. L. Sea- 
bury & Co. Consoli- 
dated, Morris Heights, 
N. Y. 


Stewart 

Truxtun 

Whipple 
Worden 

Dahlgren (No. 9). 
T. A. M. Craven 
(No. 10). 
Stringham(No.l9) 

Goldsborough 
(No. 20). 
Bailey (No. 21)... 

Bagley(No.24)... 
Barney (No. 25) . . 
Biddle (No. 26)... 
Blakeley (No. 27). 

DeLong (No. 28). 
Nicholson (No.29) 

O'Brien (No. 30) . . 


420 

433 

433 
433 
146 
146 

340 

247^ 
235 

167 
167 
167 
165 

165 
174 

174 


do 

do 

do 
do 
do 
do 

do 


S. 

s. 

s. 

8. 
S. 
S. 

8. 

S. 
S. 

8. 

S. 

s. 
& 

8- 

8 


7,000 

8.300 

8,300 
8.300 
4,200 
4,200 

7,200 

6,000 
5,600 

4,200 
4,200 
4,200 
3,000 

3,000 


::::: 


do 


do 

do 
do 
do 
do 

do. 


Torpedo boat 


do 


s 






Shubrick (No. 31) 

Stockton (No. 32). 
Thornton (No. 33) 
Tingey (No. 34)... 

Wilkes (No. 35)... 


165 

165 
165 
165 

165 


do 


S. 

s. 
s. 
s. 

s. 


3,000 

3,000 
3,000 
3,000 

3,000 




do 
do. 
do 

do 




* Torpedo tubes. 






COST OF RARE METAIS. 


The following shows the cost of rare meta 
Scienl 
1. Gallium $68,600.( 


Is i 
inc 



















o ; 



n 


er pound a 
Press : 
22. Osmium 
23. UraniuE 
24. Palladh 
25. Telluriu 
26. Chromii 
27. Gold .. 
28. Molybde 
29. Platinu 
30. Thalliui 
31. Iridium 
32. Tungste 
33. Potassh 
34. Seleniui 
35. Cobalt 
36. Magnesi 
37. Bismutt 
38. Sodium 
9. Cadmlui 
0. Mangan 


voirdupois, says the Mining and 
.... ?1 040 00 


2. Vanadium 10,780.( 


1 980 00 


3. Rubidium 9,800. ( 




4. Thorium 8,330.( 
6. Glucinium 5,800.( 


m 490.00 


6. Calcium 4,900.( 
7 Lanthanum 4,900.( 


mini 


300.00 


8 Lithium 4,900.( 




9 Indium 4,410.( 




10. Tantalum 4,410.( 
11. Yttrium 4,410.0 


112.00 


12. Didymium 4,410.( 
13. Strontium 4.200.C 
14. Arium 3,675.( 


im 28.00 
n 18.80 

S ff\ 


15. Erbium 3,675.0 


um 




16. Ruthenium 2,695.0 




17. Niobium 2,450.0 
18. Rhodium 2.450.C 


2.50 


19 Barium 1,960.0 




20 Titanium 1,102.0 


40 


21 Zirconium 1.040.C 





12. Alumini 









FIFTY-SIXTH CONGRESS. 



187 



jfilt&Sbixtij <0ngress. 

From March 4. 1899, to March 4, 1901. 

SENATE. 
Republicans, 56; Democrats, 25; PEOPLE'S PARTY, 5; Vacant, 4. 



President pro tern William P. Frye. 

ALABAMA. 

John T. Morgan Selma 

Edmund W. Pettus Selma 

ARKANSAS. 

James H. Berry Bentonvllle 

James K. Jones Washington 

CALIFORNIA. 

Vacant 

Geo. C. Perkins San Francisco... 

COLORADO. 

Edward O. Wblcott Denver 

Henry M. Tetter Central City 

CONNECTICUT. 

Joseph R. JJawUy Hartford 

Orvitte H. Platt Meriden 

DELAWARE. 

Richard R. Kenney Dover 

Vacant 

FLORIDA. 

JamesP. Taliaferro Jacksonville .... 

Stephen R. Mallory Pensacola 

GEORGIA. 

A ugustus O. Bacon Macon 

Alexanders. Clay Marietta 

IDAHO. 

George L. Shoup Salmon City 

HENRY HEITFELD Lewiston 

ILLINOIS. 

Shelby M. Cuttom Springfield 

William E. Mason Chicago 

INDIANA. 

Albert J. Beveridge Indianapolis 

Charles W. Fairbanks Indianapolis... 

IOWA. 

John H. Gear Burlington 

William B. Allison Dubuque 

KANSAS. 

Lucien Baker Leavenworth.. . 

WILLIAM A. HARRIS Linwood 

KENTUCKY. 

William Lindsay Frankfort 

William J. Deboe Marion 

LOUISIANA. 

Donelson Caffery Franklin 

Samuel D. McEnery New Orleans.. . 

MAINE. 

William P. Frye Lewiston 

Eugene Hale Ellsworth 

MARYLAND. 

Louis E. McComas Hagerstown 

George L. Wellington Cumberland . . . 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

George P. Hoar Worcester. 

Henry Cabot Lodge Nahant 

MICHIGAN. 

James McMillan Detroit 

Julius C. Burrows N . Kalamazoo 

MINNESOTA. 

Kntite Nelson Alexandria 

Cushman K. Davis. St. Paul 

MISSISSIPPI. 

William V. Sullivan Oxford 

HernandoD. S. Money Carrollton 

MISSOURI. 

Francis M. Cockrell Warrensburg. . 

George G. Vest KansasCi ty 



1901 



1901 
1903 



1905 
.1903 



.1901 
1903 



1905 
.1903 



,1901 
.1905 

.1905 
.1903 

.1901 
.1903 

.1901 
.1903 

.1901 
.1903 

.1905 
.1903 

.1901 
.1903 

.1901 
.1903 

.1901 
.1903 

.1901 
.1903 

.1901 
.1905 



.1905 
.1903 



.1901 
.1905 



.1901 
1905 



.1901 
1905 



.1901 
.1905 



.1905 
.193 



MONTANA. 

Thomas H. Carter Helena 

William A. Clark Butte 

NEBRASKA. 

John M. Thurston Omaha 

Vacant 

NEVADA. 

WILLIAM M. STEWART.. .Carson City 

JOHN P.JONES Gold Hill 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

William E. Chandler Concord 

Jacob H. Gattinger Concord 

NEW JERSEY. 

William J. Sewell Camden 

John Kean Elizabeth 

NEW YORK. 

Chauncey M. Depew New York 

Thomas C. Plan Owego 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

MARION BUTLER Raleigh 

Jeter C. Pritchard Marshall ........ 

NORTH DAKOTA. 

Porter J. McCumber Wahpeton,. . . 

Htnrif C. Hansbrough Devil's Lake . . . 

OHIO. 

Marcus A. Hanna Cleveland 

Joseph B. Foraker Cincinnati 

OREGON. 

George W. McBrlde Portland 

Joseph Simon Portland . , 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

Matthew S. Quay* Beaver 

Boies Penrose Philadelphia. . . 

RHODE ISLAND. 

George P. Wetmore Newport 

Nelson W. Aldrich Providence 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

Benjamin R. Tillman Trenton 

John L. McLaurin Bennettsville. . 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 

Richard F. Pettigrew Sioux Falls 

James B. Kyle Aberdeen 

TENNESSEE. 

Thomas B. Turley Memphis 

William B. Bate Nashville 

TEXAS. 

Horace R. Chilton Tyler 

Charles A. Culberson Dallas 

UTAH. 

Vacant 

Joseph L. Rawlins Salt Lake City. 

VERMONT. 

Redfleld Proctor Proctor .. 

Jonathan Ross St. Johnsbury.. 

VIRGINIA. 

Thomas S. Martin Scottsville 

John W. Daniel Lynchburg 

WASHINGTON. 

Addlson G. Foster Tacoma 

George F. Turner Spokane 

WEST VIRGINIA. 

Stephen B. Elkins Elkins 

Nathan B. Scott Wheeling 

WISCONSIN. 

Joseph V. Quarles Milwaukee 

John C. Spooner Hudson 

WYOMING. 

Francis E. Warren Cheyenne 

Clarence D. Clark Evanston 



1901 
1905 



,1901 
,1905 



1905 
1903 



.1901 

.1903 



.1901 
.1905 



.1905 
.1903 



.1901 

.1903 



.1905 
.1903 



.1905 

.i-.xir 



.1901 
.1903 



.1905 
.1903 



.1901 
.1905 



.1901 
.1903 



.1901 

.1903 



.1901 

.1905 



.1901 
.1905 



.1905 
.1903 



.1905 
.1903 



.1901 
.1905 



.1905 
.1903 



.1901 

.I'.KI: 



.1905 

.I'M 



.1901 

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'Appointed by the governor. 



188 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 



Republicans (in italics), 185; democrats (in roman), 163; populists (TN SMATJ, CAPS), 5; 
silverites (IN CAPS), 8. Vacant, 1. Whole number, 357. Those marked * served In the LVth 
congress. Those marked t served in a previous house. 



Speaker David B. Heiiderson. .Iowa. 
ALABAMA. 

1. George W. Taylor* Demopolis. 

2. Jesse F. Stalling* Greenville. 

3. Henry D. Clayton* Eufaula. 

4. Gaston A. Bobbins* Selma. 

5. Willis Brewer* Haynevllle. 

6. John H. Bankhead* Fayette. 

7. John L. Barnett Gadsden. 

8. Joseph Wheeler* Wheeler. 

9. Oscar W. Underwood* Birmingham. 

ARKANSAS. 

1. Philip D. McCulloch, Jr.*...Marianna. 

2. JohnS. Little* Greenwood. 

3. Thomas C. McRae* Prescott. 

4. William L. Terry* Little Rock. 

5. Hugh A. Dinsmore* Fayetteville. 

6. Stephen Brundidge, Jr.* Searcy. 

CALIFORNIA. 

1. John A. Barharn* Santa Rosa. 

2. Marion DeVries Stockton. 

3. Victor Metcalf Oakland. 

4. Julius Kahn San Francisco. 

5. Eugene F. Loud* San Francisco. 

6. Russell J. Waters Los Angeles. 

7. James C. Needham. Modesto. 

COLORADO. 

1. JOHN F. 8HAFROTH* Denver. 

2. JOHN C. BELL* Montrose. 

CONNECTICUT. 

1. E. Stevens Henry* Rockvllle. 

2. Nehemiah D. Sperry* New Haven. 

3. Charles A. Russell* Killingly. 

4. Ebenezer J. Hill* Norwalk. 

DELAWARE. 

John H. Hoffecker Smyrna. 

FLORIDA. 

1. Stephen M. Sparkman* Tampa. 

2. Robert W. Davis Palatka. 

GEORGIA. 

1. Rufus E.Lester* Savannah. 

2. James M. Griggs* Dawson. 

3. Elijah B. Lewis* Montezuma. 

4. William C. Adamson* Carrollton. 

5. Leonidas F. Livingston* Kings. 

6. Charles L. Bartlett* Macon. 

7. John W. Maddox* Rome. 

8. William M. Howard* Lexington. 

9. Farish Carter Tate* Jasper. 

10. W. H. Fleming* Augusta. 

11. William G. Brantley* Brunswick. 

IDAHO. 

EDGAR WILSON Boise. 

ILLINOIS. 

1. James R. Mann* Chicago. 

2. William Lorimer* Chicago. 

3. George P. Foster Chicago. 

4. Thomas Cusack Chicago. 

5. EdgarT. Noonan Chicago. 

6. Henry S. Boutell* Chicago. 

7. George E. Foss* Chicago. 

8. Albert J. Hopkins* Aurora. 

9. Robert R. Hitt* Mount Morris. 

10. George W. Prince* Galesburg. 

11. Walter Reeves* Streator. 

2. Joseph G. Cannon* Danville. 

13. Vespasian Warner* Clinton. 

14. Joseph, V. Graff* Pekin. 

15. Benjamin F. Marsh* Warsaw. 

IS. William E.Williams Pittsfleld. 

17. Benjamin F. Colwell* Chatham. 

18. Thomas M. Jett* Hillsboro. 



19. Joseph B. Crowley Robinson. 

20. James R. Williamst Carmi. 

21. William A. Rodenberg E. St. Louis. 

22. George W. Smith* Murphysboro. 

INDIANA. 

1. James A. Hemenway* Boonville. 

2. Robert W. Miers* Bloomington. 

3. William T. Zenor* Corydon. 

4. Francis M. Griffith* Vevay. 

5. George W. Paris* Terre Haute. 

6. James E. Watson* Ru shvllle. 

7. Jesse Overstreet* Franklin. 

8. George W. Cromer Muncie. 

9. Charles B. Landis* Delphi. 

10. E. D. Crumpacker* Valparaiso. 

11. George W. Steeled Marion. 

12. James M. Robinson Fort Wayne. 

13. Abraham L. Brick South Bend. 

IOWA. 

1. Thomas Hedge Burlington. 

2. Joe R. Lane Davenport. 

3. David B. Henderson* Dubuque. 

4. GUbertN. Haugen Northwood. 

5. Robert G. Cousins* Tipton. 

6. John F. Lacey* Oskaloosa. 

7. John A. T. Hull* Des Moines. 

8. William P. Hepburn* Clarinda. 

9. Smith McPherson Red Oak. 

10. Jonathan P. Dolliver* Fort Dodge. 

11. Lot Thomas Storm Lake. 

KANSAS. 
At Large W. J. Bailey Baileyville. 

1. Charles Curtis Topeka. 

2. Jwstin D. Bowersock Lawrence. 

3. EDWIN R. RlDGfcLY* Plttsburg. 

4. James M. Miller Council Grove. 

5. William A. Calderhead Marysville. 

6. William A. Reeder Logan. 

7. Chester I. Long* Hutchlnson. 

KENTUCKY. 

1. Charles K. Wheeler* Paducah. 

2. Henry D. Allen Morganfleld. 

3. John S. Rhea* Russellville. 

4. David H. Smith* Hodgenville. 

5. Oscar Turner Louisville. 

6. Alberts. Berry* Newport. 

7. Vacant. 

8. George G. Gilbert Shelbyville. 

9. Samuel J. Pugh* Vanceburg. 

10. Thomas Y. Fitzpatrick* Prestonburg. 

11. Vincent Boering London. 

LOUISIANA. 

1. Adolph Meyer* New Orleans. 

2. Robert C. Davey* New Orleans. 

3. Robert F. Broussard* New Iberia. 

4. Phanor Breazeale Natchitoches. 

5. Joseph E. Ransdell LakeProvid'ce. 

6. Samuel M. Robertson* Baton Rouge. 

MAINE. 

1. Amos L. Allen Alfred. 

2. Charles E. Littlefield Rockland. 

3. Edwin C. BurUigh* Augusta. 

4. Charles A. Boutelte* Bangor. 

MARYLAND. 

1. John W. Smith Snow Hill. 

2. William B. Baker* Aberdeen. 

3. Frank C. Wachter Baltimore. 

4. James W. Denny Baltimore. 

5. Sidney E. Mudd*] Laplata. 

6. George A. Pearre Cumberland. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

1. George P. Lawrence* North Adams. 

2. Frederick H. GUlett* Springfield. 



FIFTY-SIXTH CONGRESS. 



189 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. CONTINUED. 



3. John R. Thayer Worcester. 

4. George W. Weymouth* Fitchburg. 

5. William S. Knox* Lawrenca. 

6. William H. Moody* Haverhill. 

7. Ernest W. Roberts Chelsea. 

8. Samuel W.McCall* Winchester. 

9. John F. Fitzgerald* Boston. 

10. Henry F.Naphen Boston. 

11. Charles F. Spragve* Boston. 

12. William C. Lovering* Taunton. 

13. William S. Greene* Fall River. 

MICHIGAN. 

1. John B. Corliss* Detroit. 

2. Henry C. Smith Adrian. 

3. Washington Gardner Alblou. 

4. Edward L. Hamilton Nlles, 

6. William Alden Smith* Grand Rapids. 

6. Samuel W. Smith Pontlac. 

7. Edgar Weeks Mt. Clemens. 

8. John W. Fordney Saginaw. 

9. RoswellP. Bishop* Ludington. 

10. Rosseau O. Crump* Bay City. 

11. William S. Mesick* Mancelona. 

12. Carlos D. Shelden* Houghton. 

MINNESOTA. 

1. James A. Tawney* Wlnona. 

2. James T. McCleary* Mankato. 

3. Joel P. Heatwole* Northneld. 

4. Frederick C. Stevens* St. Paul. 

5. Loren Fletcher* Minneapolis. 

6. Page Morris* Duluth. 

7. Frank M. Eddy* Glenwood. 

MISSISSIPPI. 

1. John M. Allen* Tupelo. 

2. Thomas Spight* Ripley . 

3. Thomas C. Catchings* Vicksburg. 

4. Andrew F. Fox* West Point. 

6. John S.Williams* YazooClty. 

6. Frank A. McLaln* Gloster. 

7. Patrick Henry* Brandon. 

MISSOURI. 

1. James T. Lloyd* Shelbyville. 

2. William W. Rucker Key tesville. 

3. John T. Dougherty Liberty. 

4. Charles F. Cochran* St. Joseph. 

5. William S. Cowherd* Kansas City. 

6. David A. De Armond* Butler. 

7. James A. Cooney* Marshall. 

8. Dorsey W. Shackelford Jefferson City. 

9. Champ Clark*t Bowling Green. 

10. Richard Bartholdt* St. Lou)s. 

H. Charles F. Joy* St. Louis. 

12. Charles E. Pearce * St. Louis. 

13. Edward A . Robb* Perry ville. 

14. William D. Vandiver* CapeGirardeau 

15. Maecenas B. Benton Neosho. 

MONTANA. 

Albert J. Campbell Butte. 

NEBRASKA. 

1. E.J. Burkett Lincoln. 

2. David H. Mercer* Omaha. 

3. John S. Robinson Madison. 

4. WILLIAM L. STAKK* Aurora. 

5. RODBK'K D. SUTHERLAND'NelsOn. 

6. William Neville North Platte. 

NEVADA. 

FRANCIS G.NEWLANDS*Reno. 
NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

1. Cyrus A. Sulloway* Manchester. 

2. Frank G. Clarke* Peterboro. 

NEW JERSEY. 

1 . Henry C. Loudenslager* Paulsboro. 

2. Jo/m J. Gardner* Atlantic City. 

3. Benjamin F. Jlowell* NewBrunswick 

4. Joshua S. Solomon* Boonton. 

6. James F. Stewart* Paterson. 



6. Richard Wayne Parker* Newarts. 

7. William D.Daly Hoboken. 

8. Charles Newell Fowler* Elizabeth. 

NEW YORK. 

1. Townsend Scudder Glenhead. 

2. JohnT. Fitzgerald Brooklyn. 

3. Edmund H. Driggs* Brooklyn. 

4. Bertram T.Clayton...; Brooklyn. 

5. Frank E. Wilson Brooklyn. 

6. Mitchell May Brooklyn. 

7. Nicholas Mullert New York city. 

8. Daniel J. Riordau New York city. 

9. Thomas J. Bradley* New York city, 

10. Amos J. Cummings* New York city. 

11. William Sulzer* New York city. 

12. George B. McClellan* New York city. 

13. Jefferson M. Levy New York city. 

14. William A. Chanler New York city. 

15. Jacob Rupert, Jr New York city. 

16. John Q. Underbill New Rochelle. 

17. Arthur S. Tompkins Nyack. 

18. JohnH. Ketcham+1 Dover Plains. 

19. .4aron V. S. Cochrane* Hudson. 

20. Martin H. Glynn Albany. 

21. John K. Stewart Amsterdam. 

22. Lucien N. Littauer * Gloversville. 

23. Lewis W. Emerson Warrensburg. 

24. Charles A. Chickering* Copenhagen. 

25. James S. Sherman* Utica. 

26. George W. Ray* Norwich. 

27. Michael E. Driscoll. Syracuse. 

28. Sereno E. Payne* Auburn. 

29. Charles W. Gillet* Addison. 

30. James W. Wadsivorth* Geneseo. 

31. James M. E. O'Grady Rochester. 

32. William H. Ryan Buffalo. 

33. DeAlvaS. Alexander* Buffalo. 

31. Edward B. Vreeland Salamanca. 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

1. JohnH. Small Elizabeth City. 

2. George H. White* Tarboro. 

3. Charles R. Thomas Newbern. 

4. JOHN W. ATWATKB Rialto. 

6. W. W. Kitchin* Roxboro. 

6. John D. Bellamy Wilmington. 

7. Theodore F. Kluttz Salisbury. 

8. Romulus Z. Linney*.., Taylorsville. 

9. William T. Crawford Waynesville. 

NORTH DAKOTA. 

Burleigh F. Spalding Fargo . 

OHIO. 

1. William B. Shattuc* Madisonville. 

2. Jacob H. Bromwell* Cincinnati. 

3. John L. Brenner* Dayton. 

4. Robert B. Gordon St. Marys. 

6. David Meekison* Napoleon. 

6. Seth W. Brown* Lebanon. 

7. Walter L. Weaver* Springfield. 

8. Archibald Lybrand* Delaware. 

9. James H. Southard* Toledo. 

10. Stephen Morgan Oak Hill. 

11. CharlesH. Grosvenor* Athens. 

12. John J. Lentz* Columbus. 

13. James A. Norton* Tiffin. 

14. Winfleld S. Kerr* Mansfield. 

15. Henry C. Van Voorhis* Zanesville. 

16. Joseph J. Gill Steubenville. 

17. John A. McDowell* Millersburg. 

18. Robert W. Taylcr* Lisbon. 

19. Charles Dick* Akron. 

20. Fremont O. Phillips Medina. 

21. Theodore E. Burton*^ Cleveland. 

OREGON. 

1. Thomas H. Tongue* Hillsboro. 

2. Malcolm A. Moody Dallas. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 
At Large Galusha A. Grow*t.. Glenwood. 

Samuel A. Davenport* Erie. 

1. Henry H. Bingham* Philadelphia. 



190 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


HOUSE OF REPRESEN 
2 Robert A<l<tn>$ Jr * Philadelphia. 


TATIVES.-COl 
4. John L. She] 
5. Joseph W. E 
6. Robert E.B 
7. Robert L. H 
8. Samuel W. 1 
9. Albert 8. Bi 
10. R. B. Hawle 
11. Rudolph Kl 
12. James L. Sli 
13. John H. Ste 

Brigham H. 

1. H. Henry Po 
2. William W. 

1. William A. . 
2. William A. 
3. John Lamb* 
4. Sidney P. E 
5. Claude A. S 
6. Peter J. Ote 
7. James Hay* 
8. John F. Rix( 
9. William F. 1 
10. Julian M. Q 

1 

At Large Wes 
Francis W. < 

VS 

1. Blackburn J 
2. Alston Q. Di 
3. David E.Jo 
4. Borneo H.Fi 

1. Henry A. Ct 
2. Herman B. 
3. Jos. W. Bab 
4. Theobald Ot 
5. Samuel S. B 
6. James H. D 
1. John J. Esc) 
8. Edward S. A 
9. Alexander S 
10. John J. Jenk 

Frank W. M 

ARIZONA Joh 
NEW MEXICO- 
OKLAHOMA L 

ULATION. 
R. D.Peo.Sil. 
.. 42.. .. 
.. 10 3 .. .. 
. 12 


JTINUED. 
jpard Pittsburg. 


3 William McAleer* Philadelphia 


alley* . ... Gainesville. 






5. AlfredC Harmer* Philadelphia 




6. Thomas S. Butler West Chester. 


P. Lanham*t. . . . Weatherford. 
irleson Austin. 


7. Irving P. Wanger* Norristown. 


8. David H. Barber Mauch Chunk. 


y* Galveston. 




jberg* Cuero. 




lyden* San Antonio. 


11 William, Connell* Scranton 




12. Stanley W. Davenport Plymouth. 
13. James W. Ryan Pottsville. 


UTAH. 

Roberts Centerville. 


14. Martin E. Olmsted* Harrisburg. 


15. Jfredenclt V. Wright susquebanna. 
16. Horace B. Packer* Welfsboro. 


VERMONT. 
wen* Morrisville. 


17. RufusK. Polk Danville. 


19. Edward D. Zeigler York. 
20. Edward E. Throop Bedford. 


Grout* Barton. 
VIRGINIA, 
rones* Warsaw. 




22 John Dalzell* . ..Pittsburg. 


23 William H Qraham* Allegheny. 


foung* Norfolk, 


24. Ernest F. Acheson* Washington. 


Richmond, 
jes* Blackstone. 


26 Athelston Gaston Meadville. 


ivanson* Chatham. 


37 Joseph C Sibley . . Franklin. 


f* Lynchburg. 


28, James K P Hall .Ridgway. 


Madison C. H. 


RHODE ISLAND. 


y* Culpeper. 


thea Bristol. 


uarles Staunton. 


2. Adin B. Capron* Stillwater. 


WASHINGTON. 

ey L. Jones Yaklma. 
Jushman Tacoma. 


SOUTH CAROLINA. 
1 William Elliott*t Beaufort 


2. W. Jasper Talbert* Parksville. 


r EST VIRGINIA. 

J. Dovener* Wheeling. 
tyton* PhiliBpi. 


3. Asbury C. Latimer* Belton. 
4. Stanyarne Wilson* Spartansburg. 
5 David E. Finley Yorkville. 
6. James Norton* Mullins. 


7. J. William Stokes* Orangeburg. 
SOUTH DAKOTA. 

At Large Robert J. (Jamblet. . . Yankton. 
Charles H. Burke Pierre. 


eer Harrisville. 
WISCONSIN. 
oper* Racine. 


TENNESSEE. 

1. Walter P. Brownlow * Jonesboro. 
2. Henry R. Gibson* Knoxville. 


Oahle Mt. Horeb. 
cock* Necedah. 


en* Milwaukee. 
arney* West Bend. 
ividson* Oshkosh. 


3. John A. Moon* Chattanooga. 
4. Charles E. Snodgrass Crossville. 
5. James D. Richardson* Murfreesboro. 
6. John W. Gaines * Nashville. 


La Crosse. 
finor* Sturgeon Bay. 
tewart* Wausau. 


7. Nicholas N. Cox* Franklin. 
8. Thetus W. Sims* Linden. 


WYOMING. 
'endell New Castle. 


9. Rice A. Pierce* Union City. 


10. Edward W. Carmack* Memphis. 
TEXAS. 
1. Thomas H. Ball * Huntsville. 


rERRITORIES. 

n F. Wilson Prescott. 
Pedro Perea Bernalillo. 
ennis Flynn*. . .Guthrie. 

State. R.D.Peo.Sil 
Pennsylvania.... 20 10 .. .. 
Rhodelsland 2 
South Carolina. . .. 7 .. .. 
South Dakota 2 
Tennessee 2 8 .. .. 
Texas 1 12 .. . .i 


2 Samuel B. Cooper* Woodville. 


3 R C DeGraffenried* Longview. 


RECAPIT 

State. R. D.Peo.Sil. State. 
Alabama 9 .. ..Maryland 
Arkansas G .. ..Massachusetts 
California 6 1 Michigan . 


Colorado 1 1 Minnesota 7 


Connecticut 4 Mississippi 7 .. .. 
Delaware 1 Missouri ,-- a 12 .. .. 


Florida 2 .. ..Montana 
Georgia 11 .. .. Nebraska 
Idaho 1 Nevada 
Illinois 14 8 New Hampshii 


.. 222.. 
1 
e. 2 
.. 62.. .. 
.. lt> 18 .. .. 


Utah 1 .. .. 
Vermont 2 
Virginia 10 .. .. 
Washington 2 


Indiana 9 4-.. .. New Jersey ... 
Iowa 11 New York 


West Virginia... 3 1 .. .. i 
Wisconsin... 10 
Wyoming 1 




..261 .. 
.. 1 

15 fi - 


Kentucky* 28.. .. North Dakota. 


Total 185163 6 3 




Maine 4 Oregon 2 


'Vacant 1. 



FIFTY-SIXTH CONGRESS. 191 


SEN, 

Aldrich, N. W. ...Rhode Island 
Allison, William B Iowa 


1TORS (Alphabetically Arranged). 


Sear, John H Iowa 


Perkins, G. C California 
Pettigrew. R. F. .South Dakota 
Pettus, Edmund W... Alabama 
Platt, OrvilleH.... Connecticut 
flatt, Thomas C New York 
EMtchard, J. C..North Carolina 
Proctor, Redfleld Vermont 

Quarles, J. V Wisconsin 


Bacon, Augustus O Georgia 
Baker, Lucieu Kansas 




iansbrough, H.C...N. Dakota 
Harris, William A Kansas 
3awley, Jos. R Connecticut 
Heitf eld, Henry. Idaho 


Bate, W. B Tennessee 


Berry, James H Arkansas 
Beveridge, A. J Indiana 
Burrows, Julius C Michigan 
Butler, Marion. North Carolina 


Eloar, George F.Massachusetts 


Quay, M. S Pennsylvania 


Jones, John P Nevada 


Rawlins, Joseph L Utah 


Carter, Thomas H Montana 
Chandler. W.E.New Hampshire 
Chilton. Horace R Texas 




Ross, Jonathan Vermont 


Kennev. Richard R. .Delaware 
Kyle J. H South Dakota 


Scott. N. B West Virginia 


Clark, Clarence D. . . .Wyoming 
Clark W A Montana 


Lindsay, William.. . .Kentucky 
Lodge, II. C Massachusetts 

Me Bride , George W Oregon 
McComas, L. B. Maryland 
McCumber, P. J N. Dakota 
McKnery , S. D Louisiana 
McLaurin, J. L.. South Carolina 
McMillan, James Michigan 
Mallory ,8. R Florida 
Martin, Thomas S Virginia 
Mason, William E Illinois 
Money, H. D. S Mississippi 
Morgan, John T Alabama 


Shoup, George L Idaho 


Clay, Alexander S Georgia 
Cockrell. F. M Missouri 


Soooner, JohnC Wisconsin 
Stewart, W. M Nevada 


1 Culberson, C. A Texas 
Cullom, Shelby M Illinois 


Sullivan, W. V Mississippi 
Tallaferro, J. P Florida 


Daniel, John W Virginia 
Davis, C. K Minnesota 
Deboe, W. J Kentucky 
Depew, C. A New York 
Elkins, 8. B West Virginia 


Teller Henry M .... Colorado I 


Thurston, John M. ...Nebraska 
Tillman, B. R . .South Carolina 
Turley, Thos. B Tennessee 
Turner, George F.. Washington 
Vest, George G Missouri 


Foraker. Joseph B Ohio 


Warren, F. E Wyoming 


Foster, A. G Washington 
Frye William P Maine 


Nelson, Knute Minnesota 
Penrose, Boies... Pennsylvania 


Wellington, G. L Maryland 
Wetmore.Geo. P.Rhode Island 
Wolcott, E . O Colorado 


Gallinger, J.H.New Hampshire 

REPBES 

Acheson, K. F... Pennsylvania 
Adams, Robt, Jr.Pennsylvania 
Adamson. Wm. C Georgia 
Alexander, DeA. S.. New York 
Allen, A. L., Maine 
Allen, H.D Kentucky 
Allen J M Mississippi 




ENTATIVES (Alphabetically Arranged). 


Burke, Robt. E Texas 


Davenport, 8. A.Pennsylvania 
Davenport, S.W..Pennsylvania 
Davey, Robt. C Louisiana 
Davidson, J. H Wisconsin 
Davis, Robt. W Florida 


Burkett, E. J Nebraska 


Burleigh, E. C Maine 
Burleson, A. S Texas 
Surnett, J. L Alabama 
Burton, T. E Ohio 
Butler, T. S Pennsylvania 

Calderhead, W. A Kansas 
Caldwell, B. F Illinois 


Dayton, A. G . . . -West Virginia 
DeArmond, D. A Missouri 


Atwater. J. W.. North Carolina 
Babcock, J. W Wisconsin 


DeGraflenried, R.C Texas 
DeVries, Marion California 


Bailey, J.W Texas 
Bailey, W. J Kansas 
Baker,W. B Maryland 


Dampbell, A. J Montana 
Cannon, J. G Illinois 
Japron, Ad in B. .Rhode Island 
Carmack, E. W Tennessee 
Catchings, T. C Mississippi 
Chanler, W. A New York 
Chickering, C. A New York 


Dick, Charles Ohio 
Dinsmore. H. A Arkansas 


Ball, Thomas H Texas 
Bankhead, John H... Alabama 
Barber, L. H Pennsylvania 
Barham, John A California 
Barney, S. S Wisconsin 


Dougherty, J Missouri 


Dovener, B. B . .. West Virginia 
Driggs, E. H New York 


Driscoll, M. K New York 


Eddy, F. M Minnesota 


Bartholdt, R Missouri 
Bartlett C. L Georgia 


Clarke, F. G. ..New Hampshire 


Elliott, Wm. . . .South Carolina 
Emerson, L. W New York 


Bell, J. C Colorado 
Bellamy, J. D. .North Carolina 


Clayton, H. D Alabama 
Cochran, (J lias. F Missouri 
Cochrane, A. V. 8. . . .New York 
Council, Wm Pennsylvania 


Epes, S. P Virginia 


Esch, J. J Wisconsin 


Berry, A. S Kentucky 


Faris, Geo. W Indiana 


Bingnam, H. H... Pennsylvania 
Bishop, R. P Michigan 


Cooney, J. A Missour 


Finley, D. E. . . .South Carolina 
Fitzgerald, J. F.Massachusetts 
Fitzgerald, J. J New York 
Fitzpatrick. T. Y Kentucky 
Fleming, Wm. H Georgia 
Fletcher, L Minnesota 
Fordney, J. W Michigan 
Foss, Geo. E Illinois 


Boering, V Kentucky 
Boutell, H. 8 Illinois 
Boutelle. C. A Maine 


Cooper! S. B Texas 
Corliss, John B Michigan 
Cousins, R. G Iowa 
Cowherd, Wm. 8 Missour 
Cox, N. N Tennessee 
Cranford. J. W Texas 


Bowersock, J. D Kansas 
B radley , T. J New York 
Brantley, Wm. G Georgia 


Brenner, j'ohn L Ohio 
Brewer. Willis Alabama 
Brick, A. L Indiana 


Crowley. J. B Illinois 
Crump, R. O Michigan 
Crumpacker, E. D Indiana 
Cummings, A. J New York 
Curtis, CT Kansas 


Foster, G. P Illinois 
Fowler, C. N New Jersey 
Fox, Andrew F Mississippi 
Freer. R. H West Virginia 

Gaines. John W Tennessee 
Gamble, R. J South Dakota 


Bromwell. J. H Ohio 


Brosius M Pennsylvania 


Broussard, Robt. F.. Louisiana 
Brown Seth W Ohio 


Cushman. F. W Washington 

Dahle. H. B Wisconsin 
Daly, W. D New Jersey 
Dalzell, John Pennsylvania 


Gardner, John J.... New Jersey 
Gardner, Wash Michigan 


Brownlow, W. P Tennessee 
Brundidge. S., Jr Arkansas 
Bull. Melville Rhode Island 
Burke, C. H South Dakota 




Gibson, H. R Tennessee 


Gilbert. G. G Kentucky 



192 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


RF 
Gill, J.J Ohio 


.PRESENTATIVES.-CONTINFED. 
McRae, Thomas C Arkansas Shepard, J. L Texas 


Gillett, F. H Massachusetts 
Glynn, M. H New York 


Maddox. J. W Georgia 
Mahon, T. M Pennsylvania 
Mann, J. R Illinois 
Marsh, B. F Illinois 


Showalter, J. B. .Pennsylvania 
Sibley, J. C Pennsylvania 
Sims, Thetus W Tennessee 
Slayden, J. L Texas 


Gordon, R. B Ohio 


Graham, W. H.. .Pennsylvania 
Green, D. H Pennsylvania 
Greene, W. S Massachusetts 
Griffith, F. M Indiana 
Griggs, James M Georgia 


Marshall, G. A Ohio 
May, Mitchell New York 


Small, J. H North Carolina 
Smitb. D. H.. Kentucky 


Meekison, D Ohio 
Meiidell, F. W Wyoming 
Mercer, D. H Nebraska 
Mesick. W. S Michigan 


Smith, G. W Illinois 
Smith, H. C Michigan 


Smith, J. W Maryland 
Smith, S. W Michigan 


Grout, W. W Vermont 
Grow, G. A Pennsylvania 

Hall, J. K. P Pennsylvania 
Hamilton, E. L Michigan 


Meyer, A Louisiana 
Miers, Robert W Indiana 


Snodgrass, C. E Tennessee 
Southard, J. H Ohio 


Miller, J. M Kansas 
Minor, E. S Wisconsin 
Moody, W. H ...Massachusetts 
Moody, M. A ..Oregon 


Spalding, B. F... North Dakota 
Sparkman-S. M Florida 


Harmer, A.C Pennsylvania 


Spight, T Mississippi 


Hawley, R. B Texas 


Moon, J. A Tennessee 
Morgan, 8 Ohio 


Sprague, C. F.. . .Massachusetts 
Stalllngs, J. F Alabama 


Hay, James Virginia 
Heatwole, J. P Minnesota 
Hedge, Thomas Iowa 


Morris. Page Minnesota 
Mudd, Sidney E Maryland 
Muller.N New York 


Stark, W. L Nebraska 
Steele,G. W Indiana 
Stephens, J.H Texas 


Henderson, D. B Iowa 
Henry, E. S Connecticut 
Henry, Patrick Mississippi 


Naphen. H. F. . .Massachusetts 
Needham.J.C California 
Neville, W Nebraska 


Stevens, F. C Minnesota 
Stewart, Alex Wisconsin 
Stewart, J. F New Jersey 
Stewart, J. K New York 


Henry, Robert I< Texas 
Hepburn, W. P . . Iowa 


Newlands, F. G Nevada 
Noonan, E.T Illinois 


Stokes, J. W. . . .South Carolina 
Sulloway, C. A.NewHampshire 
Sulzer, W New York 


Hill, E. J Connecticut 


Norton, J South Carolina 


Hoflecker, J. H Delaware 


O'Grady, J. M. E New York 
Olmsted, M. E.. . .Pennsylvania 
Otey , Peter J Virginia 
Otjen, Theobald Wisconsin 
Overstreet, Jesse Indiana 


Sutherland, R. D Nebraska 
Swanson, C. A Virginia 


Howard, Wm. M Georgia 
Howell, B. F New Jersey 
Hull,J.A.T Iowa 


Talbert, W. J... South Carolina 
Tate, F. C Georgia 
Tawney.J.A Minnesota 
Tayler, R W Ohio 


Jack, S. M Pennsylvania 
Jenkins, J.J Wisconsin 
Jett.Thos. M Illinois 
Johnson, D. B. . .West Virginia 
Jones, W. A Virginia 


Packer, H. B Pennsylvania 
Parker, R. W New Jersey 
Payne, S. E New York 
Pearce, C. E Missouri 


Taylor, G. W Alabama 
Terry, W. L Arkansas 
Thayer, J. R. . . . Massachusetts 
Thomas, C. R, . North Carolina 


Jones, W. L Washington 
Joy, C, F Missouri 


Pearson, R North Carolina 


Thropp, J. E Pennsylvania 


Kahn, Julius.. California 
Kerr, W. S Ohio 


Peters, M.8 Kansas 
Phillips, F.O Ohio 


Tongue, T. H Oregon 
Turner, O Kentucky 


Ketcham, J. H New York 
Kitchin, W. W..North Carolina 
Kleberg, R Texas 


Polk, R. K Pennsylvania 


Underbill, J. Q New York 
Underwood. O. W Alabama 


Powers, H. H Vermont 
Prince. G. W Illinois 


Knox, W. S Massachusetts 


Pugh, S. J Kentucky 
Quarles. J. M Virginia 


Van Voorhis, H. C Ohio 
Vreeland, E. B New York 


Lamb, John Virginia 




Wachter, F. C Maryland 


Landis, C. B Indiana 
Lane, J. R Iowa 
Lanham, 8. W. T Texas 
Latimer, A. C. ..South Carolina 
Lawrence, Geo. P Mass. 
Lentz, J.J Ohio 


Ray, G. W New York 
Reeder, W. A Kansas 
Reeves. W Illinois 
Rhea J S Kentucky 


Wadsworth. J. W New York 
Wanger, I. P Pennsylvania 
Warner, V Illinois 
Waters, R. J California 


Rhea. W. F Virginia 
Richardson, J.D Tennessee 
Ridgely, E. R Kansas 


Watson, J. E Indiana 


Weaver, W.L Ohio 
Weeks. E Michigan 


Lester, R. E Georgia 


Levy. J. M New York 
Lewis, E. B Georgia 
Linney, R. Z North Carolina 
Littauer.L. N New York 


Riordan , D. J New York 
Rixey, J. F Virginia 
Robb, E. A Missouri 


Weymouth.G.WJSlassachusetts 
Wheeler, C. K Kentucky 
Wheeler, J A labama 




White. G. H . . . .North Carolina 
Williams, J. R Illinois 


Little, J. S Arkansas 


Roberts B H Utah 


Littlefleld, C.E Maine 
Livingston, L. F Georgia 
Lloyd, J. T Missouri 
Long, C. I Kansas 
Lorimer, Wm Illinois 


Roberts, E. W... Massachusetts 
Robertson, S. M Louisiana 
Robinson, J. M Indiana 
Robinson, J. 8 Nebraska 


Williams, J. S Mississippi 


Williams.W. E Illinois 


Wilson, E Idaho 


Wilson, F. E New York 
Wilson, S South Carolina 


Loud, E. F California 
Loudenslager, H. C...N. Jersey 
Levering, W. C..Massachusetts 
Lybraad Archibald Ohio 


Rucker. W. W Missouri 
Ruppert, J. Jr New York 
Russell, C. A Connecticut 


Wright, C. T Pennsylvania 

Young, J. R Pennsylvania 
Young. W. A Virginia 




McAleer, Wm.... Pennsylvania 
McCall, S. W Massachusetts 
McCleary, J. T Minnesota 
McClellan, G. B New York 
McCulloch. P. D., Jr. .Arkansas 
McDowell, J. A. Ohio 
McLain, F. A Mississippi 
McPherson, S Iowa 


Ryan, W. H New York 


W T T d' 


Salmon, J. 8 New Jersey 


Ziegler, E. D Pennsylvania 

DELEGATES. 
Flynn, D. T Oklahoma 


Scudder. T New York 
Shackelford, D. W Missouri 
Shafroth, J. F Colorado 
Shattuc, W. B Ohio 


Shelden, C. D Michigan 
Sherman, J. S New York 


Perea, P New Mexico 


Wilson, J. F Arizona 



JUDICIAL. 



193 



SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES. 
Chief Justice MELVILLE W. FULLER, Illinois, 1888. 



Justices Jno.M.Harlan.. Kentucky 1877 

Horace Gray Massachusetts 1881 

David J. Brewer Kansas 1889 

Henry B. Brown Michigan 1890 



George Shiras, Jr Pennsylvania 1802 

Edward D. White Louisiana 1894 

Kufus W. Peckham New York 1895 

J oseph McKenna California 1898 



Clerk J. H. McKenney, I). C 1880 

Salaries: Chief Justice, if 1 0.500; Justices, $10,000; Clerk. J6.000. 
Marshal J. M. Wright, Kentucky $3,500 | Reporter 3. C. B. Davis, New York $4.500 

UNITED STATES CIRCUIT COURTS OF APPEALS. 

ward R. Meek, D. E. Bryant, T. S. Maxey. 
Clerk James M. McKee. New Orleans, La. 

SIXTH C i HC riT. Judges MrJ ustice John M . 
Harlan; Circuit Judges, W. H. Taft, H. H.Lur- 
ton, Wm. R. Day; District Judges. Albert C. 
Thompson, A.J. Ricks, H . H. Swan, H. F. Sever- 
ens,Walter Evans, E. 8. Hammond, C. D. Clark. 
Clerk Frank O. Loveland. Cincinnati, O. 

SEVENTH CIRCUIT. Judges Mr. Justice H. 

B. Brown; Circuit Judges, W. A. Woods, J. 
G Jenkins, Peter 8. Grosscup; District Judges, 

C. C. Kohlsaat, J. H. Baker. W. J.Allen, W.H. 
Seaman, R. Bunn. CUrk Edw. M. Holloway. 
Chicago, 111. 

EIGHTH CIRCUIT. Judges-Mr. Justice D. J. 
Brewer; Circuit Judges, H.C.Caldwell, W.H. 
Sanborn, A. M. Thayer; District Judges, Wm. 
H. Hunger, O. P. Shiras. J. S. Woolson, Wm. 
Lochren, J. F. Phillips, J. A. Williams. Moses 
Hallett, Wm. C. Hook, J. A. Riner, Elmer B. 
Adams, John H. Rogers, Chas. F.Amldon.John 
E. Carland, Jno. A. Marshall. Clerk J. D. Jor- 
dan. St. Louis, Mo. 

NINTH CIRCUIT. Judges -Mr Justice Joseph 
McKenna; Circuit Judges, E. M. Ross, William 

B. Gilbert, W. W. Morrow; District Judges, 
James H. Beatty, J. J. DeHaven.C. B. Belling- 
er, T. P. Hftwley, O. Wellborn, Hiram Knowles, 

C. H. Hanford. Clerk F. D. Monckton. San 
Francisco. 



I'utnam; District Judges, Francis C. Lowell, 
Nathan Webb, Arthur L. Brown, Edgar Al- 
clrich. Clerk J. G. Stetson. Boston, Mass. 

SECOND CIRCUIT. Judges Mr. Justice Ru- 
fus W. Peckham; Circuit Judges, William J. 
Wallace, B. H. Lacombe, Nathaniel Shipman; 
District Judges, HoytH. Wheeler, W.K.Town- 
send, A. C. Coxe, Edw. B. Thomas, Addison 
Brown Clerk Wm. Parkins. New York city. 

THIRD CIRCUIT. Judges Mr. Justice 
George Shiras, Jr.; Circuit Judges, M. W. 
Acheson, G. M. Dallas, George Gray; District 
Judges, John B. McPherson, Andrew Kirkpat- 
rick, Joseph Bnfflngton, Edward G. Bradford. 
Clerk W. V. Williamson. Philadelphia. 

FOURTH CIRCUIT. Judges Mr. Chief Jus- 
tice Melville W. Fuller, Chief Justice United 
States; Circuit Judges.C. H. Simontou, Nathan 
Goff; District Judges, John J.Jackson, Thomas 
R. Purnell, Hamilton G. Ewart, W. H. Braw- 
ley, T. J. Morris, Edmund Waddill, Jr., John 
Paul. Olerk-H. T. Meloney. Richmond, Va. 

FIFTH CIRCUIT. Jwiges Mr. Justice E. D. 
White; Circuit Judges, D. A. Pardee, A. P. 
MeCorraick, David D. Shelby; District Judges, 
W. T. Newman. Emory Speer, Charles Swayne, 
J. W. Locke, John Bruce, H. T. Toulmin, H. C. 
Niles, Charles Parlange. Aleck Boarraan, Ed- 



CIRCUIT COURTS OF THE UNITED STATES. 
(Salaries of Circuit Judges, $6,000 each.) 



FIRST jninciAii CIRCUIT. Mr. Justice 
Gray, Boston, Mass. Districts of Maine, New 
Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island. 
Circuit Jiul'ies -Le Baron B. Colt, Bristol, R. L, 
July 5, 1884; W. L. Putnam, Portland, Me., 
March 17, 181)2. 

SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. Mr. Justice 
Peckham. Districts of Vermont, Connecticut, 
New York. Circuit Judges Wm. J. Wallace, 
Albany. N. Y., April , 1882; E. H. Lacombe, 
New York, May 2ti, 1887; Nathaniel Shipman, 
Hartford, Conn., March 17. 1892. 

THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. Mr. Justice 
Shiras, Pittshurg, Pa. Districts of New Jer- 
sey, Pennsylvania, Delaware. Circn-it Judges 
Murcus W. Acheson. Pittsburg. Pa., Feb. 3, 
1891; George M. Dallas. Philadelphia, Pa., 
March 17. 1S!H; George Gray, Wilmington, Del., 
March 29, 1899. 

FOURTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. Mr. Chief Jus- 
tine Fuller. Washington. D.C. Districts of Mary- 
land, Virginia. West Virginia. North Carolina, 
South Carolina. Circuit Jndges-C. H. Si- 
monton. Charleston, S. C.. Dec. 19, 1893; Na- 
than Goff, Clarksburg, W. Va.. March 17, 1892. 

FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. Mr. Justice 
White. Districts of Georgia. Florida, Ala- 
bama, Mississippi. Louisiana. Texas. Circuit 
Judges Don A. Pardee, New Orleans, La., 



May 13, 1881; A. P. McCormick, Dallas, Tex.. 
March 17, 1892; D. D. Shelby, Huntsville, Ala- 
March 2, 1899. 

SIXTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. Mr. Justice 
Harlan. Districts of Ohio, Michigan, Kentucky. 
Tennessee. Circuit Judges W. H. Taft. Cin- 
cinnati, O., March 17. 1892; H. H. Lurton, Nash- 
ville, Tenn.. March 27, 1893; Wm. R. Day, Can- 
ton, O., Feb. 28, 1899. 

SEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. Mr. Justice 
Brown, Chicago, 111. Districts of Indiana, Illi- 
nois, Wisconsin. Circuit Judges Vf. A. Woods, 
Indianapolis. Ind., March 17.1892; J.G.Jenkins, 
Milwaukee, Wis, March 23. 1893; Peter S. Gross- 
cup, Chicago, 111.. Jan. 23, 1899. 

EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. Mr. Justice 
Brewer, Leaven worth. Kas. Districtsof Minne- 
sota, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wyoming, 
Iowa, Missouri, Kansas. Arkansas, Nebraska, 
Colorado, Utah. Circuit Judges W.H. Sanborn, 
St. Paul, Minn., March 17, 1892; H. C. Caldwell, 
Little Rock. Ark., March 4. 1890; Amos M. 
Thayer. St. Louis. Mo., Aug. 9, 1894. 

NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. Mr. Justice Mc- 
Kenna. Districtsof California, Montana, Wash- 
ington, Idaho, Oregon, Nevada. Circuit Jiidaes 
B. M. Ross. Los Angeles, Cal.. Feb. 22. 1895; W. 
B. Gilbert. Portland, Ore.. March 18, 1892; Wm. 
W. Morrow. San Francisco, Cal., May 20, 1897. 



UNITED STATES COURT OF C1ATMS. 

(Salaries of Judges, f 4.500 each.) 
Chief Justice C. 0. NOTT, New York, 1865. 

s Lawrence "Weldon.. Illinois 1883 I S. J. Peelle Indiana 18! 

John Davis Dis. Columbia 1885 I C. B. Howry Mississippi 189/ 

Chief Clerk Archihald Hopkins, Massachusetts, 1873, $3,000. 



194 CHICAGO DAILY NFWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


JUDGES OF THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURTS. 
(Salaries, io.OOO each.) 


DISTRICTS. 


Name. 


Residence. 


Date of 
conim'tsaion. 


ALABAMA Northern and Middle Dlst.. 
Southern District 


John Bruce 




Feb. 27,1875 
Jan. 13, 1887 
June 14. 1898 
Sept. 22, 1890 
Nov. 27, 18915 
Mar. 21, 1898 
June 8, 1897 
Mar 1,1895 
Jan. 12, 1877 
Mar. 28, 1R92 
May 11, 1897 
April 22, 1887 
May 17, 18S9 
Feb. 1. 1872 
Aug. 13, is*: 
Feb. 18, 1885 
Mar 7, 1891 
Feb. 28. 1899 
April 18,1887 
Mar. 29.1892 
Dec. 12. 1895 
May ]8, 1897 
Jan. 10, 18* 
July 1, 1897 
Aug. 4, 1882 
Aug. 14, 1891 
Mar. 1, 1899 
Mar. 3, 1899 
Jan. 15, 1894 
May 18, 188] 
Jan. 24, 1882 
July 1. 1879 
Jan. 10, 1898 
Jan. 19, 1891 
May 25. 1886 
May 18, 181*5 
Aug. 11,1891 
May 17. 1895 
June 25, 1888 
Feb. 21, 1890 
Feb. 18, 1897 
Sept. 9, 1890 
Feb. 20. 1891 
Nov. 20, 1S5 
Jan. 31, 1898 
May 4, 1882 
June 2, 1881 
Feb. 15, 1898 
May 5, 1897 
July 13. 1898 
Aug. 31, 1898 
July 1, 18S9 
Sept. 28. 1898 
Feb. Ifi. 1898 
April 15. 1893 
Mar. 2. IS'fl 
Feb. 23. 1892 
Oct. l;>. ]89li 
Jan. 18. 1894 
Aug. 31, 1896 
Jan. 21. 1S95 
June 17,1878 
May 27.1890 
June 25, 1888 
July 13. 1898 
Feb. 4, lS9fi 
Mar. 1(5.1877 
Mar. 22. 1.-1W 
Mar. 3, 1883 
Feb. 25. 18!H> 
Aug. 3. ISf.l 
April 3. 1893 
Oct. 30. 1877 
Sept. 22, ISflO 


H. T. Touhnin 
Charles S. Johnson.. 
John A. Williams 
JohnH. Rogers 
Webster Street 
John J. De Haven. . . 
Olin Wellborn 
Moses Hallett 


Mobile 
Sitka 
Little Rock 


ALASKA 
ARKANSAS Eastern District 
, Western District 


Fort Smith 
Phoenix 
San Francisco 
Los Angeles 


ARIZONA 
CALIFORNIA-Northern District 
! Southern District 
COLORADO 


CONNECTICUT 
DELAWARE 
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 
1 FLORIDA Northern District 
Southern District 
GEORGIA Northern District 


W. K. Townsend 
Edward G. Bradford 
K. F. Bingham 
Charles Swayne 
James W. Locke 
Wm. T. Newman. . . 
Emory Speer 


New Haven 
Wilmington 


Pensacoia 
Jacksonville 


Southern District 




IDAHO 


James H. Beatty 


Boise. 


ILLINOIS Northern District 


C. C. Kohlsaat 
Wm. J. Allen 
JohnH. Baker 
W. M. Springer . . . 
Wm. H. H. Clayton.. 
Hosea Townsend 
lohn R. Thomas 
Oliver P. Shlras 
lohn S. Woolson 
Wm. C. Hook 
Walter Evans 
C. Parlange i . . . 
Aleck Boarman 
Nathan Webb 
Thomas J. Morris 
Francis C. Lowell ... 
Henry H. Swan 
Henry F. Severens.. 
William Lochren 
Henry C. Niles 


Chicago 
Springfield 
Indianapolis 


Southern District 
INDIANA ' 
INDIAN TERRITORY Northern Dlst. 
Middle District 
Southern District 
Additional J udge 


Muscogee 
South McAlester . . 
Ardmore 


IOWA Northern District 
Southern District 
KANSAS 
KENTUCKY 
LOUISIANA Eastern District 
Western District 
MAINE 
MARYLAND 
MASSACHUSETTS 
MICHIGAN Eastern District 
Western District 


Dubuque 


Des Moines 
Leavenworth 
Louisville 
New Orleans 
Shreveport 
Portland 
Baltimore 
Boston 
Detroit 
Grand Rapids 
Minneapolis 


MINNESOTA 
MISSISSIPPI Two Districts 


MISSOURI Eastern District 


E. B. Adams 


St. Louis 


Western District 
MONTANA 


JobnF. Philips 
Hiram Knowles 
Wm. H. Munger 
Thomas P. Hawley. . 
Edgar Aldrich 
Andrew Kirkpatrick 
Wm. J. Mills 


Kansas City 


NEBRASKA 




NEVADA 
NEW HAMPSHIRE 
NEW JERSEY 
NEW MEXICO 


Carson City 
Littleton 
Newark 


NEW YORK Northern District 


Alfred C. Coxe 


Utica 




Addison Brown 
Edw. B. Thomas 


New York city 
Brooklyn... . 


Eastern District 


NORTH CAROLINA Eastern District.. 
Western District 


Thomas R. Purnell.. 
Hamilton G. Ewart . 
Charles F. Amidon.. 
A. J. Ricks 


Raleigh 
Hendersonville 
Fargo 
Cleveland 


NORTH DAKOTA 
OHIO Northern District 


Southern District 


Albert C. Thompson 
John H. Burforu . . 




OKLAHOMA 




OREGON 

PENNSYLVANIA Eastern District 


Charles B. Bellinger 
John B. McPherson.. 
Joseph Buffington. . . 


Portland 
Uarrisburg 
Pittsburg 


RHODE ISLAND 


Arthur L. Brown 


Providence 


SOUTH C AROLI N A 


W. H. Brawley 


Charleston 


SOUTH DAKOTA 
TENNESSEE Eastern and Middle Dists. 
Western District 
TEX AS Eastern District 
Western District 
Northern District 
UTAH 
VFRMONT 


John E. Garland 
Charles D. Clark 
EH S. Hammond 
David E. Bryant 
Thomas M. Maxey. . 
Edw. R. Meek 
John A. Marshall. . . 
Hoyt H. Wheeler 


Sioux Falls 
Chattanooga 


Memphis 


Sherman 
Austin 
Fort Worth 
Salt Lake City 
Brattleboro 


VIRGINIA Eastern District . . . 


Edmund Waddill.Jr. 






Harrlsonhurg. ., 
Seattle 


WASHINGTON 


C. H. Hanford. . . 


\VFST VIRGINIA 


John J. Jackson 
W. H. Seaman 
Romanzo Buun 
John A. Riner 


Parkersburg 


WISCONSIN Eastern District 
Western District 
WYOMING 


Sheboygan 


Cheyenne 



UNITED STATES DISTRICT ATTORNEYS. 195 


UNITED STATES DISTRICT ATTORNEYS. 


DISTRICTS. 


Name. 


Residence. 


ALABAMA-Northern District 
Middle District 


Win. Vaughan 
Warren S. Reese, .lr 


Birmingham. 
Montgomery. 
Mobile. 
Sitka. 
Prescott. 
Little Rock. 
Fort Smith. 
San Francisco. 
Los Angeles. 
Denver. 
Hartford. 
Wilmington. 
Washington. 
Pensacola. 
Jacksonville. 
Atlanta. 
Macon. 
Moscow. 
Chicago. 
Springtleld. 
Indianapolis. 
Vinita. 
South MeAlester. 
Ardmore. 
Cedar Hapids. 
Corydon. 
Topeka. 
Louisville. 
New Orleans. 
Shreveport. 
Portland. 
Baltimore. 
Boston. 
Detroit. 
Grand Rapids. 
St. Paul. 
Oxford. 
Vicksburg. 
St. Louis. 
Kansas City. 
Helena. 
Omaha. 
Carson City. 
Concord. 
New Brunswick. 
Albuquerque. 
Buffalo. 
New York city. 
Brooklyn. 
Raleigh. 
Winston. 
Fargo. 
Cleveland. 
Cincinnati. 

Portland. 
Philadelphia. 
I'ittsburg. 
Providence. 
Charleston. 
Sioux Falls. 
Knoxville. 
Nashville. 
Memphis. 
(Jalveston. 
Dallas. 
San Antonio. 
Salt Lake City. 
Brattleboro. 
Norfolk. 
Abingdon. 
Seattle. 
Charleston. 
Osbkosh. 
La Crosse. 
Cheyenne. 


Southern District 
ALASKA 
ARIZONA 
ARKANSAS Eastern District 


Morris D. Wickersham... . 
Robert A. Friedrich 
Robert E. Morrison 


Western District 


James K. Barnes 


CALIFORN1 A Northern District 
Southern District 
COLORADO 


Frank L. Coombs 
Frank P. Flint 
Greeley W. Whitford 
Charles W. Coiustock 
Wm. Michael Byrne 


CONNECTICUT 


DELAWARE 
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 


FLORIDA Northern District 




Southern District 
GEORG1 A-Northern District 


Jos. N. Stripling 
Edgar A. Angier 


IDAHO 
ILLINOIS Northern District 


Robert V. Cozier 
Solomon H. Bethea 


INDIANA 


Albert W. Wishard 


INDIAN TERRITORY-Northern District.... 
Central District 


Pliny L. Soper 
John H. Wilkins 
William B.Johnson 
Horace G. McMillan 


IOWA Northern District 




Lewis M iles 


KANSAS 


Isaac E. Lambert 


KENTUCKY 


Reuben D. Hill 


LO UIS1AN A Eastern District 


J. Ward Gurley. Jr 
Milton C. Elstner 


MAINE 




MARYLAND .. 


John C. Rose 


VI ASS AC 1 1 USRTTS 


Boyd B. Jones 


MICHIGAN Eastern District 


William D. Gordon 
George G. Covell 


MINNESOTA 
MISSISSIPPI Northern District 


Robert G. Evans 
Mack A.Montgomery.... 
Albert M. Lea 


MISSOURI- Eastern District 


Edward A. Rozlcr 


MONTANA 


William B Rodgors 


NEBRASKA 


Williamson S. Summers.. 
Sardis Summertleld 
Charles J. Hamblett 


NEVADA 
NEW HAMPSHIRE 
NEW JERSEY 


NEW MEXICO 
NEW YORK Northern D. strict 


William B.Childers 


Southern District 
Eastern District 
NORTH CAROLINA Eastern District .... 


Henry L. Burnett 
George H. Pettit 


Western District 
NORTH DAKOTA 
OHIO Northern District 
Southern 1 District 
OK L AUOM A 


Alfred E. llolton 
Patrick H. Rourke 
Samuel D. Docige 
William E. Bundy.., 
(Vacant). 
John H Hall 


OREGON 


PENNSYLVANIA -Eastern District 
Western District 
RHODE ISLAND .. . .. 


James M. Heck 
Daniel B. Heiner 


SOUTH CAROLINA 
SOUTH DAKOTA 
TENNESSK K-Eastern District 
Middle District 
Western District. . .... .... 


Abial Lathrop 
James D. Elliott 
William D. Wright 
Abrarn M. Ttllnmn 


TEX AS Eastern Istrict 
Northern District 
Western District 


Marcus C. McLemore 
William H. Atwell 
Henry Terrell .-. 


UTAH 


Charles O. Whitteinore. . . 


VERMONT 


VI RGIN1 A -Eastern District 


Kdgar Allan 


Western District 
WASHINGTON 
WEST VIRGINIA 
WISCONSIN-Eastern District 
Western District 
WYOMING 


Thomas M. Alderson 
W. R.Gay 
Joseph II. Gaines 
Milton C. Phillips 
David F. Jones 
Timothy F. Burke 



196 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


UNITED STATES MARSHALS. 


DISTRICTS. 


Name. 


Reside nf. 


ALABAMA Northern District- 


D. N. Cooper ... 


Birmingham. 
Montgomery. 
Mobile. 
Sitka. 
Tucson. 
Little Rock. 
Fort Smith. 
San Francisco. 
Los Angeles. 
Denver. 
New Haven. 
Wilmington. 
Washington. 
Pensacola. 
Jacksonville. 
Atlanta. 
Macon. 
Boise City. 
Chicago. 
Springfield. 
Indianapolis. 
Muscogee. 
South McAlester. 
Ardmore. 
Dubuque 
Des Moines. 
Topeka. 
Louisville. 
New Orleans. 
Shreveport. 
Portland. 
Baltimore. 
Boston. 
Detroit. 
Grand Rapids. 
St. Paul. 
Oxford. 
Jackson. 
St. Louis. 
Kansas City. 
Helena. 
Omaha. 
Carson City. 
Concord. 
Trenton. 
Albuquerque. 
Elmira. 
New York city. 
Brooklyn. 
Raleigh. 
Greensboro. 
Fargo. 
Cleveland. 
Cincinnati. 
Guthrie. 
Portland. 
Philadelphia. 
Pittsburg. 
Providence. 
Charleston. . 
Sioux Falls. 


Middle District 


Leander J . Brvan 




Frank Simmons 


ALASKA 




ARIZONA 


William M Griffith 


ARK ANSAS Eastern District 
Western District 


Henry M. Cooper 
Solomon F. Stahl 


CALIFORNIA- Northern District 


John H. Shine 






COLORADO 
CONNECTICUT 
DELAWARE.. 


Dewey C. Bailey 
Edson S. Bishop 
John C. Short . 


DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 




FLORIDA Northern District 
Southern District 


Thomas F. McGourin 
John F. Horr 


GEORGIA Northern District 


Walter H. J ohnson 




IDAHO 




ILLINOIS Northern District 




Southern District 
INDIANA 
INDIAN TERRITORY Northern Listrict 
Central District 
Southern District 
IOWA Northern District 


Charles P. Hitch 
Samuel E. Kercheval 
Leo E. Bennett 
Jasper P. Grady 
John 8. Hammer 
Edward Knott 




Geo. M Christian 


KANSAS 
KENTUCKY 


Wm. Edgar Sterne 
A. D. James 


LOUISIANA Eastern District 


Charles Fontelieii 






MAINE 


Hutson B. Saunders 
William F. Airey 


MARYLAND 


M ASS ACHUSETTS 


Chas. K. Darling. 


MICHIGAN Eastern District 


William R. Bates. . 


Western District . 




MINNESOTA ' 


Wm. H. Grimsliaw 


M 1SS1SSI FPI Northern District 


Geo. M. Buchanan 
Frederick W. Collins. 


MISSOURI Eastern District ... 


Ixjuis C. Bohle 




Edwin R. Durham. 


MONTANA 




NEBRASKA 


T L Mathews 


NKVADA 


J. F. Emmitt 


NEW HAMPSHIRE 
NEW Jf RSEY 


Eugene P. Nute 
Thomas J. Alcott 


NEW MEXICO 


Creighton M. Foiaker 
William R. Compton 
William Henkel 


NKW YORK-Nprthern District 




Charles J. Haubert 


NORTH CAROLINA Eastern District 


Henry C. Dockery 




Jas. M. Millikan 


NORTH DAKOTA 
OHIO Northern District. 


John E. Haggart 


Matt bias A. Smalley 




Vivian J. Fagin 


OKLAHOMA 




ORKGON 


Zoeth Houser 


PENNSYLVANIA Eastern District 
Western District 


James B. Reilly 
Frederick C. Ijeonard 
James 8. McCabe 


RHODE ISLAND 


SOUTH CAROLINA . 


Lawson D. Melton 
Edward G. Kennedy 


SOUTH DAKOTA 


TENNESSEE Eastern District . 


Richard W. Austin 


Knoxville. 
Nashville. 
Memphis. 
Paris. 
Dallas 


Middle District .. .... 


John W. Overall 


Western District 


Thomas H. Baker 


TEXAS Eastern District 


John Grant 
George H. Green 


Western District 




San Antonio. 
Salt Lake City. 
Rutland. 
Richmond. 
Harrisonburg. 
Tacoma. 
I'arkerslmrg. 
Milwaukee. 
Madison. 
Cheyenne. 


UTAH 


Glen Miller 


VERMONT 


Fred A Field 


V 1 IK ; INI A-Eastern District 
Western District 
WASHINGTON ... 


Morgan Treat 
S. Brown Allen 
Clarence W. Ide 


WEST VIRGINIA 




WISCONSIN Eastern District . .. 


Thomas B Reid 






W YOMING 


Frank A. Hadsell 







CUSTOMS OFFICERS. 



197 



COLLECTORS OF INTERNAL REVENUE. 



Alabama... Julian H. Bingham, Birmingham 

Alaska (See Oregon) 

Arizouu (See New Mexico) 

Arkansas... Harmon L. Reinmel, Little Rock 
California 1.. John C. Lynch, San Francisco 

2 Henry C. Bell, Sacramento 

Colorado Frank W. Howbert, Denver 

Connecticut Thomas L. Lake, Hartford 

Dakota (See Nebraska) 

Delaware (See Maryland) 

Florida Joseph E. Lee, Jacksonville 

Georgia Henry A. Rucker, Atlanta 

Idaho: ( See Montana) 

Illinois 1 Fred E. Coyne, Chicago 

5 Aquilla J. Daugherty, Peoria 

8 Richard Yates, Springfield 

13 William H. Powell, East St. Louis 

Indian Territory (See Kansas) 

Indiana 6 A. E. Nowlin, Lawrenceburg 

7 David W. Henry, Terre Haute 

Iowa 3 John W. Patterson, Dubuque 

4 John M. Campbell, Burlington 

Kansas Michael W. Sutton, Leavenworth 

Kentucky 2.. Edward T. Franks, Owensboro 

6 Charles E. Sapp, Louisville 

6 David N. Comlngore, Covington 

7 Samuel J. Roberts, Lexington 

8 John W. Yerkes, Danville 

Louisiana Lewis J. Souer, New Orleans 

Maine (See New Hampshire) 

Maryland Benj. F. Partlett, Baltimore 

Massachusetts James D. Gill, Boston 

Michigan 1 Charles Wright, Detroit 

2 Samuel M. Lemon, Grand Rapids 

Minnesota Fred Von Baumbach. St. Paul 

Mississippi (See Louisiana) 

Missouri 1 Henry C. Grenner, St. Louis 

2 Frank K. Kellogg, Kansas City 

Montana Charles M. Webster, Helena 

Nebraska Jacob E. Houtz, Omaha 



Nevada (See California) 

New Hampshire.... J. A. Wood, Portsmouth 

New Jersey 1 Isaac Moffett, Camden 

2 H. C. H. Herold, Newark 

New Mexico. ...Alex L. Morrison, Santa Fe 

New York 1 Frank R. Moore, Brooklyn 

2 Charles N. Treat, New York city 

3 Ferd Eidman, New York city 

14 John G. Ward, Albany 

21 Charles E. Cole, Syracuse 

28 Archie D. Sanders, Rochester 

North Carolina 4... Ed C. Duncan, Raleigh 

5 Herschel S. Harkins, Asheville 

North Dakota (See Nebraska) 

Ohio 1 Bernhard Bettmunn, Cincinnati 

10 George P. Waldorf, Toledo 

11 John Entrekln, Chlllicothe 

18 Frank McCord, Cleveland 

Oklahoma (See Kansas) 

Oregon David M. Dunn, Portland 

Pennsylvania 1. . P. A. McClain, Philadelphia 

9 Henry L. Hershey, Lancaster 

12 Thomas Penman, Scranton 

23 James S. Fruit, Pittsburg 

Rhode Island (See Connecticut) 

South Carolina E. A. Webster, Columbia 

South Dakota (See Nebraska) 

Tennessee 2 A. J. Tyler, Knoxville 

5 David A. Munn, Nashville 

Texas 3 Webster Flanagan, Austin 

4 Philemon B. Hunt, Dallas 

Utah (See Montana) 

Vermont (See New Hampshire) 

Virginia 2 James D. Brady, Richmond 

6 Park Agnew. Alexandria 

Washington (See Oregon) 

West Virginia A. B. White, Parkersburg 

Wisconsin 1 Henry Fink, Milwaukee 

2 James G. Monahan, Madison 

Wyoming (See Colorado) 



CUSTOMS OFFICERS. 



Port. Collectors. 

Alabama Mobile J. W Burke 

Alaska Sitka J. W. Ivey 

Arizona Nogalis H. K. Chenowith 

California San Francisco J. P. Jackson 

San Diego W. W. Bowers 

Los Angeles J. C. Cllne 

Eureka S. A. Campbell 

Connecticut Bridgeport F. J. Navamore 

Hartford J. H. Blaklesby 

New Haven J. W. Mix 

New London T. O. Thompson 

Stonington C. T. Stanton 

Delaware Wilmington W. H. Cooper 

Dist. of Columbia Washington. .W. B. Todd 

Florida Apalachicola W. B. Sheppard 

Fernandina J. W. Howell 

Pensacola J. E. Stlllman 

St. Augustine T. B. George 

Jacksonville W. H. Lucas 

Cedar Keys S. P. Anthony 

Key West G. W. Allen 

Tampa M. B. Macfarlane 

Georgia Brunswick H T. Dunn 

Savannah J. H. Devaux 

St. Marys Budd Coffee 

Illinois Chicago W. P. Nixon 

Louisiana New Orleans A. T. Wimberly 

Brashear J. A. Thornton 

Maine Houlton T. H. Phair 

Bangor A. R. Day 

Bath , G. Moulton, Jr. 

Belfast J. H. Harrlman 



Port. Collectors. 

Castlne G. M. Warren 

Ellsworth. Henry Whiting 

Machias J. K. Ames 

Kennebunk Edwin Parsons 

Eastport G. A. Curran 

Portland W. F. Milliken 

Saco F. H. Oak? 

Waldoboro F. B. Wright 

Wiscasset D. H. Moody 

York E. H. Banks 

Maryland Annapolis L. S. Clayton 

Baltimore W. F. Stone 

Crlsfleld J. C. Tawes 

Massachusetts Barnst able T. H. Hallet 

Boston G. H. Lyman 

Edgartown C. H. Marchant 

Fall River John Desmond 

Gloucester F. C. Richardson 

Marblehead C. H. Bateman 

Nantucket C. E. Smalley 

New Bedford Z. W. Pease 

Newburyport II. P. Mackintosh 

Plymouth D. W. Andrews 

Salem John Daland 

Michigan Grand Haven G. A. Farr 

Detroit J. T. Rich 

Marquette J. Q. Adams 

Port Huron A. R. Avery 

Minnesota St. Paul John Peterson 

Duluth L. M. Willcntts 

Mississippi Shuldsboro J. P. Walworth 

Natchez David King 



198 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



Port. Collectors. 

Vicksburg J. H. Short 

Montana Great Falls D. G. Browne 

New Hampshire Portsmouth.. R. N. Elwell 

New Jersey Bridgeton G. \V. McCowan 

Jersey City M. I. Fagen 

Trenton R. Billingham 

Somers Point Walter Fifleld 

Camden F. F. Patterson 

Tuckerton S P. Bartlett 

Newark G. L. Smith 

Perth Amboy Robert Carson 

New York Buffalo H. W. Brendel 

Cape Vincent W. J. Grant 

Plattsburg W. C. Wltherbee 

Dunkirk John Bourne 

Rochester Henry Harrison 

New York Geo. R. Bidwell 

Niagara Falls James Low 

Ogdensburg C. A. Kellogg 

Oswego J. H. Cooper 

Sag Harbor Peter Dippel 

North Carolina Beaufort C. D. Jones 

Newbern Mayer Halm 

Edenton K. R. Pendleton 

Wilmington J. C. Dancy 

North Dakota Pembina N. E. Nelson 

Ohio Cleveland C. F. Leach 

Toledo J. H. Puck 

Sandusky E. H. Zurhorst 



Poet. Collectors. 

Oregon Astoria John Fox 

Portland I. R. Patterson 

Coos Bay John Morgan 

Yaquiua C. B. Crosno 

Pennsylvania Philadelphia.. .C. W. Thomas 
Erie B. B. Brown 

Rhode Island Bristol C. D. Eddy 

Newport J. H. Cozzens 

Providence E. H. Wilson 

South Carolina Beaufort Robert Smalls 

Charleston J. R. Talbert 

Georgetown A. M. Hamby, Jr. 

Texas Brownsville C. H. Marls 

Eagle Pass C. C. Dmk 

Galveston F. L. Lee 

El Paso Moses Dillon 

Corpus Christ! J. J. Haynes 

Vermont Burlington Olin Merrill 

Newport i 2. M. Mansur 

Virginia Alexandria M. L. King 

Cape Charles City C. G. Smithers 

Norfolk R. G. Banks 

Petersburg William Mahone 

Richmond J. S. Bethel 

Tappahannock T. C. Walker 

Newport News J. W. Elliott 

Washington Port Townsend..F. D. Huestis 

Wisconsin Milwaukee C. B. Roberts 



SURVEYORS OF CUSTOMS. 



Port. Surrei/ors. 

California San Francisco J. S. Spear, Jr. 

Colorado Denver C. H. Brickenstein 

Georgia Atlanta C. C. Wimbish 

Illinois Galena R. S. BostwicU 

Peoria R. W. Burt 

Cairo T. C. Elliott 

Rock Island R. G. Pearce 

Indiana Evansville W. S. Vielo 

Indianapolis A. A. Young 

Michigan City C. J. Unbb 

Iowa Burlington C. H. HOPS 

Sioux City J. H. Bolton 

Dnbuque J. M. Lenihan 

Council Bluffs L. M. Shubert 

Des Moines L. Redmon 

Kentucky Louisville C. M. Barnett 

Pnducah J. R. Puryear 

Louisiana New Orleans F. W. Gibson 

Maine Portland W. H. Anderson 

Maryland Baltimore -J. B. Hnnna 

Massachusetts Boston J. J. McCarthy 

Springfield H. L. Hines 



Port. Surveyors 

Michigan Grand Rapids J. A. Coye 

Missouri St. Louis C. H. Smith 

St. Joseph W. L. Buechle 

Kansas City W. L. Kessiuger 

Nebraska Omaha Cadet Taylor 

Lincoln C. H. Morrill 

New York New York S. C. Croft 

Albany .' William Barnes, Jr. 

Port Jefferson G. F. Bayles 

Syracuse J. F. Nash 

Patchogue S. O. Weeks 

Greeuport J. A. Bassarear 

Ohio Cincinnati L. Vorgt 

Columbus E. J. Miller 

Pennsylvania Fit tslmrg P. M. Lytle 

Tennessee Nashville J. W. Dillin 

Memphis James Jeffreys 

Knoxville E. W. Adkins 

Chattanooga T. B. Stapp 

West Virginia Wheeling C. H. Sensensy 

Wisconsin Lacrosse Robert Culvert 



DISTRICT SUPERVISORS OF THE TWELFTH CENSUS. 



Dirt. ALABAMA. 

1. J. W. Goldsby, Mobile. 

2. A. Steinhart, Greenville. 

3. A. E. Stratton, Troy. 

4. J. J. Sims, Silver Run. 

5. R. B. Smyer, Birniing- 

bam. 

6. J. B. Long, Jasper. 

7. D. S. Jones, Moody. 

8. W. W. Simmons, Court- 

land. 

ALASKA. 
Northern 

S. C. Dunham, Circle City. 
Southern 

W. A. Kelly, Sitka. 

ARIZONA. 
1. F. A. Tritle, Prescott. 



ist. ARKANSAS. 

1. C. Rernbert, Helena. 

2. J. B. Baker, Melbourne. 

3. W. B. Moss, Jasper. 

4. J. T. O'Hair, Little Rock. 

5. G. M. French, Hot Springs. 

6. W. F. Avera, Camdeu. 

CALIFORNIA. 

1. C. C. Plehn, Berkeley. 

2. J. D. Mackenzie, San Jose. 

3. S. H. Olmsted, San 

Rafael. 

4. T. W. O'Neill, Sacra- 

mento. 

5. A. M. Drew, Fresno. 

6. F. F. Davis, Los Angeles. 

COLORADO. 
1. F. S. Tesch, Denver. 



2. W. H. Brisbane, Lead- 
ville. 

CONNECTICUT. 
1. S. A. Eddy, Canaan. 

DELAWARE. 

1. J. S. Willis, Milford. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMIilA. 

1. II. Dingman, Washington. 

FLORIDA. 

1. R. Turnbull, Monticello. 

2. J. M. Cheney, Orlando. 

GEORGIA. 

1. II. Blun, Jr., Savannah. 

2. II. W. Hopkins, Thomas- 

ville. 

3. II. Wetteroth, Americus. 



DISTRICT SUPERVISORS OF THE TWELFTH CENSUS. 199 


Diat. 


DM. 


Dfct. MISSOURI. 


4. M. L. Covington, Carroll- 


7. J. C. O. Morse, Hutchln- 


1. S. J. Harrison, Hannibal. 


ton. 
5. J. W. Anderson, Coving- 


son. 
KENTUCKY. 


2. J. Broaddus. Chillicothe. 
3. J. F. Reed, Liberty. 


ton. 
6. J. M. Strickland, Thomas- 
ton. 
7. G. P. Anderson, Marietta. 
8. E. L. Campbell. Eudora. 
9. J. H. Witzel, Blue Ridge. 


1. A. C. Moore, Marion. 
2. E. M. Flack, Hopkins- 
ville. 
3. H. Morris, Glasgow. 
4. W. N. Foster, Greens- 


4. B. E. E. McJimsey, 
Marysville. 
5. G. J. Baer, Kansas City. 
6. J. M. Pldeock, Greenfield 
7. H. H. Parsons, Marshall 
8. J. W. Vosholl, Linn. 


10. E. D. Smythe, Augusta. 
11. A. Akerman, Dublin. 


5. C. K. Caron. Louisville. 
6. R. H. Elliston, Williams- 


9. C. A. Davault, Farber 
10. F. W. Rauehenstein, 


HAWAII. 


town. 


Clayton. 


1. A. T. Atkinson, Honolulu. 
IDAHO. 
1. W. H. Savidge, Boise. 


7. E. Bainbridge. Owenton. 
8. John Bright, Stanford. 
9. C. G. McAllister, Ow- 


11. J. S. Higgins, St. Louis. 
12. B. T. Walker, Dexter. 
13. B. J. Morrow, Neosho. 


ILLINOIS 


ingsville. 


MONTANA. 


1. G. F. Gilbert, Chicago. 
2. W. Jackson, Shabbona. 


30. H. S. Howes. Paintsville 
11. J. G. Forester, Harlan. 


1. J. E. Rickards, Butte. 
NEBRASKA. 


3. H. C. Burchard, Freeport. 


LOUISIANA. 


1. F. W. Miller, Falls City. 


4. W. C. Galloway. Aledo. 


1. A. E. Livaudais, New 


3. W. E. Peebles, Fender. 


5. W. E. Birkenbeuel, La- 


Orleans. 


4. T. E. Hibbert, Adams. 


Salle. 


2. P. H. Segura. New Iberia. 


5. I. D. Evans, Kenesaw. 


6. J. B. Fithian, .Toliet. 


3. W. Clegg. Lafayette. 


6. J. T. Mallalieu, Kearney. 


7. E. S. Swigart, Champaign. 


4. W. B. Peyton, Keatchie. 


NEVADA. 


8. G. De F. Kinney. Peoria. 
9. G. M. Finlay. Augusta. 


5. C. W. Phillips, Lonewa. 
6. J. Yoist, New Roads. 


1. E. W. Tremont, Eureka. 


10. T. Worthington, Jackson- 


MAINE. 


NEW HAMPSHIRE. 


ville. 
11. E. D. Blinn, Lincoln. 


1. J. A. Place, South Ber- 


1. D. F. Healy, Manchester. 
NEW JERSEY. 


12. J. M. Truitt, Hillsboro. 
13. F.W. Booth, Marshall. 


wick. 
2. E. P. Spofford, Deer Isle. 


1. J. H. Weastell, Jersey 


14. T. G. Rislev. Mt. Ciirmol 
15. II. J. Schmidt. Nashville. 
16. J. C. Willis, Metropolis. 


MARYLAND. 
1. O. L. Quinlan, Baltimore 
2. B. G. Stevens, Williston. 


City. 
2. S. A. Smith, Newark. 
3. J. M. Denton, Paterson.. 
4. C. S. Tunis, New Bruns- 


INDIANA. 


3. W. T. S. Rollins, Seat 


wick. 


1. C. G. Covert. Evansville. 
2. J. C. Billheimer, Wash- 


Pleasant. 
4. A. H. Harrington, Fred- 


5. W. L. James, Riverton. 
6. John Blowe, Camden. 


ington. 
3. J. D. Poutch. New Albany 
4. C. W. Lee, Sugar Branch. 


MASSACHUSETTS. 
1. H. G. Wadlin, Boston. 


NEW MEXICO. 
1. P. Sanchez, Santa Fe. 


5. I. L. Wimmer, Rockville 


MICHIGAN. 


NEW YORK. 


6. J. F. Thompson, New 
Castle. 


1. F. L. Brooke/Detroit. 
2. F. R. Metcali, Adrian. 


1. C. S. Wilbur, New York. 
2. W. B. Atterbury, Brook- 


7. V. G. Clifford, Indianap- 
olis. 


s! C. H. Gurney,' Hilisdaie. 
4. B. S. Wing, Hastings. 


lyn. 
3. J. L. Williams, Pough- 


8. A. L. Sharpe. Bluffton. 
9. A. E. Bradshaw, Delphi 
10. E. N. Norris, Valparaiso. 
11. O. A. Somers, Kokomo. 
12. S. A. Wood, Angola. 
13. D. B. J. Schafer, South 


5. E. M. Allen, Portland. 
6. E. V. Chilson. Lansing. 
7. G. H. Brown, Port Huron. 
8. O. L. Sprague, Owosso. 
9. J. K. Flood, Hart. 
10. C. R. Jackson, East 


keepsie. 
4. M. A. Heeran, Rensselaer. 
5. F. S. Steenberge, North 
Bangor. 
6. F. A. Weed, Potsdam. 
7. W. B. Collins, Glovers- 


Bend. 
INDIAN TERRITORY. 
1. W. H. Darrough, Wyan- 


Tawas. 
11. C. L. Rarden. Greenville. 
12. R. J. Bates, Ironwood. 


ville. 
8. J. R. Stevens, Cohoes. 
9. F. D. Cole, Cairo. 
10. Edgar M. Gordon, Port 


dotte. 


MINNESOTA. 


Jervis. 


IOWA. 


1. L. D. Frost, Winona. 


11. J. Schnell, Binghamton. 


1. ,T. W. Rowley, Keosauqua. 


2. J. G. Hamlin, Blue Earth. 


12. J. T. Roberts, Syracuse. 


2. C. D. Eaton. Wilton Jet. 


3. H. B. Wakefleld, Hutch- 


13. J. Batchelor, Utica. 


3. J. W. Krapfel, Waterloo. 


inson. 


14. R. J. Myers, Auburn. 


4. G. H. Markley, Lansing. 


4. E. Yanisn, St. Paul. 


15. W. S. Hodgman, Painted 


5. J. W. Doxsee, Monticello 


5. C. S. Cairns, Minneapolis. 


Post. 


6. A. H. Fortune, Bloom- 


6. A. N. Dare, Elk Rive'r. 


16. J. A. Warren, Fredonla. 


field. 


7. E. E. Adams, Fergus 


17. J. A. Hamilton, Buffalo. 


7. S. C. Smith, Winterset. 


Falls. 


18. Albert J. Slaight, West 


8. F. M. Kyte, Osceola. 
9. F. F. Everest, Council 


MISSISSIPPI. 
1 H E Fitts Aberdeen 


Sparta. 
19. J. W. Hannan, Rochester. 


Bluffs. 
10. J. T. Drue, Stratford. 
11. W. E. Hamilton, Odebolt. 


2'. W". A. McDonald, Holly 
Springs. 
3. C. Banks, Clarksdale. 


NORTH CAROLINA. 
1. W. Martin, Williamston. 
2. A. M. Moore, Greenville. 


KANSAS. 


4. G. E. Galceran, Sturges. 


3. D. J. Lewis, Whiteville. 


1. A. J. White, Todd. 


5. R. M. Bourdeaux, Merid- 


4. J. J. Jenkins, Pittsboro. 


2. J. M. Humphrey, Ft.Scott. 


ian. 


5. J. T. B. Hoover, Oxford 


3. Asa Smith, Parsons. 


6. W. H. Mounger, Enter- 


6. W. B. Steele, High Point. 


4. C. S. Briggs, Carbondale. 


prise. 


7. G. A. Bingham, Salisbury. 


5. W H. Smith, Marysville. 


7. W. E. Mollison, Vicks- 


8. O. F. Pool. Taylorsville. 


6. C. W. Landis, Osborue. 


burg. 


9. J. A. Hendricks, Marshall. 



200 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


Dist. NORTH DAKOTA. 
1. A. H. Laughlin, Lisbon. 

OHIO. 

1. G. Stoddard, Wyoming. 
2. F. P. Richter. Hamilton. 
3. W. BinlUey, Sidney. 
4. U. H. Hester, Van Wert 


Dist. 

12. C. A. Zerbe, Lewistown. 
13. G. R. Scull, Somerset. 
14. J. L. Alliston, Puuxsu 
tawney. 
15. W. B. Sterrett, Titus- 
ville. 
16. G. W. Youngson, Parnas- 
sus. 
17. F. M. Fuller. Uniontown. 
18. J. M. Esler, Tarentuin. 
19. J. A. McMillan, Uarlans- 
burg. 

RHODE ISLAND. 
1. G. H. Webb, Providence. 
SOUTH CAROLINA. 

1. J. W. Wheeler, Charles- 
ton. 
2. S. A. Pearce. Columbia. 
3. D. H. Russell. Anderson. 
4. G. W. Shell, Laurens. 
5. T. J. Cunningham, Clow- 
ney. 
6. L. J. Breeden, Bennetts- 
ville. 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 

1. J. I* Burke, Hot Springs. 
2. D. Williams, Webster. 

. TENNESSEE. 

1. J. S. Hill, Morristown. 
2. J. R. Penland, Knoxville. 
3. E. W. Mattson, Chatta- 
nooga. 
4. G. H. Morgan, Cookeville 
5. J. J. Jones, Fayetteville. 
6. P. P. Pickard, Waverly. 
7. A. M. Hughes, Columbia. 
8. D. A. McDougal, Savan- 
nah. 
9. J. D. Senter, Humboldt. 
10. T. F. Tobin, Memphis. 

TEXAS. 

1. John B. Stephens, Mount 
Pleasant. 
2. R. M. Kelso, Denton. 
3. W. D. Bell, Quanah. 
4. S. M. Vernon, Brown- 
wood. 
5. W. G. Robinson, San An- 
tonio. 
6. K. S. Fisher, Ennis. 


Dist. 
7. J. S. Burns, Tyler. 
8. E.W. Smith, Nacogdoches. I 
9. D. R. Emerson, Marlin. 
10. E. R. McLean, Austin. 
11. H. Settle, Galveston. 
12. T. H. Dwyer, Brenham. 
13. J. O. Luby, San Diego. 

UTAH. 
1. A. Pratt, Salt Lake City. 
VERMONT. 
1. W. B. Gates, Burlington. 
VIRGINIA. 

1. G. T. Scarburg, Accomack. 
2. H. E. Smith, Suffolk. 
3. C. P. Snead, Etna Mills. 
4. F. R. Lassiter, Peters- 

5. C. M. Hirt, Rocky Mount. 
6. C. C. Carrington, Houston. 
7. J. M. Steck, Winchester. 
8. R. R. Campbell, Warren- 
ton. 
9. G. W. Blankenship, Bris- 
tol. 
10. R. T. Hubard, Boiling. 

WASHINGTON. 
1. J. B. McMillan, Fairha- 
vcu. 
2. A. Mires, Ellensburg. 

WEST VIRGINIA. 
1. H. W. Banner, Clarks- 
burg. 
2. L. C. Powell, Fairmont. 
3. E. L. Dunn, Red Sulphur 
Springs. 
4. T. A. Brown, Elizabeth. 

WISCONSIN. 
1. A. J. Turner, Portage. 
2. R. Meyer, Jr., Lancaster. 
3. A. A. Loper, Ripon. 
4. A. G. Wright, Milwaukee 
5. E. Mclntyre, Waldo. 
6. F. S. Baldwin, Waupaca. 
7. C. S. Van Auken, La 
Crosse. 
8. J. W. Miller, Wausau. 
9. J. B. Jensen, Ellsworth 

WYOMING. 
1. C. W. Riner, Cheyenne. 


5. E. Q. Crane, Batavia. 
C. S. W. Darflinger, London. 
7. W. T. Hoopes, Marys- 
ville. 
8. R. J. West, Toledo. 
9. W. S. Lambert, South 
Webster. 
10. O. E. Vollenweider, Mc- 
Arthur. 
11. H. A. Williams, Colum- 
bus. 
12. A. Kiskadden, Tiffin. 
13. L. B. Fauver, Elyria. 
14. F. M. Martin, Caldwell. 
15. I. H. Gaston, St. Clairs- 
ville. 
16. J. W. Little, Akron. 
; 17, W. M. Hostetter, Lisbon. 
18. C. F. Brotherton, Ashta- 
bula. 
19. E. Batt, Cleveland. 

OKLAHOMA. 
1. I. G. Conkling, Enid. 
OREGON. 

1. C. B. Winn, Albany. 
2. G. F. Telfer. Portland. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

1. H. D. Beaston, Philadel- 
phia. 
2. D. S. Talbot, Westchester. 
3. H. G. Seip, Easton. 
4. J. R. Edwards, Scranton. 
5. C. H. Ainey, Montrose. 
6. C. A. Durant, Wilkes- 
barre. 
7. H. G. Reitzel, Mahanoy 
City. 
8. A. F. Shenck, Lancaster. 
9. J. M. Barnett, New 
Bloomfield. 
10. H. A. Reed, Sunbury. 
11. M. H. Stebbins, Wells- 
boro. 

COPPER P 

1851 ... . . 900 


RODUCTION IN THE UNITED STATES. 

[Tons of 2,240 pounds.] 
1867.... ...10,000 1883.... M S71 


1852 1 100 


1868 11,600 


1884. 64 708 


1853 . . 2 00 


1869 12,500 


1885 74*058 


1854.. 2 250 


1870 . 12,600 


1886 7(i 430 


1855 8 000 


1871 13, (00 


1887. . . 81 017 


1856 4 000 


1872 12,500 


1888 101064 


1857 4,800 


1873.... 15,500 


1889 101 23") 


1858 5,500 


1874 17.500 


1890 115' 'Mi 


1859 . . 6 300 


1875 18.000 


1891 I't; S3'i 


I860.... ....7,200 


187t; 19.UOO 
1877 21,1100 


1802 154^018 
1893 . U7 03,'i 


1861 . . 7 500 


1862 .. 9.000 


1878.... 21,500 


1894 158 120 


1863 8,500 


1879.... ....23,000 


1895 170 137 


1864 8.000 


1880.... ...27.000 


1896 202 '235 


1865 . . .... 8,500 


1881 32,000 


1897 219 481 


1866 8 900 


1882... ...40. 467 


1898. ... 2XS 7<lii 





UNITED STATUS DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR SERVICE. 201 


tKnitro States Diplomatic ani (Consular -Srrbice. 


DIPLOMATIC SERVICE -OCT. 1, 1899. 
Explanation A. E. and P., Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary; E. E. and 
M. P., Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary; M. R., Minister Resident; 
M. R. and C. G., Minister Resident and Consul-General. 


COUNTRY. 


Representative. 


Location. 


App' ted from. 


Salary. 


Argentine Republic 
An stria-Hu ngary 

Belgium 
Bolivia 
Brazil 


Wm. P. Lord, E. E. & M. P.. . . 
f'rancois S.Jones, Sec.of Leg. 
A. C. Harris, E. E. & M. P 
}has. V. Herdliska. S. of L. . . 


Buenos Ayres. 
Buenos Ayres. 
Vienna 


Oregon 


$10,000 
1,500 
12,000 

1,800 


Louisiana 
Indiana 


Dis.Columbia 


Lt.-Com.W.H.Bechler.Nv.At. 
L. Townsend, E. E. & M. P. . . 
i. II. Bridgeman, E. E. & M.P. 
Chas. P. Bryan, E. E. & M. P. 
Thos. C. Dawson, Sec. of Leg. 


Vienna 


Brussels 
La Paz 
Rio de Janeiro. 
Rio de Janeiro- 


Pennsylvania 
Illinois... 


10.000 
5,000 
12,000 
1,800 

io,666" 

1,500 
12,000 
2,625 
1,800 


Illinois 


Chile 


Iowa 


Lt. James A.Shipton.Mil.Att. 
H. L. Wilson E E. & M P. . 


Washington. '. 
Iowa 


China 


d. J. Lenderink. Sec. of Leg.. 
B. 11. Conger, E. E. & M. P. 


Santiago 
Pekiug 




H. G. Squires. Sec. of Leg . . . 
W.E.Bambridge.2dSec.ofLeg. 
Lt. A. L. Key, Nav. Att 


Peking 
Peking 


New York 
Wisconsin.... 


Peking 


Fleming D. Cheshire. Int 
Chas. B. Hart, E. E. &M. P... 


Peking 
Bogota 
Bogota 
Managua 
Managua 
Copenhagen. .. 
Port-au-Prince. 
Quito 
Cairo ... 


China.. . . 
W. Virginia... 
Massachus'ts. 
California.... 
California.... 
Minnesota.... 
New Jersey... 
Arizona 
Florida. . 


3,000 
10.000 
2000 
10,000 
1,800 
7,500 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
17.500 
2.625 
2,000 
1.200 


Costa Rica, Nicaragua ( 
and Salvador \ 
Denmark 
Dominican Republic 
Ecuador 


I. C. McNally, Sec. of Leg. . . . 
W. L. Merry, E. E. & M. P. . . . 
.lufus A. Lane, Sec. of Leg.. . 
j. S. Swenson, E. E. & M. P.. 
Wm. F. Powell, Charge d'A. . 
A. J. Sampson, E. E. &. M. P. 
John G. Long, Agt. & C. G 


France 
Germany 
Great Britain 

Greece 
Guatemala...* 


iorace Porter. A. E. & P (Paris 
Henry Vignaud, Sec. of Leg.. Paris 
S. F. Eddy, 2d Sec. of I^eg 1 Paris - _. 


New York 
Louisiana.... 


S. Merrill. 3d Sec. of Leg 
Japt. A. Rogers, Mil. Attache 
Lieut. Wm. S. Sims, N. A 


Paris 
Paris 


Massachus'ts. 


Paris 






Andrew D. White, A. E. & P. 
John B. Jackson, Sec. of Em. 
Geo. M. Fisk, 2d Sec. of Em. . 
P. H. Dodge, M Sec 


Berlin 
Berlin 
Berlin 
Berlin 


New York 
New Jersey . . 
Ohio 
Massachus'ts. 


17,500 

2'.000 
1,200 


Comdr. F.M.Barber, Nav. Att. 
Capt. II. T. Allen, Mil. Alt. . . 


Berlin 


J.H. Choate, A. E. &P 
Henry White, Sec. of Em 
John R. Carter, 2d Sec. of Em. 
J. 11. Choate, Jr., 3d Sec 
Lieut. John C. Colwell, N. A . 
Maj.Gen.S.S.Sumner.Mil.Att. 
A. S. Hardy, E.E., M.P.& C.G. 
W. G. Hunter, E.E. & M. P... 
A.M.Beaupro, Sec. Leg.& C.G. 
Wm. F. Powell, E. E. & M. P. 


London 
London 


New York 
Dis. Columbia 
Maryland 
New York.... 
Pennsylvania 
Pennsylvania 
N.Hampshire 
Kentucky 
New York 


17,500 
2,625 
2,000 
1,200 


Londoii 
London 
London 
London 


Athens 
Guatemala 
Guatemala 
Port-au-Prince 


6,500 
10.000 
2,000 
5,000 
10,000 
12,000 
1.500 


Haiti 


Honduras 
Italy 


W. G. Hunter, E. E. & M. P... 
Wm. P. Draper, A. E. & P 
Li. M. Iddings. Sec. of Em 
R.C.Parsons,Jr.,2d Sec. of Em. 
Capt. G.P. Scriven, Mil. Att.. 


Guatemala.. .. 
Rome 
Rome 


Kentucky 
Massachus'ts 
New York.... 


Rome 






Lt.Com.W.H.Bechler.Nv.Att 
Alfred E. Buck, E. E. <fc M. P. 
J. R. Herod, Sec. of Leg 
H. Wilson, 2d Sec. of Leg. . . . 
Lt. A. Key, Nav. Att 
Kansford S. Miller, Jr., Int... 
H. N. Allen. M. R. & C. G 
W. F. Sands, Sec. of Leg 


Rome 






Tokyo (Yedo).. 
Tokyo (Yedo).. 
Tokyo (Yedo).. 
Tokyo (Yedo).. 
Tokyo (Yedo).. 
Seoul 
Seoul... 


Georgia 
Indiana 
Illinois 
Tennessee ... 
New York 
Ohio 


12,000 
2.625 
1.800 

"2,566" 
7,500 
1,500 
500 

4,666' 
1.500 
17,500 
2.635 
2,000 
7,500 


Korea 

Liberia 
Mexico . . 


Pang Kyeng Hul, Int 
Ye Ho Yung. Int.... 
O. L. W. Smith, M. R. & C. G.. 
J. R. Snurgeon, Sec. of Leg. . . 
I'owell Clayton, A. E.& P.... 
F. R. McCreery, Sec. of Leg. . 
Wm. Heimke, 2d Sec. of Leg. 
8tan ford Newel, E. E.&M.P. 
Maj.Jas.N.Whoelan.Mil.Att. 


Seoul 
Seoul 
Monrovia 
Monrovia 
Mexico 
Mexico 
Mexico 
The Hague 


Korea 
Korea 
N. Carolina .. 
Kentucky ... 
Arkansas 
Michigan 
New York 
Minnesota... 


Netherland s 

Paraguay and Uruguay. 
Persia 

Peru 


Wm. R. Finch. R. E. & M. P.. 
II. W. Bowen. M. H. & C. G.. . 
John Tyler. Int 


Montevideo 


Wisconsin . . 
New York.... 


7,500 
6,000 
1.000 
10,000 
1,500 




1. B. Dudley, E.E. & M.P... . 
1 Richard R. Neill, Sec. of Leg. 


Lima 


California... 
Pennsylvania 





202 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1!)00. 


UNITED 


STATES DIPLOMATIC SERVICE.-CONTINUEI). 


COUNTRY. 


Representative. 


Location. 


App'ted from. 


Salary. 


Portugal 
Roumariia ami Servia 

Russia 
Slam 


J. N. Irw 
A. S. H 
andC. 
C. Towe 
H.H. D 
Lieut. V 
Hamiltc 
James A 
Bellam; 
Stanton 


fin, E. E.&M. P 
ardy, E. E., M. P. 
G 
r, A.E.&P 
Pierce, Sec. of Em... 
f.S. Sims. Nav. Att... 


Lisbon 

Athens 
5t. Petersburg. 
St. Petersburg. 
St. Petersburg. 


Iowa 

N.Hampshire 
Pennsylvan'a 
Massachus'ts. 


$7,500 

0,500 
17,500 

:i.i!'.'."> 


n King, M. R. & C. G. 
. Chivers, Int 
Storer, E. E. & M. P. 
Sickels, Sec 


Bangkok 
Bangkok 
Madrid 
Madrid 


Michigan 

Ohio.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.!'.'. 
New York 


5.000 
500 
12,000 
1,800 


Spain 

Sweden and Norway 
Switzerland 

Turkey 
Venezuela. 


W. W. Thomas, E. E. & M. P. 
J. G.A. Leishman,E.E.& M.P. 
1st Lt. J. R.Williams.Mil.Att. 
Oscar S. Straus, E. E. & M. P. 
Li. C. Griscom. Sec. of Leg 


Stocl 
Bern 
Bern 
Cons 
Cons 
Cons 
Cons 
Cara 
Cara 


cholm 
e 
e 


Maine 
Pennsylvan'a 


7,500 
7,500 


[.antinople 
tantinople 
tantinople 
tantinople 
cas 


New York 
Pennsylvan'a 


10.000 
1,800 


A. A. Gs 
F. B. Lc 
W.W.I 






3,000 
7,500 
1,500 


omis, E. B. & M. P.. 
Lussell, Sec. of Leg. . 


Ohio 
Maryland 




CONSULS-GENERAL AND CONSULS, AGENTS AND CONSULAR AGENTS. 


PLACE. 


Name. 


Appointed from. 


Salary. 


ARGENTINE REPUBLIC 
Buenos Ayres 






West Virgi 
Argentine. 
Argentine 




$2,500 

Fees 
Fees 

Fees 

' 3,666' ' 
2,590 

' 2.066' ' 
3,500 

' 3,666" 
2,500 

i',666" ' 

1,500 


I'. a hia Blanca 
Cordoba 




Walter T. Jones 
John M. Thome 


Agt. 




Rosario 
AUSTR1A-HUNGARY- 
Budapest, Hungary 
Kiume 
Prague, Bohemia 
Reichenberg, Bohemia.. 
Ilaida 
Trieste, Austria 
Vienna, Austria 
Brunn 
Innsbruck 
BELGIUM Antwerp 
Brussels 
Charlerol 
Ghent 




J. M. Ayres 

Frank Dyer Chester.. 
3iovanni Gelletich.. 
Elugo Donzelmaun. . 
F. W. Mahin 
F.Siller 
Frederick W. Hossfe 
'Jaii Bailey Hurst... 
Gustavus Schoeller.. 
August Bargehr 
jreorge F. Lincoln. . . 
3eorge W. Roosevel 
J. Fisher Reese 
R. LeBert 
A. A. Winslow 


Agt.' 

Agt,: 

Id... 

A'gt: 

Agt. 

t'."! 
Agt. 

Agt! 
Agt.' 


Ohio 

Massachusetts 
Austria-Hungary 


;owa 
Wisconsin 
[owa 
District of 
Austria-H 
Austria-H 
Jonnectici 
Pennsylva 
New York 
Colorado . 


Columbia 
angary 
angary 
it 


nia 


Liege 
Verviers 








BOLIVlA-LaPaz 
BRAZIL-Bahia 
Aracaju 
Para 




Gerardo Zalles 
H. W. Furniss 
Lulz Schmidt 


Bolivia ... 




Fees 

2,01)0 

"2,666" 


Brazil 

Mississipp 
New York. 




Manaos 




John C. Redman 
Luiz F. da S. Santos.. 
L. Goldschmidt 


Agt. 
Agt. 




Maranhao 
Pernambuco 




United Sta 
New Ham] 
Brazil... 


tes 






2.000 


Ceara 




Antonio E. daFrota.Agt. 
Charles Goble Agt. 
A. Barroca. Agt. 




Maceio 
Natal 
Rio de Janeiro. 




Brazil 
Brazil 




"5,666" 

"i',566" 

Fees 
Fees 

Fees 
3,000 


Victoria 




Jean Zinzen 


Agt. 


Brazil 




1 Santos 




Rio Grande do Sul 
CHILE Antofagiista. . . . 
Arica 
Iquique 
Valparaiso 




Jorge Vereker 
Charles C. Greene... 
J. W.Lutz 
Joseph W. Merriam. 
John F. Caples 


Agt. 


Brazil 
Rhode Islf 
Ohio 
Massachus 












John C. Morong 
J. H. Downs 
Moritz Braun 
John O. Smith 
Anson B. Johnson.. . 
Edward Bedloe 
John Fowler 
William Martin 
George F. Smithers. . 


Agt. 
Agt 
Agt. 

Agt. 


Chile 
Chile 
Chile 
Chile 




Coronel 
Punta Arenas 




Talcahuano 
CHINA Amoy... . 




Colorado 
Pennsylvania 
Massachusetts 
New York 


3,500 
3,500 
2,500 
3.000 
3.000 
3,000 
3,000 
Fees 
5,0(10 
3,500 


Canton 




Chef oo 




Chinkiang, 
Chungking 
Fucbau 




Massachu 
Illinois 
China 
Minnesota 
California 




Hankow 




LeviS. Wilcox 






Shanghai 
Tientsin 




John Goodnow 
J. W. Ragsdale 



UNITED STATES CONSULAR SERVICE. 203 


UNITED STATES CONSULAR SERVICE.-CONTINUED. 


PLACE. 


Name. 


Appointed fram. 


Salary. 


COLOMBIA 

Barranquilla 
Rio Hacha 


W.I.Shaw 


Pennsylvania 


52,000 




^a nta Marta 
Bogota 
Bucaramanga 


Gerardo M. Danies. ..Agt. 
J.C. McNally 
Gustave Volkman Agt. 


Colombia 
Pennsylvania 
Colombia 


2,000 


Call 


W. A. Barney Agt. 


United States 






P. Tillinghast Jr .Agt. 








Henry Hallam Agt. 
Kafael Madrigal 
H. G. Granger Agt. 
William W. Cobbs 


Colombia 
Maryland 
Pennsylvania 


Fees 
"3,666" 


Cartagena 
Quibdo 




David R. Hand Agt. 


Colombia 


Medellin 


Thomas Herran 
Hezekiah A. Gudger 
John C. Caldwell 


Colombia 
North Carolina 


Fees 
4.000 
2.000 

1.500 
2,500 


Panama 
COSTARICA San Jose 


Punta Arenas 
DENMARK AND DOMINIONS- 


Max Diermlssen Agt. 
J. C. Ingersoll 


Costa Rica 
Illinois 


St. Thomas, W. 1 
Christiansted 


Mahlon Van Home 
And'w J. Blackwood.Agt. 
William F. Moore Agt. 

Thomas Simpson 
Isaac T. Petit Agt. 


Rhode Island 


West Indies 
West Indies 


DOMINICAN REPUBLIC- 
Puerto Plata 


Rhode Island 


Fees 


Dominican Republic .... 




Jean M. Villain... 


Dominican Republic. . . . 
Ohio 


Fees 
1,500 




C. L. Maxwell 




John Hardy Agt. 
EdwardC.Reed Agt. 
Jose A. Puente Agt. 

Perry M. De Leon 


Massachusetts 




Dominican Republic 




Sanchez 
KCUADOR 
Guayaquil 


Dominican Republic 
Georgia 


3.000 




Ferdinand Servat Agt. 


Ecuador 






Pedro A. Moreira Agt. 


Ecuador 




FRANCE AND DOM1NIONS- 
Algiers, Africa 


Charles T. Grellet. . 
E. L. G. Milsom Agt. 


California 
Algeria, 


Fees 




Antoine Felix Garbe.Agt. 
Benj. A. Courcelle...Agt. 


Algeria 












Albion W. Tourgee 


New York 


3,000 


Pan 


J.Morris Post Agt. 


New York 




J. B. Milner .. . 




Fees 




William Hale Agt. 


North Carolina .. .. 


Gorce-Dakar, Africa 


Peter Strickland 
G.